Analysis

Programme examining the ideas and forces which shape public policy in Britain and abroad

Programme examining the ideas and forces which shape public policy in Britain and abroad.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
19700410The War for

Jenkins' Ear

On the eve of the Budget, an examination of Britain's longer-term economic prospects. Those taking part include: JOHN BIFFEN , MP

F. H. R. CATHERWOOD , Director-General Of NEDC

PROFESSOR RICHARD E. CAVES Of Harvard University

GILBERT de BOTTON, Managing Director of Rothschild's. Zurich VICTOR FEATHER, General Secretary of tuc

THE RT HON RICHARD MARSH , MP

PETER OPPENHEIMER , Student Of Christ Church, Oxford

PIERRE-PAUL SCHWEITZER, Managing Director of IMF

Presented by IAN MCINTYRE

Produced by George FISCHER

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Unknown: John Biffen

Unknown: F. H. R. Catherwood

Unknown: Professor Richard E.

Unknown: Richard Marsh

Unknown: Peter Oppenheimer

Presented By: Ian McIntyre

Produced By: George Fischer

19700501A programme cf discussion andanatysisofthemainsocial, economic, and potiticatprob)ems of the day.

Each week experts wiU discuss a topic of major importance behind the days news both at home and abroad,

19700619The Government We Deserve

As the dust settles,

Analysis tests some theories on why the Election went the way it did

Taking part:

PAUL foot, political journalist

T. E. UTLEY , leader writer to the Daily Telegraph

BRIAN WALDEN, Member (Labour) for Birmingham All Saints in the last Parliament

ESMOND WRIGHT, Member (Conservative) for Glasgow Pollok in the last Parliament Chairman IAN MCINTYRE

Produced by GEORGE FISCHER

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Leader: T. E. Utley

Unknown: Ian McIntyre

Produced By: George Fischer

19700710Do comprehensive schools work?

An investigation by ROBERT SKIDELSKY

Are they effective in creating equality of opportunity? Do they provide a good education for the more able pupil? Can a school be truly comprehensive if there is selection inside it? ROBERT SKIDELSKY has visited comprehensive schools and has talked to educationists, sociologists, and local education authority members, including PROFESSOR BRIAN SIMON , and CAROLINE BENN Of ILEA, joint authors of Half Way There. Produced by Richard KEEN

Contributors

Unknown: Robert Skidelsky

Unknown: Professor Brian Simon

Unknown: Caroline Benn

Produced By: Richard Keen

19700717Golda Meir

Israel's Prime Minister in conversation with IAN MCINTYRE

Produced by GEORGE FISCHER

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Unknown: Ian McIntyre

Produced By: George Fischer

19700731Egypt and the Middle East Written and narrated by JOSEPH HONE

Joseph Hone has recently returned from Egypt. He reports on the political and social mood in Egypt today, the chances of a negotiated settlement with Israel, the Soviet presence and missile build-up. He also enquires what future there is for the Palestinian refugees and their Liberation organisations. Produced by ALAN BURGESS

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Unknown: Joseph Hone

Produced By: Alan Burgess

19700925Times Present

The Times is not what it was. There are people inside and outside Printing House Square who regard that as no bad thing. There are others who think that one more national institution is well down the slippery slope.

With change in the air once more, Analysis takes a critical look at Britain's greatest newspaper.

Introduced by IAN MCINTYRE Produced by GEORGE Fischer

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Introduced By: Ian McIntyre

Produced By: George Fischer

19701120Defending Europe

Herr Helmut Schmidt, West German Defence Minister, talks in his Bonn office to LAURENCE MARTIN , Professor of War Studies, King's College, London. Herr Schmidt, Social Democrat Party leader, is not only one of West Germany's most prominent politicians but also author of a book on strategy. He assesses possible future threats from Eastern Europe. gives his views on NATO'S future, and discusses the logic behind Bonn's defence strategy.

Produced by DAVID WILLEY

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Unknown: Laurence Martin

Produced By: David Willey

19701211Lord Carnngton

Secretary of State for Defence, in conversation with LAURENCE W. MARTIN ,

Professor of War Studies, King's College, London about British defence policy and issues arising from it.

