All In The Mind

Dr Raj Persaud presents All in the Mind, the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of our brains.

He'll be examining the latest research in this field and bringing together experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
19930526Presented by Professor Anthony Clare.
19940420
19940427
19940504
19950419
19950426
19950503
19950510
19950517
19951001How does a violent world affect people? Repeated from Tuesday
19951029Professor Anthony Clare finds out what psychiatry and psychology have to offer the criminal justice system. Repeated from Tuesday
19951105Professor Anthony Clare enters the world of the self-help organisation. Repeated from Tuesday
19960414With Professor Anthony Clare. Repeated from Tuesday
19960421Repeated from Tuesday
19960428
19960922
19961006Are citizens'juries an appropriate forum for discussing mental health policies? Repeated from Tuesday
19961013
19961020
19961027
19961103
19961110In the last of the series Professor

Anthony Clare discusses mother/son relationships.

Repeated from Tuesday

19970420Professor Anthony Clare hears about a new psychometric instrument capable of identifying young people at risk from substance abuse.

Repeated from Tuesday

19970427Professor Anthony Clare gets into the motorist's mind.

Repeated from Tuesday

19970504Including a report on the work carried out at the Institute of Psychiatry's Child Trauma Clinic in London.

Repeated from Tuesday

19970511The programme that deals with matters psychological and psychiatric. Repeated from Tuesday
19970518Professor Anthony Clare presents the programme that deals with matters psychological and psychiatric. Repeated from Tuesday
19970525
19970601
19971102A look at religion and mental health. Repeated from Tuesday
19971109Matters psychological and psychiatric. Professor Anthony Clare looks at mental health and children.

Repeated from Tuesday

19991107Why do we dream, and where do unsolicited memories come from? Professor Anthony Clare uncovers some of the secrets of consciousness. Producer Charlie Taylor. PHONE: [number removed]44 for information (R)
19991114Professor Anthony Clare looks at schizophrenia from a positive perspective. Producer Charlie Taylor PHONE: [number removed]44 for more information (R)
19991128Professor Anthony Clare discusses the effects the ageing process has on the mind. ProducerCharlie Taylor

PHONE: [number removed]44 for more information (R)

19991212Suicide among young men has doubled in ten years. Professor Anthony Clare explores the underlying causes. Producer Charlie Taylor PHONE: [number removed] for more information (R)
19991219Professor Anthony Clare discusses the effects the ageing process has on the mind.

Producer Charlie Taylor. PHONE: [number removed] for information (R)

20000716Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind and examines the arguments Surrounding mental health. Repeated from Wednesday
20000723
20000730Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind and examines the arguments surrounding mental health. Repeated from Wednesday
20000806With Dr Raj Persaud. Repeated from Wednesday
20000813Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential Of the human mind. Repeated from Wednesday
20000820Dr Raj Persaud examines the arguments surrounding mental health. Repeated from Wednesday
20000827
19890507Professor Anthony Clare returns with the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind. Producers KEITH JONES and FRANCES BYRNES Editor MICHAEL EMBER
19890512(Details as Sunday 8.30pm)
19890514Presenter

Professor Anthony Clare Producers KEITH JONES and FRANCES BYRNES Editor MICHAEL EMBER

19890519
19890521
19890526
19890528
19890602
19890604
19890609
19890611
19890616(Details as Sunday at 8.30pm)
19890618
19890623
19890625The last programme in the series with Professor Anthony Clare Producers KEITH JONES and FRANCES BYRNES Editor MICHAEL EMBER
19890630
19900104Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 05 January 1990

Previous in series: 25 June 1989

Broadcast history

04 Jan 1990 09:30-10:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-01-03.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3001

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Professor Anthony Clare returns with the magazine devoted to matters of the mind.

Researcher CLARE DENNING Producer MATT THOMPSON Editor MICHAEL EMBER

19900105(Details as Thursday 9.30am)
19900111Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: REPEAT

Previous in series: 05 January 1990

Broadcast history

11 Jan 1990 09:30-10:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-01-04.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3003

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind, both psychiatric and psychological.

Researcher CLARE DENNING Producer matt THOMPSON Editor MICHAEL EMBER

19900112(Details as Thurs 9.30am)
19900202Producer: M.

EMBER

Next in series: 08 February 1990

Previous in series: 01 February 1990

Broadcast history

02 Feb 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-01-26.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3010

Producer: M. EMBER

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

19900215Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Notes: RELEASED BY MC (N) 23/03/01

Next in series: 16 February 1990

Previous in series: 09 February 1990

Broadcast history

15 Feb 1990 09:30-10:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-02-09.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3013

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

19901003
19901009Professor Anthony Clare with matters of the mind. Producer Matt Thompson
19910409Professor

Anthony Clare returns with the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind.

Editor Michael Ember

Editor Michael Ember

Contributors

Unknown: Anthony Clare

Editor: Michael Ember

19910410
19910416Presented by Professor Anthony Clare. Producer Tony Phillips

Presented by Professor Anthony Clare. Producer Tony Phillips

Contributors

Presented By: Professor Anthony Clare.

Producer: Tony Phillips

19910417
19910423
19910424
19910430
19910501
19910507
19910508
19910514
19910515
19910521
19910522
19910528Professor Anthony Clare presents the last programme in the series devoted to matters of the mind both psychiatric and psychological. Producer Tony Phillips

Professor Anthony Clare presents the last programme in the series devoted to matters of the mind both psychiatric and psychological. Producer Tony Phillips

Contributors

Unknown: Professor Anthony Clare

Producer: Tony Phillips

19910529
19910917Professor

Anthony Clare returns with the weekly series devoted to matters of the mind, psychiatric and psychological. Editor Michael Ember

Anthony Clare returns with the weekly series devoted to matters of the mind, psychiatric and psychological. Editor Michael Ember

Contributors

Unknown: Anthony Clare

Editor: Michael Ember

19910918
19910924Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind. Editor Michael Ember

Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind. Editor Michael Ember

Contributors

Unknown: Professor Anthony Clare

Editor: Michael Ember

19910925
19911001
19911002(Broadcastyesterday 11.30am)
19911008
19911009
19911015
19911016
19911022
19911023
19911029Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind.

Producer Tony Phillips

Producer Tony Phillips

Contributors

Unknown: Professor Anthony Clare

Producer: Tony Phillips

19911030
19911105Professor Anthony Clare presents the last of the current series of the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind.

Editor Michael Ember

Editor Michael Ember

Contributors

Unknown: Professor Anthony Clare

Editor: Michael Ember

19911106
19920505
19920506
19920512Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind.

Producer Tony Phillips

19920513
19920519
19920520
19920526ALL IN THE MIND - 26 May 1992

A radio programme

BBC Programme Number: 92HA2007

First broadcast on 1992-05-26

Recorded on 1992-05-22

Producer: T. PHILLIPS

Next in series: 02 June 1992

Previous in series: 19 May 1992

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (344)

Broadcast history

26 May 1992 11:30-12:00 (RADIO 4)

27 May 1992 20:00-20:30 (RADIO 4)

with Professor Anthony Clare.

Producer Tony Phillips

19920527
19920602
19920603
19920922Professor

Anthony Clare returns with the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind.

Today: when a man loves a woman - Dr Maryon Tysoe on the psychological problems of romance.

Producer Nadine Grieve

19920923
19920929with Professor

Anthony Clare.

Producer Nadine Grieve

19920930
19921006with Professor Anthony Clare.

Producer Nadine Grieve

19921007
19921013
19921014
19921020Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind. Producer Nadine Grieve
19921021
19921027with Anthony Clare.

This week Anthony Storr Mes to explain why some People choose to live alone. Producers Nadine Grieve and Wyfanwy Vickers

19921028
19921103Actor Brian Blessed talks about his nervous breakdown, and his recovery, with Professor Anthony Clare.

Producers Nadine Grieve and Myfanwy Vickers

19921104
19921110Last programme in the series presented by Professor Anthony Clare. When you're on the consulting couch what can you learn about your analyst, counsellor or therapist from the style of their rooms?

Producers Nadine Grieve and Myfanwy Vickers

19921111
19930413Professor

Anthony Clare returns with the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind.

Today, Dr Maryon Tysoe reports from the annual conference of the British Psychological Society. Producer Nick Utechin

19930414
19930420The magazine devoted to matters of the mind.

Professor Anthony Clare presents a drugs special. producer Nick Utechm

19930421
19930427Presented by Professor Anthony Clare.

Will the advent of video-phones lead to greater telephone apprehension? And the first in a three-part series on life in the psychiatric unit at

Withington Hospital, Manchester.

Producer Nick Utechm

19930428with Professor Anthony Clare. Will video-phones lead to greater telephone apprehension? And life in the psychiatric unit at Withington Hospital.
19930504Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind. Producer Nick Utechin
19930505Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind.
19930511with Professor Anthony Clare. Including a discussion on the rights and wrongs of treating psychiatric patients with drugs.

Producer Nick Utechm

19930512
19930518Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind, including this week a report on the psychological effects of Aids on the immediate family.

Producer James Herbert

19930519
19930525Professor Anthony Clare presents a sports special, including a report on psychological testing of a round-the-world yacht race crew.

Producer Nick Utechin

19940517Professor Anthony Clare continues his exploration of the highways and byways of the mind.

This week's programme takes a look at the future of psychoanalysis - valid treatment or plaything of the rich? Producer Paul Kobrak

19940518Professor Anthony Clare looks at the future of psychoanalysis - valid treatment or plaything of the rich?
19940524Professor Anthony Clare presents a special investigation into schizophrenia: the nature of the disorder; the ways in which it is treated: and the politics that surround it.He also looks at community care, competition between charities and race issues involved.

Producer Paul Kobrak

19940525
19940531In the last of the series, Professor Anthony Clare takes a look at psychological exhibitionism: why are so many people prepared to reveal all on chat shows like The Oprah Winfrey Show, Kilroy and In the Psychiatrist's Chair?

Producer Lisa Shaw

19940601In the last of the series, Professor Anthony Clare looks at psychological exhibitionism.
19941108In the last of the series, Professor

Anthony Clare investigates the world of the autistic child.

Producer Paul Kobrak. Rptd tomorrow 7.45pm

19950418Launching the BBC's major new season on mental health, Professor Anthony Clare takes a critical look at how the media handles mental illness. He suggests that much of the coverage contributes to a resurgence of fear about psychiatric illness and explores how mental illness can be reported fairly and with sensitivity.

Producer Paul Kobrak. Rptd tomorrow 7.45pm * Polly Toynbee : page 14

19950425Ghost hunter Eddie Burks tries to persuade Anthony Clare that spooks are more than just a figment of our imagination.

Producer Penelope Gibbs

Repeated tomorrow at 7.45pm

19950502Imagine what it would be like to win the National Lottery or to discuss symphonies with Mozart, to be psychoanalysed by Freud or painted by Van Gogh. Professor Anthony Clare investigates dream research in Britain and the US to find out how "creative sleeping" could revolutionise our future.

Producer Clare McGinn. Rptd tomorrow 7.45pm RADIO 4 HELPLINE: for free and confidential information and advice, call [number removed]

19950509Professor Anthony Clare travels to Prague to explore the impact that communism had on Eastern European Psychiatry, and to see how mental heatth care is changing under capitalism. Producer Paul Kobrak. Rptd tomorrow 7.45pm
19950516This year has seen the success of mainstream films like "Forrest Gump" and "The Madness of King George". In the last of the series, Professor Anthony Clare asks if Hollywood's treatment of mental illness is a passing fad or a positive move towards acceptance.

Producer Clare McGinn.

Rptd tomorrow 7.45pm

Radio 4 Helpline: for free and confidential information and advice, call [number removed]

19951001
19951008Professor Anthony Clare looks at power of the mind over the body. Repeated from Tuesday
19951015What happens when the mind can't accept the body it is in? Repeated from Tuesday
19951017Professor Anthony Clare explores the world of those who injure and maim themselves and asks whether current treatments are appropriate.

Producer Paul Kobrak. Rptd Sunday 10.15pm HELPLINE: for free and confidential information and advice, call [number removed]

19951022A look at the world of people who injure and maim themselves. Repeated from Tuesday
19951024Professor Anthony Clare looks at police stations and prisons to find out what psychiatry and psychology have to offer the British criminal justice system.

Producer Paul Kobrak. Rptd Sun 10.15pm

Free and confidential information and advice from the Radio 4 Helpline: [number removed]

19951031Professor Anthony Clare enters the world of the self-help organisation and voluntary group and asks why so many of them seem to spend so much time fighting each other.

Producer Bruce Whitney Low. Rptd Sun 10.15pm HELPLINE: For free and confidential information and advice, call [number removed]

19951107Ten years ago, research revealed that the average length of stay in psychiatric hospitals for deaf people was more than 19 years, compared to less than 5 months for hearing patients. In the last of the present series, Professor Anthony Clare looks at the current state of mental health provision for those with a hearing impairment.

Producer Paul Kobrak. Rptd Sun 10.15pm HELPLINE: for free and confidential information and advice, call [number removed]

19960409Professor Anthony Clare discusses Personal codes of morality with Baroness Warnock and finds out why

Psychologists have been given guidelines on how to deal with requests from the media. Producer Ronni Davis

Repeated Sunday at 10.15pm

19960416As the West End awaits a new production of Twelve Angry Men,

Professor Anthony Clare investigates the dynamics of the jury and discusses the rights and wrongs of psychiatrists and psychologists appearing as expert witnesses in court.

Producer Nick Utechin. Rptd Sun 10.15pm

19960423Professor Anthony Clare has news for all compulsive shoppers: current research suggests that they are suffering from one of three forms of mania. Plus a discussion on the differing attitudes towards and beliefs about mental illness in Britain's white, Caribbean and Asian communities. Producer Ronni Davis. Rptd Sun 10.15pm
19960430In National Carers Week, Professor Anthony Clare discusses the special Psychological problems facing those who care for sufferers of Alzheimer's disease and, in the build up to the FA Cup Final, asks if a goalkeeper is truly a man alone.

Producer Nick Utechin. Rptd Sunday 10.15pm

19960505
19960512
19960514The workplace is changing - short-term contracts and redundancies are the order of the day. Professor Anthony Clare investigates stress at work.

Producer Nick Utechin. Rptd Sun 10.15pm

19960519
19960521On call 24 hours a day, never tired or irritable and always on form -

Professor Anthony Clare investigates the Cyberdoctor and mental health. Producer Ronni Davis. Rptd Sun 10.15pm

19960526
19960917Professor Anthony Clare talks to Tim Lott , author of a moving account of his mother's suicide, and explores the psychological state of Britain's farming community in the light of BSE. Producer Nick Utechin

Repeated Sunday at 10.15pm

19960924Emotional peer pressure at school can be just as psychologically scarring as more obvious physical bullying.

Researchers say the term should be redefined. Presented by Professor

Anthony Clare.

Producer Tony Phillips

Repeated Sunday at 10.15pm

19960929Presented by Professor Anthony Clare. Repeated from Tuesday
19961001Are citizens'juries an appropriate forum for discussing mental health policies? Presented by Professor

Anthony Clare.

Producer Nick utechin

Repeated Sunday at 10.15pm

19961006
19961008Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine on matters psychological and psychiatric. Producer Tony Phillips

Repeated Sunday at 10.15pm

19961015Professor Anthony Clare explores the particular pressures to which gay men and women are susceptible. Producer Nick Utechin

Repeated Sunday at 10.15pm

19961022Presented by Professor Anthony Clare. Producer Tony Phillips

Repeated Sunday at 10.15pm

19961029With Professor Anthony Clare. Producer Nick Utechin

Repeated Sunday at 10.15pm

19961105In the last programme of the present series, Professor Anthony Clare discusses the relationship between mothers and sons.

Producers Nick Utechin and Tony Phillips Repeated Sunday at 10.15pm

19970415The programme that deals with matters psychological and psychiatric. Professor Anthony Clare hears about a new psychometric instrument capable of identifying young people at risk from substance abuse.

Producer Bruce Whitney-Low Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

19970422The programme that deals with matters psychological and psychiatric. Professor Anthony Clare gets into the motorist's mind to find out what safer cars do to our driving. Producer Nick Utechin

Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

19970429The programme that deals with matters psychological and psychiatric, this week includes a report on the work carried out at the Institute of Psychiatry's Child Trauma Clinic, London.

Producer Nick Utechin

Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

19970506Professor Anthony Clare presents the Programme that deals with matters Psychological and psychiatric. Producer Bruce Whitney Low Repeated Sunday 10.15pm
19970513Professor Anthony Clare presents the programme that deals with matters psychological and psychiatric, today including a therapy session for someone who suffers a phobia of public speaking.

Producer Nick Utechin

Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

19970520Professor Anthony Clare presents the programme that deals with matters psychological and psychiatric. Producer Bruce Whitney Low Repeated Sunday 10.15pm
19970527Professor Anthony Clare presents the programme that deals with matters psychological and psychiatric. Producer Nick Utechin

Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

19970930Professor Anthony Clare returns with the magazine programme which investigates matters psychological and psychiatric. This edition looks at the role of cognitive therapy in mental health.

Producer Constance St Louis

Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

19971005Professor Anthony Clare presents the magazine programme investigating matters psychological and psychiatric. A look at cognitive therapy. Repeated from Tuesday
19971007Magazine programme which investigates matters psychological and psychiatric. Dr Susan Blakemore marks World Mental Health Day by looking at mental health in different cultures around the world. Producer Constance St Louis Repeated Sunday 10.15pm
19971012Marking World Mental Health Day. Repeated from Tuesday
19971014Magazine programme which investigates matters psychological and psychiatric.

This week. Professor Anthony Clare highlights the role played by Psychological therapies in the treatment of schizophrenia. Producer Constance St Louis Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

19971019Magazine programme investigating matters psychological and psychiatric. Repeated from Tuesday
19971021Magazine programme which investigates matters psychological and psychiatric. Professor Anthony Clare investigates attempts to improve the quality of service offered by professional psychologists. Producer Constance St Louis Repeated Sunday 10.15pm
19971026Series examining matters psychological and psychiatric.

Professor Anthony Clare investigates attempts to improve the service offered by psychologists. Repeated from Tuesday

19971028Magazine programme which investigates matters psychological and psychiatric. Professor Anthony Clare discusses the link between religion and mental health. Producer Constance St Louis Repeated Sunday 10.15pm
19971104Magazine programme which investigates matters psychological and psychiatric. Do children respond to therapy? In a special programme Professor Anthony Clare looks at mental health and children.

Producer Constance St Louis Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

19971111Magazine programme which investigates matters psychological and psychiatric. Professor Anthony Clare looks at how people suffering from mental illness are perceived in the workplace and in the community. Producer Constance St Louis Repeated Sunday 10.15pm
19971116Professor Anthony Clare looks at how people with mental illness are perceived. Repeated from Tuesday
19971118Last in the series of the magazine programme investigating matters psychological and psychiatric.

Professor Anthony Clare poses the question: is counselling good for you? Producer Constance St Louis Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

19971123Series investigating matters psychiatric. Professor Anthony Clare poses the question: is counselling good for you? Repeated from Tuesday
19980902Professor Anthony Clare returns with his series on all matters psychological and psychiatric. The latest research combined with current events is the key to discovering how the human mind works. How is our behaviour affected by the pressures of the world around us? And what can mental illness tell us about the workings of our brains? Producer Bruce Whitney Low
19980909Professor Anthony Clare presents a series on matters psychological and psychiatric. This week he explores the psychological effects of Steven Spielberg 's new film Saving Private Ryan, set in the Second World War, and finds out what science fiction can tell us about the way we think about mental health.

Producer Bruce Whitney Low

19980916Professor Anthony Clare presents the series on matters psychological and psychiatric. Has our intuitive and contemplative nature lost out to the busyness of everyday life and, if so, are we less intelligent as a result? Producer Neil Trevithick
19980923Professor Anthony Clare presents the series on matters psychological and psychiatric. In this edition, he explores the family photo album and asks if such mementos really tell us the truth about our lives.

Producer Neil Trevithick

19980930Professor Anthony Clare presents the series on matters psychological and psychiatric. How do the client and the therapist negotiate the ending of the therapeutic relationship? Producer Neil Trevithick
19981007With Professor Anthony Clare , who this week investigates the psychological effects of a role reversal in which children find themselves looking after their parents. Producer Bruce Whitney Low
19981014Professor Anthony Clare presents the series on matters psychological and psychiatric.

Producer Bruce Whitney Low

19981021Professor Anthony Clare presents the series on matters psychological and psychiatric. In this programme, he examines how behaviour is affected by the pressures of the world and considers what mental illness can tell us about the workings of our brains. Producer Bruce Whitney Low
19990120Professor Anthony Clare explores the potential and limits of the human mind. Producer Jane O'Rourke

Phone: [number removed]44 for more information

19990127Anthony Clare explores the potential and the limits of the human mind.

Producer Jane O'Rourke

PHONE: [number removed] for more information

19990203Continuing the series in which Professor Anthony Clare explores the potential and the limits of the human mind.

Producer Jane O'Rourke

PHONE: [number removed] for more information

19990210Professor Anthony Clare explores the potential and limits of the human mind. Producer Jane O'Rourke. PHONE: [number removed]44
19990217Professor Anthony Clare explores the potential and limits of the mind. Producer Jane O'Rourke

Phone: [number removed]44 for more information

19990224
19990303
19990310
19990804Professor Anthony Clare explores the limits and potential of the human mind, and throws light into the hidden shadows of the psyche. Producer Charlie Taylor

Phone: [number removed]44 for more information

19990811Professor Anthony Clare explores the limits and potential of the human mind, and throws light into the hidden shadows of the psyche. Producer Charlie Taylor

Phone: [number removed] for more information

19990818
19990825Professor Anthony Clare explores the limits and potential of the human mind and throws light into the hidden shadows of the psyche. Producer Charlie Taylor

Phone: [number removed] for more information

19990901Professor Anthony Clare explores the limits and potential of the human mind and throws light into the hidden shadows of the psyche.

Producer Charlie Taylor

Phone: [number removed]44 for more information

19990908Professor Anthony Clare explores the limits and potential of the human mind. Producer Charlie Taylor

Phone: [number removed]44 for more information

19990915
19990922
19990929Professor Anthony Clare explores the limits and potential of the human mind and throws light into the hidden shadows ofthe psyche.

Prod ucerCharlie Taylor. Phone: [number removed] for more information

19991031Professor Anthony Clare discusses the diagnoses Of personality disorder. Producer Charlie Taylor PHONE: [number removed] for more information (R)
19991205Do rehabilitation centres really work? Professor Anthony Clare looks at the best ways of treating addiction. Producer Charlie Taylor

PHONE: [number removed]44 for more information

20000102Can animals talk? Can chimpanzees be given the power of language? Professor Anthony Clare explores the psychology of animals. Producer Charlie Taylor

PHONE: [number removed] for more information

20000202Professor Anthony Clare explores the potential and the limits of the human mind and throws light into the hidden shadows of the psyche. Producer Joanna Rahim

PHONE: [number removed] for more information

20000209
20000216Professor Anthony Clare explores the potential and the limits of the human mind and throws light into the hidden shadows of the psyche. Producer Emma Selby

PHONE: [number removed] for more information

20000301
20000308Professor Anthony Clare explores the potential and the limits of the human mind and throws light into the hidden shadows of the psyche.

Producer Emma Selby. PHONE: [number removed] for more information

20000315
20000322
20000712!n the first of a new eight-part series.

Dr Raj Persaud explores the timits and potential of the human mind and examines the arguments surrounding menta! hea!th. EditorSharonBanoff

For more information PHONE: [number removed]. Rptd Sunday 9pm

20000719Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind and examines the arguments surrounding mental health. Producer Cathy Drysdale

For more information PHONE: [number removed]

Repeated Sunday 9pm

20000726Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind and examines the arguments surrounding mental health. Producer Cathy Drysdale For more information PHONE: [number removed]. Rptd Sunday 9pm
20000802
20000809
20000816DrRaj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind and examines the arguments surrounding mental health. Producer Cathy Drysdale

For more information PHONE: [number removed]

Repeated Sunday 9pm

20000823Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential ofthe human mind and examines the arguments surrounding mental health. Producer Cathy Drysdale

For more information PHONE: [number removed]

Repeated Sunday 9pm

20000830Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential ofthe human mind and examines the arguments surrounding mental health. Producer Cathy Drysdale

For more information PHONE: [number removed]

Repeated Sunday 9pm ,

20010207LDr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind, and examines the arguments surrounding the reform of the Mental Health Act.

Producer Marya Burgess. ACTION LINE: [number removed]

20010214Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind, this week examiningthe provision of mental health services foryoung people. Producer Marya Burgess. ACTION UNE:[number removed]
20010221Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind, this week examining how one goes about ending therapy.

Producer Marya Burgess. ACTION LINE: [number removed]

20010228Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind, this week looking at the problems of homelessness and mental health. Producer Marya Burgess. ACTION LINE: [number removed]
20010307Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind. With the Government's drive to increase the numbers of adoptive and foster parents, this week's programme investigates the problems faced byfoster parents. Producer Marya Burgess and Cathy Drysdale ACTION LINE: [number removed]
20010314Dr Raj Persaud looks at the role of the advocate, and talks to those who represent the rights of patients. And a tour of the brain arrives at the amygdala - the seat of emotional memory. Producers Marya Burgess and Cathy Drysdale ACTION LINE: [number removed]
20010328Dr Raj Persaud celebrates 100 years of psychology in Britain with a look at the future and asks whetheryour computer can keep you sane. Producers Marya Burgess and Cathy Drysdale ACTION LINE: [number removed]
20010530Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind, and examines the arguments surrounding mental health.

Producers Marya Burgess and Cathy Drysdale PHONE: [number removed]

WEBSITE: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4 Repeated Sunday 9pm

20010606Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind, and examines the arguments surrounding mental health.

Producers Marya Burgess and Cathy Drysdale. PHONE: [number removed] WEBSITE: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4. Repeated Sunday 9pm

20010613Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind, and examines the arguments surrounding mental health.

Producers Marya Burgess and Cathy Drysdale. PHONE: [number removed] WEBSITE: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4

20010620Sir Michael Rutter , Professor of Developmental

Psychopathology at the Institute of Psychiatry and author of a sixties seminal study on mental health, joins Dr Raj Persuad this week to discuss how the mental health of today has changed.

Producers Marya Burgess. PHONE: [number removed] WEBSITE: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4

20010627Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the human mind, and examines the arguments surrounding mental health.

Producers Marya Burgess and Cathy Drysdale

PHONE: [number removed]. WEBSITE: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4

20010704Dr Raj Persaud explores the potential of the human mind and the arguments surrounding mental health. Producers Marya Burgess and Cathy Drysdale

PHONE: [number removed]. WEBSITE: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4

20010711
20010718Dr Raj Persaud explores mental health issues. Producers Marya Burgess and Cathy Drysdale

PHONE: [number removed]. WEBSITE: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4

20020513Dr Raj Persaud examines a condition that will affect one in a hundred people during their lifetime, most commonly those in their teens and twenties: schizophrenia. He hears from sufferers, their families and those who treat them.

Producer Marya Burgess PHONE: [number removed]

20020520Dr Raj Persaud investigates narrative therapy, which seeks to make sense of someone's situation by finding new ways of telling their life story. Producer Marya Burgess PHONE: [number removed]
20020527Dr Raj Persaud looks at an initiative to promote mental health in secondary schools by establishing peer support networks. Producer Marya Burgess
20020603As the National Autistic Society celebrates its 40th anniversary this year, a review of current knowledge and understanding of autistic spectrum disorders.

Producer Marya Burgess Phone the BBC Action Line: [number removed]

20020610This week Dr Raj Persaud hears from the president-elect of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Dr Mike Shooter , about how he plans to make his mark. He also talks about his own history of depression, and the programme examines what it's like to live with clinical depression. ProducerMarya Burgess Phone the BBC Action Line: [number removed]
20020617This week Dr Raj Persaud explores the area of self-help - can the books and the courses really help you improve your mental health? And he finds out from the Government's mental-health tsar, Professor Louis Appleby , what his new National Institute for Mental Health involves. Producer Marya Burgess Phone the BBC Action Line: [number removed]
20020624This week Dr Raj Persaud looks at a controversial newtreatment for serious anxiety disorders, EMDR, and investigates strategies to enable obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) sufferers to get on with their lives. Producer Marya Burgess

Phone the BBC Action Line: [number removed]

20020701Dr Raj Persaud chairs a debate on schizophrenia, where listeners put questions to a panel of experts. The panel includes Professor Robin Murray , head of general psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, London, Cliff Prior of the National Schizophrenia Fellowship, Dr Hilary Foster from the Assertive

Outreach Service, Surrey, Oaklands NHS Trust and Rufus May, a clinical psychologist diagnosed as suffering from schizophrenia.

PHONE: [number removed] Producer Marya Burgess

20020918In the first of a new series, DrRaj Persaud meets clinical psychologist Oliver James , whose new book focuses on the nature/nurture debate. His thesis is that who we are is largely the result ofthe way we were cared for during our first six years, ratherthanourgenes or other environmental factors. Producer Marya Burgess
20020925How many times have you wished you could tell your boss exactly what you think of him? Dr Raj Persaud hears about "360<legree feedback", a work assessment system which enables you to dojust that. Be prepared to be on the 360-degree feedback receiving end, though, too. Producer Marya Burgess
20021002Dr Raj Persaud investigates the personality test. Claudia Hammond is the guinea pig, filling in the controversial questionnaire developed by Hans Eysenck. Can numbers really tell us anything about people? Producer Marya Burgess
20021009There's a wide range of help available for those with mental health problems, but often the person who needs it refuses to acknowledge the fact. For family and friends trying to encourage someone to seek help can be an uphill struggle. Dr Raj Persaud investigates Strategies for success. Producer Marya Burgess
20021016This week Dr Raj Persaud visits Bradford, where they're pioneering a number of radical initiatives in the field of mental health. Producer Marya Burgess
20021023Dr Raj Persaud investigates childhood. As children ricochet through the various developmental stages and test their imaginations and their parents' boundaries to the limit, what is normal behaviour?

When should alarm bells ring and parents seek help? Producer Marya Burgess

20021030Dr Raj Persaud investigates the horrors of the panic attack, with the help of novelist Wendy Perriam , herself a sufferer.

Producer Marya Burgess

20021106Dr Raj Persaud examines the final personality test in the series -the Myers-Briggs test- and investigates the validity of such examinations in recruitment and assessment procedures. Producer Marya Burgess
20021113A talk or a tablet - what's best for depression? Dr Raj Persaud chairs a debate at the Freud Museum, where a panel of experts face questions from an invited audience.

Producer Marya Burgess

20030212Dr Raj Persaud returns with a new series exploring the limits and potentials of the human mind.

1: Is it possible to change one's personality? As researchers coin the term "false-hope syndrome" this programme debates whetherthe self-improvement industry is built on myth or if fundamental change is possible. Producer Marya Burgess Dr Mark Porter on the self-improvement industry: page 35

20030219Dr Raj Persaud examines the world of the chronically shy. Why are some people gregarious and confident, while others hang back, painfully inhibited? What is going on in the shy person's brain during social interactions to cause such discomfort? Or should shyness be a perfectly acceptable expression of personal ity? Producer Marya Burgess Phone [number removed]
20030226Dr Raj Persaud investigates the pressing issues in psychology and psychiatry. Producer Marya Burgess
20030305Dr Raj Persaud investigates the pressing issues in psychology and psychiatry, hearing about mental health concerns from those affected, and pursuing the latest research with the experts. Producer Marya Burgess

EMAIL: radioscience@bbc.co.uk Phone [number removed]

20030312Dr Raj Persaud looks at the latest developments in the fields of psychology and psychiatry. Producer Marya Burgess
2006040420060405It's more than 30 years since LSD was banned for clinical use - but there is a resurgence in the study of psychedelics.

Claudia Hammond finds out about the scientists who are trying to research these substances again, and looks at the controversy surrounding their potential use.

New series 1/5. It's more than 30 years since LSD was banned for clinical use, yet there has been a resurgence in interest in studying psychedelics. In the 1950s, LSD was believed to be a wonder drug and used widely to treat psychosis, depression and addiction. Claudia Hammond finds out about LSD and MDMA (ecstasy) and looks at the controversy surrounding their potential use. Producer Katy Hickman Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

2006041120060412How many times as a child did you hear - "look at me when I'm talking to you"? But psychological research has shown humans think more clearly when they don't make eye contact. Claudia Hammond visits a school in Scotland where pupils are taught not to look at the teacher when answering questions.

Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

How many times as a child did you hear: "Look at me when I'm talking to you"? But psychological research has shown we think more clearly when we don't make eye contact. Claudia Hammond visits a school in Scotland where pupils are taught not to look at the teacher when answering questions.

Plus, should Britain learn lessons from Australia, where forced detention and temporary visas have caused severe mental health problems in those seeking asylum?

How many times as a child did you hear: 'Look at me when I'm talking to you'? But psychological research has shown we think clearer when we don't make eye contact.

Claudia Hammond visits a school in Scotland where pupils are taught not to look at the teacher when answering questions.

How many times as a child did you hear: 'Look at me when I'm talking to you'? But psychological research has shown we think clearer when we don't make eye contact. Claudia Hammond visits a school in Scotland where pupils are taught not to look at the teacher when answering questions.

2/5. Psychological research has shown humans think more clearly when they don't make eye contact. Claudia Hammond visits a school in Scotland where pupils are taught not to look at the teacher when answering questions. Plus, a report from Australia, where forced detention and temporary visas have caused severe mental-health problems in those seeking asylum. Producer Katy Hickman Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

20060425200604264/5. New research suggests that over the last 100 years there has been an enormous increase in the rate of suicides among schizophrenics. Claudia Hammond asks if things are as serious as they appear and looks at the benefits of writing poetry for those who have "survived" mental illness. She meets the poets, and explores the relationship between mental illness and literature. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

What are the benefits of writing poetry for those who survived mental illness? Claudia Hammond meets the poets, and explores the relationship between mental illness and literature. [Rpt of Tue 9.00pm]

What are the benefits of writing poetry for those who've survived mental illness? Claudia Hammond meets the poets and explores the relationship between mental illness and literature. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

What are the benefits of writing poetry for those who survived mental illness? Claudia Hammond meets the poets, and explores the relationship between mental illness and literature.

4/5. New research suggests that over the last 100 years there has been an enormous increase in the rate of suicides among schizophrenics. Claudia Hammond asks if things are as serious as they appear, and looks at the benefits of writing poetry for those who have "survived" mental illness. She meets the poets, and explores the relationship between mental illness and literature. Producer Rebecca Moore Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

20060502200605035/5. Dr Kwame McKenzie looks at the psychological stress caused by modern warfare and asks whether the Army has become so obsessed by post-traumatic stress disorder that it's ignoring the more prevalent mental-health problems suffered by veterans - depression and alcoholism. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

Psychiatrist Dr Kwame McKenzie looks at the psychological stress caused by modern warfare. He also asks whether the army has become so obsessed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, that it's ignoring the more prevalent mental health problems suffered by veterans - depression and alcoholism.

5/5. Dr Kwame McKenzie looks at the psychological stress caused by modern warfare and asks whether the Army has become so obsessed by post-traumatic stress disorder that it's ignoring the more prevalent mental-health problems suffered by veterans - depression and alcoholism. Producer Rebecca Moore Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

2011102520111026The power of sleep to improve memory and why hysteria isn't a thing of the past.

How can a good night's sleep improve your memory? Why does the answer to a crossword clue suddenly appear first thing in the morning after a night's rest? In this week's programme Claudia Hammond talks to psychologist, Kimberly Fenn about what happens in the brain when we sleep and why it can significantly improve our memory.

Hysteria or conversion disorder is surprisingly, not confined to medical history.

Nearly 1 in 5 patients seen by neurologists will have symptoms like paralysis, fits or loss of vision which can't be explained neurologically.

Claudia talks to neurologist, Mark Edwards and psychiatrist, Richard Kanaan about the history of conversion disorder, how common it is today, the best way to treat it and its complex causes.

Also in the programme, Claudia meets the carers getting involved in mental health research and why their input is making a a difference to research projects exploring mental health across the country.

How can a good night's sleep improve your memory? Why does the answer to a crossword clue suddenly appear first thing in the morning after a night's rest? In this week's programme Claudia Hammond talks to psychologist, Kimberly Fenn about what happens in the brain when we sleep and why it can significantly improve our memory. Hysteria or conversion disorder is surprisingly, not confined to medical history. Nearly 1 in 5 patients seen by neurologists will have symptoms like paralysis, fits or loss of vision which can't be explained neurologically. Claudia talks to neurologist, Mark Edwards and psychiatrist, Richard Kanaan about the history of conversion disorder, how common it is today, the best way to treat it and its complex causes. Also in the programme, Claudia meets the carers getting involved in mental health research and why their input is making a a difference to research projects exploring mental health across the country.

2011110120111102"Nudge" was the best-selling book that David Cameron famously ordered his shadow cabinet to read over their summer holidays.

The previous Labour government had already shown some interest in the new science of behavioural economics, but as Prime Minister, Cameron put the ideas of University of Chicago behavioural economist, David Thaler, at the heart of his government, and set up the world's first Behavioural Insight Team, or "Nudge Unit".

Based in the Cabinet Office and led by psychologist, David Halpern, this small team is chewing over ways to persuade us to make the "right" decisions about the way we live using a nudge, rather than a regulatory shove - but will it work ?

Claudia Hammond talks to the Behavioural Insight Team about where they believe they can really make a difference and finds out whether the psychological research to date, justifies the belief that major policy challenges like crime, obesity and environmental sustainability, can be tackled using behavioural science.

And Claudia hears from the critics, sceptical that evidence of individual behaviour change can be extrapolated to whole populations when it comes to the most serious problems in our society.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

Can we be 'nudged' into good behaviour? We report on the UK's Behavioural Insight Team.

"Nudge" was the best-selling book that David Cameron famously ordered his shadow cabinet to read over their summer holidays. The previous Labour government had already shown some interest in the new science of behavioural economics, but as Prime Minister, Cameron put the ideas of University of Chicago behavioural economist, David Thaler, at the heart of his government, and set up the world's first Behavioural Insight Team, or "Nudge Unit".

