Aftermath

Episodes

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01Hungerford2017012320170125 (R4)

30 years on from the first mass shooting in modern British history, Alan Dein visits Hungerford. He investigates how the town has coped in the aftermath.

'Aftermath' is a new series which explores what happens to a community after it has been at the centre of a nationally significant event.

In August 1987, Hungerford was rocked to its core by a mass shooting. A local man killed 16 people and injured many more. The whole country was shocked, and as Hungerford tried to recover and grieve, the world's press camped out in this small Berkshire town. For a generation, the name of the town became synonomous with this event.

How did the town manage in the face of overwhelming attention, and how has it changed since? Alan Dein investigates the aftermath, meeting people involved at the time of the event, and asks what Britain has learned from Hungerford.

Produced by Melvin Rickarby.

Alan Dein visits Hungerford, 30 years on from the mass shootings of 1987.

01Morecambe Bay2017020620170208 (R4)

Alan Dein visits Morecambe Bay to investigate the aftermath of the 2004 cockle picking disaster. How did the community cope when 23 Chinese workers lost their lives in the bay?

The third programme in the Aftermath series, which explores what happens to a community after it has been at the centre of a nationally significant event.

Morecambe faced its greatest tragedy in February 2004, when a group of Chinese cockle pickers drowned in a bay notorious for its dangerous tides. The event brought to the country's attention issues of people-trafficking and illegal gangmaster activity. As the media of the world descended, reported and left, the shock felt by locals lived on. Alan Dein looks at how the community changed as a result.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

01Shipman2017013020170201 (R4)

What has been the aftermath of the Harold Shipman murders? Alan Dein investigates.

'Aftermath' is a new series which explores what happens to a community after it has been at the centre of a nationally significant event. This week, the Harold Shipman murders.

In the year 2000, Dr. Harold Shipman was convicted of murdering 15 of his patients. It was later established that he had killed around 250 people. In 2004 he hanged himself in prison. Alan Dein travels to Hyde in Greater Manchester, the town where Shipman was based, to find out what the impact has been; he speaks to victims' relatives, former patients and the GP who took over Shipman's surgery.

Produced by Karen Gregor.

0102Shipman2017013020170201 (R4)

What has been the aftermath of the Harold Shipman murders? Alan Dein investigates.

'Aftermath' is a new series which explores what happens to a community after it has been at the centre of a nationally significant event. This week, the Harold Shipman murders.

In the year 2000, Dr. Harold Shipman was convicted of murdering 15 of his patients. It was later established that he had killed around 250 people. In 2004 he hanged himself in prison. Alan Dein travels to Hyde in Greater Manchester, the town where Shipman was based, to find out what the impact has been; he speaks to victims' relatives, former patients and the GP who took over Shipman's surgery.

Produced by Karen Gregor.

0103Morecambe Bay20170206

Alan Dein visits Morecambe Bay to investigate the aftermath of the 2004 cockle picking disaster. How did the community cope when 23 Chinese workers lost their lives in the bay?

The third programme in the Aftermath series, which explores what happens to a community after it has been at the centre of a nationally significant event.

Morecambe faced its greatest tragedy in February 2004, when a group of Chinese cockle pickers drowned in a bay notorious for its dangerous tides. The event brought to the country's attention issues of people-trafficking and illegal gangmaster activity. As the media of the world descended, reported and left, the shock felt by locals lived on. Alan Dein looks at how the community changed as a result.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.