Produced by GEORGE FISCHER

S.58 Weather

Contributors

Unknown: Laurence W. Martin

Produced By: George Fischer

19701218Does Parliament Work? Its critics feel that Parliament has been reduced from a powerful workshop, constantly challenging and checking a powerful Executive, to a mere talk-shop.

The new Administration has complemented changes in government machinery - designed to improve its own efficiency -by a redesigned system of Select Committees which, it is claimed, will increase MPs' ability to scrutinise the Executive's intentions and actions.

Is this enough? Or should Parliament redefine its role? Presented by NORMAN HUNT

Produced by BERNARD TATE

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Presented By: Norman Hunt

Produced By: Bernard Tate

19880128The Need to Know

The current tussle in the courts between the Government and the press.

(Details tomorrow at 11. 00am L W)

19880129The Need to Know

The current tussle in the courts between the Government and the press may have implications far beyond the relationship between politicians and the media.

There are arguments about the public's right to know what government is doing in its name, and about the essential ingredients of an open society. Where should the line be drawn between freedom of expression and the security of the state? Who should draw it: the Government, Parliament or the courts?

Presented by Peter Hennessy Producer MARK LAITY

19910131Up the Ladder

An upwardly mobile new Prime Minister and renewed educational anxieties are raising an old British question about social origins and destinations. In the first of a new series, David Walker asks: who goes to the top of the classes, and do they stay there? Producer Simon Coates

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

Producer: Simon Coates

19910203Up the Ladder

An upwardly mobile new Prime Minister and renewed educational anxieties are raising an old British question about social origins and destinations.

David Walker asks: who go to the top of the classes, and do they stay there?

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

19910207The series that takes an in-depth look at current affairs. Presented by Peter Hennessy.

Producer Caroline Anstey

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Hennessy.

Producer: Caroline Anstey

19910210with Peter Hennessy

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy
19910214Trading Partners

The old world order of trade is crumbling.

Even if an international agreement can be rescued, the emergence of new regional trading blocs is increasing protectionist pressures. Roland Dallas asks: can future trade wars be averted?

Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Producer: Frank Smith

19910217Trading Partners

The old world order of trade is crumbling.

Even if an international agreement can be rescued, the emergence of new regional trading blocs is increasing protectionist pressures. Roland Dallas asks: can future trade wars be averted?

19910221Centre Point

One way out of its Poll Tax dilemma is for the Government to centralise things yet further. David Walker asks: What would schools, the police and other services look like if the man from Whitehall took complete charge? Producer Simon Coates

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

Producer: Simon Coates

19910224Centre Point

David Walker asks what would schools, the police and other services look like if the Government were to centralise things yet further?

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

19910228with Peter Hennessy Producer Zareer Masani

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Zareer Masani

19910303with Peter Hennessy

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy
19910307The series that takes an in-depth look at current affairs.

Presented by David Walker.

Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Presented By: David Walker.

Producer: Frank Smith

19910310with David Walker

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker
19910314As Europeans submit blueprints for their common future, will their Constitution turn out to be like the British one - a set of unwritten conventions, nudges, winks and historical precedents - rather than a formal document?

Presented by David Walker.

Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Presented By: David Walker.

Producer: Frank Smith

19910317Shaping Up

As Europeans submit blueprints for their common future, how will their Constitution turn out? Presented by David Walker.

Contributors

Presented By: David Walker.

As Europeans submit blueprints for their common future, how will their Constitution turn out? Presented by David Walker.

Contributors

Presented By: David Walker.

19910321From Clogs to Clogs? The politics of relative economic decline have featured in virtually every British election since

1906 and will undoubtedly do so again. In the first of a three-part series, Peter Hennessy examines the deeper, historical causes of Britain's economic under-performance. Producer Caroline Anstey

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Caroline Anstey

19910324From Clogs to Clogs?