2011111520111116Daniel Kahneman

Widely regarded as the world's most influential living psychologist, Daniel Kahneman, reflects on his lifetime's research on why we make the "wrong" decisions.

He won the Nobel Prize for Economics for his pioneering work with Amos Tversky on the irrational ways we make decisions about risk.

He directly challenged traditional economic orthodoxy that we are rational, logical and selfish in the choices we make, laying the foundations for behavioural economics.

And his research quantified how real people, rather than textbook examples, consistently make less than rational choices, prey to the quirks of human perception and intuition.

Claudia Hammond talks to him about "anchoring" and "priming" and why he fears for the behaviour of people motivated by money.

Conjoined Twins

Could conjoined twin girls, joined at the head have two brains but share a mind? One girl is pricked for a blood test, her sister cries.

Or one watches TV, the other laughs at the images her sister sees.

What does the connection of these young girls' brains reveal about the difference between brain and mind?

Producers: Fiona Hill and Pam Rutherford.

One of the world's most influential psychologists, Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman.

Producers: Fiona Hill & Pam Rutherford.

He won the Nobel Prize for Economics for his pioneering work with Amos Tversky on the irrational ways we make decisions about risk. He directly challenged traditional economic orthodoxy that we are rational, logical and selfish in the choices we make, laying the foundations for behavioural economics.

Could conjoined twin girls, joined at the head have two brains but share a mind? One girl is pricked for a blood test, her sister cries. Or one watches TV, the other laughs at the images her sister sees. What does the connection of these young girls' brains reveal about the difference between brain and mind?

2011112220111123Claudia Hammond reports on new research which followed over 6000 young children through school and found that if they experienced long term or very severe bullying by their peers, their risk of developing serious mental health problems like Borderline personality disorder was increased by as much as seven times.

Borderline Personality disorder is normally diagnosed in adulthood and is characterised by a difficulty in maintaining relationships, emotional instability, extreme risk taking and sometimes self harm.

Claudia discusses why bullying by peers can have such a powerful effect and why that influence can be so much stronger than from others, even your parents.

New research on the powerful effect of childhood bullying and future mental health.

Claudia Hammond reports on new research which followed over 6000 young children through school and found that if they experienced long term or very severe bullying by their peers, their risk of developing serious mental health problems like Borderline personality disorder was increased by as much as seven times. Borderline Personality disorder is normally diagnosed in adulthood and is characterised by a difficulty in maintaining relationships, emotional instability, extreme risk taking and sometimes self harm. Claudia discusses why bullying by peers can have such a powerful effect and why that influence can be so much stronger than from others, even your parents.

2011112920111130Claudia Hammond reports on an innovative mentoring project in Manchester where people with social phobia, agoraphobia or other anxiety disorders are matched up with volunteer mentors who've been through, and recovered their own experience of anxiety.

They meet once a week for six months and initial results are finding great success with those on the scheme reporting significant reductions in their own anxiety.

Claudia meets the mentors and mentees and to find out how and why it works and asks whether similar schemes could spread across the country.

Why an innovative mentoring scheme for people with anxiety disorders is so successful.

Claudia Hammond reports on an innovative mentoring project in Manchester where people with social phobia, agoraphobia or other anxiety disorders are matched up with volunteer mentors who've been through, and recovered their own experience of anxiety. They meet once a week for six months and initial results are finding great success with those on the scheme reporting significant reductions in their own anxiety. Claudia meets the mentors and mentees and to find out how and why it works and asks whether similar schemes could spread across the country.

2011120620111207Zoe from South Wales spent twelve years with undiagnosed Bipolar Disorder.

The personal cost to this mother of three was devastating, as, over the years, she was told she had Post Natal Depression and treated with anti-depressants.

It's long been recognised that Bipolar Disorder could be under-diagnosed and Claudia Hammond hears about a pilot study to screen for the condition in Leicester.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

Mistaken diagnosis: Zoe on 'twelve lost years' without treatment for her bipolar disorder.

Zoe from South Wales spent twelve years with undiagnosed Bipolar Disorder. The personal cost to this mother of three was devastating, as, over the years, she was told she had Post Natal Depression and treated with anti-depressants. It's long been recognised that Bipolar Disorder could be under-diagnosed and Claudia Hammond hears about a pilot study to screen for the condition in Leicester.

2011121320111214How the latest developments in understanding of the brain affect law and evidence in court

Claudia Hammond explores the implications from the latest developments in neuroscience for the legal process and asks what kind of new brain based information might be submissible as evidence in court? Claudia will explore the ethical issues raised by the possibility of predicting criminal behaviour and asks what our rapidly increased understanding of how the brain works will mean for how we understand decision-making, free will, and systems of punishment.

Producer: Pam Rutherford.

2011122020111221Claudia Hammond reports on the results of the BBC's scientific study into the UK's stress levels.

The BBC Stress test was launched in June and the results have just been revealed.

How anxious and depressed are we and what does this huge psychology experiment tell us about the causes of all kinds of mental ill health.

Peter Kinderman, professor of clinical psychology at the University of Liverpool, reveals the results of the first experiment of this size and asks what it can tell us about our mental well being and what coping mechanisms we can use to be more resilient to stress.

Producer: Pam Rutherford.

How stressed are we as a nation? Results from a scientific study of the UK's stress levels

Claudia Hammond reports on the results of the BBC's scientific study into the UK's stress levels. The BBC Stress test was launched in June and the results have just been revealed. How anxious and depressed are we and what does this huge psychology experiment tell us about the causes of all kinds of mental ill health. Peter Kinderman, professor of clinical psychology at the University of Liverpool, reveals the results of the first experiment of this size and asks what it can tell us about our mental well being and what coping mechanisms we can use to be more resilient to stress.

2014042920140430Claudia Hammond hears from a shortlisted entry to the All in the Mind mental health awards

Claudia Hammond discusses some of the entries to the All in the Mind mental health awards and she hears from one of the shortlisted entries. Also in the programme in World War I the Craiglockhart hospital near Edinburgh was a military psychiatric hospital treating shell shocked soldiers. Claudia travels to the hospital to see recently discovered editions of The Hydra - a magazine produced by patients and edited by Wilfred Owen with poems by Siegfried Sassoon who were both patients. Claudia hears how the magazine didn't talk directly about treatment or how soldiers were ill, referring instead to someone feeling a little seedy or not at the top of their game. And while the celebrated poets have made the magazine famous she finds out that the other contributions from regular soldiers are as equally moving.

2014050620140507Are mental health services in crisis? Claudia Hammond talks to Sue Bailey.

Are mental health services in crisis? Claudia Hammond talks to Sue Bailey, president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists who has recently written about her fears that mental health is at a tipping point and could be heading towards its own Stafford Hospital style scandal. Claudia also hears from another shortlisted entry to the All in the Mind mental health awards.

2014051320140514

Why does one child become rebellious and another not? Claudia Hammond talks to Mark McDermott from the University of East London about new research into parenting and rebelliousness. She also hears from another shortlisted entry to the All in the Mind mental health awards.

Claudia Hammond hears from a shortlisted entry to the All in the Mind mental health awards

2014052020140521Claudia hears from an All in the Mind awards finalist. And mental health in the City.

Claudia Hammond hears from another pair of finalists in the All in the Mind awards. She also talks to the senior City executives who are calling for urgent changes to mental health provision for workers in the Square Mile.

2014052720140528Visual overload; All in the Mind mental health awards finalist; professional boundaries.

Claudia Hammond meets more finalists in the All in the Mind 25th anniversary awards.

Magician Chris Cox tricks Claudia Hammond's attention system and Professor Nilli Lavie explains what is happening in our brains when our visual system is overloaded; Claudia hears from Mike who nominated Pat in the professional category of the All in the Mind Mental Health Awards after she guided him through addiction and mental health problems lasting 15 years; and psychologist Guy Holmes discusses the difficulties of navigating professional boundaries.

Claudia Hammond hears from another pair of finalists in the All in the Mind 25th anniversary awards. And she chairs a discussion about professional boundaries between therapists and their clients.

2014060320140604Claudia Hammond meets more finalists in the All in the Mind 25th anniversary awards.

2014061020140611Claudia Hammond meets two more finalists in the All in the Mind 25th anniversary awards.

She talks to a mother who's been nominated by her daughter with anorexia. For years she has tried to help her, staying up at night to check her pulse and as her daughter put it "even when I was a bag of bones, all pointy-edged and cold she'd sit and cuddle me". We hear why she feels she went way beyond her parental duties. Claudia also hears from the man who nominated Maytree, a sanctuary for the suicidal and the only place of its kind in the UK, about why Maytree saved his life. Also in the programme Professor Janet Treasure discusses new research on the so-called love hormone oxytocin and why it can disrupt the way that people with anorexia view food and body shape.

2014061720140618

Claudia Hammond meets more finalists in the All in the Mind 25th anniversary awards.

2014062420140625Claudia Hammond hosts the All in the Mind Awards Ceremony, and meets all the finalists.

Claudia Hammond hosts the All in the Mind Awards Ceremony from the Wellcome Collection in London, and meets all the finalists.

The small gestures of help and support can make a huge difference to someone with mental health problems. It can be the difference between life and death. Here, some of those who have been helped describe their own personal turning points.

Mike Henderson was first arrested at the age of 12. By 14 he had had his first stint in prison, and two years later he was addicted to hard drugs, including cocaine.

A life of petty crime followed to fuel his addiction. He was described by the police as ""a one-man crime wave"".

But he says: ""I didn't know I'd been battling with anxiety and depression. I didn't know I would now suffer a dual diagnosis with the onset of drug induced psychosis."

I was locked out of hope, and she opened a door"

He was labelled a trouble-maker early on and when he did begin to seek help, he felt treated like ""a threat that needed sedation"".

I didn't understand addiction. I just smoked drugs like my peers... I just did what I needed to do to survive."

'Acceptance'

Then almost two decades ago he met mental health worker Pat Rose at the charity Nilaari, which offers support and counselling to ethnic minority adults who experience mental health problems.

She worked with him for 15 years, while he progressed and relapsed and sent him poems and cards of encouragement when he was in prison.

Pat helped Mike for over 15 years

She accepted me. I had never had a relationship that was not undermined by my race, their fear or the perceived threat of violence.

I was the big, dangerous, drug-using, mentally-unwell, aggressive black man. But Pat did not fear me.

I was locked out of hope, and she opened a door,"" says Mike.

Without her, there would have been one of three outcomes, he says: ""Jail, institution or death"".

The awards were set up to recognise an individual, professional or group who went over and above to help. Catch up with stories from other finalists

Mike was one of over 700 people who wrote in to nominate Pat for the BBC's All in the Mind awards.

Now three years clean - and out of prison - he wants others to recognise the important part she played, going above and beyond her job, in turning his life around. He now works with young people who are in a similar situation to the one he was in.

'He saved my life'

Another charity put forward was Maytree, which offers a four-day stay for those who feel suicidal.

James was a resident there and says Maytree is a place where suicide is not a taboo or a dirty word.

My essential needs were catered for so that I could concentrate on trying to live. One night I felt very suicidal and wanted to leave, a volunteer sat with me for hours.

Sometimes we talked, sometimes we didn't, but he saved my life that night. I've never met him since, I can't remember what his name was but the belief in me and the quiet but persistent trust that I could survive this experience, was magical."

A false accusation had resulted in his breakdown and he felt like his ""soul had been obliterated"" by depression.

But the stay gave him hope and helped him get his life back. He's now working again and says he is much better at asking for support.

It was completely different from any stay in a psychiatric hospital, he says. And, crucially, talking about suicide was the norm, which he felt unable to do with friends and family.

Mental health issues affect one in four people at some time in their life

But unlike professionals or charities who deal with difficult issues on a daily basis, friends and families of those with mental health issues often find it difficult to know how to respond.

'A bag of bones'

Getting this balance right was the key for Maya's survival. She battled with anorexia nervosa which she says ""invaded every single aspect of my life"".

It was, she says ""a monstrous creature"" but her mum helped fight her demons. She now wants her mum to be recognised for going over and above her role as a parent.

She has sat with me as I sobbed over a small piece of dry toast, encouraged and supported me for the hour it took for it all to be eaten.

She always made it clear that she was frustrated with anorexia and not me, which is really important because otherwise you can end up feeling more awful about yourself,"" she told the BBC's All in the Mind programme.

But most important of all, she says, her mum never stopped cuddling her even when she was little more than a bag of bones ""all pointy edges and cold"".

It was her mother's belief in her ability to recover that was crucial, even during intense arguments.

Without this faith, I'm pretty sure I would not have made it so far. But she has dragged me through, even when I was kicking and screaming. She carried me on her shoulders when it seemed anorexia would drown me. She continues to do this all everyday, with unwavering faith."".

2014110420141105 (R4)Claudia Hammond explores pioneering new research into radicalisation.

Claudia explores pioneering new research into radicalisation. She finds out why being depressed and socially isolated makes you more likely to sympathise with terrorist actions.

2014111120141112 (R4)Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.
2014112520141126 (R4)Psychologists call for radical change in how to treat people who experience psychosis.

If you have extremely suspicious thoughts, or you hear voices that other people can't hear, traditionally these are seen as signs of mental illness, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. This week a major new report from the British Psychological Society calls for a radical change in the way we think and offer help to people who are experiencing psychosis. Claudia Hammond investigates how our knowledge, attitudes and treatment of psychosis and schizophrenia have changed over the past decade.

2014120220141203 (R4)Claudia Hammond reports on current issues in mental health and research findings from the world of psychology and neuroscience.

Claudia Hammond explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

2014120920141210 (R4)Stockpiling possessions and collecting obsessively can tip into Hoarding Disorder, a condition recently recognised as a mental health problem.

Martin tells Claudia Hammond how his growing collection of cars, trucks and bikes awaiting "renovation" was growing out of control, and how a self help group for hoarders helped him to come to face up to his problem. NHS Clinical Psychologist Sophie Holmes describes the need for services to provide help and support for this often hidden group of people.

Claudia Hammond on how stockpiling clutter and possessions can tip into hoarding disorder.

2014121620141217 (R4)Claudia Hammond with the latest in psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Claudia Hammond investigate the mind, the brain and why we behave the way that we do.

20141223Claudia Hammond investigate the mind, the brain and why we behave the way that we do.
2014123020141231 (R4)Claudia Hammond with the latest in psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Claudia Hammond investigate the mind, the brain and why we behave the way that we do.

2015041420150415 (R4)Claudia Hammond with the latest in psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

2015042120150422 (R4)Claudia Hammond examines the evidence on whether screen time is bad for young people.

Claudia Hammond examines the evidence asking whether screen time is bad for young people.

2015042820150429 (R4)Claudia Hammond with the latest in psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

2015050520150506 (R4)Claudia Hammond with the latest in psychology, neuroscience and mental health. This week her studio guest is neuroscientist Phil Beaman from Reading University, his latest research suggests a novel way to prevent those irritating earworms that plague most of us at one time or another. Plus how to be invisible, researchers in Sweden have discovered a way to trick the brain so people feel invisible. And that dress, earlier in the year pictures of a dress went viral and it divided families but does it matter if you think its blue and black or white and gold? Researcher Brad Pearce asks an audience at the Wellcome Collection.

Claudia Hammond on new research that could prevent ear worms, plus how to be invisible.

2015051920150520 (R4)Claudia Hammond with the latest in psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

2015110320151104 (R4)Claudia Hammond presents a series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

2015120120151202 (R4)Claudia Hammond presents a series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

2015120820151209 (R4)Claudia Hammond presents a series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

2015121520151216 (R4)Claudia Hammond presents a series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

2020062320200624 (R4)A new therapy to help with memory and concentration in bipolar disorder.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

People living with bipolar disorder can experience episodes of depression and mania which last for weeks - and following these episodes many say they have cognitive deficits - difficulties with memory, concentrating and doing even simple tasks. Rosie Phillips who has bipolar and works as a Peer Support Services Manager for the charity Bipolar UK experienced such difficulties after an episode of mania. She describes the impact as like going head-first through a car windscreen, needing a long period of recovery. Professor Allan Young of Kings College, London, wants to see if a treatment called Cognitive Remediation Therapy can help. Originally used to improve the thinking skills of people with schizophrenia, the therapy involves working with a therapist on a computer for 3 months. Although the work has been affected by lockdown so far the results look promising.

Getting up early comes naturally to some people who are like larks whereas their late-night counterparts, the owls thrive on staying up late. New research carried out at Brunel University has revealed that the grey matter in one area of the brain called the precuneus is larger in owls than larks. But it's not such good news for owls. Previous studies have already shown that lower volumes of grey matter in this region are associated with how empathetic and pro-social someone is, traits which are associated with being an early riser.

When you use certain apps on your phone or computer a tell-tale blue or green dot or tick lets people know if you are online. But do you want everyone to know when you are available? New research suggests that many people don't realise just how much information that online status indicators reveal to other people.

30th Anniversary, Incivility Of Politicians, Arctic Scientists' Mental Health2018110620181107 (R4)Happy Birthday to us! All in the Mind is 30 years old this month and to celebrate we’ve searched the archive to bring you clips of Anthony Clare, the original presenter of the programme, and a very young Claudia Hammond as a reporter. Professor Catherine Loveday is in the studio with Claudia to discuss the pieces of psychology research which have had the biggest impact on them in that time.

Last month Donald Trump called for civility after pipe bombs were posted to ten of his most vocal opponents. As America goes to the polls for midterm elections we hear about a new piece of research that suggests civility in politics is not dead. Dr Jeremy Frimer, from the University of Winnipeg in Canada, explains his new research on how approval ratings vary before and after volunteers read tweets by Donald Trump.

And what impact does a year in the Arctic have on your mental state? Claudia talks to research psychologist, Dr Anna Temp, who travelled to Svalbard to find out what impact a prolonged stay has on the mental health of scientists working there. How do they cope with the total darkness of the polar nights? And what's it like to be cooped up with 10 of your colleagues and polar bears lurking outside?

Producer: Lorna Stewart

30th anniversary, incivility of politicians and ratings, Arctic scientists' mental health

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

What impact does a year in the Arctic have on the mental health of people working there?

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

A Tale Of Recovery From Clarke Carlisle And His Wife2019042320190424 (R4)When ex-footballer Clarke Carlisle went missing in 2017 his wife Carrie thought the worst: he had severe depression and had already attempted to take his own life.

Found safely in Liverpool, he then spent weeks in a psychiatric hospital and 18 months in therapy.

Clarke’s whole sense of identity was tied up with football and the buzz it gave him. So a knee injury at 21 made him feel like a failure and pushed him towards destructive behaviours with alcohol and marathon computer game sessions.

Carrie responds to the question sometimes asked by well-meaning people: How could he put you through this?

“Clarke didn’t put me through anything. This illness [severe depression] invades and puts all of you through it collectively.”

The Carlisles share their tips for recovery: asking for professional help; talking openly to their children about feelings; their daily marks-out-of-ten check in; how much the Pixar film Inside Out taught them about emotional resilience.

Ex-footballer Clarke Carlisle on his struggle with depression and suicidal thoughts

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Acceptance And Commitment Therapy; Million Minds Tour; Personality Traits And Spending Behaviour2019112620191127 (R4)Acceptance and commitment therapy is an evolving talking therapy that is being used to address anxiety and depression. Rather than challenging negative thoughts, patients are trained to embrace them, Claudia Hammond hears how it's now being trialled for the psychological challenges that come with a number of physical conditions from muscular dystrophy to cancer.

We're at the culmination of the Million Minds tour - an attempt to reclaim the world record for the largest mental health lesson, which draws together psychologists, top performers and school children, aiming to break the teenage stigma surrounding mental health issues.

And with more financial transactions taking place online that ever before, can our digital footprint accurately reveal traits of our personality?

Claudia Hammond's guest is psychologist Prof Daryl O'Connor from Leeds University

Producer: Adrian Washbourne

Acceptance and commitment therapy; Million Minds tour; Personality traits and spending

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Adhd And Mindwandering, Treating Insomnia Helps Depression, Think Ahead Scheme2016120620161207 (R4)ADHD and mindwandering, treating insomnia helps depression and the Think Ahead scheme.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

ADHD - or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder - tends to be characterised by difficulties in concentrating, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Claudia Hammond talks to Philip Asherson, Professor of Clinical and Molecular Psychiatry at Kings College London and a consultant at the Maudsley Hospital in London, who has recently published research that shows that excessive mind-wandering might be at its core. She also hears from two teenage girls with ADHD about their experience of mindwandering during school lessons.

it's not at all unusual for people with depression to have difficulty sleeping. Now a trial has focussed on treating the insomnia in the hope that it improves the depression, rather than vice versa. Professor of Mental Health, Helen Christensen, and Dr Aliza Werner-Saidler, a Research Fellow and Clinical Psychologist at the Black Dog Institute at the University of New South Wales in Australia, showed Claudia Hammond how an online programme called SHUTi - developed by the University of Virginia and commercially available - helped people with insomnia and depression.

Two years ago on All in the Mind we debated the merits of a new scheme to get more high-flying graduates into the mental health field. Called Think Ahead it follows in the footsteps of similar schemes like Teach First. This time top graduates train, mostly on the job, to become mental health social workers. Claudia finds out how two of the first graduates are getting on in the their first placements.

Claudia Hammond presents a series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Adolescent Brain, Awards Update, Phonagnosia2016112220161221 (R4)Adolescent brain, awards update, phonagnosia.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond's studio guest is Catherine Loveday Principal Lecturer in Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Westminster.

Adolescence is a time when life-long mental health difficulties sometimes emerge for the first time. By combining genetic data with the information from brain scans of many hundreds of people, a team at Cambridge might have worked out why this can happen. Claudia Hammond hears from neuroimaging researcher Dr Kirstie Whittaker and bioinformatics researcher Dr Petra Vertes who work together as part of the Neuroscience in Psychiatry Network (NSPN) consortium.

We've the first in an occasional update from the finalists of the All in the Mind Awards. We hear of progress from Alex : she nominated the organisation One in Four which offers subsidised long-term counselling and supports people in what can be a very long process if they want their abuser to be tried in court.

Some people can't recognise the voices they know. And they might not even realise they have the condition - until they take a test. Phonagnosia is thought to affect as much as 3% of the population. Professor of Neuroscience Irving Biederman has just published the largest analysis to date in the journal Brain and Language. He played people a whole series of celebrity voices to test their skills at identification. He discusses the causes and strategies to minimise this unusual audio anomaly.

Adult Adhd; Insiders' Guide To Mental Health Services; Wound Healing And Expressive Writing2017042520170426 (R4)Adult ADHD, Insiders' Guide to Mental Health Services, wound healing & expressive writing.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is often thought of as a condition of childhood, but up to 3% of the adult population also experience it. Impressionist and comedian Rory Bremner is one of those. He discusses his experiences with Jonna Kuntsi and Jessica Agnew-Blais from Kings College London who study how childhood and adult versions of the condition differ, whether we can predict which children continue to experience symptoms in adulthood, and a new proposal that the majority of adult ADHD might not have begun in childhood at all.

The first two parts of the All in the Mind Insiders' Guide to Mental Health Services ask how do you know when you have a mental health problem, and what should you say to your GP in order to get help. Our 'insiders' are service user, mental health campaigner and retired chief of an NHS Trust Lisa Rodrigues, GP and All in the Mind Awards finalist Daniel Dietch, Head of Information at Mind Stephen Buckley, and psychiatrist Sri Kalidindi.

And Claudia Hammond talks to Kavita Vedhara about a new study that shows once more that simply writing about how you feel can speed up wound healing. Although this effect has been known since James Pennebaker's landmark studies in the 1980's, this is the first study to demonstrate that expressive writing after an injury can aid healing as much as doing it in advance of a wound. An important finding since we don't always plan our wounds in advance.

Producer: Lorna Stewart.

Adult ADHD, Insiders' Guide to Mental Health Services, wound healing and expressive writing.

Claudia Hammond explores the latest developments in the worlds of psychology, neuroscience, and mental health.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Aircraft Noise And Mental Health, All In The Mind Awards, Imitation In Newborn Babies2016060720160608 (R4)Claudia Hammond examines a study linking aircraft noise and mental health.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Summer temperatures might be tempting you to eat outside, but maybe you live in a part of the country where your barbecues are blighted by aircraft noise and where you're woken in the morning by the roar of planes overhead? Some people insist that the noise affects their mental health. The evidence for the link between aircraft noise and depression has been patchy, but a major new study suggests there is a link. Claudia Hammond discusses the evidence with project leader and epidemiologist Professor Andreas Seidler from Dresden University.

We've another finalist in the All in the Mind Awards - this week from your nominations for the professional who'd made a real difference to your mental health.

If you've ever stuck your tongue at a young baby and watched it copy you back, you've observed early imitation - a key concept in developmental psychology. But is a new study about to overturn what psychology textbooks have been telling us for years? Psychologist Janine Oostenbroek of York University discusses her results.

With expert comment from Dr Catherine Loveday, Principal Lecturer in Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Westminster.

All In The Mind Awards Ceremony From Wellcome Collection In London2016062820160629 (R4)Claudia Hammond hosts the All in the Mind Awards ceremony.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond hosts the All in the Mind Awards Ceremony from Wellcome Collection in London and meets all the All in the Mind Award Finalists.

Back in November we asked you to nominate the person, professional or group who had made a difference to your mental health.

Throughout the current series we've been hearing the individual stories of the nine finalists, and this edition offers the chance to recap the people and organisations who've made a huge difference to other people's lives - and of course to hear comments from the judges and winners from each of the three categories.

Winner in the personal category was Jane Clement nominated by her friend and neighbour Charlotte Forsyth. Charlotte's daughter died in the hospital where Charlotte worked. She was grateful for the down to earth approach of Jane who has helped her cope with grief and depression.

Glasgow's Common Wheel project won the group or project award. They use bicycle building as a therapy to help people with a range of mental health issues. By learning to strip, service and rebuild bicycles, clients gain a new skill and a sense of achievement. By concentrating on bicycle building they dwell less on their mental health issues.

The professional category winner was case worker Amy Wollny from Turning Point. After spending half his life in prison 'John' was helped to turn his life around. For the first time in his life he has regular employment and is in control of his own behaviour.

The event is hosted by Claudia Hammond.

Judges are author Matt Haig, clinical psychologist Linda Blair, mental health campaigner Marion Janner, and Kevan Jones MP.

Produced by Adrian Washbourne and Julian Siddle.

All In The Mind Awards Finalists - Common Wheel, Psychology Replication Crisis, Gender Stereotyping In Babies.2016042620160427 (R4)Claudia Hammond meets one of the All in the Mind Awards finalists.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Why film directors consult psychologists plus finalists for the All in the Mind Awards.

In this new series of All in the Mind Claudia Hammond meets the finalists for the All in the Mind Awards and in June will host the award ceremony at the Wellcome Collection in London. In the first of the series she will also be discovering why film directors are turning to psychologists.

All In The Mind Awards, Elegy, Directors In Theatre And Film Turn To Psychologists2016050320160504 (R4)All in the Mind awards, Elegy, why theatre and film directors are turning to psychologists

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

We hear the second nomination in this year's All in the Mind Awards - where we asked you to nominate the person or group who has made a difference to your mental health. Last week we heard from the first of the finalists in the groups category. This week we have the first of our individuals.

Neuroscience may be a young science, but discoveries are coming through fast. Will we see a day where everything is known about the brain and where parts of it that have gone wrong can even be replaced with computer chips? This is the premise of a new play called Elegy at the Donmar Warehouse in London. Cognitive neuroscientist Catherine Loveday reviews the play.

Why are theatre and film directors, who have long turned to historians and scientists for help, increasingly embracing psychology? Claudia Hammond talks to University of Berkeley Psychology Professor Dacher Keltner who was invited to advise on the Pixar animation Inside Out and to director Simon McBurney who sought advice about the psychology of time perception in advance of his production Encounter.

Allergies And Anxiety; Imposter Syndrome; Recognising Dog Expressions2020010720200108 (R4)There’s a growing number of children with severe allergies to peanuts and other foods. Parents and children themselves have to learn not only to cope with the physical risks but mental health issues that severe food allergies can bring. Rebecca Knibb, Associate Professor of Psychology from Aston University discusses how the psychological impacts are being addressed which until now have been slow to be recognised.

Imposter syndrome is the feeling that you shouldn’t really be allowed to do what you’re doing and that eventually everyone else will realise that. And new research shows that it’s more widespread than we thought. Claudia Hammond discusses fraudulent feelings with Professor Richard Gardner from the University of Nevada, who’s done this new research and Dr Steve Nimmo, Editor of the Journal Occupational Medicine.

How good at humans at recognising their dog’s emotions? Is it something we can all do or something you have to learn? Federica Amici from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig has published new research on this little studied area, that could help reduce problems when human-hound encounters go wrong.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Allergies and anxiety; imposter syndrome; recognising dog expressions

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Imposter syndrome is the feeling that you shouldn’t really be allowed to do what you’re doing and that eventually everyone else will realise that. And new research shows that it’s more widespread than we thought. Claudia Hammond discusses fraudulent feelings with Professor Richard Gardner from the University of Nevada, who’s done this new research and Dr Steve Nimmo, Editor of the Journal Occupational Medicine.

Antidepressant Withdrawal, Mates In Mind, Eyes That Betray Personality2018112720181128 (R4)Antidepressants are a helpful treatment for many, but some people do have problems when they stop taking them. A recent review of the evidence about antidepressant withdrawal symptoms found more people may experience them for longer than previously thought, and many people describe these symptoms as severe. But the study has come in for some criticism over data analysed and the fact that withdrawal symptoms also may vary by antidepressant type. So what does this mean in practice? Claudia Hammond is joined by the survey’s author John Read, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of East London, and by Dr Sameer Jauhar, Senior Research Fellow, King’s College London.

Poor mental health in the construction industry is ‘the silent epidemic’, reporting more suicides than any other profession. Greater mental health support for construction workers is now identified as a priority area. Claudia Hammond examines Mates in Mind, a new initiative to improve mental health in the sector by increasing awareness and the confidence amongst its predominantly male workforce to openly discuss the issues.

And do eye movements reveal more about our personality than previously thought? Claudia Hammond speaks to Sabrine Hoppe from the University of Stuttgart who carried out the first real world study that appears to find a relationship between our changing eye movements with our distinct character traits.

Studio guest is Dr Mathijs Lucasson from the Open University

Antidepressant withdrawal, Mates in Mind, and eyes that betray personality.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Anxiety And Children; First Impressions; Mental Health Manifestos; Insiders' Guide2017060620170607 (R4)For parents, it can be very hard to watch their child struggle with anxiety. Parents often blame themselves, thinking that it must be their fault that their child feels so worried. What can parents can do about it and how much of a genetic component there is in anxiety? Claudia Hammond meets Professor Cathy Creswell from Reading University who's done extensive practical research helping parents to deal with their child's anxiety, Thalia Eley Professor of Developmental Behavioural Genetics at the Institute of Psychiatry, and Rachel - whose daughter suffers constant anxiety.

When we see a photograph of a person we make instant judgements about how trustworthy or competent we think they are. But how reliable are these snap decisions? Claudia meets Professor Alexander Todorov from Princeton University who studies first impressions from faces and has brought his findings together in a new book called Face Value: The Irresistible Influence of First Impressions.

Politicians know people really care about mental health. So what are the different parties promising in their election manifestoes? We set Rachel Schraer from the BBC's political research unit, the task of scrutinising each manifesto and summing it all up for us.

The next in our insiders' guide to getting the best out of your mental health services asks if it's a good idea to take a friend or relative along to an appointment with a psychiatrist or clinical psychologist?

Producer Adrian Washbourne.

Parents of anxious children; first impressions; mental health manifestos; Insiders' Guide.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond explores the worlds of psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Producer Adrian Washbourne.

Are Bucket Lists A Good Thing?2020011420200115 (R4)Are bucket lists always a good thing? Many people choose to write a bucket list to fill their life with exciting and new experiences. Blogger Annette White tells Claudia Hammond about how her bucket list has helped her overcome anxiety. But clinical psychologist Linda Blair is not convinced that they really help people’s well-being.

A new paper found that people tend to worry more about the actions of significant others in their lives than their own actions or the actions of people they are not that close to. Surprisingly, people also worry more about moderate friends than they do about themselves.

Annie Hickox is a consultant clinical neuropsychologist with 35 years experience of helping clients with their mental health. One day she got a call from her daughter Jane and discovered that her own daughter had depression. Jane and Annie share their story of navigating depression.

A new paper shows that people who engage in altruistic behaviours may experience an instantaneous buffer to physical pain.

Producer: Caroline Steel

Bucket lists; depression; how altruism can alleviate pain

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Are bucket lists always a good thing? Many people choose to write a bucket list to fill their life with exciting and new experiences. Blogger Annette White tells Claudia Hammond about how her bucket list has helped her overcome anxiety. But clinical psychologist Linda Blair is not convinced that they really help people’s well-being.

Astronauts, All In The Mind Awards, Crying And Lying2015111720151118 (R4)How astronauts' view of Earth from space changes their perspective on life.

Claudia Hammond finds out why astronauts' experiences of seeing Earth from space can have profound effects on their feelings towards planet Earth. She talks to astronaut, Michael Lopez-Alegria, and trainee counselling psychologist, Annahita Nezami, about the Overview Effect and how the power of planet Earth may have therapeutic value for everyone back on terra firma. Clinical psychologist, Linda Blair, is one of the judges on the All in the Mind awards. She talks about how to have a conversation with someone who may be having problems with their mental health and what makes a good, empathetic listener. Thomas Dixon, Director of the Centre for the History of the Emotions at Queen Mary University, London, talks about the history of crying and why the stiff upper lip was just a blip in history. Also, Claudia talks to forensic psychologist, Bruno Verschuere, about his research into why we become worse at lying as we get older.

Claudia Hammond presents a series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Blue Health; Talking To The Dying; Diet Or Exercise To Halt Memory Decline2020063020200701 (R4)Blue Health; talking to the dying; diet, exercise and memory decline.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Blue Health and well-being:
During lockdown many people have said how they value getting out in nature more than ever. But is there something extra special about getting out into places where there is water? This doesn’t just have to mean the seaside. Could a river, canal or even a fountain in a park make us feel better? Dr Mathew White, senior lecturer in social and environmental psychology at Exeter University, is part of a large research project across eighteen countries called Blue Health. Dr Jo Garrett is a researcher in coastal environments and human health, and they discuss their latest research into pinning down the benefits of aquatic environments on our well-being.

Discussing dying:
It’s never going to be an easy conversation, but one that a lot of us will face, whatever illness our relatives or friends might be dying from. What should you say and how can avoiding regrets afterwards about what you didn’t say? We hear from Janie Brown, who spent more than thirty years nursing and counselling people dying from cancer and recounts some of her experiences in her book Radical Acts of Love, and writer Audrey Nieswandt.

Diet or exercise to starve off memory decline?
Even as we get older we carry on making new brain cells. The bad news is that the process slows down which can lead to problems with memory. But as Dr Sandrine Thuret and Dr Chiara De Lucia from Kings College London have found, our genetic makeup can influence this process. They’ve found that changing diet might make more of a difference to some, whilst exercise might make more of a difference to others.

Claudia Hammond's guest is Prof. Catherine Loveday, Principal Lecturer in Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Westminster.

Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Social Media And Ptsd, Preventing Procrastination2015051220150513 (R4)Claudia Hammond investigates Body dysmorphic disorder and asks if social media can really cause Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. She also talks to the psychologist who explains why describing events in terms of the number of days away they are, rather than years could help prevent people procrastinating.

Claudia Hammond with the latest in psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Boomerang Generation, Listener Feedback, All In The Mind Awards, The Lipstick Effect2016121320161214 (R4)The Boomerang generation, parents may moan but are there any health benefits?

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond presents a series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Burnout19991121Professor Anthony Clare discusses the psychological phenomenon of burnout in sport.

Professor Anthony Clare discusses the psychological phenomenon of burnout in sport. Producer Charlie Taylor

PHONE: [number removed]44 for more information (R)

Cafe Conversations, The Light Triad, Conveying Anxiety Through Cartoon Pigeons, Listener Feedback2019051420190515 (R4)Claudia visits Café Conversations – a weekly meet up in West London for people who are feeling lonely. The café group was organised by Louise Kay who felt lonely after her husband was diagnosed with Parkinson’s and wants to help people in the same position. The dark triad, a term coined by psychology researchers, is a group of three personality traits: narcissism, Machiavellianism and psychopathy. Claudia speaks to Professor Scott Kauffman from Columbia University; he has decided enough focus has been given to dark personality traits so he created a light triad: faith in humanity, treating people as ends unto themselves and humanism. He explains how we all have light and dark traits within us and also how to find out how light or dark your own personality might be. Artist Chuck Mullin explains how and why she conveys her anxiety and depression through drawing cartoon pigeons. Also, listeners who have shared their experiences of aphantasia and spatial navigation.

Producer: Caroline Steel

Caf\u00e9 Conversations, the light triad, conveying anxiety through cartoon pigeons

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Care Farming; All In The Mind Awards; Turn-taking In Conversation2016062120160622 (R4)Care farming, the All in the Mind Awards and turn-taking in conversation.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Many people say they feel better when they're out in nature. And some projects deliberately get people involved in conservation, horticulture or farming in order to take advantage of the benefits to health and well-being in the great outdoors. It's known as green care and a new report from Nature England suggests it could play a bigger part in our mental health services. Claudia Hammond visits a Care Farm - Church Farm near Stevenage in Hertfordshire to examine the therapeutic benefits.

In the final candidate for this year's All in the Mind Awards we hear of a care worker who was nominated for making a real difference to a victim of a violent assault succumbing to post traumatic stress disorder but whose life is turning around as a result of seemingly effortless intervention.

For conversations to work we need to take turns to speak and it's something we learn when we're very young and then hone as time goes on. But there are also moments where no one is speaking and it's those lapses in conversation which might give us a clue as to how all this turn-taking takes place with precise millisecond timing. Claudia Hammond speaks to Elliott Hoey, from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, about this research.

Children Of Parents With Mental Illness, Exercise Perception, Dame Kelly Holmes, Addressing Panic Attacks2017121920171220 (R4)Children of parents with mental illness, exercise, Kelly Holmes, addressing panic attacks.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia finds out what can be done to help children whose parents have a mental illness and who may end up becoming their carers. She talks to Kiera and Ambeya who have lived with their parents' depression and schizophrenia and she meets Alan Cooklin, the founder of Kidstime, a charity which aims to support families where one or more parent has a mental illness.

Claudia talks to the psychologist who finds out why our perceptions of the amount of exercise we do can change its health benefits. And Dame Kelly Holmes is one of the judges for the All in the Mind Awards. She talks about the mental health struggles she faced just months before winning two gold Olympic medals. She explains why it was so hard to talk about her feelings at the time and why she believes it's so important people are more open about their own mental health difficulties. Also another awards judge, Mandy Stevens, explains how to do square breathing and why it's such a good technique to help tackle anxiety and panic attacks.

Claudia talks to the psychologist who finds out why our perceptions of the amount of exercise we do can change its health benefits. And Dame Kelly Holmes is one of the judges for the All in the Mind Awards. She talks about the mental health struggles she faced just months before winning two gold Olympic medals. She explains why it was so hard to talk about her feelings at the time and why she believes it's so important people are more open about their own mental health difficulties. Also another awards judge, Mandy Stevens, explains how to do square breathing and why it's such a good technique to help tackle anxiety and panic attacks.

Citizens Uk And Mental Health, Robin Ince, Film Cuts And Attention2018121120181212 (R4)A year ago a community organisation in Tyne and Wear called Citizens UK brought together people from schools, mosques, churches, politicians and the NHS to address mental health issues in their area. Claudia Hammond revisits the scheme a year on, to examine how a wide variety of local improvements now appear imminent. It follows months of hearing hundreds of personal testimonies and winning commitment from decision makers and those in power, to pledge to take action.

What can those of us who would never dream of doing stand-up learn about human nature from comedians? Comedian Robin Ince who of course co-presents The Infinite Monkey Cage here on Radio 4 has written a book all about this called I'm a Joke and So Are You. He discusses the value his audiences get from him openly discussing anxieties on stage....

If you're a fan of old films you might well have noticed that they were cut together with much longer shots than we tend to see these days - with an average change of image every ten seconds in the 1930s and 40s to just four seconds currently. Celia Andreu Sanchez from the Autonomous University of Barcelona has looked closely at impact this has on the way we pay attention to movies, with surprising results.

Psychologist Prof. Catherine Loveday of the University of Westminster is this week’s studio guest.

Citizens UK and addressing community mental health, Robin Ince, film cuts and attention

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond Launches The 2018 All In The Mind Awards2017111420171115 (R4)

All in the Mind Awards:
Claudia Hammond launches the 2018 All in the Mind Awards - a chance for anyone who has received help for a mental health problem, to recognise the people and organisations who have gone above and beyond the call of duty

1 in 3 of us will experience problems with our mental health at some time in our lives, and help and support from people around us can make all the difference in how we cope day to day and helping us on the road to recovery. Between now and the end of January 2018 the Radio 4 All in the Mind Awards is seeking listeners' experiences of brilliant mental health care and to recognise the people - the unsung heroes who helped make the difference.

The judging panel this year includes Star Wards founder Marion Janner; director of nursing and mental health services Mandy Stevens; Dr Mathijs Lucassen lecturer in mental health ; and Claudia Hammond, psychologist and All In The Mind presenter.

There are 3 categories for the awards, the individual, professional or project

Individual Award : An individual family member, friend, boss or colleague who offered significant support

Professional Award: A mental health professional whose dedication, help and support made a really significant difference to you. This could be a psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, nurse, volunteer or other professional

Project Award: A mental health project or group you took part in, which made a big difference to your recovery or the way you cope.

The winners of the awards will be announced during a ceremony to be held at the Wellcome Collection in London in June 2018

Attachment theory:
For decades researchers have been interested in how the attachment between parents and their babies might affect how the baby develops into an adult. Elizabeth Meins, Professor of psychology at York University argues that this body of research is now being misinterpreted , leaving parents feeling anxious about whether they're doing the right thing

Children's willpower:
The popular image of children is that they have short attention spans and want everything right now. But a new analysis of 50 years of data from the Marshmallow Test - a classic test of self control suggests that children are getting better at delaying gratification. John Protzko of University of California Santa Barbara explains why it's happening.

Claudia Hammond's studio guest is fellow judge Mathijs Lucassen , lecturer in mental health at the Open University.

Claudia Hammond launches the 2018 All in the Mind Awards.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy20030326Cognitive behavioural therapy has become the treatment of choice for any number of psychological problems - from post-traumatic stress disorder to eating disorders. Now, it is even being used with patients with cancer and diabetes. Dr Raj Persaud meets Professor Aaron Beck. the creator of CBT, and hears what he thinks of the various directions his therapy has taken. Producer Marya Burgess

EMAIL: radioscience@bbc.co.uk Phone [number removed]

has become the treatment of choice for any number of psychological problems, from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder to Eating Disorders.

Now it's even being used with patients with cancer and DIABETES.

Dr Raj Persaud meets Professor Aaron Beck, the creator of CBT, and hears what he thinks of the various directions his therapy has taken.

Conspiracy Theories, New Mps On Mental Health, Raw Sounds Music Project2015052620150527 (R4)Claudia Hammond with the latest in psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Claudia Hammond presents the latest in psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Cronic Pain2006041820060419One in seven of us will at some point in our lives suffer from chronic pain.

Dr Tanya Byron looks at how the treatment of this condition is bringing together both the medical and psychological worlds.

Just how much of the pain we feel is determined by our fear and perception of pain? Dr Byron meets adolescents suffering from chronic pain, and their parents, to find out how they can get help to lead more normal lives.

Researchers at Oxford University test Dr Byron's pain threshold by torturing her to see what's happening in her brain.

In this week's All in the Mind, Dr Tanya Byron looks at how the treatment of this condition is bringing together both the medical and psychological worlds.

Tanya meets adolescents suffering from chronic pain and their parents to find out how CBT can help them lead more normal lives.

And researchers at Oxford University test her pain threshold by torturing her - all in the interests of science - to see what's happening in her brain.

One in seven of us will at some point in our lives suffer from chronic pain. Dr Tanya Byron looks at how the treatment of this condition is bringing together both the medical and psychological worlds.

Just how much of the pain we feel is determined by our fear and perception of pain? Dr Byron meets adolescents suffering from chronic pain, and their parents, to find out how they can get help to lead more normal lives. Researchers at Oxford University test Dr Byron's pain threshold by torturing her to see what's happening in her brain.

In this week's All in the Mind, Dr Tanya Byron looks at how the treatment of this condition is bringing together both the medical and psychological worlds. Just how much of the pain we feel is determined by our fear and perception of pain?

Tanya meets adolescents suffering from chronic pain and their parents to find out how CBT can help them lead more normal lives. And researchers at Oxford University test her pain threshold by torturing her - all in the interests of science - to see what's happening in her brain.

3/5. One in seven people will, at some point during their lives, suffer from chronic pain. Dr Tanya Byron looks at how the treatment of this condition is bringing together the worlds of medicine and psychology. producer Katy Hickman Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

3/5. One in seven people will, at some point, suffer from chronic pain. Dr Tanya Byron (of TV House of Tiny

Tearaways), looks at how the treatment of this condition is bringing together the worlds of medicine and psychology. Researchers at Oxford University test Byron's pain threshold by torturing her - all in the interests of science - to see what's happening in her brain. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

Cyber Snooping Your Therapist; Performing Anxiety; Insiders' Guide; Bribery And Corruption2017050920170510 (R4)

Whether you're seeing a psychiatrist, a psychologist or another kind of therapist, the tradition has been that the information all goes one way. Professional boundaries tend to be closely guarded, but social media is changing all that. A quick search online might tell you all sorts about a therapist. Should you engage in this kind of cyber snooping and how about the other way round? Claudia Hammond speaks with Louise Chunn, the founder of welldoing.org, an online directory of independent counsellors and psychotherapists and Susanna Hailstone-Walker, a psychotherapist.

How can you overcome performance anxiety? For musicians and music students performing in front of audiences and audition panels, the experience can be terrifying. But this is where a digital simulation of the event could help. We visit the Royal College of Music where researchers have designed a concert hall which even includes a nerve-racking waiting area, and grim-faced judges reacting on a screen, to give students a chance to experience what it's like and to try putting the coping skills they've learnt into practice.

The next in our insiders' guide to getting the best out of your mental health services asks what can you do if you're worried about the mental health of someone you know, but they don't want to go for help.

We tend to think of the descent into corruption as a slippery slope where people do one small thing wrong and then gradually it gets more serious. But psychologists in the Netherlands have discovered that people are more likely to engage in corruption when there's a big reward and a sudden opportunity, than to do it bit by bit. Nils Kobis from the University of Amsterdam explains.

Producer: Adrian Washbourne.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Cyber snooping your therapist; performing anxiety; Insiders' Guide; bribery and corruption

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Dementia Films, The Unconscious Mind, Citizen Mental Health Campaign2017112820171129 (R4)Dementia films, why sad music makes people spend more and Citizen UK mental health project

Claudia Hammond finds out why films are being made of residents of a care home in South West London. They all have dementia and the story of their lives is told through photos, interviews and music and their beneficial effects are being studied in a small NHS trial. Claudia meets 92 year old May and her daughter, Valerie to find out what the film has done for her and why this kind of reminiscence therapy is so effective. Claudia talks to psychologist John Bargh about the power of the unconscious mind, why sad music makes people spend more and how we can use our unconscious mind's susceptibility to our own advantage. And why a community organisation in Tyne and Wear called Citizens UK has brought together people from schools, mosques, churches, politicians and the NHS to ask what their top priority should be. Find out why they all voted for mental health and what they're going to do about it. Psychologist Dr Catherine Loveday of the University of Westminster also explains why just believing that you do less exercise than your friends is likely to make you die earlier even if it's not true and a she discusses a recent study investigating the therapists' habits that most annoy their clients.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder, Agreeableness And Money, Emodiversity2018111320181114 (R4)Claudia visits a specialist personality disorder clinic in South London where she meets Jo, Susan and Chanelle to talk about what it's like to have a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. Psychotherapist, Merryn Jones explains why long term, regular group and individual therapy can help people cope with the intense emotional difficulties often caused by traumatic early life experiences.
New research on why agreeable people might be worse at managing their money. Sandra Matz from Columbia business school explains that it's not because agreeable people are more cooperative negotiators but that they just care less about money. Also in the programme what is emodiversity and can experiencing a range of negative and positive emotions be protective for your mental health? Tim Dalgleish from the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences unit at the University of Cambridge explains.

Emotionally unstable personality disorder, agreeableness and money, and emodiversity.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia visits a personality disorder clinic in South London

Claudia talks to Jo, Susan and Chanelle about their experience of group therapy at a personality disorder clinic in South London. Psychotherapist, Merryn Jones talks about treatment and why intensive group therapy can help people cope with the intense emotional difficulties often caused by traumatic early life experiences.

Exams And The Mental Health Of Children, A Community Approach To Suicide Prevention2016052420160525 (R4)The reality of exam stress, and the community initiative to prevent suicide.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents the series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Heart Failure; Insiders' Guide To Mental Health; Use Of You2017050220170503 (R4)900,000 people in the UK suffer from heart failure - where the heart can no longer pump sufficient blood around the body. Symptoms can include a combination of breathlessness, fluid retention and tiredness - enough to have a severe impact on a person's quality of life. Getting a diagnosis of heart failure can be frightening, but there is good evidence that psychological input can make a difference. Claudia Hammond hears from patients and Dr John Sharp, Consultant Clinical Psychologist with the Scottish National Advanced Heart Failure Service, on recognising and dealing with the unique mental health challenges of this increasingly prevalent condition.

The second of the All in the Mind Insiders' Guide to Mental Health Services asks what can you do if you think you're not getting the best from your GP, and, if you think you're waiting too long for treatment, should you seek a private referral? Our 'insiders' this week are service user, mental health campaigner and retired chief of an NHS Trust, Lisa Rodrigues, GP and All in the Mind Awards finalist Daniel Dietch, and Head of Information at Mind Stephen Buckley

And Claudia Hammond talks to psychologist Ariana Orvell from the University of Michigan on why we use the word "you", instead of "I", more frequently than we realise. It's emerging as a useful tool to distance ourselves psychologically - and extract meaning - from negative experiences.

Producer: Adrian Washbourne.

Heart failure; Insiders' Guide to Mental Health; Use of you.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Producer: Adrian Washbourne.

How Are Memories Formed?2016110820161109 (R4)Claudia Hammond meets the winners of the 2016 Brain Prize.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

The brain has billions of neurons interconnected by trillions of synapses. It is at these synapses where memories are made.

Ground-breaking research by Timothy Bliss, Graham Collingridge and Richard Morris has transformed our understanding of memory, and offered new insights into devastating effects of failing memory. This year they won the Brain Prize, the world's most valuable award in brain research. Claudia Hammond meets them in front of an audience at London's Royal Institution to discuss how memories are made.

How Children Think About Maths And Time2020060220200603 (R4)Claudia Hammond explores how children think about maths and about time.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond explores how children think with two psychologists; Dr Victoria Simms from Ulster University who researches how children’s understanding of maths develops and Professor Teresa McCormack from Queens University Belfast who researches how children understand time. The discussion was recorded in front of an audience at the Northern Ireland Science Festival in February 2020.

Producer: Caroline Steel

Intensive Care Unit And Post Traumatic Stress Disorder20030319Dr Raj Persaud looks at research into the nature of the trauma suffered by patients in intensive care units.

New evidence suggests that this is psychological as well as physical.

It seems that the trauma for patients in intensive care units is not purely physical -the psychological impact can be equally devastating. This programme visits Liverpool, where researchers are looking for ways to limit the damage. Presented by Raj Persaud. EMAIL: radioscience@bbc.co.uk Producer Marya Burgess

Intuition, All In The Mind Awards, Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation, Think Ahead2017121220171213 (R4)Intuition, All in the Mind Awards and transcranial direct current stimulation.

How good is your intuition - those hunches you follow because you're convinced you're right? Alas, if you think you're good at it, evidence shows you're probably not. Claudia Hammond hears the latest research from Dr Mario Weick from the University of Kent

There's still time for you to enter the 2018 All in the Mind Awards. This is your chance to nominate someone who's made a difference to your mental health. You could nominate a group or project or maybe a friend, a therapist, a partner, a nurse - anyone who's really been there for you. We hear from GP Daniel Dietch - one of last year's finalists on the impact being nominated had on him after being put forward by a patient with bi-polar disorder.

Medication taken by some people with psychosis or schizophrenia is designed to reduce delusions and hallucinations. What it doesn't tackle are the additional problems with memory and decision-making. Claudia Hammond meets Dr Natasza Orlov of Kings College London who's been trialling mild electrical stimulation to the brain aimed specifically at these symptoms. Could it improve everyone else's memory as well?

And we catch up on what's happened to the very first high flying graduates we've been following who've been fast- tracked into mental health social work.

Producer Adrian Washbourne.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Launch Of 2016 All In The Mind Awards, Latest Results From Big Brain Projects2015111020151111 (R4)The launch of the 2016 All in the Mind awards. Judge and novelist Matt Haig tells us what he will be looking for and 2014 finalists Pat Rose and Maya Pillay give their top tips for winning entries. Plus can we recreate the human brain? The latest results from two major neuroscience projects with very different approaches are giving fascinating insights into how the brain works.

The 2016 All in the Mind awards launch, plus can the human brain be recreated?

Lawyers' Wellbeing; Sociable Brains; Young Peoples' Mental Health Advisory Group2019121020191211 (R4)A recent poll of junior lawyers suggested that 93% of participants experienced distress in the last month and 19% had felt unable to cope. Those across the legal profession are experiencing higher than average levels of stress, anxiety and alcohol abuse. Can the profession adapt to openly accommodate wellbeing to balance the demands of the job? Claudia Hammond talks to Emma Jones, Senior Lecturer in Law at the Open University who is now conducting research with the charity LawCare on mental health in the legal profession, and Alex McBride, who’s a criminal barrister turned author.

We all know that some of us are more sociable than others, depending on our personalities, experiences and the situations we find ourselves in. But could the microbes in our gut also play a part? John Cryan of the APG Microbiome Centre in Cork discusses his latest observations across species and in humans.

Three quarters of mental health problems first occur before we reach our mid-20s. Yet much of the research is done with adults. Dame Til Wykes, Professor of Clinical Psychology & Rehabilitation at Kings College London, discusses a new initiative - the young people mental health advisory group - to ensure the best possible research is being carried out through liaison with a group of teenagers who have experienced mental health difficulties themselves.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Lawyers' wellbeing; sociable brains; young peoples' mental health advisory group

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Lockdown Easing And Mental Health; Early Life Stress And Catching Cold; New Lockdown Jobs2020061620200617 (R4)Lockdown easing and mental health; early life stress and catching cold; new lockdown jobs

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Emerging from lockdown might not be as easy on our mental health as it sounds. After weeks spent adjusting to lockdown and working out how to cope, how easy is it to re-adjust to old routines? And is it even possible to predict how we’ll feel about things in a few weeks’ time? Daisy Fancourt, Associate Professor of Behavioural Science and Health at University College London discusses the latest results from the Covid-19 Social study, exploring how people’s feelings have changed during the course of the pandemic. Claudia Hammond is also joined by Paul Dolan, Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics, and James Downs, a campaigner on mental health and eating disorders.

Claudia Hammond’s guest is psychologist Prof Daryl O’Connor from University of Leeds with news of new research on the striking impact a supportive family environment can have on your susceptibility to the common cold in later life.

We are hearing a lot about the possibility of job losses in the future as a result of the pandemic. But there are some people starting new jobs under lockdown – with the prospect of not meeting their colleagues in person. So how will people manage? We hear from two experts who are just embarking – or about to embark, on new jobs: Andrew Clements a senior lecturer in Organisational Psychology at the University of Bedfordshire and Gail Kinman, Visiting Professor of Occupational Health Psychology at Birkbeck University.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in association with the Open University

Loneliness Results2018100120181003 (R4)55,000 people worldwide completed the BBC Loneliness Experiment. It is the largest survey of loneliness ever done. The results are unique in their scope and reach and were revealed first at an event in the Reading Room of Wellcome Collection.

At the live event, presented by Claudia Hammond, musician Jazz Morley and poet Daljit Nagra perform and talk about how their creativity was driven by their loneliness. Philosopher Julian Baggini challenges the idea that loneliness is always a negative experience. And Claudia discusses the results of the Wellcome supported research with Professor Christina Victor of Brunel University and Professor Pam Qualter of Manchester University.

Claudia Hammond reveals the results of the BBC Loneliness Experiment

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

55,000 people worldwide completed The BBC Loneliness Experiment which is the largest survey of loneliness ever done. The results are unique in their scope and reach and will be revealed first at an event in the Reading Room of Wellcome Collection.

At the live event, presented by Claudia Hammond, musician Jazz Morely and poet Daljit Nagra perform and talk about how their creativity was driven by their loneliness. Philosopher Julian Baggini challenges the idea that loneliness is always a negative experience and questions Professor Christina Victor and Professor Pam Qualter on the results of the Wellcome supported research.

Magic And Gender Bias2019120320191204 (R4)The Wounded Healer, also known as Dr Ahmed Hankir, Academic Clinical Fellow in Psychiatry at Kings College London, tours the world talking about his experience of mental ill health and attacking stigma. But how does his lived experience impact his clinical practice? Joining Claudia and Ahmed in the studio to discuss the issues is Dr Sri Kalidindi,, consultant rehabilitation psychiatrist at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.

While traditionally magicians have been men, there are more and more successful women entering the male dominated industry. But do they have to work harder to impress? Gustav Kuhn from Goldsmiths University of London and colleagues carried out a study revealing a very strong gender bias but this was erased comparatively simply by asking people to work out how the magic tricks worked.

Technology companies are developing artificial intelligence that can detect your mood. They are doing this by reading facial expressions but is this too simplistic an approach? Lisa Feldman Barrett at North Eastern University in the US questions whether the psychological research is being interpreted in the right way. Gary McKeown, a psychologist from Queens University Belfast, joins the discussion.

Studio guest is Professor Catherine Loveday from the University of Westminster.

Psychiatrists with lived experience of mental ill health, magic and gender, AI emotion

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Mdma For Alcohol Dependence, Music And Sleep, Interoceptive Skills, Parasites And Entrepreneurship2018112020181121 (R4)Claudia Hammond finds out how MDMA assisted psychotherapy could help treat people with alcohol dependence. Trials are in their early stages but initial results are promising. Could this in the future be a new way to treat an addiction which ordinarily can have high relapse rates? Clinical psychologist, Laurie Higbe, explains how she and co therapist, Dr Ben Sessa, conduct the therapy and why MDMA might work at helping tackle the causes of alcohol addiction. Also, why city traders who can detect their own heartbeat may have better instincts when they have to make quick decisions on what's happening in the financial markets. Professor Sarah Garfinkel from the University of Sussex explains why the heart can be a powerful source of information guiding our behaviour without us being consciously aware of it. And Stephanie Johnson from the University of Colorado discusses her research exploring the relationship between risk taking and entrepreneurial behaviour and the toxoplasma gondii parasite.

Claudia Hammond investigates why MDMA might help treat people addicted to alcohol

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond finds out how MDMA assisted psychotherapy could help treat people with alcohol dependence. Trials are in their early stages but initial results are promising. Could this in the future be a new way to treat an addiction which ordinarily can have high relapse rates? Clinical psychologist, Laurie Higbed, explains how she and co therapist, Dr Ben Sessa, conduct the therapy and why MDMA might work at helping tackle the causes of alcohol addiction. Also, why city traders who can detect their own heartbeat may have better instincts when they have to make quick decisions on what's happening in the financial markets. Professor Sarah Garfinkel from the University of Sussex explains why the heart can be a powerful source of information guiding our behaviour without us being consciously aware of it. And Stephanie Johnson from the University of Colorado discusses her research exploring the relationship between risk taking and entrepreneurial behaviour and the toxoplasma gondii parasite.

Mental Health Support In The Community; Awareness In Children; Insiders' Guide2017061320170614 (R4)Claudia Hammond has been following some of the first tranche of trainee mental health social workers setting out on the Think Ahead scheme which is getting high-flying graduates into social work. As a 22 year old English graduate Al Toombs was one of the youngest people on the course. It's rare to be able to eavesdrop on actual sessions between mental health professionals of any kind and their clients, but Claudia spent the day with Al in Coventry on visits to clients such as Jo, who's lived with depression for several years whilst juggling a complicated family life.

As we grow up we get better at tasks involving thinking. But there is something at which 5 year olds excel and that adults are really not very good at - and that is noticing things. New research by Vladimir Sloutsky, a psychologist at Ohio State University, shows that small children pay more attention to what's going on around them than adults do. It's a skill he thinks we've been underestimating and a finding that holds lessons for the appearances of our primary schools.

In this week's Insiders' Guide to getting the best out of mental health services - what should you do if you're not happy with the mental health care you're getting? We hear from Stephen Buckley from Mind, psychiatrist Sri Kalidindi, GP Dr Daniel Dietch and Lisa Rodrigues, who has both experienced mental health problems and run services herself.

Producer Adrian Washbourne.

Mental heath workers begin learning on the job through the Think Ahead scheme.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond explores the worlds of psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Producer Adrian Washbourne.

Mental Health Support In The Community; Insiders' Guide To Mental Health; Confidence2017052320170524 (R4)All in the Mind has been following the progress a scheme called Think Ahead, which trains high-flying graduates to become a new generation of mental health social workers. A bit like Teach First, they are taught mostly on the job with a lot of special support. Not everyone in the field supports the idea but there has been no shortage of applicants. One of the first trainees, Charlotte Seymour who used to work in the legal field, is now based in east London where her clients' needs vary - from very practical help with sorting out rent arrears to emotional support when they fear their mental health is deteriorating. She met Emma during a stay in hospital, under section and her mental health is now vastly improved. But a family bereavement has affected her deeply. Despite not eating or sleeping for days she keeps her appointment with Charlotte to discuss how to keep herself safe at this difficult time.

In our Insiders' Guide series - if you've been referred to mental health services, what can you expect to happen at that first appointment? Lisa Rodrigues who has had mental health issues herself and has long experience managing mental health services and Sri Kalidindi, a psychiatrist with South London and Maudsley NHS Trust explain what's involved. This includes building up a good rapport and the taking of a full medical history - including traumatic life events and social circumstances. This helps to establish a diagnosis. Making a list might help if you are anxious - but you should also be realistic as most problems aren't sorted out straight away. A mental illness might make you feel like you don't deserve help - but everyone does, so it's important to go along to that first appointment with an open mind.

If you're not sure about something how do you make a decision? Who should you believe if you rely on others to help you decide? Researchers have found that if someone appears confident then we are likely to be influenced by them - our brains literally tune in to confident people. Psychologist Dr Dan Campbell-Meiklejohn from the University of Sussex has scanned the brains of people and discovered that they assess the confidence of others using a specific part at the front of the brain, in the prefrontal cortex. He asked people to play a computer game - with a "virtual" jar of marbles - where the colour of the next one pulled out had to be predicted. Computer-generated faces - with more or less confident expressions - helped to influence their decisions.

Mental health support in the community; Insiders' Guide to Mental Health; Confidence

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond explores the worlds of psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Mindfulness, Rest And Slothfulness, All In The Mind Awards, Compulsive Sexual Behaviour And The Internet20151124Over the last decade mindfulness has grown in popularity and is recommended in many settings such as the NHS, schools, the work place and prisons. But how strong is the scientific data? Mental Elf blogger Andre Tomlin and Professor Willem Kuyken review the evidence.

All in the Mind Awards Judge Marion Janner talks to Claudia Hammond on the mindfulness of gardening and how to take part in the awards.

Plus the search for rest: is being slothful still a sin?

New research from Valerie Voon, a Consultant Neuropsychiatrist at Cambridge University, uncovers what's happening in the brains of people with compulsive sexual behaviour. The results suggest that the constant supply of novel images from the internet can drive this behaviour and Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist Graham Music discusses how the findings could be translated to the clinic.

Neuromyths2018121820181219 (R4)Claudia busts some myths in neuroscience. She meets scientists attending the British Neuroscience Association's Christmas symposium on Neuromyths. She talks to Professor Chris MacManus about myths around left and right and how we use the different sides of our brain. She discusses with Duncan Astle from Cambridge University about the brain myths that have been used in education in primary schools. Cordelia Fine from Melbourne University discusses the myths about the differences between male and female brains. Anne Cook from the BNA talks about some historical myths which have been busted but why others still persist. Emma Yhnell from Cardiff University talks about whether brain training really works.

Neuromyths: Claudia explores some common myths in neuroscience

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

New Brain Cells And Depression; Yoga In Prisons; Insiders' Guide; Preferring Our Own Ideas2017062020170621 (R4)Neurogenesis is the process where we create new brain cells. Many researchers believe that if someone has depression then neurogenesis is reduced. Could this in some cases even be the cause of depression? It's possible this idea could lead to the discovery of new drugs for depression, drugs which don't tackle mood, but which encourage the creation of new brain cells. Claudia Hammond brought together Timothy Powell, MRC postdoctoral research fellow, and Sandrine Thuret, Head of Neurogenesis and Mental Health, from Kings College London to examine the latest research.

The Government has committed to make prisons not just places of detention, but of rehabilitation. Some prisons are hoping that yoga classes could make a difference. Research from Oxford University is beginning to suggest that yoga can help with prisoners' mental health. Claudia Hammond hears from lead researcher and psychologist Amy Bilderbeck, Sam Settle Director of the Prison Phoenix Trust and former prisoner Richard for whom yoga was to become a vital tool during his years as an inmate.

This week's Insiders' Guides to mental health asks with all the guidance out there in the public domain, how do you decide what is best for you? We hear from Stephen Buckley from Mind, GP Daniel Dietch and before them Lisa Rodrigues, who's had mental health issues herself and long experience of managing services.

Psychologists discovered long ago that most of us think we're better than average at most things - the Lake Wobegon Effect - and that we go round looking for information that confirms our views on life - the confirmation biases. But there's now another bias in our thinking. If we imagine a theory is our own, we think it must be true. Aiden Gregg, Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Southampton, told Claudia Hammond about his new research.

Producer Adrian Washbourne.

New brain cells and depression; yoga in prisons; Insiders' Guide; preferring our own ideas

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond explores the worlds of psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Producer Adrian Washbourne.

Our Visual Experience: Perception Of Colour And Eye Contact2019050720190508 (R4)Remember that dress? In All in the mind recorded in front of an audience at the Free Thinking Festival at Sage Gateshead, Claudia Hammond delves into the psychology and neuroscience of our visual experience. How do we know we all see the same colours? And why do adults look away from other people’s faces when they’re trying to concentrate? We hear from the visual neuroscientist trying to work out exactly what we all see when we look at colours and from the psychologist training the police and teachers that it’s ok if people look away when they talk to you. It doesn’t mean they’re lying. It could mean they’re concentrating.

Producer: Caroline Steel

Claudia Hammond and guests explore the complexity of our visual experience

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Pain And The Brain2019121720191218 (R4)Pain has long been recognised as something of an enigma by scientists and clinicians. It's both a measurable physiological process, as well as deeply personal and subjective. Claudia Hammond meets scientists attending the British Neuroscience Association's Christmas symposium on pain and the brain.

She talks to the so-called "queen of pain", Professor Irene Tracey of Oxford University, about how research into acute and chronic pain is being addressed. We hear from Professor Ulrike Bingel about the positive and negative effects of expectation and anxiety on painful symptoms, and how this could be harnessed to enhance the power of drug treatments and reduce side effects.

Professor Tamar Makin of University College London reveals some of the latest insights into the mysterious pain associated with missing limbs and wonders if we've been getting the thinking on phantom limb pain all wrong.

And why are some kinds of pain - after exercising say, almost enjoyable? Professor Siri Leknes of Oslo University discusses the curious relationship between pain and pleasure.

Pain and the brain, with Claudia Hammond.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Pathological Demand Avoidance, Is Wisdom A Trait Or A State, Anxiety-free Comedy Gigs2016112920161130 (R4)Claudia Hammond examines pathological demand avoidance.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond presents a series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Personality Change, Roald Dahl's Marvellous Medicine, Insider's Guide, The Self-help Craze2017062720170628 (R4)We tend to assume that once we are adults there are aspects of our personalities that never alter. But a huge new re-analysis of more than 200 studies has found that therapy can change your personality in just a few weeks. The idea of therapy is to make you feel happier, and to help you find a way of resolving your problems. But as Professor Brent Roberts from the University of Illinois reveals, it can also change our personalities in surprising ways.

Over 25 years ago as a junior doctor, Tom Solomon soon learnt that a patient on his ward, the children's author Roald Dahl, was fascinated by the brain. Then years later, away from his day job as a neurologist at Liverpool University, he decided to trace the influence of that interest on Dahl's writing. Last year he recounted it in a book which has now been adapted into a stage show for this year's Edinburgh Fringe - Roald Dahl's Marvellous Medicine. He tells Claudia Hammond how Dahl's interest in the brain began with an accident.

The final Insiders' Guide to getting the best out of mental health services is probably the most important of all. What to do if you or someone you know is in serious crisis? We hear from Stephen Buckley from Mind, GP Daniel Dietch and Lisa Rodrigues, who's both had mental health difficulties and led services herself.

Look in any bookshop at the self-help section, and it appears that a lot of people are trying to change themselves. Now a Danish philosopher and psychologist Sven Brinkmann says it's gone too far. In his new book "Stand Firm: resisting the self-improvement craze" he says the secret to a happier life is to come to terms with yourself as you are. But there is some very good research out there on happiness, so isn't it worth trying to put that evidence into practice? We brought together Sven Brinkmann with a leading researcher in the field of happiness, Dr Sonja Lyubomirsky from the University of California Riverside.

Personality change, Roald Dahl's Marvellous Medicine, Insider's Guide, the self-help craze

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond explores the worlds of psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Look in any bookshop at the self-help section, and it appears that a lot of people are trying to change themselves. Now a Danish philosopher and psychologist Sven Brinkmann says it's gone too far. In his new book "Stand Firm: resisting the self-improvement craze" he says the secret to a happier life is to come to terms with yourself as you are. But there is some very good research out there on happiness, so isn't it worth trying to put that evidence into practice? We brought together Sven Brinkmann with a leading researcher in the field of happiness, Dr Sonja Lyubomirsky from the University of California Riverside.

Problem Gambling; Owls And Larks; Milgram Revisited; Depression And Gut Instinct2014111820141119 (R4)Claudia Hammond talks to Henrietta Bowden-Jones who runs the only NHS clinic for problem gamblers. Based in Central London it offers help to problem gamblers across the country. Treatment is mainly group based cognitive behavioural therapy. As many as 8 out of 10 patients, who are mostly men, have stopped gambling after 8 weeks of treatment at the clinic. But should more similar treatment centres be set up across the country for an addiction which often remains hidden? Also in the programme, Christian Jarrett joins Claudia to discuss why owls and larks could soon be joined by two new types of people based on how energetic they feel. Also, psychologist Stephen Reicher questions some of Stanley Milgram's conclusions about his infamous obedience experiments of the 1960s. And why if you're depressed you may find you lose your gut instinct.

Claudia finds out about the only NHS clinic for problem gamblers. Should there be more?

Claudia Hammond talks to Henrietta Bowden-Jones who runs the only NHS clinic for problem gamblers. Psychiatrists, psychologists a family therapist and financial advisor offer specialist treatments which have been shown to work and it has been inundated with referrals since opening. So should more similar treatment centres be set up across the country?

Programme Catalogue - Details: 01 February 199019900201Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 02 February 1990

Previous in series: 26 January 1990

Broadcast history

01 Feb 1990 09:30-10:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-01-25.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3009

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Programme Catalogue - Details: 02 October 199019901002Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: REPEAT

Previous in series: 23 February 1990

Broadcast history

02 Oct 1990 10:02-10:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-09-28.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3064

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Seven programmes in which Professor Anthony Clare examines the mind. Producer Matt Thompson

Programme Catalogue - Details: 05 January 199019900105Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 11 January 1990

Previous in series: 04 January 1990

Broadcast history

05 Jan 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-01-03.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3002

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Programme Catalogue - Details: 07 November 199019901107Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 13 November 1990

Previous in series: ORIGINATION

Broadcast history

07 Nov 1990 19:45-20:15 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-11-02.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3075

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with Professor Anthony Clare

Programme Catalogue - Details: 08 February 199019900208Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 09 February 1990

Previous in series: 02 February 1990

Broadcast history

08 Feb 1990 09:30-10:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-02-01.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3011

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Programme Catalogue - Details: 09 February 199019900209Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 15 February 1990

Previous in series: 08 February 1990

Broadcast history

09 Feb 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-02-07.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3012

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

(Details as Thurs 9.30am L W)

Programme Catalogue - Details: 10 October 199019901010Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 16 October 1990

Previous in series: REPEAT

Broadcast history

10 Oct 1990 19:45-20:15 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-10-05.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3067

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 16 February 199019900216Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 22 February 1990

Previous in series: 15 February 1990

Broadcast history

16 Feb 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-02-14.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3014

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

(Details as yesterday

9.30am L W)

Programme Catalogue - Details: 16 October 199019901016Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 17 October 1990

Previous in series: 10 October 1990

Broadcast history

16 Oct 1990 10:02-10:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-10-12.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3068

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with Professor Anthony Clare

Producer Matt Thompson

Programme Catalogue - Details: 17 October 199019901017Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 23 October 1990

Previous in series: 16 October 1990

Broadcast history

17 Oct 1990 19:45-20:15 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-10-12.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3069

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 18 January 199019900118Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 19 January 1990

Previous in series: REPEAT

Broadcast history

18 Jan 1990 09:30-10:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-01-11.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3005

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind, both psychiatric and psychological.

Researcher CLARE DENNING Producer MATT THOMPSON Editor MICHAEL EMBER

Programme Catalogue - Details: 19 January 199019900119Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 25 January 1990

Previous in series: 18 January 1990

Broadcast history

19 Jan 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-01-18.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3006

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

(Details Thurs 9.30am L W)

Programme Catalogue - Details: 22 February 199019900222Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 23 February 1990

Previous in series: 16 February 1990

Broadcast history

22 Feb 1990 09:30-10:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-02-15.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3015

Producer: M. THOMPSON

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Last in the present series with Professor Anthony Clare

Researcher CLARE DENNING Producer MATT THOMPSON Editor MICHAEL EMBER

Programme Catalogue - Details: 23 February 199019900223Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 02 October 1990

Previous in series: 22 February 1990

Broadcast history

23 Feb 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-02-20.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3016

Producer: M. THOMPSON

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(Details yesterday 9.30am L W)

Programme Catalogue - Details: 23 October 199019901023Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 24 October 1990

Previous in series: 17 October 1990

Broadcast history

23 Oct 1990 10:02-10:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-10-18.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3070

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Professor Anthony Clare examines the mind. Producer Matt Thompson

Programme Catalogue - Details: 24 October 199019901024Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 30 October 1990

Previous in series: 23 October 1990

Broadcast history

24 Oct 1990 19:45-20:15 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-10-19.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3071

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 25 January 199019900125Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 26 January 1990

Previous in series: 19 January 1990

Broadcast history

25 Jan 1990 09:30-10:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-01-18.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3007

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

with Professor Anthony Clare

Researcher CLARE DENNING Producer MATT THOMPSON Editor MICHAEL EMBER

Programme Catalogue - Details: 26 January 199019900126Producer: M.

EMBER

Next in series: 01 February 1990

Previous in series: 25 January 1990

Broadcast history

26 Jan 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-01-19.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3008

Producer: M. EMBER

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

(Details as Thurs 9.30am LW)

Programme Catalogue - Details: 30 October 199019901030Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 31 October 1990

Previous in series: 24 October 1990

Broadcast history

30 Oct 1990 10:02-10:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-10-25.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3072

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Programme Catalogue - Details: 31 October 199019901031Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: ORIGINATION

Previous in series: 30 October 1990

Broadcast history

31 Oct 1990 19:45-20:15 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-10-28.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3073

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Programme Catalogue - Details: Origination19901106Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 07 November 1990

Previous in series: 31 October 1990

Broadcast history

06 Nov 1990 10:02-10:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-11-02.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3074

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Programme Catalogue - Details: Repeat19900112Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 18 January 1990

Previous in series: 11 January 1990

Broadcast history

12 Jan 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-01-10.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3004

Producer: M. THOMPSON

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Psychiatrist Shortage, Gp Helps With Mental Health, Why Boredom Could Be A Good Thing2016051020160511 (R4)Psychiatrist shortage, GP helps with mental health, and why boredom might be a good thing.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

In the UK there are around a hundred unfilled Consultant Psychiatrist posts. Claudia Hammond discusses with Sir Simon Wessely, President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, why there is such a shortage, and the knock on effect for patients. Why does psychiatry seem to be the poor relation when compared with other branches of medicine and what can be done to persuade more trainee doctors to consider psychiatry as a career?

In the next of our series of features on the shortlist for the All in the Mind Awards, Claudia meets a GP who has helped one patient with a range of mental health issues, giving advice to her when she was admitted to hospital - despite not being in the same country at the time - and helping her to manage mental health complications associated with childbirth.

Are you bored? Don't worry it could be good for you. Research into boredom suggests an uncluttered schedule might be a good thing, giving us the chance for a bit of creative thinking. Sandi Mann, Senior Lecturer at the School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire talks to Claudia about the benefits of boredom.

With expert comment from Dr Catherine Loveday, Principal Lecturer in Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Westminster.

Claudia Hammond presents the series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Psychology Of Voting, Media Portrayals Of Mental Health, Designer Asylum2015040720150408 (R4)The psychology of voting, and portrayal of mental health in the media. Is it accurate?

Are you an undecided voter? Claudia Hammond finds out what psychology can tell us about some of the subtle influences on our decision making in the run up to the election. Portrayals of mental health: Paul Whitehouse's recent comedy Nurse showed him playing a range of people being visited by community psychiatric nurse, Liz. Is it funny and does it matter if people with mental health problems are used as the subject of comedy? Claudia is joined by real life CPN, Lin and by anti-stigma campaigner, Nikki Mattocks to discuss. Also - the call for picture editors not to use the 'headclutching' shot to accompany stories about mental health in the media. Sue Baker, director of Time to Change explains.

Self-care, Schadenfreude, How Maths Ability Might Relate To Ball-catching Skills2018120420181205 (R4)What is self-care and what's the evidence that it works for anxiety and depression in young people? Claudia talks to Professor in Evidence Based Practice and Research at UCL, Miranda Wolpert and Maggy Van Eijk, author of Remember this when you're sad - Lessons learned on the road from self-harm to self-care. They discuss how useful is self-care and what are the kinds of strategies that work. Liam Hill from the University of Leeds explains why mathematical ability might relate to ball catching skills and his work with pupils at a primary school in Bradford. Claudia discusses schadenfreude with historian of emotions, Tiffany Watt-Smith and psychologist, Wilco Van Dijk from the University of Leiden.

Self-care, schadenfreude and how maths ability might relate to ball-catching skills.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Sibling Rivalry, Prisoner Of War Diaries, Inflammation And Depression2017110720171108 (R4)

Claudia Hammond's guest is Catherine Loveday, Principle lecturer in Psychology at the University of Westminster

If you have sisters or brothers you probably know all about sibling rivalry. But if you're a parent who despairs over your children squabbling, fear not. Claudia Hammond hears how sibling rivalry can be handled and can have an upside. It's something that should be embraced argues child psychologist Linda Blair, author of a new book Siblings.

What insights can diaries and letters from prisoners of war can give us into the imprisoned soldier's minds? We hear from historian Clare Makepeace who has spent years studying the diaries and letters of POWs and Mark McDermott Professor of Health Psychology at the University of East London to discuss the psychological impact the confined experience can have.

And new evidence on the link between inflammation in the body and depression. It's the first study ever published showing that inflammation can lead to alterations in how specific new brain cells are formed - a process that leads to depression in a third of patients. As Patricia Zunszain of Kings College London explains, drugs targeting these mechanisms could be the effective antidepressants of the future - drugs which don't tackle mood, but which encourage the creation of new brain cells.

Sibling rivalry, Prisoner of war diaries, Inflammation and depression.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Sleep Paralysis; Exploding Head Syndrome; Robot Therapy; Mental Health Awareness2017103120171101 (R4)Sleep paralysis, exploding head syndrome, robot therapy, mental health awareness campaigns

Claudia Hammond talks to Professor Christopher French from Goldsmiths, University of London about the strange phenomenon of sleep paralysis. As many as 1 in 20 people will experience vivid hallucinations while falling asleep or waking up while also completely unable to move. People also describe a very powerful sense of fear and the feeling of being crushed or that an intruder or something supernatural is there with them. Despite being relatively common, this sleep anomaly is little understood. Even less well known or understood is the frightening experience of 'Exploding Head Syndrome' where someone perceives abrupt and very loud noises when going to sleep or waking up.

Also can a robot deliver therapy via your smartphone? Claudia talks to Alison Darcy - Stanford University researcher who's created Woebot - an artificially intelligent chatbot designed to treat depression. Woebot, uses cognitive-behavioural therapy and is available via Facebook messenger. Alison explains how it works and that it's not a replacement for traditional therapy, but it's the first tech based treatment to have been properly scientifically tested and peer reviewed..

Simon Wessley, outgoing president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, and Paul Farmer, chief executive of the mental health charity MIND discuss mental health awareness campaigns with Claudia. Do they overload already stretched mental health services? Or are they vital to helping people understand their own mental health and are they changing the wider landscape of how these conditions are understood, talked about and de-stigmatised?

Sleep paralysis: why do some people have vivid nightmares when their body also can't move?

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Space Travel's Impact On The Brain; Viktor Frankl's Search For Meaning; Contagious Stress2020060920200610 (R4)Space travel's impact on the brain; Viktor Frankl's search for meaning; contagious stress.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

The success of the recent SpaceX launch to the ISS has reignited talk of return manned missions to the moon and onwards to Mars. But beyond well know physiological effects of space travel on our bodies, what do effects of immobility and microgravity have on our brains? A new study offers a detailed insight from 12 fit astronauts subjected to a battery of tests in a microgravity simulator capturing changes in brain images, disrupted sleep rhythms and mood changes and cognition. As Ivana Rosenzweig, Head of the Sleep and Brain Plasticity Centre at Kings College London explains, her work has important implications for understanding astronaut behaviour and capabilities – and more immediately – the long term effects on the brains of Covid 19 patients supported on ventilators.

Viktor E. Frankl, was one of the last of the great Viennese psychotherapists, who used his experiences as a prisoner in German concentration camps in World War II to write ''Man's Search for Meaning,'' an enduring work of survival literature.. A collection of his lectures, Life in Spite of Everything, is now published in English. His writings, lectures and teaching were an important force in forming the modern concept that many factors may be implicated in mental illness - opening the door to a wide variety of psychotherapies. Frankl’s grandson, Alex Vesely, together with the Viennese psychotherapist and former colleague Alfred Lengle, reveal how this newly translated collection of his lectures underpin his ideas about hope, resilience and ways to confront personal suffering, which continues to have great relevance to us in today’s uncertain world.

When parents try to hide their stress, can they still pass on these feelings to their children? Sara Waters at Washington State University has been measuring the extent to which children “catch” their parents’ stress during interaction. The more out of control parents feel - and during a global pandemic that feeling is likely exacerbated- the stronger they have an impulse to reassure their kids that everything is OK. But it may be more comforting for kids to have their feelings discussed than just be told “it's going to be fine”.

Claudia Hammond’s guest is Catherine Loveday Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Westminster.

Producer: Adrian Washbourne

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Spatial Navigation, Aphantasia And Depression Musical2019043020190501 (R4)Claudia talks to Catherine Loveday about her new research trying to find out why some people have difficulty navigating and what strategies might help. Madeleine Finlay reports from the 'Extreme Imagination' conference at Exeter University about people with aphantasia who have no mind's eye - who can't visualise friends, family, objects or anything. She meets people with the condition and the researchers trying to understand it. And the musical all about depression, 'A Super happy story about feeling Super sad'. How to make the experience of depression into an uplifting musical. Catherine Loveday tells Claudia about new research looking into why people with depression seek out sad music and explains that, contrary to the idea that it maintains low mood, people with depression find it calming and even empathetic.

Spatial navigation, aphantasia: people with no mind's eye and a musical about depression

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Stress1995091919950924First broadcast on 1995-09-19

Producer: P.

KOBRAK

Next in series: TORTURERS

Previous in series: GRAND FINAL

Description

*

Subject Categories

stress (mental)

medical programmes (programme genre)

Broadcast history

19 Sep 1995 11:30-12:00 (RADIO 4)

24 Sep 1995 22:15-22:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Anthony Clare

Kathleen Griffin (int)

Paul Kobrak (Producer)

Cary Cooper (Speaker)

Melanie Lilley (Speaker)

Wanda Nash (Speaker)

Fiona Jones (psychologist (spkr)) (Speaker)

Robert Sharpe (psychologist (spkr)) (Speaker)

James Watson (psychiatrist (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1995-09-14.

Producer: P. KOBRAK

Stress At Work2019110520191106 (R4)Stress at work. Adam Kay, an ex junior doctor turned author and stand up performer, published the diary of his time of working in the NHS. It struck a chord and sold over a million copies in the UK. It's a story of working under duress, long hours and limited resources which many people can identify with and he delivered over 1200 babies in those circumstances. Gail Kinman is Professor of Occupational Health Psychology at the University of Bedfordshire. Gail's worked with doctors, nurses, prison officers and social workers. Together with presenter Claudia Hammond and an audience they look at what stress is, how people burn out as well as how to spot the warning signs. What can individuals do to protect themselves and what are the responsibilities of the organisations they work for?

Ex junior doctor Adam Kay and Professor Gail Kinman look at work stress and how to cope.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Stress at work. Junior doctor turned author and stand up Adam Kay's diary of his time of working in the NHS struck at chord and sold over a million copies in the UK.
It's a story of working under duress, long hours and limited resources which many people can identify with and he delivered over 1200 babies in those circumstances.
Gail Kinman is Professor of Occupational Health Psychology at the University of Bedfordshire. Gail's worked with doctors, nurses, prison officers and social workers.
Together with presenter Claudia Hammond and an audience they will look at what stress is, how people get burnt out as well as how to spot the warning signs. What can individuals do to protect themselves and what are the responsibilities of the organisations they work for.

But if someone is part of the gig economy, on a zero hours contract, juggling several jobs or a digital nomad - how can they look after their mental health?

Adam Kay ex junior doctor and Professor Gail Kinman look at work stress and how to cope.

Ex junior doctor Adam Kay and Professor Gail Kinman look at work stress and how to cope.

Suicide In The Veterinary Profession, Psychology Of Autonomous Cars, Awards Nomination2016051720160518 (R4)Claudia Hammond examines the high suicide rate within the veterinary profession.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

For many, working with animals is a dream job and every year thousands of students compete to get into vet school. But whilst life as a vet isn't always easy, surprisingly the suicide rate amongst vets is four times greater than among medical doctors. This fact came to prominence in research back in 2004 and steps have been taken to address it. Yet the exact reasons are still unclear. Claudia hears from vet Richard Hillman and meets Rosie Allister, who's based at Edinburgh University researching the wellbeing of vets, and is the Chair of Vetlife Helpline.

There's been a lot of talk about the technology behind self-driving cars, but what about the psychology? As the first UK trials begin examining how other drivers, cyclists and pedestrians react to coming across a car that's driving itself, Claudia travels to the Transport Research Laboratory in Surrey, to meet its Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Stevens, to discuss the behaviour psychologists and car manufacturers need to understand before autonomous vehicles hit the road.

Our latest finalist in this year's All in the Mind Awards is a boss called Blair with an unusual relationship with her employee, Steven. She doesn't just pay him and supervise him. She has supported him through some of the hardest times in his life.

Supertaskers, Technology To Replace Exams And The All In The Mind Awards2016061420160615 (R4)2.5% of people are supertaskers, plus replacing exams with AI and our latest award winner.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents the series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Tackling Mental Health Myths2019111920191120 (R4)The National Gallery is launching a new tour with the help of young people from the McPinn Foundation challenging stereotypes in mental health. The tour focuses on works of art which confront commonly held myths. Claudia meets Lucy who was diagnosed with anorexia at 13 and Helen Fisher from the Institute of Psychiatry , Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, Kings College, to see their favourite exhibits including “An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump” by Joseph Wright 'of Derby' and “The Vision of the Blessed Gabriele” by Carlo Crivelli. A magnificent domed room which hosted daily piano concerts during the Second World War and survived the bombing demonstrates the resilience often felt by people recovering from mental ill health. The tour is available for free until 10th April 2020 via smartphones. (tiny.cc/ngmentalhealth)

Studio guest Mathijs Lucassen of the Open University discusses his latest research on LGBT teenagers and mental health.

Plus, most people are used to the idea that as we get older there is a diminishing of our abilities, but Professor Roger Kreutz of Memphis University in his book “Changing Minds” demonstrates that language is one skill that can just get better. And with the aim of improving brain health Dr Alastair Noyce and colleagues recently launched a European report which says “Time Matters”.

How art challenges mental health stereotypes plus what happens to language as we age

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

The National Gallery is launching a new tour with the help of young people from the McPinn Foundation challenging stereotypes in mental health. The tour focuses on works of art which confront commonly held myths. Claudia meets Lucy who was diagnosed with anorexia at 13 and Helen Fisher from the Institute of Psychiatry , Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, Kings College, to see their favourite exhibits including “An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump” by Joseph Wright 'of Derby' and “The Vision of the Blessed Gabriele” by Carlo Crivelli. A magnificent domed room which hosted daily piano concerts during the Second World War and survived the bombing demonstrates the resilience often felt by people recovering from mental ill health. The tour is available for free until 10th April 2020 via smartphones. (tiny.cc/ngmentalhealth)

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Taking Pride, Correct Vocabulary In Describing Mental Health, Green Exercise2016110120161102 (R4)Taking pride, correct vocabulary in describing mental health, green exercise.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Pride is one of the seven deadly sins, and we all know it comes before a fall. But in her new book Take Pride, Jess Tracy, Professor of Psychology at the University of British Columbia, argues that pride is the glue that holds societies together and that it can explain much of human success.

How often do you use words like mad, crazy and schizophrenic in every day conversation? What impact does this have on people with mental health problems? To discuss this we brought together Niall Boyce, the Editor of the Lancet Psychiatry, linguist Dr Zsofia Demjen, and Clive Buckenham, an ambassador for Time to Change.

There's plenty of evidence to suggest that exercise is good for our mental health. And there's an increasing interest in the idea of green exercise - the idea that exercising outdoors might be even better. Bur why is this? Claudia Hammond takes a bike ride with Dr Mike Rogerson who researches how exercising in different environments can influence psychological well-being.

Taking pride, correct vocabulary in describing mental health, green exercise.

Tasers, Amnesia Museum, The Dangers Of Diagnosing Donald Trump2016102520161026 (R4)Being shot by a taser hurts, but evidence says it could also affect thinking and memory.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents a series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Teenage Mental Health2015102720151028 (R4)Claudia Hammond is joined by a panel of experts to discuss teenage mental health.

As evidence accumulates that mental health problems are on the rise amongst adolescents, are services keeping up? Claudia Hammond is joined by a panel of experts to discuss teenage mental health.

Professor Shirley Reynolds, Dr Dickon Bevington, Kimberley Robinson and Sarah Hulyer discuss the pressures teenagers face and how the mental health of our adolescents is changing. They also offer thoughts on how services could be reshaped to cope with this changing demand and what parents can do to help their teenagers.

The Brain Prize Winners2017112120171122 (R4)The winners of the 2017 Brain Prize discuss their groundbreaking work on reward.

Our sense of reward motivates us and is essential for survival - influencing the hundreds of decisions we make every day about what feels good and what doesn't. Claudia Hammond meets Ray Dolan, Wolfram Schultz and Peter Dayan, winners of this year's Brain Prize, in front of an audience at London's Royal Institution, to discuss their ground-breaking work on how the brain recognises and processes reward.

The trio's discoveries have revolutionised our understanding in how our brain's reward system can motivate us, give us the best chance in life and influence the way we learn. So when the system malfunctions, it can lead to big problems such as obesity, gambling and addiction. But as understanding of this brain system continues to be unravelled Claudia Hammond hears why this happens and what can be done to control it.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

The Depressed Cake Shop, Gut Bacteria And The Mind, The Perils Of Perception2016053120160601 (R4)The Depressed Cake Shop, plus gut bacteria and the mind, and the perils of perception.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents the series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

The Everyday Effect Of Unconscious Bias2017051620170517 (R4)Claudia Hammond hosts a special edition from the Royal Institution in London.

We are all guilty of making instant unconscious decisions about other people. Could a greater awareness and a practical approach help to overcome this common hurdle at work?

Claudia Hammond hosts a special edition recorded live in front of an audience at the Royal Institution in London to discuss something that happens to all of us - when our minds make snap judgments about other people without us even realising it. It's known as unconscious bias - it doesn't mean bias in any deliberate way. The whole point is that we don't even know it's happening. How does it play out in real life?

Claudia Hammond is joined by a panel of experts to discuss what effect the bias in our decision making has on the lives of each and every one of us and what we can do about it

Taking part are business psychologist Binna Kandola; Jessica Rowson, from the Institute of Physics who's been examining why more girls don't choose to study physics at school; Emma Chapman, a Royal Astronomical Society fellow; and Louise Archer, Professor of Sociology of Education at King's College London.

The everyday results of unconscious bias.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

The Importance Of Play In Childhood2019122420191225 (R4)Psychologists’ advice is that play is beneficial for children developmentally and socially. In this Christmas episode of All in the Mind Claudia visits the Play Well exhibition at Wellcome Collection which looks at the significance of play in childhood and across society as a way of learning, expressing emotions and building empathy. Claudia’s joined at the exhibition by play experts Maia and Rachel.

Children in the UK have written letters to Father Christmas since Victorian times and Dr Sian Pooley at the University of Oxford shows how they reveal the history of play.

LEGO Professor of Play Paul Ramchandani at the University of Cambridge researches the developmental benefits for children and looks at how fathers play with their children.

And how do you get children off the computer and playing outside? Helen Dodd, Professor of Child Psychology at Reading Univesity, and Dr Pete Etchells, Reader in Psychology and Science Communication at Bath Spa University, look at the evidence and ask if a balance can be achieved.

Letters to Santa, why play matters, balancing time between video games and outside play.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

The Loneliness Experiment20180214All in the Mind: The Loneliness Experiment launches the world's largest ever survey of its kind on loneliness.
Britain is the "loneliness capital of Europe" according to the Office for National Statistics. Loneliness is likely to affect all of us at some point in our lives and is not only distressing, but is implicated in health problems such as an increased risk of heart disease.
For some people loneliness occurs because of a change in circumstances such as after bereavement, becoming unemployed or starting university. And while some tend to adapt to their new lives and the feeling of loneliness fades others are less able to shake off their pain.

The Loneliness Experiment, devised by Professor Pamela Qualter and colleagues, aims to look at causes and possible solutions to loneliness. And we want as many people as possible to fill in our survey, even if they've never felt lonely, because we want to know what stops people feeling lonely, so that more of us can feel connected. To launch the Experiment Claudia Hammond is joined by Olivia Laing, author of Lonely City, and psychology professor, Pamela Qualter, an expert in loneliness in young people.

Building on the success of 2016's Rest Test, which was the largest global survey on rest, Radio 4 will explore the topic of loneliness in a further collaboration with the Wellcome Collection.

Claudia Hammond launches the BBC Loneliness Experiment with Olivia Laing and Pam Qualter.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Building on the success of 2016's Rest Test, which was the largest global survey on rest, Radio 4 will explore the topic of loneliness in a further collaboration with the Wellcome Collection.

The Need For Possessions, Predicting Effective Use Of Cbt, Talking To Strangers2019111220191113 (R4)Why do we have a strong desire to own things? Psychologist Professor Bruce Hood, author of a new book Possessed, and artist Hannah Scott, whose installation All this Stuff is Killing Me addresses our desire to acquire, discuss why we want more than we need and the extent to which we are controlled by our possessions.

Cognitive behavioural therapy is one of the most effective treatments for depression but it only works for 45% of patients, so success is not guaranteed. Claudia hears from Filippo Queirazza of Glasgow University who's been using brain imaging techniques to predict an individual's likely success with the therapy. This could dramatically increase the odds of correct treatment for a patient.

Talking to strangers is something many feel anxious about or reluctant to do but could it be good for your state of mind? Social psychologist Gillian Sandstrom of Essex University discusses her latest research: seemingly inconsequential conversations with strangers can have a surprisingly beneficial effect on mood and well being.

Producer: Adrian Washbourne

The need for possessions, predicting effective use of CBT and talking to strangers.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Time Travelling In The Human Mind2016111520161116 (R4)Claudia Hammond and guests examine our ability to mentally time travel.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond presents a series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Torturers19950926Producer: B.

WHITNEY LOW

Next in series: 03 October 1995

Previous in series: STRESS

Broadcast history

26 Sep 1995 11:30-12:00 (RADIO 4)

01 Oct 1995 22:15-22:45 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1995-09-21.

Producer: B. WHITNEY LOW

While atrocities in Bosnia continue to shock, Professor Anthony Clare delves into the minds of torturers.

Sadistic monsters? Or can a violent world bring out the beast in us all? Producer Bruce Whitney Low Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

HELPLINE: for free and confidential

'"formation and advice, call [number removed]

While atrocities in Bosnia continue to shock, Professor Anthony Clare delves into the minds of torturers.

Sadistic monsters? Or can a violent world bring out the beast in us all? Producer Bruce Whitney Low Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

HELPLINE: for free and confidential

'"formation and advice, call [number removed]

Transient Amnesia; Mindfulness In Schools; Insiders' Guide; Autism In Somali Culture2017053020170531 (R4)Claudia Hammond's guest today is Tim Dalgleish a clinical psychologist at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit in Cambridge.

Transient global amnesia is a sudden, temporary episode of memory loss that can't be attributed to a more common neurological condition, such as epilepsy or a stroke. Following a letter from a listener who suffered an episode of this curious condition we were intrigued to find out how it is triggered and what's really occurring in the brain. Claudia Hammond spoke with Adam Zeman, Professor of Cognitive and Behavioural Neurology at Exeter University.

Is the enthusiasm for mindfulness in schools running ahead of the evidence? The skill of learning to become aware of what's going on around you and in your body and mind at a given moment has been shown to benefit people who've had recurrent episodes of depression. An increasing number of schools are holding mindfulness classes. But when it comes to the research on its benefits in school, the results are mixed. Andre Tomlin started the blog Mental Elf which examines the evidence when it comes to mental health so we got him into the All in the Mind studio to help us examine what difference mindfulness does and doesn't make in school.

The latest Insiders Guide to getting the best out of mental health services asks: how do you tell your friends and family that you are having difficulties with your mental health if this is something you've never broached with them before? We hear from Stephen Buckley, Head of Information at Mind, Lisa Rodriguez who has had mental health issues herself and has long experience of managing mental health services, psychiatrist Sri Kalidindi and GP Daniel Dietch.

Autism spectrum disorder is a lifelong condition which can affect how a child or adult communicates with and relates to other people. Scientists are still trying to understand the causes and why symptoms can range from the mild to the severe. The Somali language doesn't have a word for autism, so when Nura Aabe's son Zak was diagnosed with autism at the age of two and a half she was at a loss to explain the diagnosis to others in the Somali community in the UK. As she explains to Claudia Hammond she was inspired by her experience to write a play called Yusuf Can't Talk

Producer: Adrian Washbourne.

Transient amnesia; mindfulness in schools; Insiders' Guide; autism in Somali culture.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond explores the worlds of psychology, neuroscience and mental health.

Producer: Adrian Washbourne.

Trigger Warnings, Myths About Van Gogh's Mental Health2019052120190522 (R4)Universities globally are increasingly being asked by students for trigger warnings on course material that could cause distress and the universities are responding. But what is the evidence they work? All in the Mind talks to Mevagh Sanson, one of the psychologists who has done the first empirical research to find out. The conclusion is – they don’t. She talks to Claudia about the research and its implications. Also, there are many myths about Vincent van Gogh and his mental health. His creative genius has been linked to his struggles with his mental health but as curator at Tate Britain, Carol Jacobi explains he only experienced episodes of mental illness in the last 18 months of his life and far from being a symptom of his illness, he painted in order to stay well. Claudia and Carol discuss why some of the myths about Vincent Van Gogh, his incredible genius and his mental health still persist today. Mathijs Lucassen from the Open University joins Claudia to discuss the government's select committee enquiry into reality TV.

Trigger warnings, Myths about Van Gogh's mental health, Multi-tasking

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

0119940413NEWIn the first of the new series, Professor Anthony Clare looks at out-of-body experiences.
011990112119920415
0119920414Professor

Anthony Clare presents a new series of the magazine programme devoted to illuminating the workings of the mind, normal and abnormal, as reflected through events, books, films and plays.

And throughout the new series, the programme will feature a user's guide to emotions.

Producer Tony Phillips

0119930921Professor Anthony Clare returns with the magazine devoted to matters of the mind.

Today, the first of three features on how well the community cares for those with mental illness.

Producer Paul Kobrak

0119940412As the programme that travels the highways and byways of the mind returns, Professor Anthony Clare explores the phenomena of out-of-body and near-death experiences.

Producer Paul Kobrak

0119940920In the first of another series of the programmes that travel the highways and byways of the mind, Professor Anthony Clare explores faith healing.

Producer Paul Kobrak.

Rptd tomorrow 7.45pm

Producer Paul Kobrak.

Rptd tomorrow 7.45pm

0120020227A new series of the programme that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

Dr Raj Persaud looks at schizophrenia, a condition which will affect one in 100 people during their lifetime, and hears from sufferers, their families and those who treat them, debunking the myths along the way. Producer Marya Burgess. Phone the BBC Action Line [number removed].

012004012720040128New series Dr Raj Persaud returns for another series of the programme dedicated to new finds about the wonders and mysteries of the mind. Producer Tony Phillips Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Dr Raj Persaud returns for another series of the programme dedicated to new discoveries about the wonders and mysteries of the mind. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

012004110220041103CRAVING SUNLIGHT - On Sunday the clocks went back an hour and we gained an hour of SLEEP but how does this change affect us? Do we feel better or worse and do our inner biological clocks get confused? Raj Persaud talks to Russell Foster, Professor of Molecular Neuroscience at Imperial College, and author of Rhythms of Life about the rhythms embedded in our genes and how they are affected by the seasons.

CAPSULE LIFE - Astronauts, submariners and even arctic explorers live in fairly extreme conditions.

It's often described as capsule living because of its lack of space and privacy.

However one day this kind of experience might be available to all of us, but are we ready for it? Raj Persaud joins listener Jeff Tall, a former submarine commander during the Gulf war, aboard the HMS Alliance, Professor Elizabeth Morris, Glaciologist, and Dr.

David F.

Dinges, team leader for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, to discuss the preparations for, and psychological effect of, living in a confined space.

MENTAL HEALTH AWARDS - Last month All in the Mind won a Mental Health Media Award for our series on the particular problems facing black people in the psychiatric system.

Trevor Phillips, Chair of the Commission for Racial Equality,joins Raj Persaud to discuss what still needs to be done.

MALINGERING - Malingering is not a medical or psychiatric disorder but, from a military point of view, it is punishable under the Articles of War.

However it is usually difficult, if not impossible, to provide unassailable proof of guilt and nowadays it's used mainly in an attempt to de-fraud insurance companies.

Peter Halligan, Professor of Neuropsychology at Cardiff University, explains to Raj Persaud how neuropsychologists try to detect a malingerer.

New series 1/6. The programme dedicated to the mysterious workings of our brains returns with Dr Raj Persaud as presenter. He examines the latest research in this field, bringing together experts from the fields of psychiatry, psychology and mental health. Producer Maire Devine Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

1/6. The programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of our brains returns with Dr Raj Persaud as presenter. Repeated from yesterday 9pm

012005022220050223Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research in psychology, psychiatry and mental health. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research in psychology, psychiatry and mental health. [Rpt of Tue 9.00pm]

New series 1/10. The programme dedicated to the mysterious workings of the brain. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and menta! heaith. Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow 4.30pm

0120050726200507271/6. In the programme dedicated to the wonderful workings of the brain, Dr Raj Persaud discusses the psychology Of negotiation. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

Professor Raj Persaud discusses the psychology of negotiation.

Whether it be industrial disputes or political deadlock, what's the knack to kick starting discussion and keeping up momentum when there are entrenched positions on both sides?

Professor Raj Persaud discusses the psychology of negotiation. Whether it be industrial disputes or political deadlock, what's the knack to kick starting discussion and keeping up momentum when there are entrenched positions on both sides?

New series 1/6. In the programme dedicated to the mysterious workings of the brain, Dr Raj Persaud discusses the psychology of negotiation. Whether it be industrial disputes or political deadlock, what's the knack to kick-starting discussion and keeping up momentum when there are entrenched positions on both sides? Producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

012005112920051130Professor Raj Persaud returns for another series of All in the Mind and talks to Italian film director Bernardo Bertolucci about how his 36 years of psychoanalysis have imbued his movies and put Freud in his lens.

He explains the motivation behind some of his most well known scenes from The Last Emperor and Little Buddha, and confesses to the psychological technique he used to provoke Marlon Brando's tears in the Last Tango in Paris.

New series 1/6. Professor Raj Persaud returns for another series of the programme dedicated to the wonderful and mysterious workings of our brains.

Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

1/6. Professor Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health. Repeat of yesterday at 9pm

012006062720060628The series returns to examine the everyday psychological challenges we face and to delve deeper into how our brains work.

With Claudia Hammond

New series1/5. The series returns to examine everyday psychological challenges and to delve deeper into how our brains work. Presenter Claudia Hammond sets out on a journey to find out if it is "all in the mind". Producer Helen Sharp Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm FM

1/5. Presenter Claudia Hammond examines everyday psychological challenges and delves deeper into how our brains work in a bid to find out if it is "all in the mind". Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

012007040320070404New series 1/5. Raj Persaud reveals the latest discoveries in the worlds of psychology and psychiatry - about how the brain works, what governs the choices we make and the way we behave. Producer Fiona Hill.

Dr Raj Persaud presents the series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind and examining the arguments surrounding mental health.

1/5. Raj Persaud shares his interest in the fascinating way that decisions and choices are made in the human mind. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

012007111320071114Dr Raj Persaud presents the series exploring current developments in psychology and psychiatry.

New series 1/6. Raj Persaud looks at the latest research and developments in the worlds of psychology and psychiatry.

Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 430pm

012008060320080604Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring current developments in psychology and psychiatry.

She takes a virtual reality ride on the London Underground designed to test paranoid thoughts in the general population.

New series 1/8. Claudia Hammond takes a virtual reality ride on the London

Underground, designed to test paranoid thoughts in the general population.

Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

012008110420081105Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring current developments in psychology and psychiatry.

She talks to the new president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Prof Dinesh Bhugra, about the stigma suffered by those with mental distress, the new Mental Health Act and why he believes so many acute in-patient wards are not fit for purpose.

New series 1/8. Professor Dinesh Bhugra , the new president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, discusses the stigma suffered by those with mental illnesses, and assesses the quality of the country's in-patient wards. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

012009052620090527Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring the latest scientific research about the brain and the mind.

More than a third of Britons say that they believe in ghosts and nearly as many claim to have actually seen one.

Could these paranormal experiences be due to naturally-occurring electro-magnetic fields and low level sound, which make people feel that something 'strange' is happening? Claudia hears from scientists who actually built their own 'haunted room' in an attempt to show that they could induce a haunting by manipulating energy fields and sound.

More than a third of Britons say that they believe in ghosts and nearly as many claim to have actually seen one. Could these paranormal experiences be due to naturally-occurring electro-magnetic fields and low level sound, which make people feel that something 'strange' is happening? Claudia hears from scientists who actually built their own 'haunted room' in an attempt to show that they could induce a haunting by manipulating energy fields and sound.

The scientists who tried to induce a haunting by manipulating energy fields and sound.

New series. 1/8. Can ghostly experiences be explained by electromagnetic fields?

Claudia Hammond finds out from scientists who have constructed a "haunted room". Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

0120091103200911041/8. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring the latest scientific research about the brain and the mind.

Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring the latest scientific research.

New series. 1/8. Claudia Hammond focuses on the brain, the mind and human behaviour as well as the wider mental health agenda. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

012010052520100526In a new seres of All In the Mind, Claudia Hammond gathers together users of mental health services as well as key professionals in the field, to discuss the future of mental health care.

With a new government installed, how will ministers balance demands for improved access to mental health services with demands for budget cuts to balance the books.

After the election, what's the future for mental health care?

In a new seres of All In the Mind, Claudia Hammond gathers together users of mental health services as well as key professionals in the field, to discuss the future of mental health care. With a new government installed, how will ministers balance demands for improved access to mental health services with demands for budget cuts to balance the books.

012010110220101103The mental health of the UK's armed forces has been analysed before they go to war and then, tested again when they return home.

But until now, there's been scant evidence about the psychological health of the Army, Air Force and the Navy while they're actively deployed in a war zone.

Now Claudia Hammond reports on the first-ever UK study of military personnel in a theatre of war, in Iraq, which guages levels of psychological distress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and general health.

One of the report's authors, Professor Simon Wessely, Director of the King's Centre for Military Health Research, describes the mental health lessons being learned from the front line.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

Battlefield Mental Health: Claudia Hammond on the UK's first study from the Iraq war zone.

The mental health of the UK's armed forces has been analysed before they go to war and then, tested again when they return home. But until now, there's been scant evidence about the psychological health of the Army, Air Force and the Navy while they're actively deployed in a war zone.

012011041920110420Presenter Claudia Hammond starts a new series of All in the Mind by joining mothers and babies at a travelling, high-tech language lab in a Children's Centre in London's East End.

The testing session is just one of many to be carried out over the next two years in the communities of two of London's most deprived boroughs, Tower Hamlets and Newham.

Parents and babies are being invited to participate in a novel psychological study to investigate whether researchers can pick up very early indicators of later language or attention problems in infants as young as 6 months.

The babies will be retested and assessed again when they are two years old.

The travelling 'babylab' is a high tech computer screen, set up in local children's centres.

The baby sits in front of it and is played various videos and sounds aimed at testing how sensitive he or she is to speech and other aspects of their environments.

The computer screen also contains a camera and eye movement tracker, so as well as testing the infants it also records all their responses to what they are seeing and hearing.

For example, at 6 months old, babies should be very interested in looking at faces and mouths when people are speaking, learning which mouth shapes match particular speech sounds.

At this age they are likely to know the difference between the look of a mouth saying 'ba' as opposed to 'ga'.

This is part of their earliest language development.

If they are not able to make these and other discriminations, it could be a sign of language and other developmental problems to come.

This seems to be the case from studies of babies in formal university laboratories.

But this new project aims to find out whether reliable predictors of language and learning difficulties can be picked up with testing equipment out in the real world.

And in particular in communities at the lower end of the socio-economic scale.

Children from this section of society are at greater risk of language and other developmental problems than children in better-off areas.

The community testing sessions are also aimed at increasing parents' understanding and appreciation of how their babies learn about language and the world around them, and demonstrating just how clever their infants are - even at 6 months.

The research project is run by the University of East London and Birbeck College London.

The psychologists hope their findings will in the future allow the identification of individual children with potential problems at the youngest age possible.

The idea is that the earliest that weaknesses are identified, the greater the chance the children can be helped to catch up in the development of their communication and social skills.

Claudia Hammond joins mothers and babies at a portable language lab in London's East End.

Parents and babies are being invited to participate in a novel psychological study to investigate whether researchers can pick up very early indicators of later language or attention problems in infants as young as 6 months. The babies will be retested and assessed again when they are two years old.

The travelling 'babylab' is a high tech computer screen, set up in local children's centres. The baby sits in front of it and is played various videos and sounds aimed at testing how sensitive he or she is to speech and other aspects of their environments. The computer screen also contains a camera and eye movement tracker, so as well as testing the infants it also records all their responses to what they are seeing and hearing.

For example, at 6 months old, babies should be very interested in looking at faces and mouths when people are speaking, learning which mouth shapes match particular speech sounds. At this age they are likely to know the difference between the look of a mouth saying 'ba' as opposed to 'ga'. This is part of their earliest language development. If they are not able to make these and other discriminations, it could be a sign of language and other developmental problems to come.

This seems to be the case from studies of babies in formal university laboratories. But this new project aims to find out whether reliable predictors of language and learning difficulties can be picked up with testing equipment out in the real world. And in particular in communities at the lower end of the socio-economic scale. Children from this section of society are at greater risk of language and other developmental problems than children in better-off areas.

The research project is run by the University of East London and Birbeck College London. The psychologists hope their findings will in the future allow the identification of individual children with potential problems at the youngest age possible. The idea is that the earliest that weaknesses are identified, the greater the chance the children can be helped to catch up in the development of their communication and social skills.

This seems to be the case from studies of babies in formal university laboratories. But this new project aims to find out whether reliable predictors of language and learning difficulties can be picked up with testing equipment out in the real world. And in particular in communities at the lower end of the socio-economic scale. ChilAll In The Mind

012011100420111005US marine Jess Goodell on the psychological impact of retrieving soldiers' bodies in Iraq.

Claudia Hammond talks to Jess Goodell about her role in Mortuary Affairs in the US Marines.

Jess's job was to recover the remains of soldiers in Iraq so they could be returned to the US.

She talks about the psychological impact of retrieving bodies often in the aftermath of Improvised Explosive Devices.

In her training she was told "PTSD is real - like 'flu." In her insightful account of one aspect of the Iraq conflict she explains how she developed PTSD and how she dealt with the nightmares and depression on returning home to civilian life.

Also in the programme, there is a higher rate of premature death in people with mental disorders.

How much are the drugs for some mental illnesses contributing to their risk of disease? Anti psychotic drugs can increase the risk of developing conditions like heart disease and diabetes in people taking them.

Claudia talks to psychiatrist, Dr Alex Mitchell about a new review which looks at the latest evidence on the world wide rates of metabolic abnormalities in people with schizophrenia taking anti-psychotic drugs.

And are psychiatrists doing enough to monitor these potentially health threatening side effects?

Claudia Hammond talks to Jess Goodell about her role in Mortuary Affairs in the US Marines. Jess's job was to recover the remains of soldiers in Iraq so they could be returned to the US. She talks about the psychological impact of retrieving bodies often in the aftermath of Improvised Explosive Devices. In her training she was told "PTSD is real - like 'flu." In her insightful account of one aspect of the Iraq conflict she explains how she developed PTSD and how she dealt with the nightmares and depression on returning home to civilian life.

Also in the programme, there is a higher rate of premature death in people with mental disorders. How much are the drugs for some mental illnesses contributing to their risk of disease? Anti psychotic drugs can increase the risk of developing conditions like heart disease and diabetes in people taking them. Claudia talks to psychiatrist, Dr Alex Mitchell about a new review which looks at the latest evidence on the world wide rates of metabolic abnormalities in people with schizophrenia taking anti-psychotic drugs. And are psychiatrists doing enough to monitor these potentially health threatening side effects?

012012050120120502In the first of a new series Claudia Hammond investigates what the government's health reforms could mean for mental health services.

What could the government's health reforms mean for mental health services?

012012103020121031Claudia Hammond reports on 60 years of the Anna Freud Centre and how it uses neuroscience.

In the first of a new series, presenter Claudia Hammond reports on the latest developments in neuroscience, mental health and psychology.

Anna Freud was the daughter of Sigmund Freud who pioneered child psychotherapy. She set up the Hampstead War nurseries during the Second World War, which became the Anna Freud Centre after her death in 1982. The Centre is now celebrating its 60th anniversary and Claudia investigates how it has changed and asks what the eponymous founder would think of its many new projects, including neuroscience and teenage brains.

012013043020130501Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Claudia Hammond presents a series that explores the limits and potential of the human mind.

012014010720140108Starting a new business when you have got a serious mental health problem.

0125th Anniversary - 12013111220131113Claudia explores how attitudes to mental health have changed over the last 25 years.

The first ever edition of All in the Mind was broadcast in October 1988. For its 25th anniversary, Claudia Hammond is joined by community psychiatrist, Graham Thornicroft, Paul Farmer, chief executive of Mind and by the artist, Bobby Baker to look back at archive editions of the programme and explore how attitudes to mental health have changed in the last 25 years. Have campaigns to raise awareness of mental health been successful and how far is there still to go? More and more public figures are talking about their own experience of mental illness. Even last year MPs made history by opening up to the House of Commons about their own mental health problems. How much do these kinds of conversations help change attitudes?

The first ever edition of All in the Mind was broadcast in October 1988. For its 25th anniversary, Claudia Hammond and guests look back at archive editions of the programme to explore how attitudes to mental health have changed over the last 25 years. Have campaigns to raise awareness of mental health been successful and how far is there still to go? How much does public figures talking about their own experience of mental illness help change attitudes?

01Electro Convulsive Therapy - Ect2003070820030709Dr Raj Persaud will be takes issue with the way his profession is represented in Hollywood.

He also asks why Electro Convulsive Therapy is controversial.

In the first of a new series that highlights issues from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health, Dr Raj Persaud examines the way psychiatry is represented - or misrepresented - in Hollywood. Producer Katy Hickman Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm Are TV psychiatrists all loopy?: page 31

In the first of a new series that highlights issues from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health, Dr Raj Persaud examines the way psychiatry is represented -or misrepresented - in Hollywood. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

01Ndas, The Listening Place2019052819930922
20190529 (R4)
New research shows that we are more envious of someone else's covetable experience before it happens than after it has passed.

Non-Disclosure Agreements can be used to prevent employees discussing allegations of misbehaviour in the workplace with friends, family and even a therapist. But what is the impact of this silence? Claudia Hammond talks to psychologist Nina Burrowes about the effect of not talking about abusive behaviour and Zelda Perkins shares her experience of signing an NDA and the impact it had on her mental health.

Leonardo da Vinci produced some masterpieces but historical accounts show he struggled to complete his works - did da Vinci have ADHD?

Claudia visits The Listening Place – a small charity that provides support for anyone who, for whatever reason feels that life is no longer worth living. Visitors are able to speak to the same trained volunteer for an hour every fortnight. Claudia talks to Jon who first visited the charity 18 months ago when he was in desperate need of support. She meets volunteer Lucy who supported Jon during his time at The Listening Place.

Also, new research that suggests that even those whose lives don't revolve around logic and numbers can have an appreciation for mathematical "beauty".

The studio guest is Professor Catherine Loveday from the University of Westminster.

Producer: Caroline Steel

The impact signing NDAs can have on mental health and The Listening Place

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Non-Disclosure Agreements can be used to prevent employees discussing allegations of misbehaviour in the workplace with friends, family and even a therapist. But what is the impact of this silence? All in the Mind talks to psychologist Nina Burrowes about the effect of not talking about abusive behaviour and Zelda Perkins shares her experience of signing an NDA and the impact it had on her mental health. Also, Claudia visits The Listening Place – a small charity that provides support for anyone who, for whatever reason feels like life is no longer worth living. Visitors are able to speak to the same trained volunteer for an hour every fortnight. Claudia talks to Jon who first visited The Listening Place 18 months ago when he was in desperate need of support. Volunteer Lucy supported Jon during his time at The Listening Place, we hear about her experience.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

01New Addictions2004070620040707In this programme he looks into new addictions like internet sex addiction and shopping addiction.

Are we too quick to label things as addictions when it might be merely a failure of will? He also heads off to London Zoo with a woman who's petrified of spiders and insects.

Can their programme cure her?

r New series 1/5. Dr Raj Persaud returns for another run of the programme dedicated to new discoveries about the wonders and the mysteries of the mind.

He looks into new addictions, such as internet sex and shopping, and asks if we are too quick to label such things as addictions when they may well be due to a lack of willpower. He also heads off to London Zoo with a woman who's petrified of spiders and insects. Can their programme cure her?

Producer Angharad Law Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Dr Raj Persaud assesses family life: page 18

1/5. Dr Raj Persaud looks into new addictions like internet sex and shopping, and asks if we are too quick to label such things as addictions when they may be due to a lack of willpower. He also heads off to London Zoo with a woman who's petrified of spiders and insects. Can their programme cure her? See the choice on pagel22. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

01Reality Tv2006121920061220New series 1/6. Reality TV is hugely popular, but what happens after the cameras have gone and families' lives have been exposed to millions? Claudia Hammond hears from children who have been troubled by the way they were portrayed and investigates the ethics and the impact of involving young people in reality TV. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

A hugely popular sector of the broadcasting industry, but what is the emotional impact on children after the cameras have gone and their families' lives have been exposed to millions of people?

Claudia Hammond hears from children who have been greatly troubled by the way they were portrayed, and investigates the ethics and the impact of involving young people in reality TV.

Reality TV is a hugely popular sector of the broadcasting industry, but what is the emotional impact on children after the cameras have gone and their families' lives have been exposed to millions of people?

1/6. Reality TV is hugely popular, but what happens after the cameras have gone? Claudia Hammond hears from children who have been troubled by the way they were portrayed and looks at the ethics and the impact of involving young people in reality TV. Repeated from yesterday

01Suggested Memories2003101420031015Dr Raj Persaud grapples with memory.

How do we know what we remember is what really happened? New research in the USA shows that people presented with a fake picture of Bugs Bunny in Disneyland will distinctly remember shaking its hand when they were a child, despite the fact the character doesn't belong in Disney.

But just how far can memories be suggested and what impact does childhood trauma have on our brains?

New series Dr Raj Persaud grapples with memory and tries to answer the mystery of recollection. How do we know what we remember is what really happened? Just how far can memories be suggested and what impact does childhood trauma have on our brains?

Producer Katy Hickman Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Dr Raj Persaud grapples with memory and tries to answerthe mystery of recollection. How do we know what we remember is what really happened? Just how far can memories be suggested and what impact does childhood trauma have on our brains? Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

01The Feel Good Garden At Chelsea Flower Show, All In The Mind Awards, Avoiding Exam Stress2018052219940921
20180523 (R4)
Professor Anthony Clare explores faith healing.

Repeated from yesterday 11.30am

Claudia visits the RHS Feel Good Garden at the Chelsea Flower Show.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond visits the RHS Feel Good Garden at the Chelsea Flower Show. The garden is part of the 70th birthday celebrations for the NHS and was proposed by occupational therapist Andrew Kingston and designed by Matt Keightley. It highlights the benefits of gardening for mental health. After the show the garden will be replanted in the grounds of a hospital in Archway.

Michael Scullin is Director of the Sleep, Neuroscience and Cognition Lab at Baylor University in the US and he has a useful suggestion to alleviate exam stress.

All in the Mind awards, this week the finalist is Fiona Sadler a pastoral support advisor at a primary school in Norfolk. Fiona was nominated by Stephanie because of all the support she has shown over the years. They first became friends when Fiona found a note in Steph's son's school bag.

Post Olympic Blues. Dr Mathijs Luccassen from the Open University reports on the difficulties athletes face when they return from the Olympics.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

01What's Happened To Our Mental Health In 2020; Tools To Get Through The Winter2020110320201104 (R4)More than two-thirds of adults in the UK have reported feeling somewhat or very worried about the effect COVID-19 is having on their life. The most common issues affecting wellbeing are worry about the future, feeling stressed or anxious and feeling bored. So what does the data say about what has really happened to the nation’s mental health during the pandemic? Claudia Hammond hears about the short and potential long term impacts, possible ways to address the effects, and examines the psychological tools to get through an uncertain winter from so called Awe-Walks to building resilience through humour.

The short and longterm impact of the pandemic on the nation's mental health

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

More than two-thirds of adults in the UK have reported feeling somewhat or very worried about the effect Covid-19 is having on their life. The most common issues affecting well being are worry about the future, feeling stressed or anxious and feeling bored. So what does the data say about what has really happened to the nation’s mental health during the pandemic? Claudia Hammond hears about the short and potential long term impacts, possible ways to address the effects, and examines the psychological tools to get through an uncertain winter from so called Awe-Walks to the technique of Decentering.

With contributions from:
Tim Dalgleish, Professor of Clinical Psychology University of Cambridge
Til Wykes, Professor of Clinical Psychology and Rehabilitation at King's College London.
Daisy Fancourt, Associate Professor of Psychobiology & Epidemiology University College London
Virginia Sturm, UCSF Centre for Psychophysiology and Behaviour
James Downs, mental health and eating disorders activist

Producer Adrian Washbourne

The short and long term impact of the pandemic on the nation's mental health

0219920421Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine programme devoted to matters of the mind.

Producer Tony Phillips

0219930928This week Professor Anthony Clare talks to Ruth Rendell about the use of Psychology in her novels. Plus a special report on the fear of performing. Producer Nadine Grieve
0219940419Professor Anthony Clare presents a special investigation into the phenomenon of children who are brutal and violent.

Producer Paul Kobrak

0219940921Professor Anthony Clare explores faith healing.

Repeated from yesterday 11.30am

0219940927In the programme that reaches parts of the mind that other programmes do not reach, Professor Anthony Clare asks whether the Government's latest plans for the care of psychiatric patients in the community will actually help, or merely take away more rights. Producer Feisal Ali

Repeated tomorrow at 7.45pm

In the programme that reaches parts of the mind that other programmes do not reach, Professor Anthony Clare asks whether the Government's latest plans for the care of psychiatric patients in the community will actually help, or merely take away more rights. Producer Feisal Ali

Repeated tomorrow at 7.45pm

0220020306DrRaj Persaud investigates narrative therapy, in which individuals are encouraged to make sense of a problem byfinding new ways oftalking about their life stories.

Producer Marya Burgess Phone the BBC Action Line [number removed]

022004020320040204Dr Raj Persaud continues to probe the wonders and mysteries of the mind.

Producer Angharad Law Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Dr Raj Persaud probes the wonders and mysteries of the mind. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

022005030120050302Dr Raj Persaud explores the pressing issues in psychology and psychiatry. [Rpt of Tue 9.00pm]

2/10. The programme dedicated to the mysterious workings of the brain. With Dr Raj Persaud.

Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

2/10. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

022005080220050803New research which may help in the treatment of people involved in traumatic events, reducing their flashbacks.

Professor Raj Persaud presents the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of our brains. He looks at new research which may help in the treatment of people involved in traumatic events, reducing their flashbacks.

Professor Raj Persaud presents the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of our brains. He looks at new research which may help in the treatment of people involved in traumatic events, reducing their flashbacks. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

2/6. In the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of the brain, Dr Raj Persaud looks at new research that may help in the treatment of people involved in traumatic events, reducing their flashbacks. Producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

2/6 Dr Raj Persaud looks at new research that may help in the treatment of people with post-traumatic stress disorder. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

022005120620051207The first therapeutic community was set up during the Second World War.

Since then they have flourished around the country, both as residential homes and as centres in hospitals and prisons.

But just how are they run? And why are so many now closing?

Professor Raj Persaud visits a community house founded by R D Laing which is now being shut down, and discusses the future of therapeutic communities.

The first therapeutic community was set up during the Second World War. Since then they have flourished around the country, both as residential homes and as centres in hospitals and prisons. But just how are they run? And why are so many now closing?

2/6. Professor Raj Persaud returns for another series of the programme dedicated to the wonderful workings of our brains. Producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

2/6. Professor Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health. Repeat of yesterday at 9pm

022006070420060705Claudia Hammond examines the everyday psychological challenges we face and delves into how the human brain works. [Rpt of Tue 9.00pm]

Claudia Hammond examines everyday psychological challenges we face and delves into how the human brain works.

Claudia Hammond examines everyday psychological challenges we face and delves into how the human brain works. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

2/5. Claudia Hammond examines everyday psychological challenges and delves deeper into how our brains work. Producer Helen Sharp Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

2/5. Claudia Hammond examines everyday psychological challenges and delves deeper into how our brains work in a bid to find out if it is "all in the mind". Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

022006122620061227Claudia Hammond considers whether our brains have an innate colour sense or whether we learn how to describe which colour is which as we learn to speak.

2/6. Claudia Hammond considers whether all human brains have an innate colour sense or whether we learn which colour is which as we learn to speak. Producer Fiona Hill

0220070410200704112/5. Raj Persaud discusses what impact the new Mental Capacity Act will have on Alzheimer's patients who are planning for the moment when they are no longer able to make decisions for themselves. Producer Louise Corley Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Dr Raj Persaud presents the series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind and examining the arguments surrounding mental health. This edition features a woman who has contracted Alzheimer's Disease at the age of 52. She and her husband talk about their plans for the moment when she won't be able to make decisions for herself.

Rptd from yesterday at 9pm

0220071120200711212/6. Dr Raj Persaud looks at developments in the worlds of psychiatry and psychology. Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm
022008061020080611Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring current developments in psychology and psychiatry.

She follows Janey Antoniou, a woman who hears constant voices in her head, as she teaches ambulance crews a greater understanding about caring for people who suffer from schizophrenia.

2/8. Claudia Hammond meets

Janey Antoniou who hears voices constantly in her head. She has schizophrenia and has learned ways of coping with the condition. Now she teaches police and ambulance crews about how to deal with greater sensitivity with people who have the illness. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

022008111120081112Claudia Hammond finds out about the practical and emotional support that is being offered to families of children in intensive care.

10,000 children are admitted to intensive care every year for life-saving treatment, and some of them are left with traumatic flashbacks. Claudia hears about new research on the benefits of keeping diaries for such children and of having a shoulder to cry on for parents.

2/8. Practical and emotional support is now offered to families of children in intensive care in a London hospital. Claudia Hammond finds out about how psychologists are helping families to cope.

Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

0220090527
022009060220090603Claudia Hammond speaks to the UK's first Mental Health Liaison Officer, Richard Harwin, to see how he can help those with mental health problems to have better experiences when dealing with the police.

People with mental health problems are often reluctant to report crimes.

Richard Harwin discusses examples of vulnerable people having their houses taken over by drug dealers.

They are often bullied and intimidated into not reporting to the police, or fear they may be held accountable for the crimes taking place in their homes.

Richard's job is to work with the police and those with mental health problems in the Hackney area of London.

He was a psychiatric nurse before becoming a police officer and he trains other officers about mental illness.

People with mental health problems are often reluctant to report crimes. Richard Harwin discusses examples of vulnerable people having their houses taken over by drug dealers. They are often bullied and intimidated into not reporting to the police, or fear they may be held accountable for the crimes taking place in their homes.

Richard's job is to work with the police and those with mental health problems in the Hackney area of London. He was a psychiatric nurse before becoming a police officer and he trains other officers about mental illness.

Claudia Hammond speaks to the UK's first Mental Health Liaison Officer.

2/8. How can we help those with mental health problems have better experiences when dealing with the police?

Claudia Hammond speaks to the UK's first mental health liaison officer to see how he can help. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

0220091110200911112/8. Psychologist Claudia Hammond investigates the workings of the brain, the mind and the wider mental health agenda. Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm
022010060120100602Mystery shoppers are commonly used to test services in shops, hotels and airlines.

But as All In The Mind discovers, they're now also widely used in the health service, including mental health services.

Claudia Hammond hears about a Dutch mystery shopping" project which involved pseudo patients with fake identities and invented case histories being sent to a closed psychiatric ward for several days in order to report back on the standards of service.

All In The Mind investigates the extent of mystery shopping in psychiatric services here in the UK, and asks what the ethical implications are of people pretending to be mentally ill.

The hit movie, Rain Man, is based on Kim Peek, a Savant who memorised twelve thousand books.

Kim's bottomless factual recall led to him being described as "a living Google".

But when he was a child, his parents were advised to put him into an institution.

Professor Darold Treffert has been studying Savant Syndrome for the past fifty years, and he talks to Claudia Hammond about this rare and remarkable condition, which results in astounding ability co-existing alongside debilitating disability within the same person.

Investigating mystery shoppers in mental health services.

Mystery shoppers are commonly used to test services in shops, hotels and airlines. But as All In The Mind discovers, they're now also widely used in the health service, including mental health services.

Claudia Hammond hears about a Dutch "mystery shopping" project which involved pseudo patients with fake identities and invented case histories being sent to a closed psychiatric ward for several days in order to report back on the standards of service.

The hit movie, Rain Man, is based on Kim Peek, a Savant who memorised twelve thousand books. Kim's bottomless factual recall led to him being described as "a living Google". But when he was a child, his parents were advised to put him into an institution.

022010110220101103Battlefield Mental Health: Claudia Hammond on the UK's first study from the Iraq war zone.

022010110920101110Excessive worry can ruin lives, Claudia Hammond looks at some simple techniques that can break this debilitating condition.

And a new study offers hope for keeping young offenders out of prison.

Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald.

A new study offers hope for keeping young offenders out of prison.

Claudia Hammond reports

Excessive worry can ruin lives, Claudia Hammond looks at some simple techniques that can break this debilitating condition. And a new study offers hope for keeping young offenders out of prison.

A new study offers hope for keeping young offenders out of prison. Claudia Hammond reports

022011042620110427American neuroscientist James Fallon talks to Claudia Hammond about his own personal journey of discovery about the nature of criminal brain.

With his expertise in neuroanatomy, James Fallon was often asked to analyse and interpret the brain scans of convicted murderers in legal cases.

Neuroimaging studies have shown that psychopaths often have differences in brain structure and functioning to normal people.

Knowing his professional interest in the criminal brain, his mother then told Professor Fallon about a dark ancestral streak in his father's side of the family.

Genealogical detective work uncovered 8 murderers and alleged killers in one branch of the family tree - including Lizzy Borden (who was accused but acquitted of the axe-murders of her father and step mother).

The opportunity to have his own brain scanned then came up.

James Fallon was unnerved to discover that aspects of his own brain functioning had marked similarities to those of psychopath he had studied.

Adding to the alarm were results of some subsequent genetic tests.

A number of genes have been linked to aggressive and violent behaviour.

One of these has been nick-named the 'warrior' gene.

The gene makes a brain chemical called monoamine oxidase A, MAO-A.

There are different versions or 'flavours' of this gene.

James Fallon turned out to have the version which has been most strongly correlated with violent behaviour in some studies.

Professor Fallon says that in a sense, he's a born killer.

However, Professor Fallon's discoveries about himself have had a profound effect on his thinking about the roots of psychopathy and violent behaviour.

He used to be a strong advocate of the power of genes on human nature and behaviour.

Now, he's convinced that his childhood and upbringing made all the difference in who he is.

Claudia Hammond talks to a neuroscientist who has the brain and genes of a psychopath.

American neuroscientist James Fallon talks to Claudia Hammond about his own personal journey of discovery about the nature of criminal brain. With his expertise in neuroanatomy, James Fallon was often asked to analyse and interpret the brain scans of convicted murderers in legal cases. Neuroimaging studies have shown that psychopaths often have differences in brain structure and functioning to normal people.

Knowing his professional interest in the criminal brain, his mother then told Professor Fallon about a dark ancestral streak in his father's side of the family. Genealogical detective work uncovered 8 murderers and alleged killers in one branch of the family tree - including Lizzy Borden (who was accused but acquitted of the axe-murders of her father and step mother).

The opportunity to have his own brain scanned then came up. James Fallon was unnerved to discover that aspects of his own brain functioning had marked similarities to those of psychopath he had studied. Adding to the alarm were results of some subsequent genetic tests.

A number of genes have been linked to aggressive and violent behaviour. One of these has been nick-named the 'warrior' gene. The gene makes a brain chemical called monoamine oxidase A, MAO-A. There are different versions or 'flavours' of this gene. James Fallon turned out to have the version which has been most strongly correlated with violent behaviour in some studies. Professor Fallon says that in a sense, he's a born killer.

However, Professor Fallon's discoveries about himself have had a profound effect on his thinking about the roots of psychopathy and violent behaviour. He used to be a strong advocate of the power of genes on human nature and behaviour. Now, he's convinced that his childhood and upbringing made all the difference in who he is.

022012110620121107Can psychosis be treated with talking therapy alone? - news from a radical new trial.

Anti-psychotic medication has long been seen as the first line of treatment for psychosis. In fact, prescriptions are increasing in the UK and around the world. But there's criticism that the effectiveness of these drugs has been over-estimated, and the serious side effects, underestimated. Now, in the first trial of its kind in the world, treating psychosis using talking therapies alone, is being measured and analysed.

It is the first time psychological treatment, in the absence of medication, has been put to the test, and the results of this experiment have the potential to transform the treatment options for the many people who have diagnoses of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Tony Morrison, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Manchester, is leading the research along with colleagues in the North East of England. He tells Claudia Hammond that patients should be given more choice about the treatments they're offered for psychosis, instead of medication always being the default option.

And trial participants, Natalie and Steve, describe their experience of psychosis and the treatments that helped them to recover and stay well.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

022014011420140115

Starting a new business when you have got a serious mental health problem.

022018052919930929Professor Anthony Clare talks to novelist Ruth Rendell. Plus: the fear of performing.
0201/05/20122012050820120502What could the government's health reforms mean for mental health services?
0208/05/20122012050820120509Claudia visits HMP Grendon, the only prison in Europe that runs as a therapeutic community

Claudia Hammond visits HMP Grendon, the only prison in Europe which operates wholly as a therapeutic community. More than nine out of ten prisoners there will be serving indeterminate sentences for murder or serious violent offences. Inmates have to apply for a place and once at Grendon will undergo intensive group therapy three times a week for over a year. Claudia meets inmates, therapists and prison staff to find out how the prison operates and how its unique environment aims to reduce reoffending rates.

Producer: Pam Rutherford.

0219/04/20112011042620110420Claudia Hammond joins mothers and babies at a portable language lab in London's East End.
0225th Anniversary - 22013111920131120Claudia explores the real-world impact of psychology research over the last 25 years.

The first ever edition of All in the Mind was broadcast 25 years ago. In the second of three anniversary programmes Claudia Hammond and guests look back at archive editions of the programme to examine what impact psychology research has had on our lives over the last 25 years. How does evidence-based psychology affect policy decisions? Is psychology just 'proving the obvious' or has it offered insights into ourselves which we could never have guessed?

02Antidepressant Resistance2003102120031022Up to 30% of people suffering from DEPRESSION fail to respond to conventional treatment.

Raj Persaud explores the latest research into antidepressant resistance.

Up to 30 per cent of people with depression do not respond to antidepressants. And some fail to respond to any kind of treatment at all. In this week's programme, Raj Persaud looks at people suffering from resistant depression and explores the latest research in the area.

Producer Lucinda Montefiore Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

U p to 30 per cent of people with depression do not respond to antidepressants. And some fail to respond to any kind of treatment at all. In this week's programme, Raj Persaud looks at people suffering from resistant depression and explores the latest research in the area. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

02Dsm-5; Should Therapists Cry - Sleep And Mental Illness2013050720130508How will the new edition of the American Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders impact the UK? Plus new research into the link between sleep and mental illness
02Eyewitness2004110920041110Dr Raj Persaud takes part in an experiment at the Eyewitness laboratory in Aberdeen University to see how accurately he can recall past experiences.

We hear how these experiments are helping the police understand and improve the truthfulness of eyewitness memories especially in America where it may mean the difference between life and death.

Dr Raj Persaud returns for another series of All in the Mind, the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of our brains. This week Dr Raj Persaud takes part in an experiment at the Eyewitness laboratory in Aberdeen University to see how accurately he can recall past experiences. We hear how these experiments are helping the police understand and improve the truthfulness of eyewitness memories especially in America where it may mean the difference between life and death.

2/6. How accurately can we recall past experiences? Raj Persaud takes part in an experiment to test the extent Of his recall. Producer Maire Devine Rptd tomorrow 4.30pm

2/6. Eyewitneses frequently play a vital role in uncovering the truth about a crime or an event. Dr Raj Persaud takes part in an experiment at the Eyewitness laboratory in Aberdeen University to see how accurately he can recall past experiences. He learns how these experiments are helping the police understand and improve the truthfulness of eyewitness accounts. Repeated from yesterday 9pm

02Mind Wars - Parapsychology - Laughter2007071720070718
20070718 (R4)
PARAPSYCHOLOGY
Fifty percent of the population holds some form of paranormal belief. Parapsychology research is booming and there are UK university departments studying phenomena such as psychics, séances, and telepathy. Much of the growth of parapsychology in the UK might be owed to the late Bob Morris, who in 1985 became the inaugural holder of The Koestler Chair of Psychology in Edinburgh University.

Dr Raj Persaud discusses the latest developments in the world of parapsychology with Dr Caroline Watt, Senior Lecturer in Psychology and a founder member of the Koestler Parapsychology Unit at Edinburgh University; and Professor Christopher French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

LAUGHTER
The psychological and scientific study of laughter has recently taken a turn for the serious. Evolutionary theory argues that any behaviour as universal as laughter must have some solemn survival purpose. And laughter has such profound effects on people’s brain and mind that it is now being seriously deployed to assist those suffering bereavement, having surgery, and even fertility treatment. Could further understanding of the function laughter served become a weapon in our armoury of persuasion and manipulation of others?

A recent study by the Universities of Kent and Liverpool revealed that laughter acts as a social lubricant and increases altruism towards strangers. Mark Van Vugt, Professor of Social Psychology and a member for the University of Kent’s Centre for the Study of Group Processes explains how this theory was tested.

MIND WARS
The United States defence agencies are looking at ways of improving soldiers’ endurance and psychological performance as well as ways of using brain power to remotely control machines, such as robots or aircraft.

Professor Jonathan Moreno, Director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the University of Virginia, talks about his latest book Mind Wars – Brain Research and National Defense - which reveals how advances in brain research may change the way wars are fought in the future, and how developments in neuroscience could be employed to control soldiers, or maybe even the enemy.

Dr Raj Persaud is joined by Jonathan Moreno to discuss brain research in national defence.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

How can we harness the power of the human nervous system in order to gain strategic advantage over our adversaries?

Dr Raj Persaud is joined by Jonathan Moreno, Director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the University of Virginia, to discuss the role of brain research in national defence.

4/5. Dr Raj Persaud discusses the possible role of brain research in connection with national defence with Jonathan Moreno, director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics in Virginia. Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Repeated from yesterday 9pm

02New Approach To Spider Phobia, Putting Yourself In Someone Else's Shoes, Empathic Cars2019060420190605 (R4)Claudia undergoes a novel treatment for her spider phobia. She meets Professor Sarah Garfinkel at her Sussex lab who has trialled a new technique which involves tuning in to the beat of the heart and finding a quicker way to dampen down and reduce arachnophobia. Does it work for Claudia and does the method allow her to get closer to Terry the tarantula? Also why stepping into someone else's shoes doesn't mean you'll see their point of view and can even mean you can become more entrenched in your own, original views. And are empathic cars the vehicles of the future?

New approach to spider phobia, putting yourself in someone else's shoes, and empathic cars

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

02Political Psychology2003071520030716Dr Raj Persaud examines the secretive world of political psychology.

When President Bush began discussions on his Road Map to a Palestinian state, he did so armed with profiles of all the major players.

Dr Jerrold Post has been profiling the world's leaders for the Pentagon and the CIA for the last 20 years.

He explains how he does it and how it helped in the recent war with Iraq.

In Britain political psychologists pick apart the relationship between leaders and their followers.

As politics becomes more personal, how does this affect Tony Blair's chances of success.

This week Dr Raj Persaud examines the secretive world of political psychology. Dr Jerrold Post has been profiling the world's leaders forthe Pentagon and the CIA for the last 20 years. He explains how he does it and how it helped in the recent war in Iraq. Producer Katy Hickman Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

This week Dr Raj Persaud examines the secretive world of political psychology. Dr Jerrold Post has been profiling the world's leaders for the Pentagon and the CIA forthe last 20 years. He explains how he does it and how it helped in the recent war in Iraq. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

02Programme Catalogue - Details: Repeat1990111419901003Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: 09 April 1991

Previous in series: 13 November 1990

Broadcast history

14 Nov 1990 19:45-20:15 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-11-09.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3077

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

Next in series: 10 October 1990

Previous in series: 02 October 1990

03 Oct 1990 19:45-20:15 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-09-28.

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3065

02Psychosis And Medication, Aitm Awards, Challenging Antisocial Behaviour2018052919940928
20180530 (R4)
Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Is it possible to take the guesswork out of the prescription of medication for psychosis? Medication is available for the distressing experiences of hallucinations or delusions, but anti-psychotics only work for about three quarters of people and psychiatrists currently have no good way of working out who those people are. New research at Kings College London is trialling a type of scan that's been around for some time - a PET scan - but using it in a new way to detect whether a person's brain has an overactive dopamine system which might be able to predict which drugs will work. Claudia Hammond talks to Oliver Howes, Professor of Molecular Psychiatry, King's College London and Sameer Jauhar, Senior Research Fellow, King's College London who've been conducting this game changing research.

We hear from the latest finalist in the All in the Mind Awards - someone who knows just what it's like to struggle for many years with mental health issues and to deal with some of worst things that can happen in life. Douglas, who's had to deal with a combination of physical and mental pain, nominated his GP Jens Foell for an award in the Professional category.

What type of personality dictates whether we're prepared to stand up to someone dropping litter, chatting during a movie or more serious transgressions such as verbal abuse? It takes a certain type of person to say something, rather than to sit there and fume. So who is the most likely to stand up to anti-social behaviour? Markus Brauer, who's Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Wisconsin Madison, has been investigating just that. How did he go about it?

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Professor Anthony Clare asks whether the Government's latest plans for the care of psychiatric patients in the community will actually help, or merely take away more rights.

Repeated from yesterday 11.30am

Psychosis and medication, AITM awards, Challenging antisocial behaviour.

02Recovered Memories And Sodium Amytal2004071320040714Dr.

Raj Persaud continues to probe into the workings of the mind.

This week he looks at the so-called 'truth drug' Sodium Amytal, which was used in the 50s and 60s to recover previously forgotten memories.

However, a leading psychologist found the drug led to a patient creating false memories.

He discusses the contentious issue of recovered memory.

Are people who recall childhood abuse and trauma in later life really tapping into lost memories or are they, as some people think, drawing on false memory?

Plus a look into the dangers of psychiatrists and therapists forming a sexual relationship with their patients.

2/5. Dr Raj Persaud looks at the contentious issue of recovered memory. Are people who recall childhood abuse and trauma in later life really tapping into lost memories or are they, as some people think, drawing on false memory? Plus a look at the dangers of psychiatrists and therapists forming a sexual relationship with their patients.

Producer Angharad Law Repeated tomorrow at4.30pm

2/5. Dr Raj Persaud looks at the contentious issue of false-memory syndrome and the so-called "truth drug", sodium amytal. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

02Spotting Fake News; Humour Seriously; Green Prescriptions A Joy Or Chore?2020111020201111 (R4)Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Fake news can travel faster and lodge itself deeper in the mind than the truth. Fact-checking comes too late and lies have already spread like a virus. Claudia Hammond investigates a new approach to pre-bunking misinformation via social media by inoculating the mind through exposing people to a mild dose of the methods used to disseminate fake news.

How underrated is humour? According to Stanford Business School researchers Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas, authors of Humour Seriously, the frequency at which we laugh or smile drops rapidly from the age of 23 and the workplace is to blame. But as a tool for resilience and success at work, humour has some surprisingly powerful effects on the mind that we should all embrace.

People with anxiety or depression are increasingly being prescribed spending a certain amount of time in nature. But are so called Green Prescriptions right for everyone? Mathew White of Exeter University discusses his new research that reviews 166 studies which suggest that for some, a walk in nature may be more of a chore than a joy. Could the strong psychological beneficial effects be achieved with a dose of virtual reality instead?

Claudia Hammond’s guest is Daryl O’Connor, Professor of Psychology at the University of Leeds.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Spotting fake news; Humour Seriously; Green Prescriptions a joy or chore?

02Virtual Reality War Zones And Ptsd - The Science Of Attraction2007070320070704
20070704 (R4)
VIRTUAL REALITY WAR ZONES and PTSD
Dr Raj Persaud discovers how computer games are being developed into virtual reality war zones in order to treat traumatised soldiers.

Raj Persaud experiences first hand a version of the American’s Virtual Iraq. He is joined by Professor Paul Sharkey, Director of the Visualisation Centre at Reading University, Dr David Purves, Head of the Berkshire Traumatic Stress Service, and Researcher Ronan Jamieson, to find out how virtual reality is being used as a therapeutic tool to treat combat troops returning from Iraq who are suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

A team led by Professor Skip Rizzo at the University of Southern California’s Institute for Creative Technologies has built the prototype called Virtual Iraq using the art assets from Full Spectrum Warrior. Professor Rizzo explains why the realism provided by Virtual Reality was so important in the therapeutic process.

THE SCIENCE OF ATTRACTION
Have psychologists finally unlocked the secrets of attraction? Why do British men prefer slimmer women whereas the Samoans fall for females with the fuller figure? Philosopher David Hume declared “Beauty is no quality in things themselves; it exists merely in the mind that contemplates them; and each mind perceives a different beauty. ?

But is it really the case that beauty, particularly personal physical attractiveness, defies scientific measurement because it’s purely subjective? Dr Viren Swami, Evolutionary and Social Psychologist and Research Associate at the University of Liverpool and the author of The Missing Arms of Venus de Milo, Reflections of the Science of Attractiveness explains why beauty can be objectively and scientifically defined.

Dr Raj Persaud sees how computer gaming technology is providing therapy for combat troops.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Dr Raj Persaud sees how the latest computer gaming technology is being developed into a therapeutic tool for combat troops suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

2/5. Could creating a "virtual Iraq" help returning troops suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder? Dr Raj Persaud sees how the very latest computer gaming technology is being developed as a therapeutic tool. Producer Fiona Hill Rptd tomorrow at 4.30pm

02Why Is Yawning Catching? And The Nurse Who Went The Extra Mile To Help Her Cancer Patient2018051520180516 (R4)Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

In the All in the Mind Awards, Claudia hears from a nomination in the professional category. Fiona who nominated the nurse who gave her treatment for cancer for the 2018 Awards. Fiona explains why her experience of childhood trauma re-surfaced when she realised what her treatment for bladder cancer would involve. And why nurse Tanya went the extra mile to manage her anxieties and make the treatment as trauma free as possible. Also in the programme,is yawning really as contagious as we think it is, or does it depend on who is doing the yawning?

Tips to help insomnia and the nurse who went the extra mile to treat her cancer patient.

Claudia hears from Fiona who nominated the nurse who gave her treatment for bladder cancer for the 2018 All in the Mind Awards. Fiona explains why her experience of childhood trauma re-surfaced when she realised what her treatment for bladder cancer would involve. And why nurse Tanya went the extra mile to manage her anxieties and make the treatment as trauma free as possible. Also in the programme, is yawning really as contagious as we think it is, or does it depend on who is doing the yawning? John Drury from Sussex University talks about his latest research. And for people who find it difficult to drop off at night, how does writing a list help? Michael Scullion from Baylor University talks explains. Studio guest, Professor Daryl O'Connor from the University of Leeds talks about the relationship between conscientiousness and stress.

Claudia hears from Fiona who nominated the nurse who gave her treatment for bladder cancer for the 2018 All in the Mind Awards. Fiona explains why her experience of childhood trauma re-surfaced when she realised what her treatment for bladder cancer would involve. And why nurse Tanya went the extra mile to manage her anxieties and make the treatment as trauma free as possible. Also in the programme for people who find it difficult to drop off at night, how does writing a to-do list help? Michael Scullin from Baylor University explains. Studio guest, Professor Daryl O'Connor from the University of Leeds talks about the relationship between conscientiousness and stress. And,is yawning really as contagious as we think it is, or does it depend on who is doing the yawning? John Drury from Sussex University talks about his latest research.

0319920422
0319931005Prof Anthony Clare presents the magazine devoted to matters of the mind. This week: a report on the psychological stresses of sailing around the world.

Producer Claire McGinn

0319940426Presented by Professor Anthony Clare. Do mixed-race families face any particular psychological problems? And news of alternative treatments for sufferers of bulimia.

Producer Lisa Shaw

THE ANDREW DUNCAN INTERVIEW uith Anthony Qare page26

0319940928Professor Anthony Clare asks whether the Government's latest plans for the care of psychiatric patients in the community will actually help, or merely take away more rights.

Repeated from yesterday 11.30am

0319941004Can simple eye movements cure deep seated trauma? Professor Anthony Clare investigates a new therapy sweeping the States and Australia and about to make its mark in Europe. Producer Feisal Ali. Repeated tomorrow 7.45pm
0320020313Dr Raj Persaud looks at a new initiative to promote mental health in secondary schools by establishing peer support networks

Producer Marya Burgess Phone the BBC Action Line [number removed]

032004021020040211
0320050308200503093/10. The programme dedicated to the mysterious workings of the brain. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health.

Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

3/10. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

032005080920050810This edition examines the provision of cognitive behavioural therapy for bulimia sufferers.

Dr Raj Persaud explores the pressing issues in psychology and psychiatry. This edition examines the provision of cognitive behavioural therapy for bulimia sufferers. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

Dr Raj Persaud explores the pressing issues in psychology and psychiatry. This edition examines the provision of cognitive behavioural therapy for bulimia sufferers. [Rpt of Tue 9.00pm]

3/6. In the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of the brain, Dr Raj Persaud examines the provision of cognitive behavioural therapy for people with bulimia. Producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

3/6. Dr Raj Persaud looks at cognitive behavioural therapy for those With bulimia. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

032005121320051214Dr Raj Persaud presents the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of our brains. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

3/6. Examining the latest research and bringing together experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health, with Raj Persaud.

Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

3/6. Professor Raj Persaud presents the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings Of our brains. Repeat of yesterday at 9pm

032006071120060712Kwame McKenzie examines everyday psychological challenges we face and delves into how the human brain works. [Rpt of Tue 9.00pm]

Kwame McKenzie examines everyday psychological challenges we face and delves into how the human brain works. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

3/5. Kwame McKenzie examines everyday psychological challenges and delves deeper into how our brains work in a bid to find out if it is "all in the mind".

Producer Helen Sharp Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

0320070102200701034/6. Claudia Hammond hears about one American high-school pupil who's objecting, through the courts, to a brief, online mass-screening programme for mental illness. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind and examining the arguments surrounding mental health.

Claudia Hammond reports on an American high school pupil who is objecting, through the courts, to the mass USA screening programme for mental illness.

4/6. In the USA a mass screening programme for mental illness is well under way using a controversial online test that takes barely 15 minutes to complete.

Claudia Hammond hears about one high-school student who's objecting, through the courts, to her instant diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder and social anxiety disorder. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

0320070417200704183/5. Dr Raj Persaud explores phrenology and physiognomy - deducing character through a study of head shape and facial features. Though the practices have been discredited as pseudo-science, recent studies reveal they may yet hold a germ of truth. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Dr Raj Persaud presents the series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind and examining the arguments surrounding mental health. This programme considers new studies on the possibility of judging personality by appearance.

This programme considers new studies on the possibility of judging personality by appearance.

0320071121
032007112720071128Dr Raj Persaud presents the series exploring current developments in psychology and psychiatry.

He is joined by Dr Michael Dudley and Professor John Gunn to consider the Nuremberg Code of 1947, which set new international ethical standards about patient care.

Sixty years on, has the profession strayed from these standards?

He is joined by Dr Michael Dudley and Professor John Gunn to consider the Nuremberg Code of 1947, which set new international ethical standards about patient care. Sixty years on, has the profession strayed from these standards?

3/6. After the atrocities committed in the name of medicine were revealed at the Nuremberg Trials, the Nuremberg Code of 1947 set up ethical standards about patient care. Dr Raj Persaud considers how the profession has strayed from those guidelines.

Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

032008061720080618Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring current developments in psychology and psychiatry.

Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or ADHD are rarely asked what they think about the stigma or the drugs they take. But on this week's All In The Mind, children have their say.

The number of children who are diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, has risen hugely in the UK, but what's striking in all the research is that children who have the condition are rarely asked what they think. Claudia Hammond hears from youngsters about the stigma and bullying associated with having ADHD and how they feel about the drugs they take.

Claudia Hammond hears from youngsters about the stigma and bullying associated with having ADHD and how they feel about the drugs they take.

3/8. Claudia Hammond reports on the latest developments in psychology, psychiatry and mental health. Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

032008111820081119Claudia Hammond hears about the potential advantages of video-taping people while they are suffering from hallucinations or a psychosic episode, which has been shown to give patients a greater understanding of their illness.

3/8. Could filming people during a psychotic episode help an individual gain insight into their condition? Claudia Hammond investigates the arguments for and against. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

03200906032/8. How can we help those with mental health problems have better experiences when dealing with the police? Claudia Hammond speaks to the UK's first mental health liaison officer to see how he can help. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm
032009060919941005with a report on a new eye-movement therapy for deep-seated trauma. Repeated from yesterday 11.30am 3/8. Claudia Hammond examines cases of Munchausen's syndrome by proxy, finds out about the new name "fabricated or induced illness", and talks to a psychiatrist about the condition.

Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

032009060920090610Munchausen by Proxy, when a parent deliberately falsifies illness in a child by making up or even causing symptoms, has been renamed as Fabricated or Induced Illness after controversial cases in the past few years.

But senior doctors are concerned that there is now a public reluctance to accept that the condition does exist, however rare.

Claudia hears about the cases, usually mothers, who do harm their children on purpose.

Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring the latest scientific research about the brain and the mind.

Munchausen by Proxy, when a parent deliberately falsifies illness in a child by making up or even causing symptoms, has been renamed as Fabricated or Induced Illness after controversial cases in the past few years. But senior doctors are concerned that there is now a public reluctance to accept that the condition does exist, however rare. Claudia hears about the cases, usually mothers, who do harm their children on purpose.

Claudia Hammond looks into the condition once termed 'Munchausen by Proxy'.

032009111720091118Claudia Hammond asks if we can be taught to be happy.

Dr Martin Seligman's mission is to promote positive psychology.

He says that psychology has spent over a hundred years studying misery and it might be more rewarding to look at what makes people happy.

Doing brave things might be one way to make us happier, or at least have interesting results, as Claudia discovers.

If Dr Seligman is right, should we be introducing happiness classes into the national curriculum to prevent children becoming depressed adults? Wellington College's headmaster, Anthony Sheldon, has initiated wellbeing classes to teach pupils resilience.

Claudia meets some of the pupils and discovers if the teenagers think this is helpful or if they are sceptical about it.

Not everyone may want to be cheery, however, and work by American psychologist Julie Norem suggests that defensive pessimism might be a better strategy for some people.

Claudia Hammond asks Martin Seligman if we can all be taught to be happy.

Dr Martin Seligman's mission is to promote positive psychology. He says that psychology has spent over a hundred years studying misery and it might be more rewarding to look at what makes people happy. Doing brave things might be one way to make us happier, or at least have interesting results, as Claudia discovers.

If Dr Seligman is right, should we be introducing happiness classes into the national curriculum to prevent children becoming depressed adults? Wellington College's headmaster, Anthony Sheldon, has initiated wellbeing classes to teach pupils resilience. Claudia meets some of the pupils and discovers if the teenagers think this is helpful or if they are sceptical about it.

3/8. Psychologist Claudia Hammond investigates the workings of the brain, the mind and the wider mental health agenda. Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

032011050320110504
032012050820120509
032012051520120516
032012111320121114How accurate is gaydar, the guessing of a person's sexuality just by looking at them?

Most of us think we're pretty good at guessing when somebody's gay or straight, but what signals are we using to make our decision, and how often are we right ?

Psychologists at Queen Mary University of London are, for the first time, trying to isolate the individual signals and patterns in somebody's face, in order to work out exactly what motivates us to make a snap decision about sexuality.

Using cutting edge computer imagery, researchers have found a way of transferring male facial expressions onto female faces and vice versa, which means they can work out exactly how our "gaydar" works.

Hopes are that the work will help to challenge stereotypes and prejudice by increasing awareness of how quickly, and often inaccurately, people classify each other.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

032018052219920428Professor Anthony Clare presents the weekly magazine devoted to matters of the mind. Producer Tony Phillips
032018052219931006
0309/11/20102010111620101110A new study offers hope for keeping young offenders out of prison. Claudia Hammond reports

When the Oregon attorney, Brandon Mayfield, was arrested for the Madrid bombing six years ago, the FBI's fingerprint examiners claimed they were 100% sure that his fingerprints were on the bag containing detonators and explosives.

But they were wrong.

And this sensational error has drawn attention ever since, to the widely held, but erroneous belief, that fingerprint identification is infallible.

Cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists have challenged forensic science as a whole to raise its game; and acknowledge that errors in fingerprinting and other forensic disciplines are inevitable because of the architecture of cognition and the way our brains process information.

Experts say that it's not a case of will an error occur, but when.

Claudia Hammond investigates the evidence that forensic examiners are making mistakes simply because they're human, and asks what safeguards are in place to limit the potentially lifethreatening impact of forensic error.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

Claudia Hammond investigates cognitive psychology and the challenge to forensic science.

When the Oregon attorney, Brandon Mayfield, was arrested for the Madrid bombing six years ago, the FBI's fingerprint examiners claimed they were 100% sure that his fingerprints were on the bag containing detonators and explosives. But they were wrong. And this sensational error has drawn attention ever since, to the widely held, but erroneous belief, that fingerprint identification is infallible.

Cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists have challenged forensic science as a whole to raise its game; and acknowledge that errors in fingerprinting and other forensic disciplines are inevitable because of the architecture of cognition and the way our brains process information. Experts say that it's not a case of will an error occur, but when.

0325th Anniversary - 32013112620131127Professors Sophie Scott and Irene Tracey examine 25 years of understanding the brain.

In this special anniversary programme Claudia Hammond looks at developments in neuroscience and how our understanding of the brain has changed.

In 1988 scientists predicted that new techniques of scanning the brain would lead to exciting innovative treatments for diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Researchers were enthusiastic about the possibilities of seeing what went on in the brain. Many had high hopes that this would help us understand how and why mental health problems develop. But how much progress has been made?

Professor Irene Tracey Director of the Oxford Centre for functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and Professor Sophie Scott from the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London discuss with Claudia the major advances in this fast growing field but also take a sceptical look and asks whether with highly ambitious big brain studies the science is still promising more than it delivers.

0326/04/20112011050320110427Claudia Hammond talks to a neuroscientist who has the brain and genes of a psychopath.
03Can You Cure Depression In A Day?2003072220030723Dr Raj Persaud is sceptical but in the interests of his programme, All In The Mind, heads off to one of Joe Griffin's workshops to find out.

Discover whether he thought the mixture of dream-sequencing and cognitive behavioural therapy would work miracles at nine o'clock on Tuesday night.

And while the courts continue to lock up more and more prisoners what role does restorative justice have to play.

Would the psychology of shame really help in stopping criminals offending again?

Can you cure depression in a day? Dr Raj Persaud is sceptical, but in the interests of his programme he goes to one of Joe Griffin 's workshops to find out. Discoverwhether he thought the mixture of dream-sequencing and cognitive behavioural therapy would work miracles. And the programme asks what role restorative justice has to play. Would the psychology of shame really help to stop criminals re-offending?

Producer Katy Hickman Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Can you cure depression in a day? Dr Raj Persaud is sceptical, but in the interests of his programme he goes to one of Joe Griffin 's workshops to find out. Discoverwhether he thought the mixture of dream-sequencing and cognitive behavioural therapy would work miracles. And the programme asks: would the psychology of shame really help to stop criminals re-Offending? Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

03Carl Rogers - Refugee Doctors2007071020070711
20070711 (R4)
CARL ROGERS
This year marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Carl Rogers, and American psychologist and one of the founders of humanistic psychotherapy. He developed a non-directive psychotherapy which he initially called client-centred therapy, his approach radicalised the profession and his contribution is still being felt today.

For almost a quarter of a century, Howard Kirschenbaum, Emeritus Professor in the Department of counselling and human development at the University of Rochester in the States, has been interpreting and researching the life and work of Carl Rogers. He is the author of a soon to be published updated biography entitled The Life and Work of Carl Rogers.

Professor Kirschenbaum talks about the work, influence and legacy of Carl Rogers.

REFUGEE DOCTORS
It takes refugee doctors a minimum of 18 months before they can work in medicine here in the UK and the route to employment is a difficult one. One charity, the Migrant and Refugee Communities Forum, is attempting to tap into the unused resources of this group in a initiative called Face to Face. Refugee doctors are paired up with migrants from the same geographical and cultural background as themselves, who have mental health needs. The doctors act as mentors to this group. Reporter Kathleen Griffin spoke to David from Face to Face and Zahara and Ibrahim who are taking part in the scheme.

ASYLUM CLAIMS AND MEMORY OF TRAUMA
To claim asylum in this country, applicants have to demonstrate a “well founded ? fear of persecution in their country of origin. In a series of interviews applicants are asked to disclose their personal history and experience. It is the difficult job of the immigration, or Home Office official, to work out which stories are true. Accounts which are deemed contradictory, incomplete or inconsistent tend to be rejected based on the assumption that such errors indicate that the applicant has been lying.

But new research reveals that the discrepancies in asylum seekers’ accounts could be a direct result of their traumatic experience, not because they’re lying. Dr Jane Herlihy is a Clinical Psychologist at the Trauma Clinic in London and has recently been calling for the asylum process to take account of the latest “science of trauma ?
Dr Raj Persaud talks to Dr Jane Herlihy and considers the implications these findings have for the way interviews with asylum seekers are conducted.

Dr Raj Persaud hears from refugee doctors who mentor asylum seekers with mental illness.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Dr Raj Persaud hears from refugee doctors in the UK who are using their medical skills to mentor asylum seekers suffering from mental illness.

3/5. Dr Raj Persaud hears from refugee doctors in the UK who are using their skills to help mentor asylum seekers with mental illness. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

3/5 Dr Raj Persaud hears from refugee doctors in the UK. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

03Childrens Prejudice Against Mental Health2003102820031029Children as young as seven have a negative picture of mental health, according to the latest research in the USA.

Dr Raj Persaud finds out what can be done to counter such prejudice among young people and asks what role children's literature has to play.

Children as young as seven have a negative picture of mental health, accordingto the latest research in the USA. Today Raj Persaud looks at what can be done to counter such prejudice among young people and asks what role children's literature has to play. Producer Katy Hickman Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Children as young as seven have a negative picture of mental health, according to the latest research in the USA. In this week's programme Raj Persaud looks at what can be done to counter such prejudice among young people and asks what role children's literature has to play. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

03Exam Revision - Therapists Who Cry - Nhs Acute Bed Shortages - Skin Disorders2013051420130515It's exam time and students up and down the country are busy revising. But what methods actually work ? The handy highlighter pen and last-minute cramming come bottom of the list.

Claudia Hammond investigates the role of sleep in mental health.

03F1 Drivers - Iraq Mental Health Services2007062620070627
20070627 (R4)
FORMULA 1 DRIVERS
Raj Persaud finds out how the latest advances in neuroscience are gaining the edge in Formula 1 and peers into the mind of a Formula 1 racing driver, at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Does what goes on in the driver’s mind determine which car first crosses the finishing line?

Honda’s top driver, Jenson Button, who last year won the Hungarian Grand Prix and in the second half of the season, won more points than any other driver, explains what mental preparation is needed to drive at 220 miles per hour.

Tony Lycholat is Head of Human Performance at Honda and the man responsible for keeping Jenson’s mind on track; he describes his role.

Twenty two year old Lewis Hamilton has astounded Formula 1 fans and won a place in the history books by ending up on the podium at every race this season and winning the past two Grand Prix in America and Canada. Dr Kerry Spackman is a neuroscientist, who as a consultant to the Maclaren team, has worked with Lewis Hamilton, helping to prepare him for his very first season in Formula 1.
Dr Spackman talks about his research, which shows that in Formula 1 some cars are faster than others, but that the driver is the key to better speed.

IRAQ MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
In 2003, after the invasion of Iraq and the toppling of Saddam Hussein, Dr Sabah Sadik went back to his country to visit his family. He had originally trained as a psychiatrist but had left in 1979 to work in the UK. He describes what he found in Iraq after three wars, years of sanctions and continuing violence; 25 million people with just 91 psychiatrists.
Dr Sabah Sadik is now National Advisor for Mental Health to the Iraqi Ministry of Health, helping to rebuild the country's mental health services.

Dr Raj Persaud explores how developments in neuroscience are being applied to motor racing

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind and examining the arguments surrounding mental health.

Dr Raj Persaud watches British Grand Prix stars Lewis Hamilton, David Coulthard and Jenson Button race at Goodwood and finds out how the latest developments in neuroscience are being used by Formula 1 teams to prepare their drivers for the track.

New series 1/5. Dr Raj Persaud watches Formula One drivers Louis Hamilton , David Coulthard and Jenson Button race at Goodwood and discovers how racing teams are using neuroscience to prepare their stars for the track. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

1/5. Dr Raj Persaud watches Formula One drivers race and discovers how the sport is using neuroscience to prepare its stars for the track. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

03Kim In The Awards, Smell Blindness, How To Find Help For Your Own Mental Health, Paul Broks2018060520180606 (R4)KIM - the latest group in the Awards, smell blindness and neuropsychologist Paul Broks.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

KIM stands for Knowledge, Inspiration and Motivation. It is a mental health group running activities for people around Holywell in North Wales and is the latest group finalist in the All in the Mind Awards. They were nominated by Hannah who explains why she sought their help as a teenager. Sophie Forster from Sussex University talks about her new research on smell blindness. One of the awards judges, Mandy Stevens, talks about some of the best ways to find help for your own mental health. Also, neuropsychologist and writer, Paul Broks talks about grief and how his wife's death changed his views on the importance of magical thinking.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

03Programme Catalogue - Details: 13 November 199019901113Producer: M.

THOMPSON

Next in series: REPEAT

Previous in series: 07 November 1990

Broadcast history

13 Nov 1990 10:02-10:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-11-08.

Producer: M. THOMPSON

BBC Programme Number: 90HA3076

See more ALL IN THE MIND programmes (345)

The last programme in which Professor Anthony Clare explores matters of the mind.

Producer Matt Thompson

03Recovery Stories, Personality Change, Covid2020111720201118 (R4)Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Do recovery stories work; personality change and Covid.

03Rewriting The Psychiatrists' Bible2010060820100609Claudia Hammond investigates proposed changes to how mental illness is diagnosed.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is known as the Psychiatrists' Bible and is revised every decade.

The 5th and latest version is not due out until 2013, but the recommendations for change have already been published.

Field trials of the new diagnoses are due to start in June of this year.

Claudia discusses the main proposals with American psychiatrists Daniel Carlat and Professor Terry Brugha.

One of the main changes could see people being treated for mental illness before they develop a clinical condition such as depression, Claudia asks if this is a useful initiative for prevention or will large numbers of people be diagnosed unnecessarily? And should Asperger's syndrome remain as a stand alone condition or be subsumed into the autism spectrum disorder.

Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald.

With Claudia Hammond

All in the Mind: Claudia Hammond investigates proposed changes to how mental illness is diagnosed. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is known as the Psychiatrists' Bible and is revised every decade. The 5th and latest version is not due out until 2013, but the recommendations for change have already been published. Field trials of the new diagnoses are due to start in June of this year.

Claudia discusses the main proposals with American psychiatrists Daniel Carlat and Professor Terry Brugha. One of the main changes could see people being treated for mental illness before they develop a clinical condition such as depression, Claudia asks if this is a useful initiative for prevention or will large numbers of people be diagnosed unnecessarily? And should Asperger's syndrome remain as a stand alone condition or be subsumed into the autism spectrum disorder.

With Claudia Hammond. Rewriting the Psychiatrists' Bible.

03Self-driving Cars And The Pedestrian, Risk Tolerance In The Brain, Awards Nominee2018050820180509 (R4)Self-driving cars and the pedestrian, risk tolerance in the brain, and Awards nominee.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond's guest is University of Cambridge clinical psychologist Tim Dalgleish

The vision of autonomous vehicles on our roads is becoming a reality, but in order for driverless cars to succeed, not only does the technology need to be faultless, but it's essential they can interact with pedestrians safely. So we need to know more about how pedestrians deal with the cars. Claudia Hammond takes a driverless ride with Prof Ed Galea of the University of Greenwich who's just conducted a trail to assess the detailed response of other road users.

Some of us are much more likely to take risks than others. One way of spotting the risk-takers is to look at how they behave, but do our brains hold clues as well. Joe Kable, Associate Professor of Psychology at the university of Pennsylvania, has unravelled the system in the brain that could help predict the degrees of risk we're prepared to take.

And Claudia meets the third of the nine finalists for the All in the Mind Awards 2018. We hear from Maddie, a professional actor- nominated by her childhood friend and now health economist Stephanie.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

03Sleep Deprivation Therapy2004111620041117This week, Dr Raj Persaud asks the experts why some people suffering from DEPRESSION are discovering that getting less SLEEP improves their mood.

SLEEP deprivation therapy was widely used in 1970's, but rapidly became unpopular as antidepressant medications took over.

Now it's medication that's become unpopular with some patients.

So, is SLEEP deprivation therapy as a treatment for DEPRESSION about to make a comeback?

This week, Dr Raj Persaud asks the experts why some people suffering from depression are discovering that getting less sleep improves their mood. Sleep deprivation therapy was widely used in 1970's, but rapidly became unpopular as antidepressant medications took over. Now it's medication that's become unpopular with some patients. So, is sleep deprivation therapy as a treatment for depression about to make a comeback?

3/6. Sleep deprivation therapy as a means of tackling depression has been overshadowed since the 1980s by anti-depressants. Dr Raj Persaud asks the experts why it may be making a comeback.

Producer Maire Devine Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

3/6. Dr Raj Persaud assesses the reintroduction of sleep deprivation as a means of tackling depression. Anti-depressants have overshadowed the tactic since the 80s, but their appeal for some is now waning. Repeated from yesterday 9pm

03The Priory And R D Laing2004072020040721This week he goes to the well known private hospital 'The Priory', favoured haunt of ill celebrities, to take a look at how they treat alcoholics.

Also, a look into the life and work of the colourful and charismatic Glaswegian PSYCHIATRIST Dr Ronald Laing, famed for using LSD therapy in the 50s and for 'romanticising schizophrenia'.

His work is currently being re-catalogued - do the recently found unpublished writings shed new light on him?

3/5. The Priory is a private hospital that has become a favoured haunt of addicted celebrities. Dr Raj Persaud goes there to look at how the clinic treats alcoholics.

Plus a look at the life and work of charismatic psychiatrist Dr Ronald Laing , famed for using LSD in his therapies in the 1950s. Producer Angharad Law Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

3/5. The Priory is a private hospital that has become a favoured haunt of addicted celebrities. Dr Raj Persaud goes there to see what methods the clinic employs to treat alcoholics. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

03The Psychology Of Motivation And Procrastination2019061120190612 (R4)Claudia Hammond explores the psychology of motivation and procrastination with an audience at the Cheltenham Science Festival. Is will power a good source of motivation? And why being a chronic procrastinator is bad for your health but there are ways to stop. Claudia is joined by guests, BBC presenter and Team GB triathlete, Louise Minchin, who talks about her route from journalist to representing team GB in triathlon World Championships. Fuschia Sirois from Sheffield University discusses procrastination, why we do it and how we can stop. Ian Taylor from Loughborough University discusses some of the best ways to motivate ourselves to achieve our goals.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

0419920429
0419931012Travelling back in time to the origins of the Masons, westward to Los Angeles and north to Manchester, Professor

Anthony Clare presents a programme on the development and psychology of gangs and secret societies.

Producer Paul Kobrak

0419940503Anthony Clare presents an international edition of the programme that reaches parts of the brain that others do not reach. It includes a report from the isolated island of St Helena and further news of the stresses faced by the crews sailing in the round-the-world yacht race. Producer Usa Shaw
0419941011Professor Anthony Clare looks into the minds of writers and asks where creativity ends and insanity begins.

Producer Paul Kobrak. Rptd tomorrow 7.45pm

0420020320As the National Autistic Society celebrates its 40th anniversary, Dr Raj Persaud reviews current knowledge and understanding of autistic spectrum disorders. Producer Marya Burgess Phone the BBC Action Line [number removed]
0420040211Dr Raj Persaud presents the programme dedicated to new discoveries about the wonders and mysteries Of the mind. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm
042004072719931013Travelling back in time to the origins of the Masons, westward to Los Angeles and north to Manchester, Professor Anthony Clare looks at the development and psychology of gangs.
0420050315200503164/10. The programme dedicated to the mysterious workings of the brain. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health.

Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

4/10. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

042005081620050817He examines the serious side of an often mocked condition, the effect of snoring on our relationships.

Dr Raj Persaud explores issues in psychology and psychiatry. He examines the serious side of an often mocked condition, the effect of snoring on our relationships.

4/6. In the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of the human brain, Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts in psychiatry, psychology and mental health. Producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

4/6. Professor Raj Persaud examines the human brain. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

0420051220200512214/6. Examining the latest research and bringing together experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health, with Raj Persaud. Producer Jo Coombs Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

4/6. The latest from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health, with Raj Persaud. Repeat of yesterday at 9pm

042006071820060719Kwame McKenzie examines the everyday psychological challenges we face and delves deeper into how our brains work.

4/5. Kwame McKenzie examines everyday psychological challenges and delves deeper into how our brains work in a bid to find out if it is "all in the mind".

Producer Helen Sharp Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

0420070109200701104/6. Professor Kwame McKenzie reviews new research that could explain why extremely violent criminals do not care about Others. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

It's official - the brains of psychopaths react differently when they're dealing with other people's emotions. Professor Kwame McKenzie reviews new research which could explain why extremely violent criminals do not care about others.

4/6. It's official: the brains of psychopaths react differently when they're dealing with other people's emotions. Professor Kwame McKenzie reviews new research that could explain why extremely violent criminals do not care about others.

Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

0420070424200704254/5. Raj Persaud focuses on issues in the worlds of psychiatry and mental health. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Dr Raj Persaud investigates the recruitment crisis in the psychiatry profession and asks medical students why they are shunning the discipline. Sheila Hollins, President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, discusses her plans to turn things around.

Dr Raj Persaud investigates the recruitment crisis in the psychiatry profession and asks medical students why they are shunning the discipline.

Sheila Hollins, President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, discusses her plans to turn things around.

0420071128
0420071204200712054/6. Dr Raj Persaud presents the series exploring current developments in psychology and psychiatry.

4/6. Dr Raj Persaud looks at developments in the world of psychology and psychiatry. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

042008062420080625Claudia Hammond brings us the latest science about our brains, our minds and our behaviour.

4/8. Examining pressing issues in the world of psychiatry and mental health. Producer Fiona Hill Rptd tomorrow at 4.30pm

042008112520081126Claudia Hammond explores how treatment for eating disorders can be a postcode lottery.

4/8. Claudia Hammond explores how treatments for eating disorders can be a postcode lottery. Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

0420090610
042009061619941012Repeated from yesterday 11.30pm 4/8. In 2001 Portugal became the only European country to decriminalise all drugs. Claudia Hammond heads for Lisbon to discover how this lenient approach has affected drug use. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

042009061620090617Claudia Hammond travels to Portugal to find out how decrimalising drugs could help addicts.

In 2001, Portugal became the only European country to decriminalise all drugs, from cannabis to heroin.

Claudia reports from Lisbon to find out how the policy has affected drug use in the intervening years.

Visiting a hospital there, she finds that psychiatrists play a large role in determining people's level of addiction.

They counsel anyone using cannabis through to harder, more addictive drugs such as crack cocaine and heroin.

Critics have said that spending time on cannabis users reduces time spent on more serious cases.

Yet those in favour of the system argue that tackling drug abuse from 'low level' use such as cannabis can lead to helping more people with more severe problems.

On her return to the UK, Claudia finds out if such a system would have any place within psychiatric care in England.

In 2001, Portugal became the only European country to decriminalise all drugs, from cannabis to heroin. Claudia reports from Lisbon to find out how the policy has affected drug use in the intervening years.

Visiting a hospital there, she finds that psychiatrists play a large role in determining people's level of addiction. They counsel anyone using cannabis through to harder, more addictive drugs such as crack cocaine and heroin. Critics have said that spending time on cannabis users reduces time spent on more serious cases. Yet those in favour of the system argue that tackling drug abuse from 'low level' use such as cannabis can lead to helping more people with more severe problems.

Claudia Hammond travels to Lisbon to find out how decrimalising drugs could help addicts.

0420091124200911254/8. Allowing adopted children access to their birth parents is the norm, but some think that when maltreatment is involved, contact causes long-term psychological harm. Claudia Hammond hears why.

Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

The wisdom of adopted children having ongoing contact with their birth family has achieved axiomatic status in adoption and fostering services, but some professionals are now challenging the current orthodoxy.

When children aren't told the full truth about their early maltreatment, they argue, ongoing contact amounts to a 'grievous mistake'.

Claudia Hammond talks to adopting and fostering families about the harm they believe was caused by their child maintaining a relationship with their birth families, and hears why some professionals think the policy should be re-thought.

Claudia Hammond hears the latest debate on the psychology behind adoption.

The wisdom of adopted children having ongoing contact with their birth family has achieved axiomatic status in adoption and fostering services, but some professionals are now challenging the current orthodoxy. When children aren't told the full truth about their early maltreatment, they argue, ongoing contact amounts to a 'grievous mistake'. Claudia Hammond talks to adopting and fostering families about the harm they believe was caused by their child maintaining a relationship with their birth families, and hears why some professionals think the policy should be re-thought.

042010061520100616Claudia Hammond presents a father's story of his son's struggle with schizophrenia.

For every person with a serious mental illness, there are countless relatives and carers who watch, helpless, on the sidelines, witnessing the devastating transformation of their loved ones.

Tim Salmon's son developed schizophrenia after college and the past twenty years have been a desperate struggle to secure him the care and support he needs.

Tim tells Claudia Hammond about the daily reality of living with this little understood illness and criticises the woeful inadequacies of provision in our society for those with mental illness.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

042010112320101124Taste can be described by sounds, sugary flavours match pleasant piano music, bitter tones are linked to low pitched notes in an new finding from the University of Oxford's Experimental Psychology Department.

A sceptical Claudia Hammond is subjected to the taste experiment.

In Switzerland a Michelin starred chef has a composer in his kitchen, and others have matched not only wine with food, but wine with music as well.

Most people with dementia and their families prefer to remain in their own homes after their diagnosis, but for some this may become impossible because of incontinence and wandering.

Professor June Andrews of Stirling University says therapeutic design in the home can keep people there longer.

Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald.

Does Chianti taste better listening to Mozart or Bach?Claudia Hammond investigates.

Taste can be described by sounds, sugary flavours match pleasant piano music, bitter tones are linked to low pitched notes in an new finding from the University of Oxford's Experimental Psychology Department. A sceptical Claudia Hammond is subjected to the taste experiment. In Switzerland a Michelin starred chef has a composer in his kitchen, and others have matched not only wine with food, but wine with music as well.

Most people with dementia and their families prefer to remain in their own homes after their diagnosis, but for some this may become impossible because of incontinence and wandering. Professor June Andrews of Stirling University says therapeutic design in the home can keep people there longer.

042011051020110511
042012052220120523What impact will neuroscience have on the novel ? Claudia Hammond talks to science writer, Jonah Lehrer, and to academic psychologist and writer, Charles Fernyhough, about the emergence of brain science in literature and considers whether new understandings of the brain can enrich fiction in the same way that Darwinism or Psychoanalysis did.

How much does knowing about our neurons contribute to our knowledge of who we are, of the essence of being human ? Or will explanations from neuroscience always seem inadequate when they're used to address the human condition.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

042012112020121121The chilling history of the Victorian 'mad doctor'. Claudia Hammond talks to Sarah Wise.

Author Sarah Wise talks to Claudia Hammond about the wealth of evidence she has uncovered about the rise, in 19th Century Britain, of the "mad doctor".

This new generation of medical men were powerful and corruptible, and there are many stories of difficult family members being locked up in lunatic asylums - or "living tombs" as they were called - in return for bribes.

And it seems that far from the classic view of women being the main victim of such skulduggery, moneyed men were more likely targets as relatives and business partners sought to get hold of their cash and property.

Suspicion and anger towards the asylum committal procedure crossed classes, and there were protests in the streets against "lunacy inquisitions".

Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald.

042013120320131204Claudia launches 3 new awards to recognise outstanding help and support in mental health.

For its 25th anniversary All in the Mind launches 3 new awards to recognise outstanding help, support or advice in the field of mental health. Claudia Hammond explains the categories and how to nominate. Also in the programme, a new look at one of the most famous and controversial psychology experiments ever. In 1961 Stanley Milgram ran a series of experiments where unwitting volunteers were ordered to give increasing electric shocks to a man they'd never met under the guise of research into memory. Many gave a series of increasing shocks up to 450 Volts despite hearing screams and calls for help from the unseen 'victim'. But it was a set up. The shocks were fake and the victim was an actor. The results of Milgram's obedience research caused a worldwide sensation. Milgram reported that people had repeatedly shocked a man they believed to be in pain or even dying and he linked his findings to Nazi behaviour. But was his version of the results really what happened? Claudia Hammond talks to Gina Perry who has researched Milgram's unpublished papers and spoken to those who took part in the experiment. Her findings reveal a story far from Milgram's own version of his obedience research.

0403/05/20112011051020110504Claudia Hammond reports on a new support scheme for families bereaved by suicide.
0408/06/201020100609With Claudia Hammond. Rewriting the Psychiatrists' Bible.
0416/11/201020101117Claudia Hammond investigates cognitive psychology and the challenge to forensic science.

04African And Caribbean People2003110420031105Following the progress of Paul Grey who spent 10 years in and out of hospital.

As part of a special examination into the way African and Caribbean people are treated in the mental health system, Paul will be looking at what happens to people once they're discharged from a psychiatric ward.

Paul Grey spent ten years in and out of hospital. As part of a special investigation into the way African and Caribbean people are treated in the mental health system, he looks at what happens to people once they're discharged from a psychiatric ward. Producer Lucinda Montefiore Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Paul Greyspentten years in and out of hospital. As part of a special investigation into the way African and Caribbean people are treated in the mental health system, he looks at what happens to people once they're discharged from a psychiatric ward. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

04Big Brain Projects - Anti-depressants - Learning Disability And Bereavement2013052120130522Europe and the USA are spending millions mapping the brain but will this approach pay off?

In the US scientists are working out the details of President Obama's $100 million BRAIN initiative,

and the EU is funding the billion euro Human Brain project. What will these expensive projects tell us, and are we even asking the right questions? Mind Hacker Vaughan Bell analyses the debate.

Novelist Alex Peston talks about his essay on creativity and antidepressants, and Claudia Hammond asks Nooreen Akhtar of Aberdeen University about her analysis of how antidepressants are portrayed in the press.

Noelle Blackman of Respond discusses the benefits of bereavement counselling for adults with learning disabilities.

04Borderline Personality Disorder2004112320041124Borderline Personalities are impulsive, prone to mood swings and erratic behaviours.

They are also easily depressed and tend to class things in black and white terms.

This tendency to move between the idealization and devaluation of others is very typical of Borderline Personality Disorder.

Dr Raj Persauds explores what it really means and what can be done to treat someone with the disorder.

Borderline Personalities are impulsive, prone to mood swings and erratic behaviours. They are also easily depressed and tend to class things in black and white terms. This tendency to move between the idealization and devaluation of others is very typical of Borderline Personality Disorder. Dr Raj Persauds explores what it really means and what can be done to treat someone with the disorder.

Dr Raj Persaud explores Borderline Personality Disorder and how it can be treated. Borderline Personalities are impulsive, prone to mood swings and erratic behaviour.

4/6. Borderline personalities are impulsive, prone to mood swings and erratic behaviour. They are also easily depressed and have a tendency to move between idealisation and devaluation of others. Borderline personality disorder and its treatments are explored by Dr Raj Persaud. Producer Maire Devine Rptd tomorrow at 4.30pm

4/6. Borderline personalities are impulsive, prone to mood swings and erratic behaviour. They are easily depressed and tend to class things in black-and-white terms. This tendency to move between idealisation and devaluation of others is typical of borderline personality disorder. Dr Raj Persaud looks at the condition and What can be done to treat it. Repeated from yesterday 9pm

04Cannabis And Psychosis2003072920030730Dr Raj Persaud investigates the possible link between cannabis and psychosis.

New research is mapping the brains of volunteer smokers to observe the drug's effects on the mind.

Dr Raj Persaud asks whetherthere is a link between cannabis and psychosis. Using volunteers underthe influence, new research is under way to map the human brain to see how the drug affects the mind. Producer Katy Hickman Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Dr Raj Persaud asks whether there is a link between cannabis and psychosis. Using volunteers underthe influence, new research is underwayto map the human brain to see how the drug affects the mind. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

04Changing Mindsets, Exercise To Prevent Depression, Nathan And Judith2018050120180502 (R4)Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

How do our minds view policies that we don't really like, once they become a reality? New research shows that once they actually take place, our mind set changes - and surprisingly we stop minding quite as much. So have we been overestimating the amount of opposition to new initiatives? Kristin Lauren from the University of British Columbia has found that we rationalise the things we feel stuck with.

There's been much research on the link between exercise and depression, but to what extent does exercise prevent depression, rather than help with it? An international team including Brendon Stubbs, a post-doctoral research physiotherapist at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, has identified 49 studies from around the world which followed non-depressed people for an average of seven years asking them how much exercise they did. The results are striking.

And Claudia meets the second of the nine finalists for the All in the Mind Awards 2018. We hear from Nathan who's nominated Judith, a counsellor at the Oxfordshire Association for the Blind who has played a huge role in addressing Nathan's mental health issues since his sight began to decline.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Changing mindsets, Exercise to prevent depression, Nathan and Judith.

04Claudia Hammond Launches The 2021 All In The Mind Awards2020112420201125 (R4)Claudia Hammond launches the 2021 All in the Mind Awards – a chance for anyone who has received help for a mental health problem, to recognise the people and organisations who have gone above and beyond the call of duty.

1 in 3 of us will experience problems with our mental health at some time in our lives and help and support from people around us – can make all the difference in how we cope day to day and helping us on the road to recovery. Between now and the end of January 2021 the Radio 4 All in the Mind Awards is seeking listeners’ experiences of brilliant mental health care and to recognise the people – the unsung heroes who helped make the difference.

The judging panel this year includes sports commentator and former Olympic champion hurdler Colin Jackson and Miranda Wolpert head of the mental health programme at Wellcome Institute.

There are 3 categories for the awards, the individual, professional or project:

Individual Award : An individual family member, friend, boss or colleague who offered significant support
Professional Award: A mental health professional whose dedication, help and support made a really significant difference to you. This could be a psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, nurse, volunteer or other professional
Project Award:A mental health project or group you took part in, either in person or online, which made a big difference to your recovery or the way you cope.

The winners of the awards will be announced during a ceremony to be held in London in June 2021

Join Claudia Hammond and members of this year’s judging panel to hear the moving stories of past winners who have gone beyond the call of duty in the lives of people with mental health difficulties,and details of how to apply for the 2021 Awards

Claudia Hammond launches the 2021 All in the Mind Awards.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond launches the 2021 All in the Mind Awards – a chance for anyone who has received help for a mental health problem to recognise the people and organisations who have gone above and beyond the call of duty.

1 in 3 of us will experience problems with our mental health at some time in our lives. Help and support from people around us can make all the difference in how we cope day to day and set us on the road to recovery. Between now and the end of January 2021 the Radio 4 All in the Mind Awards are seeking listeners’ experiences of brilliant mental health care and will recognise the people – the unsung heroes - who helped make the difference.

Individual Award : An individual family member, friend, boss or colleague who offered significant support.
Professional Award: A mental health professional whose dedication, help and support made a really significant difference to you. This could be a psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, nurse, volunteer or other professional.
Project Award: A mental health project or group you took part in, either in person or online, which made a big difference to your recovery or the way you cope.

The winners of the awards will be announced during a ceremony to be held in London in June 2021.

Have you ever wondered what therapists are thinking while people sit opposite them telling them their innermost thoughts? Psychotherapist Philippa Perry discusses her graphic novel Couch Fiction which describes what actually happens during therapy. This can help many of us to understand the therapeutic process better.

And we hear of a really simple way of raising achievement levels in teenagers in disadvantaged groups – by giving them three short writing exercises, taking just 15 minutes each. It might sound a little too simple. But preliminary research by Ian Hadden at the University of Sussex suggests it could have a profound effect.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

04Mental Health Workers Suffering Mental Illness2004072720040728Dr Raj Persuad finds out how well the health service treats mental health workers, including psychiatrists and psychotherapists, when they suffer from mental illness.

Dr Raj Persuad finds out how well the health service treats mental health workers, including psychiatrists and psychotherapists, when they suffer from mental illness. [Rpt of Tue 9.00pm]

4/5. Dr Raj Persaud finds out how well the health service treats mental health workers, including psychiatrists and psychotherapists, when they suffer from mental illness. Are people working within the system less likely to seek help and, if they do, do they receive worse treatment than the rest of the population? Producer Angharad Law Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

4/5. Dr Raj Persaud finds out how well the health service treats mental health workers, including psychiatrists and psychotherapists, when they suffer from mental illness. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

04Predicting Memory Loss In Parkinson's, 22 The Avenue Phoneline, Alexander Morison Archive2018061220180613 (R4)Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

As the population ages, Parkinson's disease is the fastest growing neurodegenerative disease. Symptoms of tremor and difficulties with co-ordination are well known, but memory problems or cognitive decline also affects over 30% of patients. Until now doctors had no reliable way of predicting which people will develop these cognitive symptoms or how serious they'd get. Now a team at Kings College London has found a way of doing this before symptoms even begin using an MRI brain scanner. Claudia Hammond meets neuroimaging researcher Heather Wilson, and Marios Politis, the Lily Safra Professor of Neurology and Neuroimaging at Kings College London to examine the benefits of its predictive power.

We hear about the last Group Finalist in this year's All in the Mind Mental Health Award : 22 The Avenue is a mental health telephone helpline which has been going for 15 years in York - and it's funded by the council. The staff there have been nominated by Jackie who has been receiving support from the team on and off for much of that time.

Medical Historian Sarah Wise uncovers the archive of celebrated 19th century psychiatrist Sir Alexander Morison, held in his home city of Edinburgh, He made a serious attempt to raise the professional profile of 'lunatic' attendants / keepers - a job that was very looked down on, but crucial in the burgeoning world of both public-sector and private asylum care. The archive offers a unique insight into a voice that up until now has gone missing in mental health history.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

Predicting memory loss in Parkinson's, 22 The Avenue phoneline, Alexander Morison archive.

04Sodium Amytal And Recovered Memories2004021720040218Dr Raj Persaud investigates the uses of the 'truth drug' Sodium Amytal and asks whether 'recovered' memories are in fact the invention of psychotherapy.

What are the uses of the truth drug, sodium amytal, and are "recovered memories" just an invention of psychotherapists? Dr Raj Persaud investigates. Producer Angharad Law Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

What are the uses of the truth drug, sodium amytal, and are "recovered memories" just an invention of psychotherapists? DrRaj Persaud investigates. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

04The Science Of Meetings, Helping Those With Dementia Sleep, Estimating Body Size2019061820190619 (R4)Claudia talks to Professor Steven Rogelberg about the science of meetings. Should we get rid of them altogether? Or what can we do to improve them? Also, how can we help those with dementia sleep better? Professor Susan McCurry and Dr Alpar Lazar discuss the latest research on sleep-regulation for people with dementia. And how good are we at estimating the size of our bodies? Claudia visits Birkbeck, University of London where Renata Sadibolova and Professor Matthew Longo conduct an experiment to see how good Claudia is at estimating her body size.

The science of meetings, helping those with dementia sleep, estimating body size

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

The science of meetings, helping those with dementia sleep, estimating body size.

0519931019Presented by Professor Anthony Clare. Apartheid and South African

Psychologists - how much responsiblity should they shoulder?

Producers Nadine Grieve and Clare McGinn

0519940510Professor Anthony Clare presents the programme that travels the highways and byways of the mind.

Today: the effectiveness of psychological profiling, and why do so many people go and see films that disgust?

Producer Paul Kobrak

0519941018Professor Anthony Clare presents a special programme on psychiatry in the armed forces, looking at how service men and women are coping with their changing roles. Producer Paul Kobrak.

Repeated tomorrow at 7.45pm

0520020327Dr Raj Persaud hears from the president-elect of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Dr Mike Shooter , about how he plans to make his mark. He also talks about his own history of depression and the programme examines what it's like to live with clinical depression. Producer Marya Burgess Phone the BBC Action Line: [number removed]
052003111120031112Dr Raj Persaud continues our series of features looking at the the current state of mental health for black people in the UK.

This week Paul Grey reflects on the important role that work played in his own rehabilitation.

Dr Raj Persaud continues his series on the current state of mental health for black people in the UK. This week Paul Grey reflects on the important role that work played in his own rehabilitation. PHONE: [number removed]

Producer Tony Phillips Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Dr Raj Persaud continues his series on the current state of mental health for black people in the UK. This week Paul Grey reflects on the important role thatwork played in his own rehabilitation. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

052004022419931020
052004022420040225Dr Raj Persaud visits Feltham Young Offenders

Institute, tests a brain-scanning lie detector, and looks into the controversial research of Cyril Burt , founder of the 11-plus examination.

Producer Angharad Law Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Dr Raj Persaud probes the mysteries of the mind. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm See yesterday for details

052005032220050323Dr Raj Persaud explores the pressing issues in psychology and psychiatry. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

5/10. The programme dedicated to the mysterious workings of the brain. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health.

Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

5/10 Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts and commentators rom the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

052005082320050824This edition investigates how adverse events in our childhood can affect us as adults.

Dr Raj Persaud explores the pressing issues in psychology and psychiatry. This edition investigates how adverse events in our childhood can affect us as adults.

5/6. Dr Raj Persaud presents the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of our brains. This week he investigates how adverse events in our childhood affect us as adults.

Producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

5/6. Dr Raj Persaud presents the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of our brains. This week he investigates how adverse events in our childhood affect us as adults. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

052005122720051228All in the Mind studies the world of autism in a special programme dedicated to the latest research.

Dr Raj Persaud asks what the scientists now know about the genetic make-up of autism and whether it really is one disorder or separate, but related, conditions.

Also, he visits a school to find out how the latest findings are helping to improve the education of children with autism and severe learning disability.

All in the Mind studies the world of autism in a special programme dedicated to the latest research. Dr Raj Persaud asks what the scientists now know about the genetic make-up of autism and whether it really is one disorder or separate, but related, conditions.

5/6. Raj Persaud finds out how research is helping to improve the education of children with autism and severe learning disability. Producer Katy Hickman Rptd tomorrow at 4.30pm

5/6. Exploring the world of autism, with Raj Persaud.

Repeated from yesterday 9pm

052006072520060726Claudia Hammond examines the everyday psychological challenges we face and delves deeper into how our brains work. [Rpt of Tue 9.00pm]

Claudia Hammond examines the everyday psychological challenges we face and delves deeper into how our brains work. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

5/5. Claudia Hammond examines everyday psychological challenges and delves deeper into how our brains work in a bid to find out if it is "all in the mind".

Producer Paula McGrath Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

0520070116200701175/6. Examining pressing issues in the world of psychiatry and mental health. Producer Fiona Hill Rptd tomorrow at 4.30pm

The Mental Health Bill, currently on its second reading in the House of Lords, would re-define mental disorder and remove the 'treatability' test. It would introduce community treatment orders and provide for indefinite detention as long as offender's mental health problems posed a risk to others.

Professor Kwame McKenzie talks to the Mental Health Minister, Rosie Winterton, about this hugely controversial Bill.

It would introduce community treatment orders and provide for indefinite detention as long as an offender's mental health problems posed a risk to others.

The Mental Health Bill, currently on its second reading in the House of Lords, would re-define mental disorder and remove the 'treatability' test. It would introduce community treatment orders and provide for indefinite detention as long as an offender's mental health problems posed a risk to others.

5/6. Examining pressing issues in the world of psychiatry and mental health. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

052007050120070502Dr Raj Persaud presents the series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind and examining the arguments surrounding mental health. This edition looks at Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, the current treatment recommended for depression and other emotional disorders. Raj visits a pilot project in East London to find out what the treatment involves and how effective it is.

Raj visits a pilot project in East London to find out what the treatment involves and how effective it is.

0520071211200712125/6. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest developments in the worlds of psychology and psychiatry.

Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

052008070120080702Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring current developments in psychology and psychiatry.

5/8. Examining important issues in the world of psychiatry and mental health. Presented by Claudia Hammond.

Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

0520081202200812035/8. Two prominent bloggers talk about why they think the "blogosphere" is proving so important in mental health. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

Claudia Hammond explores the popularity of mental health blogging.

Claudia Hammond examines the rising popularity of mental health blogs.

Two prominent bloggers explain why they think the blogosphere is proving to be so important in mental health.

Claudia Hammond examines the rising popularity of mental health blogs. Two prominent bloggers explain why they think the blogosphere is proving to be so important in mental health.

5/8. There's been an explosion in mental health blogging. Scores of blogs are being written and read every day, drawing thousands of readers and comments. The programme hears from two prominent bloggers about why they think the "blogosphere" is proving so important in mental health.

Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

0520090617
0520090623199410195/8. A shockingly high number of teenagers in the UK self-harm - the highest in Europe. Claudia Hammond and guests look at ways of dealing with the condition, including a clinic in Sheffield with a zero-tolerance approach, while a representative from mental health charity SANE says why she believes banning self harm doesn't work. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm
052009062320090624Claudia Hammond and guests discuss ways of dealing with self harm, something that more teenagers do in the UK than anywhere else in Europe.

The programme hears about a Sheffield clinic which has significantly reduced incidents of adolescents cutting and harming themselves by introducing a new 'zero tolerance' rule.

But this has proved to be a controversial measure, because many believe that accepting and working with self-harming behaviours is the best approach in the long term.

The doctor behind the Sheffield experiment tells Claudia what led him and his team to introduce this new policy and Marjorie Wallace from SANE explains why she doesn't think that banning self harm works.

The programme hears about a Sheffield clinic which has significantly reduced incidents of adolescents cutting and harming themselves by introducing a new 'zero tolerance' rule. But this has proved to be a controversial measure, because many believe that accepting and working with self-harming behaviours is the best approach in the long term.

Claudia Hammond and guests discuss ways of dealing with self harm.

052009120120091202Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring the latest scientific research about the brain and the mind.

Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring the latest scientific research.

5/8. Claudia Hammond reports on attempts to find a new name for schizophrenia to lessen the stigma attached to the condition, and on Mindfulness - a new way of thinking that is said to prevent depression. Does neuroscience support the claims? Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

052010062220100623Claudia Hammond explores the latest scientific research about the brain and the mind.
052012052920120530
20120530 (R4)
Could there ever be a vaccine against depression? Claudia Hammond investigates.

At the 2000 Sydney Paralympics ten members of the Spanish basketball team were stripped of their gold for pretending to have a learning disability. For the first time since that scandal athletes with learning disabilities can compete again in this year's games. British psychologist, Professor Jan Burns is the Head of Eligibility for the International Sports Federation for Persons with Intellectual Disability. She tells Claudia which sports and which athletes will be eligible.

In 2007 the Harvard political scientist, Robert Putnam published a paper stating that ethnic diversity in a community is associated with more mistrust. His paper was influential with governments, both in the UK and the US. Claudia is joined by one of Britain's leading social psychologists, Professor Miles Hewstone from Oxford University, about his new research which finds Putnam's bleak conclusions about society are wrong.

Clinical microbiologist, Graham Rook from University College London is hopeful that one day there might be a vaccination against depression. He's basing his ideas on two things: the finding that some people with depression are found to have higher levels of inflammation in the body and the idea that inflammation could be controlled by our exposure to contact with certain worms and bacteria - the so-called hygiene hypothesis. Professor Rook tells Claudia why he thinks with more research there could one day be a vaccine. The link between depression and inflammation in a proportion of people with depression is established, but is a vaccine for all really possible and would it be a useful avenue to explore for preventing the condition? Nick Craddock is Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Cardiff and explains why he is critical of the idea.

Producer: Pam Rutherford.

Exploring the limits and potential of the human mind. Presented by Claudia Hammond.

052012112720121128In a culture obsessed by body image, how do people cope when they become disfigured?

Our looks are our "social currency" so what happens when our appearance is radically altered by disfigurement ?

How people cope, psychologically, with dramatic changes to the way they look is the subject of a major new research project, and the results challenge many myths about who copes best.

Time is a great healer", "women care about their looks more than men", "the more serious the disfigurement, the harder it is to cope", are all beliefs challenged in this new study.

Claudia Hammond hears one woman's story about how she coped with dramatic changes to her appearance and talks to Nichola Rumsey and Diana Harcourt from the Centre for Appearance Research in Bristol about their new research.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

052013121020131211Claudia goes behind the scenes of the Science Museum's new psychology exhibition, Mind Maps.

How do you change teenagers' negative body images? Psychological strategies can help young people defend themselves against unrealistic expectations and stop them "fat talking". Claudia Hammond reports on a new study by Dr Helen Sharpe of Kings College London

Last week All in the Mind launched its 25th anniversary Awards scheme. This week clinical psychologist and All in the Mind Award judge Guy Holmes explains what makes a good therapeutic group.

Learning complicated dance steps can be challenging, as the celebrities on BBC One's Strictly Come Dancing discover every week. New research by Professor Margaret Wilson has shown that one technique used by dancers known as marking can improve performance. Claudia cha cha challenges her two left feet with Strictly star Robin Windsor.

How do you change teenagers negative body images? Psychological strategies can help young people defend themselves against unrealistic expectations and stop them "fat talking". Claudia Hammond reports on a new study.

0510/05/20112011051720110511
0530/11/20102010113020101201John O'Donoghue gives Claudia Hammond his first hand account of life in Victorian asylums.

John O'Donoghue was first admitted to psychiatric hospital when he was 16 years old.

He experienced the old Victorian asylums, ECT, homeless hostels and life on the streets.

He tells Claudia Hammond about how he turned his life around.

He's a poet and now teaches creative writing.

This year his memoir, Sectioned: A Life Interupted, has scooped the MIND Book of the Year prize.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

John O'Donoghue gives Claudia Hammond his first hand account of life in Victorian asylums.

John O'Donoghue was first admitted to psychiatric hospital when he was 16 years old. He experienced the old Victorian asylums, ECT, homeless hostels and life on the streets. He tells Claudia Hammond about how he turned his life around. He's a poet and now teaches creative writing. This year his memoir, Sectioned: A Life Interupted, has scooped the MIND Book of the Year prize.

05Ambiguous Loss; All In The Mind Awards; Pandemic Impact On Memory; Corpus Callosum2020120120201202 (R4)Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Have you ever lost a loved one who was still a part of your life in some way? Did it leave you feeling confused or frozen about how to continue with life? Claudia Hammond examines the distressing phenomenon known as ambiguous loss – the enormous challenge of dealing with a loss when you aren’t sure what’s happened, leaving you searching for answers, unable to move on.

The All in the Mind 2021 mental health awards have just been launched, where you can nominate the person or group who has a made a difference to your mental health. Claudia catches up with some of the finalists from the past to see what’s happened to them since, and what the awards have meant for them.

What has the pandemic done to our memories? Anecdotally many report they keep forgetting things they’re sure they would have remembered before. Claudia’s studio guest, Professor Catherine Loveday of the University of Westminster examines the new emerging evidence behind this phenomenon.

Our brains are in two halves and they are linked by a structure known as the corpus callosum. But some babies are born without a corpus callosum linking the brain's two sides. A quarter of these babies grow up with serious developmental difficulties, while others have no difficulties at all, suggesting that somehow the brain is compensating,. A researcher at the University of Geneva. Dr Vanessa Sifreddi, has scanned the brains of children aged between 8 and 17 and has found that for some children the two halves of their brains succeed in communicating.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Ambiguous Loss; All in the Mind Awards; Pandemic impact on memory; Corpus Callosum

05Autobiographical Memory Loss, All In The Mind Awards, Gaming Addiction, Depression After Spanish Flu2018061920180620 (R4)Autobiographical memory loss, All in the Mind Awards, Gaming addiction, Spanish Flu.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Susie McKinnon doesn't have amnesia but can't remember her own past. She has Severely Deficient Autobiographical Memory syndrome where she knows an event happened but has no recollection of being there herself. She tells Claudia what it is like and memory scientist Brian Levine from Baycrest in Canada explains more about what the syndrome's existence tells us about the nature of memory and knowledge. In the All in the Awards, Rosa explains why she nominated Ian, her manager while working at Church's shoes after her experience of psychosis while studying at University. The Spanish Flu outbreak of 1918 killed at least 50 million people but many who survived were left overwhelmed by depression. Laura Spinney explains more about the effects of Spanish Flu on the mind.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

05Keeping Secrets2004113020041201We've all told one.

You may even be keeping one right now.

Secrets are part of our everyday life.

Join Dr Raj Persaud as he explores whether keeping secrets is harmful or helpful.

We've all told one. You may even be keeping one right now. Secrets are part of our everyday life. Join Dr Raj Persaud as he explores whether keeping secrets is harmful or helpful. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

We've all told one. You may even be keeping one right now. Secrets are part of our everyday life. Join Dr Raj Persaud as he explores whether keeping secrets is harmful or helpful. [Rpt of Tue 9.00pm]

5/6. We're all told secrets- you may even be keeping one right now. Dr Raj Persaud explores whether keeping secrets is harmful or helpful.

Producer Maire Devine Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

5/6. We're all told secrets- you may even be keeping one right now. Dr Raj Persaud explores whether keeping secrets is harmful or helpful. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

05Neuromyths In Schools - Psychosis And Prisons - The Case Of Hm2013052820130529New knowledge about the brain is feeding its way into the classroom, but there are fears that neuromyths are thoroughly muddled up with neurofacts. With Claudia Hammond.
05Paedophiles And Police Work2004080320040804Dr Raj Persaud visits the child protection unit at the Metropolitan Police, the nerve centre from which the police track down Britain's paedophiles.

Dr Raj Persaud visits the child protection unit at the Metropolitan Police.

It is the nerve centre from which the police track down Britain's paedophiles.

By following one of their recent cases, Dr Persaud learns how the police manage to trace and convict paedophiles.

He finds out what it takes to work there and discovers the kind of therapy and couselling available to officers employed in this section.

He also discovers what kind of treatment is available to convicted paedophiles and whether it works.

Dr Raj Persaud visits the child protection unit at the Metropolitan Police. It is the nerve centre from which the police track down Britain's paedophiles. By following one of their recent cases, Dr Persaud learns how the police manage to trace and convict paedophiles. He finds out what it takes to work there and discovers the kind of therapy and couselling available to officers employed in this section. He also discovers what kind of treatment is available to convicted paedophiles and whether it works.

5/5. Dr Raj Persaud visits the child protection unit at the Metropolitan Police, the nerve centre from which the police track down Britain's paedophiles. He finds out what sort of character it takes to work there and the kind of counselling available to officers. He also discovers what kind oftreament is available to convicted paedophiles and whether or not it works. Producer Angharad Law Repeated tomorrow at4. 30pm

5/5. Dr Raj Persaud visits the child protection unit at the Metropolitan Police, the nerve centre from which the police track down Britain's paedophiles. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

05Preventing Anxiety, Calmtown, Air Pollution And Psychosis2019062520190626 (R4)Claudia finds out about a new approach to childhood anxiety - an intervention for anxious parents to help them manage their own fears and how they impact their parenting. She meets parents on the course run by Sussex Partnership NHS Trust and talks to Professor Sam Cartwright-Hatton from Sussex University who explains what can be done to help prevent mums and dads transmit their own fears to their children. Pamela Qualter from Manchester University discusses new findings on what predicts mental well-being in children. After several suicides in St Ives in Cambridgeshire, residents decided to prioritise mental health and make it a place where people are encouraged to open up about their feelings in the pub, barbers and even at Pilates. Olivia Crellin reports. Also in the programme, research has found that people who live in areas of high air pollution experience more psychosis. But why and what might be the mechanism? Pamela Qualter discusses.

Preventing anxiety in children, CALMTown and does air pollution cause psychosis?

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

05Sarah's Runners, Avatars And Eyewitness Testimony, Untranslatable Words2018042420180425 (R4)Sarah's runners, avatars and eyewitness testimony and untranslatable words.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

In the first of a new series Claudia Hammond meets the first of the nine finalists for the All in the Mind Awards 2018. We hear from Helen who nominated Sarah's Runners, a running group in Tunbridge Wells who helped her after her husband took his own life when she was pregnant with their second child. The group meets twice a week and their ethos is far from personal bests on the track but all about people being included and getting the best they can from exercise. Claudia goes running with Helen and finds out why Sarah and the group have been such a huge support to her after her bereavement. Catherine Loveday explains how running helps with improving mood and even cognitive function. Also in the programme, Claudia talks to Professor Coral Dando about research published this week showing that eye witnesses recalled more information more accurately when interviewed by an avatar in a virtual reality environment rather than a real person. So why do the social pressures of an interview with a human impact on our ability to recall events in the past? Have you ever felt 'Gigil'? It's a Tagalog word meaning 'to want to squeeze or pinch someone because you cherish them so much. Claudia talks to Tim Lomas about his lexicon of 'untranslatable words' related to wellbeing from other languages which can't easily be translated into English. Catherine Loveday discusses a new way of understanding how different parts of the brain communicate: brain entropy. What is it and why might caffeine increase it.

A lot of us experience a problem with our mental health at some point in our lives and help and support from people around us can make all the difference to how we cope day to day and on the road to recovery.

In the first of a new series Claudia Hammond meets the first of the nine finalists for the All in the Mind Awards 2018. We hear from Helen who nominated Sarah's Runners, a running group in Tunbridge Wells whose philosophy is far from personal bests on the track but all about people being included and getting the best they can from exercise. Claudia goes running with Helen and finds out why Sarah and the group were such a big support after bereavement

The Radio 4 All in the Mind Awards aims to champion some of the brilliant mental health care and recognises the unsung heroes who helped make the difference. The finalists will gather at a ceremony at Wellcome Collection in June at which the winners are announced.

05The Power Of Placebo2011051720110518Placebos have been shown to have a huge effect on people's symptoms in a vast range of illnesses and even change the body's physiology.

And their use is widespread.

In recent surveys of German and American doctors half said they at some point, prescribed their patients placebos - pills with no active ingredient.

But any doctor who wants to exploit their power has to take the ethically dubious step of deceiving their patients - to lie to make them think they're getting a real drug.

And undermining the relationship of trust, key to success of healing and medicine.

Or do they? In this week's All in the Mind Claudia Hammond talks to Ted Kaptchuk, Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard University, who in the first experiment of its kind, has shown that even in sceptical patients who know they are getting a sugar pill, the effect of the tablets on their IBS symptoms was huge.

Twice as much as those who'd had no treatment at all.

How does it work and why? Is it that the medical ritual of pill taking , even in the face of accurate information about the lack of any active drug has a powerful therapeutic effect all on its own? Ted Kaptchuk suggests this effect isn't that patients are thinking themselves better but the ritual of taking pills twice a day somehow encapsulates and unleashes the power of their initial consultation with a compassionate physician.

As he says "under the white coat and despite all the hi-tech tools at modern medicines disposal, we doctors still have the feathers of the shaman".

While he says this is just proof of principle, in theory it could pave the way for drugs with powerful effects on symptoms but with no side effects.

Claudia finds out why placebos might work even when when people know they're getting them.

The power of placebo. Placebos have been shown to have a huge effect on people's symptoms in a vast range of illnesses and even change the body's physiology. And their use is widespread. In recent surveys of German and American doctors half said they at some point, prescribed their patients placebos - pills with no active ingredient. But any doctor who wants to exploit their power has to take the ethically dubious step of deceiving their patients - to lie to make them think they're getting a real drug. And undermining the relationship of trust, key to success of healing and medicine. Or do they? In this week's All in the Mind Claudia Hammond talks to Ted Kaptchuk, Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard University, who in the first experiment of its kind, has shown that even in sceptical patients who know they are getting a sugar pill, the effect of the tablets on their IBS symptoms was huge. Twice as much as those who'd had no treatment at all.

How does it work and why? Is it that the medical ritual of pill taking , even in the face of accurate information about the lack of any active drug has a powerful therapeutic effect all on its own? Ted Kaptchuk suggests this effect isn't that patients are thinking themselves better but the ritual of taking pills twice a day somehow encapsulates and unleashes the power of their initial consultation with a compassionate physician. As he says "under the white coat and despite all the hi-tech tools at modern medicines disposal, we doctors still have the feathers of the shaman". While he says this is just proof of principle, in theory it could pave the way for drugs with powerful effects on symptoms but with no side effects.

05Ugandan Depression2003080520030806In parts of Uganda, more than one person in five suffers from DEPRESSION.

Dr Raj Persaud looks at new research into interpersonal psychotherapy for groups, to help local people.

In parts of the south west of Uganda, more than a fifth of the population is suffering from depression. This week, Dr Raj Persaud examines new research that is piloting interpersonal psychotherapy for groups to help local people.

Producer Jane O'Rourke Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

In parts of the south west of Uganda, more than a fifth of the population is suffering from depression. This week Dr Raj Persaud examines new research that is piloting interpersonal psychotherapy for groups to help local people. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

05 LAST20070501200705025/5. Cognitive behavioural therapy is the current psychiatric wonder treatment. But there is a problem getting access to CBT because of a shortage of trained therapists. Raj Persaud visits a pilot project in East London to find out what the treatment involves and discusses provision within the NHS and, indeed, how effective a form of therapy it actually is.

Producer Producer Louise Corley Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

05 LASTIntoxication Of Power - Board Game - Statutory Regulation2007072420070725
20070725 (R4)
INTOXICATION OF POWER
Power is a heady drug when exercised in the political arena, and it appears that not every political leader has the necessary character to counteract its effects. The Greeks called it hubris, where the hero wins power and glory but then becomes puffed up with pride and self confidence.

Dr David Owen was a neurologist before he became a politician and has long been interested in the effect of ill health on heads of government. In his new book entitled The Hubris Syndrome, Lord Owen reveals and explores a pattern of hubristic behaviour manifest in some political leaders; he argues that it could legitimately be deemed to constitute a medically recognised syndrome.

NEW BOARD GAME
Thirteen projects up and down the country are competing for a share of half a million pounds of prize money. NESTA, the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts is putting up the money in an attempt to boost innovative grassroots projects in the field of mental health.

Carol Anne Bristow’s project at the Lonsdale Unit in Lancaster is one of the schemes on the shortlist. Carol developed a simple board game, based on Monopoly, which gave in-patients an equal say in the way their building and environment was designed. Winning the prize could secure a manufacturer and turn the prototype into an actual board game. Jill Hopkins went to meet Carol Anne Bristow and Dave, a service user who’s been very involved in transforming the Lonsdale Unit using the board game.

STATUTORY REGULATION
Psychologists, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, many titles, all with very different qualifications and approaches. So how can the public get to see the right professional, properly trained and regulated? The government is introducing statutory regulation across this field and one of the first professions in line for regulation is psychology.

Members of The British Psychological Society - the representative body for psychologists and psychology in the United Kingdom - already have a strict code of ethics and a powerful disciplinary procedure. While they agree with the government’s intention to regulate, they’re not at all happy about the body that the government has chosen to oversee them. The BPS’s president, Professor Pam Maras, discusses their concerns.

Dr Raj Persaud is joined by David Owen to discuss The Hubris Syndrome.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Dr Raj Persaud is joined by David Owen to discuss The Hubris Syndrome and the intoxication of power.

5/5. David Owen joins Raj Persaud to discuss the effect of mental ill health on heads of government. Trained as a doctor, Lord Owen has had a keen interest in the intoxication of power and what he has dubbed the "hubris syndrome".

Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

5/5. Lord Owen joins Raj Persaud to discuss the effect of mental ill health on heads of government. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

0619931026Presented by Professor Anthony Clare. Why do men hate women - a look into the minds of violent men.

Producer Paul Kobrak

0619940511
0619941025Professor Anthony Clare assesses the Psychological impact of changing sex. Producer Paul Kobrak

Repeated tomorrow at 7.45pm

0620020403In Mental Health Action Week, Dr Raj Persaud explores the area of self-help: can the books and the courses really help you improve your mental health? And he finds out from the government's mental health tsar, Professor Louis Appleby , what his new National Institute for Mental Health involves.

Producer Marya Burgess Phone the BBC Action Line: [number removed]

062003111820031119In the late 70s research showed that African and Caribbean people suffered severe disadvantage in the mental health system: they were more likely to be diagnosed as schizophrenic, more likely to be forcibly taken to hospital by the police and more likely to be given drugs than counseling.

Little has changed over the last thirty years.

On All in the Mind this week Dr Raj Persaud asks why so many black people are still facing discrimination and what the Government and Royal College of Psychiatrists is doing about it.

Dr Raj Persaud concludes an examination of the way African and Caribbean people are treated in the mental health system. In the late 1970s, research showed that African and Caribbean people suffered severe disadvantage in the mental health system - more likely to bediagnosed as schizophrenic, more likely to be forcibly taken to hospital by the police and more likely to be given drugs than counselling. Dr Persaud finds that little has changed, and asks what the Government and the Royal College of Psychiatrists are doing about it.

Producer Katy Hickman Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

Dr Raj Persaud concludes a special examination into the way African and Caribbean people are treated in the mental health system. In the late 70s, research showed that African and Caribbean people suffered severe disadvantage in the mental health system: they were more likely to be diagnosed as schizophrenic, more likely to be forcibly taken to hospital by the police and more likely to be given drugs than counselling. Dr Persaud asks why so many black people are still facing discrimination and what the Government and Royal College of Psychiatrists are doing about it. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

0620050329200503306/10. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research with experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry,

DSVChOlogy and mental health. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

6/10 The programme dedicated to the mysterious workings of the brain. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health.

Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

062005083020050831In a special programme, he interviews Health Minister Rosie Winterton about the provision of mental health care, treatment and rehabilitation.

Professor Raj Persaud presents the programme dedicated to the mysterious workings of our brains.

6/6. Dr Raj Persaud presents the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of our brains. This week he interviews Health Minister Rosie Winterton about the provision of mental health care, treatment and rehabilitation. Producer Rebecca Asher Rptd tomorrow at 4.30pm

062006010320060104Mental health problems in children and adolescents is a growing concern, with recent figures showing that as many as one in ten children aged 5-16 has had a clinically recognisable mental disorder.

Professor Raj Persaud talks to experts about the facilities, services and recent research in this area, and visits a specialist psychiatric unit where children with severe problems are looked after, meeting therapists who explain their work and parents who share their experiences about coping with mental health problems in their children.

Professor Raj Persaud talks to experts about the facilities, services and recent research in this area, and visits a specialist psychiatric unit where children with severe problems are looked after, meeting therapists who explain their work and parents who share their experiences about coping with mental health problems in their children. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

Mental health conditions in children and adolescents is a growing problem, with recent figures showing that as many as one in ten children aged 5-16 had a clinically recognisable mental disorder.

6/6. Recent figures show that one in ten children aged 5-16 has a clinically recognisable mental disorder. Raj Persaud talks to experts in this area and visits a specialist psychiatric unit for children with severe problems, meeting therapists and parents who share their experiences about coping with mental health problems in their children. PHONE: osoo [number removed]

Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

6/6. Raj Persaud presents a programme on mental disorders in children. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

062007012320070124New rules about smoke-free public spaces mean that mental health units in England and Wales will have to ban cigarettes. Only those whose stay is longer than six months will escape the new regulations.

But how will a 'no smoking' ban go down with the 70% of mental health patients who smoke? Claudia Hammond hears from patients and staff, some of whom fear banning smoking will lead to aggression, violence and increased rates of absconding.

Only those whose stay is longer than six months will escape the new regulations.

062007073119931027with Professor Anthony Clare.
0620071212
0620071218200712196/6. Dr Raj Persaud looks at the latest developments in the world of psychology and psychiatry. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

6/6. Dr Raj Persaud looks at the latest developments in the world of psychology. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

0620080708200807096/8. Claudia Hammond discovers the latest news and developments from the worlds of psychology and psychiatry. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

6/8. Psychologist Claudia Hammond reveals the latest scientific findings as she investigates the workings of the brain, the mind and the wider mental health agenda. Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

062008120920081210Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring current developments in psychology and psychiatry.

She talks to researchers who have studied a rare condition which prevents a person from making facial expressions and discovers how they can help those people to express their identities.

Claudia Hammond presents the series exploring current developments in psychology and psychiatry. She talks to researchers who have studied a rare condition which prevents a person from making facial expressions and discovers how they can help those people to express their identities.

6/8. Claudia Hammond meets people who cannot make facial expressions. She talks to researchers who have studied this rare condition and finds out how they can help the expressionless express their identities.

Producer Beth Eastwood Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

6/8. Claudia Hammond meets people who cannot make facial expressions. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

062009063019941026Professor Anthony Clare assesses the psychological impact of changing sex.

Repeated from yesterday 11.30am

6/8. Following the Lord Bradley Review of the Criminal Justice System, Claudia Hammond takes a look at the recommendations for people with mental illness who end up in police custody. Producer Helen Sharp Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

062009063020090701A look at moves to improve help for those with mental illness who end up in police custody

In April 2009, Lord Bradley completed a review of how those with mental illness are treated in the Criminal Justice System.

The aim was to see how those with mental illness and learning difficulties could be diverted from prison and given other care and guidance to prevent them reoffending.

The review has come up with many recommendations.

Claudia Hammond visits two Diversion Schemes - one aimed at adults and the other at young offenders, to see what diversion really means and how these approaches can help someone with mental illness.

In April 2009, Lord Bradley completed a review of how those with mental illness are treated in the Criminal Justice System. The aim was to see how those with mental illness and learning difficulties could be diverted from prison and given other care and guidance to prevent them reoffending. The review has come up with many recommendations.

0620091208200912096/8. Psychologist Claudia Hammond reveals the latest scientific findings as she investigates the workings of the brain, the mind and the wider mental health agenda. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

For decades, psychologists, teachers and employers have used IQ testing to measure learning potential, but now scientists say that instead of IQ, testing 'working memory' is a far more accurate predictor of academic success.

Dr Tracy Alloway from Stirling University says that a recent experiment has shown that measuring working memory, or our capacity to learn, helped to predict children's future grades more accurately than IQ tests.

For decades, psychologists, teachers and employers have used IQ testing to measure learning potential, but now scientists say that instead of IQ, testing 'working memory' is a far more accurate predictor of academic success. Dr Tracy Alloway from Stirling University says that a recent experiment has shown that measuring working memory, or our capacity to learn, helped to predict children's future grades more accurately than IQ tests.

Scientists say testing our 'working memory' instead of IQ would be more accurate.

062010062920100630Mental Health Minister Paul Burstow gives his first major interview to All In The Mind, and talks to Claudia Hammond about how mental health services are likely to fare in the current climate of financial restraint.

Being in the countryside and enjoying nature has long been known to have a beneficial effect on mental health.

And for several years now, psychologist Guy Holmes, has been running "Walk and Talk" sessions in the beautiful Shrewsbury countryside.

062011052420110525
062012060520120606
20120606 (R4)
Claudia talks to Jacopo Annese from the San Diego brain observatory about brain donation.

Claudia Hammond talks to Jacopo Annese, director of the San Diego brain observatory about his mission to create what he calls 'a Hubble space telescope for the brain'. He is recruiting people who will be willing to donate their brains to his laboratory. By interviewing them regularly to record their detailed life histories and interests and by doing psychological tests he aims to provide a brain archive for neuroscientists in the future. But what sort of links can be established between brain anatomy and personality and what sort of people are willing to donate their brains to his lab?

Producer: Pam Rutherford.

Exploring the limits and potential of the human mind. Presented by Claudia Hammond.

062012120420121205Claudia Hammond on why we continue to believe information even when we are told it's wrong

Why we continue to believe information even when we are told its wrong. Claudia Hammond discovers how the brain stores facts and why we don't erase erroneous explanations.

062013121720131218Does performing rituals improve the taste of food? Claudia Hammond investigates.

Why rituals like blowing out candles on a birthday cake or carving a turkey at the table before eating can improve the taste of food. Claudia Hammond talks to Michael Norton from Harvard University about his new research which shows the effect can work for chocolate and even carrots.

0617/05/201120110518Claudia finds out why placebos might work even when when people know they're getting them.
06All In The Mind Awards Ceremony From The Wellcome Collection In London2018062620180627 (R4)Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond hosts the All in the Mind Awards Ceremony from Wellcome Collection in London and meets all the All in the Mind Award finalists.
Back in November we asked you to nominate the person, professional or group who had made a difference to your mental health.

Throughout the current series we've been hearing the individual stories of the nine finalists, and this edition offers the chance to recap the people and organisations who've made a huge difference to other people's lives - and of course to hear comments from the judges and winners from each of the three categories.

The event is hosted by Claudia Hammond.

Judges are Olympic athlete Dame Kelly Holmes, mental health campaigner Marion Janner, Mathijs Lucassen lecturer at the Open University, and manager of mental health services, Mandy Stevens

Produced by Pam Rutherford and Adrian Washbourne.

Claudia Hammond presents a series exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

All in the Mind Awards ceremony from the Wellcome Collection in London.

06Broadmoor2004030220040303A special programme from Broadmoor, the high security mental hospital that houses many of Britain's most violent offenders.

The most recent inspection of Broadmoor found the institution's Victorian wards 'totally unfit for purpose'.

Dr.

Raj Persaud walks round the wards to find out the challenges staff face and asks what they are doing to improve facilities.

He talks to staff about the medical and therapeutic treatments available to patients, some of whose behaviour is so challenging that they cannot be cared for by general mental health services.

He also speaks to a patient about the treatment they receive and to someone who has been released from Broadmoor about the benefits of such care.

A special programme from Broadmoor, the high-security mental hospital that houses many of Britain's most violent offenders. A recent inspection found the wards "totally unfit for purpose". DrRaj Persaud talks to staff and to an inmate about medical and therapeutic treatments and facilities, and to a former patient about the care he received. Producer Angharad Law Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

A special programme from Broadmoor, the high-security mental hospital that houses many of Britain's most violent offenders. DrRaj Persaud asks what the staff are doing to improve facilities and about the medical and therapeutic treatments available to patients. He also talks to an inmate about his treatment, and to a former patient about the Care he received. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

06Memory And Depression - Global Mental Health - Compassion Training2013060420130605How an ancient memory training technique can help people with depression. Can people learn compassion? Claudia Hammond explores the limits and potential of the human mind.
06Wellcome Trust Mental Health Initiative; Teenage Sleep; Choices Children Make2020120820201209 (R4)Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.

What really works when it comes to preventing and dealing with mental health difficulties? Can a world exist in which no one is held back by mental health problems.? That’s the vision of Professor Miranda Wolpert Head of the Mental Health Priority Area at the Wellcome Trust. With £200million to spend over five years, Miranda Wolpert and her team are taking a radical new approach to addressing anxiety and depression in 14- to 24-year-olds. Claudia hears about her new vision in addressing mental health problems in young people

Sleep problems are common in adolescence, and often related to anxiety and depression. But one factor which might be affecting mental health in people in their twenties is how they slept as teenagers, according to new research from Faith Orchard - lecturer at the University of Sussex. She disentangles exactly what is going on and teases apart the specific sleeping difficulties involved in the complex relationship between sleep, anxiety and depression.

We use various mental shortcuts to save our brains effort. One of those is that when we’ve made a choice in the past and rejected one option, we carry on rejecting that option and downgrade the thing we didn’t choose and actively avoid it if we are offered it again. And until now what wasn’t realised was that infants who of course have far less sophisticated thinking processes, do it too. Does this mean it’s intuitive, rather than something we learn to do? Alex Silver from the University of Pittsburgh dissects the evidence

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Wellcome Trust Mental health initiative, teenage sleep, choices children make.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

What really works when it comes to preventing and dealing with mental health difficulties? Can a world exist in which no one is held back by mental health problems.? That’s the vision of Professor Miranda Wolpert Head of the Mental Health Priority Area at the Wellcome Trust. With £200million to spend over five years, Miranda Wolpert and her team are taking a radical new approach to addressing anxiety and depression in 14- to 24-year-olds. Claudia hears about her new vision in addressing mental health problems in young people

Sleep problems are common in adolescence, and often related to anxiety and depression. But one factor which might be affecting mental health in people in their twenties is how they slept as teenagers, according to new research from Faith Orchard - lecturer at the University of Sussex. She disentangles exactly what is going on and teases apart the specific sleeping difficulties involved in the complex relationship between sleep, anxiety and depression.

We use various mental shortcuts to save our brains effort. One of those is that when we’ve made a choice in the past and rejected one option, we carry on rejecting that option and downgrade the thing we didn’t choose and actively avoid it if we are offered it again. And until now what wasn’t realised was that infants who of course have far less sophisticated thinking processes, do it too. Does this mean it’s intuitive, rather than something we learn to do? Alex Silver from the University of Pittsburgh dissects the evidence

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Wellcome Trust Mental health initiative, teenage sleep, choices children make.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

What really works when it comes to preventing and dealing with mental health difficulties? Can a world exist in which no one is held back by mental health problems.? That’s the vision of Professor Miranda Wolpert Head of the Mental Health Priority Area at the Wellcome Trust. With £200million to spend over five years, Miranda Wolpert and her team are taking a radical new approach to addressing anxiety and depression in 14- to 24-year-olds. Claudia hears about her new vision in addressing mental health problems in young people

Sleep problems are common in adolescence, and often related to anxiety and depression. But one factor which might be affecting mental health in people in their twenties is how they slept as teenagers, according to new research from Faith Orchard - lecturer at the University of Sussex. She disentangles exactly what is going on and teases apart the specific sleeping difficulties involved in the complex relationship between sleep, anxiety and depression.

We use various mental shortcuts to save our brains effort. One of those is that when we’ve made a choice in the past and rejected one option, we carry on rejecting that option and downgrade the thing we didn’t choose and actively avoid it if we are offered it again. And until now what wasn’t realised was that infants who of course have far less sophisticated thinking processes, do it too. Does this mean it’s intuitive, rather than something we learn to do? Alex Silver from the University of Pittsburgh dissects the evidence

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Wellcome Trust Mental health initiative, teenage sleep, choices children make.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

06Wiring The Brain2010120720101208Understanding how different parts of the brain interact would help explain human behaviour more clearly.

Claudia Hammond reports on a major new project.

Plus exclusive information on a new initiative for online counselling support for cancer.

Wiring the brain.Plus online psychological support for cancer.

Claudia Hammond reports.

Claudia Hammond reports on a major new project. Plus exclusive information on a new initiative for online counselling support for cancer.

Wiring the brain.Plus online psychological support for cancer. Claudia Hammond reports.

06 LAST20070123200701246/6. Smoke-free public spaces mean that mental-health units in England and Wales will have to ban cigarettes. But how will a "no smoking" ban go down with the 70 per cent of mental health patients who smoke? Claudia Hammond hears from patients and staff, some of whom fear banning smoking will lead to violence and increased rates of absconding. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

6/6. How will a "no smoking" ban go down with the 70 per cent of mental health patients who smoke?

Claudia Hammond hears from patients and staff, some of whom fear banning smoking will lead to violence and increased rates Of absconding. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

06 LASTConscious Ageing2004120720041208Raj Persaud explores the concept of 'conscious ageing', described by experts as a new way of looking at and experiencing aging that moves beyond our cultural obsession with youth.

Raj Persaud explores the concept of 'conscious ageing', described by experts as a new way of looking at and experiencing aging that moves beyond our cultural obsession with youth. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

6/6. Described by experts as a new way of experiencing ageing in a youth-obsessed culture, Dr Raj Persaud looks at the concept of "conscious ageing". Producer Maire Devine Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

6/6. Along with a close look at new research that explodes the assumption that memories inevitably fade as we grow old, Dr Raj Persaud examines the concept of "conscious ageing", a new way of experiencing growing old that moves beyond our cultural obsession with youth. Repeated from yesterday 9pm

0719931102Professor Anthony Clare looks at cognitive therapy. Can training the mind ever cure mental illness?

Producers Nadine Grieve and Clare McGinn

0719941101From Guy Fawkes Night to forest fires, Professor Anthony Clare explores the fascination of the naked flame for both young and old.

Producer Feisal All. Repeated tomorrow 7.45pm

From Guy Fawkes Night to forest fires, Professor Anthony Clare explores the fascination of the naked flame for both young and old.

Producer Feisal All. Repeated tomorrow 7.45pm

0720020410Dr Raj Persaud discusses mental health in the workplace and investigates strategies intended to enable sufferers of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) to get on with their lives.

Producer Marya Burgess Phone the BBC Action Line: [number removed]

Dr Raj Persaud discusses mental health in the workplace, and investigates strategies to enable obsessive compulsive disorder sufferers to get on with their lives.

072004121419931103Professor Anthony Clare looks at cognitive therapy.
0720050405200504067/10 Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research with experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health. Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

7/10. The programme dedicated to the mysterious workings of the brain. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health.

Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

0720080715200807167/8. Claudia Hammond presents the latest developments and research in the worlds of psychology and psychiatry. Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm
072008121620081217Claudia Hammond reports from Cardiff on trials of Magnetic Seizure Therapy, a treatment for major depressive illnesses that it is hoped will replace Electroconvulsive Therapy, which is more damaging to the short-term memory.

7/8. Could magnetic stimulation of the brain replace ECT as a treatment for major depressive illnesses? Instead of electricity, the therapy stimulates the brain using magnetic fields and hopefully has less impact on short-term memory. Claudia Hammond visits

Cardiff's Whitchurch Hospital where trials for magnetic seizure therapy (MST) are being held. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

0720090707199411027/8. We don't know the cause, we don't have a cure, but we know that soon more than a million of us will suffer from dementia. Claudia Hammond investigates the science and the healthcare needs behind the figures. Producer Fiona Hill Rptd tomorrow at 4.30pm
072009070720090708To mark Dementia Awareness Week, Claudia Hammond asks how we are placed to deal with the fact that, in just 20 years, one and a half million of us will have a fatal brain disease.

There is no cure, and no treatment that can even slow it down; dementia is the health challenge of our generation.

Claudia talks to the British scientists at the forefront of the global race to find a way to treat Alzheimer's disease and asks why so many people's dementia remains undiagnosed.

Patients and carers state what improvements in health and social care they want to see and Claudia visits one of the government's flagship new memory services, which is modelling the improvements contained in the government's new National Dementia Strategy.

Claudia Hammond asks how we are placed to deal with growing numbers of dementia sufferers.

0720091215200912167/8. Psychologist Claudia Hammond investigates the workings of the brain. Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm
072010070620100707The latest neuroscientific studies on how children learn are changing traditional teaching methods.

In "All in the Mind" Claudia Hammond reveals new work which could challenge long held beliefs, and meets the teachers and children taking part in this ground breaking work.

Claudia Hammond reveals new evidence on how children learn.

All in the Mind. The latest neuroscientific studies on how children learn are changing traditional teaching methods. In "All in the Mind" Claudia Hammond reveals new work which could challenge long held beliefs, and meets the teachers and children taking part in this ground breaking work.

072010121420101215Claudia Hammond reports on the latest findings in neuroscience and mental health.

072011053120110601Is the increasingly networked, online world of teenagers contributing to emotional bullying and violence among teen girlfriends and boyfriends? This is one of the questions raised by the research of Christine Barter of the University of Bristol.

She is one of the few UK researchers to study the incidence and impact of emotional and physical violence within teenage sexual relationships.

Dr Barter and her colleagues have surveyed and interviewed both a general school population between the ages of 13 and 17 years old, and also disadvantaged teenagers who were excluded from school or in foster or care homes.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, girls are much more likely to be on the receiving end of aggressively controlling and physically violent behaviour.

The researchers were surprised themselves however that as many as a quarter of girls say they had been victims of physical violence from their boyfriends.

With emotional violence or controlling behaviour, three quarters of teenage girls said had been on the receiving end of this.

The researchers were also disturbed that the incidences of these behaviours doesn't vary much from the youngest to the oldest teenagers.

Emotional violence ranges from name calling to being frequently checked up on through texting and social networking sites.

This includes keeping tabs on their girlfriends by monitoring their movements through mobile phones.

One young woman interviewed by Dr Barter said she frequently had to send photos of herself by camera phone to prove to her boyfriend she was where she said she was.

New technologies give teenagers many more opportunities to exert control over their partners.

The studies suggest the impact, particularly on girls, can be very damaging for self-esteem.

However, a significant number of young women, particularly from disadvantaged backgrounds, feel that these controlling and aggressive behaviours indicate that their boyfriends are showing they care about them.

Christine Barter worries that this suggests these attitudes are becoming normalised among young people.

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker.

Claudia Hammond discusses the impact and incidence of violence in teenage relationships.

Dr Barter and her colleagues have surveyed and interviewed both a general school population between the ages of 13 and 17 years old, and also disadvantaged teenagers who were excluded from school or in foster or care homes. Perhaps unsurprisingly, girls are much more likely to be on the receiving end of aggressively controlling and physically violent behaviour.

The researchers were surprised themselves however that as many as a quarter of girls say they had been victims of physical violence from their boyfriends. With emotional violence or controlling behaviour, three quarters of teenage girls said had been on the receiving end of this. The researchers were also disturbed that the incidences of these behaviours doesn't vary much from the youngest to the oldest teenagers.

Emotional violence ranges from name calling to being frequently checked up on through texting and social networking sites. This includes keeping tabs on their girlfriends by monitoring their movements through mobile phones. One young woman interviewed by Dr Barter said she frequently had to send photos of herself by camera phone to prove to her boyfriend she was where she said she was. New technologies give teenagers many more opportunities to exert control over their partners.

The studies suggest the impact, particularly on girls, can be very damaging for self-esteem. However, a significant number of young women, particularly from disadvantaged backgrounds, feel that these controlling and aggressive behaviours indicate that their boyfriends are showing they care about them. Christine Barter worries that this suggests these attitudes are becoming normalised among young people.

072012061220120613
20120613 (R4)
A woman who was stalked by a disgruntled female employee speaks out.

In an exclusive interview for All in the Mind, a woman who was harassed and threatened over four years by a female member of staff, calls for employers to take stalking in the workplace seriously.

After her attacker was sent to jail for two years, this former high-flying senior manager tells Claudia Hammond about the death threats, abusive mails and harassment that amounted to "four years of hell".

Producer: Fiona Hill.

072013061120130612
0720131224Claudia takes a musical journey inside the brain looking at the very latest neuroscientific research on everything from how we notice patterns in music to why the beat can be so powerful.

We're not born with musical ability, but the brain is an efficient machine that lets us learn the rules. But what about the people who can't understand music? And how can our emotional responses to music be used therapeutically?

When it comes to understanding the mind and the brain, the beauty of music is that there are so many dimensions to it - there's pitch, rhythm, melody, our memories and that all-important emotional element. These are rich pickings for those using it to try to understand the workings of the mind better and to develop new therapies.

0724/05/201120110525
07Preventing Ptsd2012121120121212How changing the way you think could prevent PTSD or Post Traumatic Shock Disorder.

Rates of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD in the emergency services are much higher than the general population, but new research at Kings College, London, and Oxford University suggests that it's possible to protect staff of the 999 Services by teaching them how to think differently.

Dr Jennifer Wild and her doctoral student, Rachel White, have discovered that by training people to concentrate on HOW the event is unfolding rather than WHY, significantly fewer PTSD-type symptoms are reported.

Researchers exposed volunteers to traumatic films with visuals of accidents and deaths, but whereas those in the WHY group were encouraged to focus on the abstract, on why such terrible things happen and what it would mean for the people involved and their families, the HOW group was prompted to focus on the specific and objective details of the event without straying into its greater meaning.

The results showed that the WHY group suffered from more intrusive memories, flashbacks and hyper-arousal than the HOW group, suggesting that if emergency workers could be trained to change their thinking, then psychological trauma could be reduced.

Claudia Hammond discusses the implications of these findings with Dr Jennifer Wild and talks to "Bob", who suffered severe PTSD for years after traumatic events in the armed forces and later the police went untreated.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

07Racism, Awards And Hypermobility2020121520201216 (R4)Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

Claudia Hammond asks why there is little research in the UK into whether childhood racism can cause mental health problems in the future. She is joined by BBC Broadcaster, Rajan Datar, psychiatrist Kam Bhui and Professor Craig Morgan to discuss the importance of investigating racism and its effects and how recent findings are pointing towards the kinds of changes that need to be made in the future. Claudia catches up with Hannah who nominated the winner in the group category of the 2018 All in the Mind Awards to find out what she’s been up to in the last two years. Also Madeleine Finlay reports on why being double-jointed means you might be more likely to be prone to anxiety.

Producer: Pam Rutherford

Childhood racism and future mental health.

Claudia Hammond asks why there is little research in the UK into whether childhood racism can cause mental health problems in the future. She is joined by BBC Broadcaster, Rajan Datar, psychiatrist Kam Bhui and Professor Craig Morgan to discuss the importance of investigating racism and its effects and how recent findings are pointing towards the kinds of changes that need to be made in the future. Claudia catches up with Hannah who nominated the winner in the group category of the 2018 All in the Mind Awards to find out what she’s been up to in the last two years. Also Madeleine Finlay reports on why being double-jointed means you might be more likely to be prone to anxiety.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

081993110919931110In the last of the present series, Professor Anthony Clare looks at mental Workouts for mental fitness, plus a special report on electro-convulsive therapy.

Producers Nadine Grieve and Clare McGinn

0819941102Professor Anthony Clare explores the fascination of the naked flame. Repeated from yesterday at 11.30am
0820020417Dr Raj Persaud chairs a debate on schizophrenia. Answering listeners' questions in front of an audience of psychiatric service-providers and users will be Professor Robin Murray , head of general psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry; Cliff Prior of the National Schizophrenia Fellowship; Dr Hilary Foster from the Assertive Outreach Service, Surrey Oaklands NHS Trust; and Rufus May, a psychologist who suffered from schizophrenia. Producer Marya Burgess Phone the BBC Action Line: [number removed]
0820080722200807238/8. Claudia Hammond reports on psychological and psychiatric matters.

Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

0820081223Could hobbies like knitting help to keep depression at bay?

Could hobbies like knitting help to keep depression at bay? Plus psychological research that could help us all to be more persuasive.

8/8. Can hobbies, like knitting, help keep depression at bay? Claudia Hammond examines the evidence. Producer Fiona Hill

082009071419941109Repeated from yesterday 11.30am

Repeated from yesterday 11.30am

8/8. Claudia Hammond looks at a cognitive behavioural therapy course to see what it would entail. Is it really an easier option than addressing the painful past? Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

082009071420090715Claudia Hammond examines Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to find out if it is, as some people think, the easy option in helping them come to terms with mental illness.

CBT has been branded a panecea for treating mental illness.

Some people think it would be easier to have a course of this than to delve into their past and address their relationships with their parents.

Yet is a course of CBT that easy? It looks at people's behavioural patterns and sees how they can change them in order to deal with situations better.

Change is sometimes hard to come to terms with, so CBT might not be the easy option.

CBT has been branded a panecea for treating mental illness. Some people think it would be easier to have a course of this than to delve into their past and address their relationships with their parents. Yet is a course of CBT that easy? It looks at people's behavioural patterns and sees how they can change them in order to deal with situations better. Change is sometimes hard to come to terms with, so CBT might not be the easy option.

Claudia Hammond looks at Cognitive Behavioural Therapy.

8/8. Claudia Hammond looks at cognitive behavioural therapy.

Repeated from yesterday at 9pm

082009122220091223Alois Alzheimer, Hans Asperger, Sergei Korsakoff all lent their names to the disease, syndrome or autistic disorder that they first identified.

Claudia Hammond talks to Professor Douwe Draaisma about the personal background of these brain researchers as well as the individual patients on which such scientific breakthroughs were made.

Alois Alzheimer, Hans Asperger, Sergei Korsakoff all lent their names to the disease, syndrome or autistic disorder that they first identified. Claudia Hammond talks to Professor Douwe Draaisma about the personal background of these brain researchers as well as the individual patients on which such scientific breakthroughs were made.

Exploring scientists whose names have become synonymous with a disease or a syndrome.

8/8. Claudia Hammond hears about the eminent psychiatrists and neurologists, such as Asberger, Bonnet, Korsakoff and Gilles de la Tourette, whose names have become synonymous with a disease or a syndrome. Producer Fiona Hill Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

082010071320100714Sex offenders are among the most reviled people in our society; their crimes evoking powerful responses from communities and the media.

But over 30,000 named people on the Sex Offenders Register do live in our midst, and with loneliness and social isolation contributing to recidivism, how can the risk of re-offending be reduced ? In a special programme, Claudia Hammond talks to former prisoners about their crimes and meets the volunteers in Circles of Support and Accountability, who choose to meet, befriend and support these people, in order to help them rehabilitate and reintegrate back into society.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

Sex offenders are among the most reviled people in our society; their crimes evoking powerful responses from communities and the media. But over 30,000 named people on the Sex Offenders Register do live in our midst, and with loneliness and social isolation contributing to recidivism, how can the risk of re-offending be reduced ? In a special programme, Claudia Hammond talks to former prisoners about their crimes and meets the volunteers in Circles of Support and Accountability, who choose to meet, befriend and support these people, in order to help them rehabilitate and reintegrate back into society.

Claudia Hammond reports on the rehabilitation of sex offenders.

082011060720110608Why is it that humans have evolved to be capable of both extreme cruelty but also deep compassion? Compassion-focused therapy was developed with an emphasis on what evolutionary psychology tells us about our brain and emotions.

Compassion is the cornerstone of Professor Paul Gilbert's work as a psychologist in Derby, and for people with chronic mental health problems, often from neglectful or abusive backgrounds, it is designed to help stop their feelings of shame and self-criticism.

Claudia Hammond talks to Paul Gilbert about compassion, what is it, why did it evolve and why is it useful as a basis for talking therapies?

Claudia Hammond talks to Professor Paul Gilbert about compassion.

Why is it that humans have evolved to be capable of both extreme cruelty but also deep compassion? Compassion-focused therapy was developed with an emphasis on what evolutionary psychology tells us about our brain and emotions. Compassion is the cornerstone of Professor Paul Gilbert's work as a psychologist in Derby, and for people with chronic mental health problems, often from neglectful or abusive backgrounds, it is designed to help stop their feelings of shame and self-criticism. Claudia Hammond talks to Paul Gilbert about compassion, what is it, why did it evolve and why is it useful as a basis for talking therapies?

082012061920120620Who should investigate when someone detained under the mental health act dies in hospital?

The well respected mental health campaigner, Janey Antoniou, died in hospital last year, while detained under the Mental Health Act. Her husband, Dr Michael Antoniou, talks exclusively to All in the Mind's Claudia Hammond, about the circumstances of his wife's death, and why he believes it's wrong that hospitals, when a patient dies, can investigate themselves.

082012121820121219How reading a baby's mind helps their development, Claudia Hammond investigates.

How reading a baby's mind aids their development, Claudia Hammond investigates a new technique which helps depressed mothers connect with their infants.

082013061820130619Do older people want or need specialist mental health services? Claudia Hammond investigates. A London-based Vietnamese community has developed a recipe to prevent homesickness.
0820131231Claudia Hammond finds out why your exercise regime could be hindered if you have been taxing your brain too much. She talks to Professor Samuele Marcora from the University of Kent about his research on why the chemical by products of being mentally exhausted can actually make physical exercise much harder. He discusses his new research with the Ministry of Defence where he is finding that soldiers can be trained to resist the overwhelming effects of cognitive fatigue. Also in the programme the moral distress experienced by nurses and more results from the BBC Stress test and what it reveals about mental well-being.

0814/12/201020101215Claudia Hammond reports on the latest findings in neuroscience and mental health.

0831/05/20112011060720110601Claudia Hammond discusses the impact and incidence of violence in teenage relationships.
08Parkinson's Disease20050412200504138/10 Muhammad Ali 's daughter Rasheda talks to

Dr Raj Persaud about the disease that the former boxer suffers from and the effects it has on his family - Parkinson's disease. Repeated from yesterday at9pm

In 1982 Boxing legend Muhammad Ail was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease, raising the profile of this chronic neurological condition which affects so many people around the world.

His daughter, Rasheda Ali talks to Dr Raj Persaud about the book she has written to help the children and grandchildren of people affected by Parkinson's disease, and looks into new research in this area.

In 1982, Boxing legend Muhammad Ail was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease, raising the profile of this chronic neurological condition which affects so many people around the world. His daughter, Rasheda Ali, talks to Dr Raj Persaud about the book she has written to help the children and grandchildren of people affected by Parkinson's disease, and looks into new research in this area.

8/10. In 1982 Boxing legend Muhammad Ail was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease, raising the profile of this chronic neurological condition which affects so many people around the world. His daughter, Rasheda Ali talks to Dr Raj Persaud about the book she has written to help the children and grandchildren of people affected by Parkinson's disease, and looks into new research in this area. [Rpt of Tue 9.00pm]

8/10. In 1982 boxing icon Muhammad Ali was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, raising the profile of this chronic neurological condition. His daughter, Rasheda, talks to

Dr Raj Persaud about the book she has written to help the children and grandchildren of people affected by the disease, and looks into new research in this area.

Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

08Rapport; Brain Health In Later Life; Changing Optimism Through Lifespan2020122220201223 (R4)Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

What is the best way of getting on with people at home and at work? Psychologists Emily and Laurence Alison have spent their careers working with the police as they build rapport with suspects, sometimes terrorism suspects or perpetrators of domestic violence. And their conclusions about how best to do it have lessons for the rest of us too. They discuss their new book, "Rapport: the four ways to read people".

Claudia catches up with Helen who nominated a finalist in the group category of the 2018 All in the Mind Awards to find out what she’s been up to in the last two years.

What can you do in middle age to protect your brain later on? Everyone’s brain changes as they get older, but some people maintain their cognitive health and others don’t. Rik Henson, Deputy Director of the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge, has brought together studies using brain scans with research where people in their 80s are asked to look back on their lives to try to work out the impact middle age activity can have on preserving your faculties.

Do we have everything to look forward to in our teens and then realise later what life can throw at us? Bill Chopik Assistant Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University, carried out the largest study of its kind to discover when optimism peaks, with surprising results.

Claudia's studio guest is Catherine Loveday, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Westminster.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Rapport; Brain health in later life; Changing optimism through lifespan.

What is the best way of getting on with people at home and at work? Psychologists Emily and Laurence Alison have spent their careers working with the police as they build rapport with suspects, sometimes terrorism suspects or perpetrators of domestic violence. And their conclusions about how best to do it have lessons for the rest of us too. They discuss their new book, "Rapport: the four ways to read people".

Claudia catches up with Helen who nominated a finalist in the group category of the 2018 All in the Mind Awards to find out what she’s been up to in the last two years.

What can you do in middle age to protect your brain later on? Everyone’s brain changes as they get older, but some people maintain their cognitive health and others don’t. Rik Henson, Deputy Director of the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge, has brought together studies using brain scans with research where people in their 80s are asked to look back on their lives to try to work out the impact middle age activity can have on preserving your faculties.

Do we have everything to look forward to in our teens and then realise later what life can throw at us? Bill Chopik Assistant Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University, carried out the largest study of its kind to discover when optimism peaks, with surprising results.

Claudia's studio guest is Catherine Loveday, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Westminster.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Rapport; Brain health in later life; Changing optimism through lifespan.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

What is the best way of getting on with people at home and at work? Psychologists Emily and Laurence Alison have spent their careers working with the police as they build rapport with suspects, sometimes terrorism suspects or perpetrators of domestic violence. And their conclusions about how best to do it have lessons for the rest of us too. They discuss their new book, "Rapport: the four ways to read people".

Claudia catches up with Helen who nominated a finalist in the group category of the 2018 All in the Mind Awards to find out what she’s been up to in the last two years.

What can you do in middle age to protect your brain later on? Everyone’s brain changes as they get older, but some people maintain their cognitive health and others don’t. Rik Henson, Deputy Director of the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge, has brought together studies using brain scans with research where people in their 80s are asked to look back on their lives to try to work out the impact middle age activity can have on preserving your faculties.

Do we have everything to look forward to in our teens and then realise later what life can throw at us? Bill Chopik Assistant Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University, carried out the largest study of its kind to discover when optimism peaks, with surprising results.

Claudia's studio guest is Catherine Loveday, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Westminster.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Rapport; Brain health in later life; Changing optimism through lifespan.

Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind

08 LAST21/12/20102010122120101222

Claudia Hammond reports on the latest findings in neuroscience and mental health.

092005041920050420Dr Raj Persaud presents a programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of our brains. Hell be examining the latest research with leading experts.

Dr Raj Persaud presents All in the Mind, the programme dedicated to the mysterious and wonderful workings of our brains. He'll be examining the latest research in this field, and bringing together experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health.

9/10. The programme dedicated to the mysterious workings of the brain. Dr Raj Persaud examines the latest research and brings together experts from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health.

Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

092011061420110615icting the future - why expert forecasters aren't very good at it but we believe them anyway.

Why did so many economists not foresee the financial crisis in 2008? President Obama recently criticised American spy agencies for not predicting unrest across the Middle East - but could they have done - are experts in their field actually better at predicting future events? And are some personalities or professions better at it than others? Some psychologists say experts are about as accurate as dart throwing monkeys yet we consistently ask them to predict the future.

In this week's All in the Mind Claudia is joined by author Dan Gardner and by psychologist Dylan Evans to discuss the reasons why expert predictions fail but why we are still attracted to those who predict confidently even if they end up being spectacularly wrong.

Could it all be down to a human aversion to uncertainty?

Why expert forecasters aren't good at predicting the future but we believe them anyway.

icting the future - why expert forecasters aren't very good at it but we believe them anyway. Why did so many economists not foresee the financial crisis in 2008? President Obama recently criticised American spy agencies for not predicting unrest across the Middle East - but could they have done - are experts in their field actually better at predicting future events? And are some personalities or professions better at it than others? Some psychologists say experts are about as accurate as dart throwing monkeys yet we consistently ask them to predict the future. In this week's All in the Mind Claudia is joined by author Dan Gardner and by psychologist Dylan Evans to discuss the reasons why expert predictions fail but why we are still attracted to those who predict confidently even if they end up being spectacularly wrong. Could it all be down to a human aversion to uncertainty?

092012062620120627Claudia Hammond reports on the link between nature therapy and mental health.

Old asylums were often sited in pleasant gardens and natural landscapes. The treatment regime inside might not have been so therapeutic, but being outside and experiencing nature was seen as important for recovery.

Claudia Hammond investigates the evidence behind the commonly held belief that the growing cycle, the seasons and horticulture in general, really do aid good mental health care.

She talks to psychologists training to be "ecotherapists" and asks whether those deprived of any access to green space are more vulnerable to mental illness.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

0907/06/20112011061420110608Claudia Hammond talks to Professor Paul Gilbert about compassion.
0913/07/201020100714Claudia Hammond reports on the rehabilitation of sex offenders.
102011062120110622
1014/06/201120110615Why expert forecasters aren't good at predicting the future but we believe them anyway.
10 LAST200504262005042710/10. Given that we are living longer, can we live better

Raj Persaud visits the Institute for Ageing and Health at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Repeat of yesterday at 9pm

Dr Raj Persaud visits the Institute for Ageing and Health, University of Newcastle upon Tyne.

He discovers more about its work and how it might improve the lives of older people.

Dr Raj Persaud visits the Institute for Ageing and Health at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. He discovers more about its work and how it might improve the lives of old people. [Rptd Wed 4.30pm]

Dr Raj Persaud visits the Institute for Ageing and Health, University of Newcastle upon Tyne. He discovers more about its work and how it might improve the lives of older people. [Rpt of Tue 9.00pm]

10/10. Given that we are living longer, can we live longer better? Raj Persaud visits the Institute for Ageing and Health at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Here he discovers how it might improve the lives of older people. Executive producer Rebecca Asher Repeated tomorrow at 4.30pm

112011062820110629Nobody knows exactly how many people experience mental illness in Hong Kong, but as this former British colony undertakes its first-ever survey of mental health, it's widely believed that rates will match every other developed, industrialised country.

And when that data comes in, as Claudia Hammond reports in a special All In The Mind from Hong Kong, the gaps in mental health care will be exposed.

For years, the reality of mental illness in Hong Kong has remained hidden: a combination of shame, stigma and denial.

Claudia hears from those who have experienced mental distress about the discrimination they suffer, and talks to mental health campaigners and professionals about the urgent need to expand and modernise the service to meet the soaring demand for mental health care.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

A special programme about mental health care in Hong Kong.

Claudia Hammond reports.

For years, the reality of mental illness in Hong Kong has remained hidden: a combination of shame, stigma and denial. Claudia hears from those who have experienced mental distress about the discrimination they suffer, and talks to mental health campaigners and professionals about the urgent need to expand and modernise the service to meet the soaring demand for mental health care.

A special programme about mental health care in Hong Kong. Claudia Hammond reports.

1121/06/201120110622
122011070520110706
1228/06/201120110629A special programme about mental health care in Hong Kong. Claudia Hammond reports.
1305/07/201120110706Claudia Hammond explores the limits and potential of the human mind.
13 LASTUnderstanding Arsonists2011071220110713What makes somebody become an arsonist ? Every week in England and Wales sixty five people are either killed or injured by somebody who has deliberately started a fire.

But surprisingly little is known about the different kinds of arsonists, apart from the worrying fact that once they've shown an interest in fire, they then tend to carry on risking life and property by starting more.

Claudia Hammond hears from "firesetters" as they're formally known, and talks to one of the leading experts in the field, Dr Theresa Gannon from the University of Kent.

Dr Gannon's research is aiming to fill the gaps in our knowledge about arsonists - mostly men - and from this develop the country's first treatment programme.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

Understanding arson: Claudia Hammond reports on the scale and seriousness of "firesetting"

What makes somebody become an arsonist ? Every week in England and Wales sixty five people are either killed or injured by somebody who has deliberately started a fire. But surprisingly little is known about the different kinds of arsonists, apart from the worrying fact that once they've shown an interest in fire, they then tend to carry on risking life and property by starting more. Claudia Hammond hears from "firesetters" as they're formally known, and talks to one of the leading experts in the field, Dr Theresa Gannon from the University of Kent. Dr Gannon's research is aiming to fill the gaps in our knowledge about arsonists - mostly men - and from this develop the country's first treatment programme.

LAST19951112In the last of the series, Anthony Clare looks at mental health provision for people with a hearing impairment. Repeated from Tuesday
LAST19960602In the last of the series, Professor

Anthony Clare discusses biographies. Repeated from Tuesday

LAST19970608Professor Anthony Clare celebrates 750 years of Bedlam. Last in series. Repeated from Tuesday
LAST19930601In the last programme of the series, Professor

Anthony Clare discusses liaison psychiatry, and there's a review of how I V and radio have been covering matters of the mind in recent weeks. Producer James Herbert

LAST19930602In the last programme of the series, Professor

Anthony Clare discusses liaison psychiatry, and there's a review of how TV and radio have been covering matters of the mind in recent weeks.

LAST19960528In the last of the series, Professor

Anthony Clare talks to the author of a new biography of Jung.

Producer Nick Utechin. Rptd Sunday 10.15pm

LAST19970603The last programme of the current series dealing with matters psychological and psychiatric. Professor Anthony Clare celebrates 750 years of Bedlam, Europe's first lunatic asylum. Producer Nick Utechin

Repeated Sunday 10.15pm

01011988103019881104Professor Anthony Clare presents a weekly magazine devoted to matters of psychology, normal and abnormal, as reflected in events, books, films and plays, as well as in the work of psychologists and psychiatrists. Researcher RONNI DAVIS Producer MICHAEL EMBER

Stereo

Stereo (Details on Friday at 4. 05pm)

01021988110619881111Professor Anthony Clare presents a weekly magazine devoted to matters of psychology, normal and abnormal, as reflected in events, books, films and plays as well as in the work of psychologists and psychiatrists. Researcher RONNI DAVIS

Producer MICHAEL EMBER. Stereo

Stereo (Details on Friday at 4.05pm)

01031988111319881118Professor Anthony Clare presents a weekly magazine devoted to matters of psychology, normal and abnormal, as reflected in events, books, films and plays as well as in the work of psychologists and psychiatrists. Researcher RONNI da vis

Producer MICHAEL EMBER. Stereo

01041988112019881125Professor Anthony Clare presents a weekly magazine about matters of psychology. Researcher RONNI DAVIS

Producer MICHAEL EMBER. Stereo

01051988112719881202Professor Anthony Clare presents a weekly magazine devoted to psychological matters

Researcher RONNI DAVIS

Producer MICHAEL EMBER. Stereo

01061988120419881209Professor Anthony Clare presents a weekly magazine devoted to matters of psychology, normal and abnormal, as reflected in events, books, films, plays as well as in the work of psychologists and psychiatrists. Researcher RONNI DAVIS

Producer MICHAEL EMBER. Stereo

01071988121119881216Professor Anthony Clare presents a weekly magazine devoted to matters of psychology, normal and abnormal, as reflected in events, books, films, plays as well as in the work of psychologists and psychiatrists. Researcher RONNI DA vis

Producer MICHAEL EMBER. Stereo

0108 LAST1988121819881223Last in the present series of Professor Anthony Clare 's weekly magazine devoted to matters of psychology. Researcher RONNI DAVIS

Producer MICHAEL EMBER. Stereo