In the first of a three-part series, Peter Hennessy examines the deeper, historical causes of Britain's economic under-performance.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

In the first of a three-part series, Peter Hennessy examines the deeper, historical causes of Britain's economic under-performance.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

19910328From Clogs to Clogs In the second of his

three-part series on Britain's relative economic decline, Peter Hennessy examines the price paid for victory in 1945 and asks why the UK missed out on Western

Europe's post-war economic miracle.

Producer Caroline Anstey

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Caroline Anstey

19910331From Clogs to Clogs? In the second of his

three-part series on Britain's relative economic decline, Peter Hennessy examines the price we paid for victory in 1945 and asks why the UK missed out on Western Europe's postwar economic miracle.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

three-part series on Britain's relative economic decline, Peter Hennessy examines the price we paid for victory in 1945 and asks why the UK missed out on Western Europe's postwar economic miracle.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

19910404From Clogs to Clogs? In the last of three programmes on Britain's relative economic decline, Peter Hennessy asks: after a century of political debate about industrial regeneration, are we a nation that really wants to be modernised? Or is it simply lack of business as usual?

Producer Caroline Anstey

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Caroline Anstey

19910407From Clogs to Clogs? In the last of his three programmes on Britain's relative economic decline, Peter Hennessy asks: after a century of political debate about industrial regeneration, is Britain a nation that really wants to be modernised? Or is it simply lack of business as usual?

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

'From Clogs to Clogs? In the last of his three programmes on Britain's relative economic decline, Peter Hennessy asks: after a century of political debate about industrial regeneration, is Britain a nation that really wants to be modernised? Or is it simply lack of business as usual?

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy'

19910502MEUt Markets a la

NEW Mode

The return of the series.

Tory leaders are now trumpeting the 'social market' and sedulously courting their German counterparts.

David Walker asks: is a new Conservatism being unveiled or old-style Toryism done up in different garb?

Producer Simon Coates

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

Producer: Simon Coates

19910509Over the Rainbow

Latin America's economic prosperity looks more assured now than it has for years, but the region's poor are getting poorer. Roland Dallas asks: will better economic management under democracy ever deliver improved living conditions? Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Producer: Frank Smith

19910512Over the Rainbow

Latin America's economic prosperity looks more assured now than it has for years, but the region's poor are getting poorer. Roland Dallas asks: will better economic management under democracy ever deliver improved living conditions?

19910516Merchants of the Apocalypse

The Gulf War highlighted the dangers of international arms sales to dubious regimes. Peter Hennessy examines the case for new controls on the trade in lethal weaponry by western arms producers.

Producer Zareer Masani

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Zareer Masani

19910519Merchants of the Apocalypse

The Gulf War highlighted the dangers of international arms sales to dubious regimes. Peter Hennessy examines the case for new controls on the trade in lethal weaponry by western arms producers.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

The Gulf War highlighted the dangers of international arms sales to dubious regimes. Peter Hennessy examines the case for new controls on the trade in lethal weaponry by western arms producers.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

19910523The series that takes an in-depth look at current affairs.

With David Walker.

Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker.

Producer: Frank Smith

19910526The series that takes an in-depth look at current affairs. Presented by David Walker.

Contributors

Presented By: David Walker.

The series that takes an in-depth look at current affairs. Presented by David Walker.

Contributors

Presented By: David Walker.

19910530Fuelling Problems? Britain's energy industries are now largely in private hands, shadowed by small domestic regulators.

But, with international price pressures, Brussels activism and environmental concerns all growing,

Dieter Helm asks: are we equipped to meet the needs of the 1990s?

Producer Simon Coates

Contributors

Unknown: Dieter Helm

Producer: Simon Coates

19910602Fuelling Problems?

Britain's energy industries are now largely in private hands, shadowed by small domestic regulators. But, Dieter Helm asks: are we equipped to meet the needs of the 1990s?

Contributors

Unknown: Dieter Helm

19910606To Have and to

Have Not

Where has the ending of east-west conflict left the former Third World?

Peter Hennessy discusses the changing shape of north-south relations, and the role of foreign aid in developing countries. Producer Zareer Masam

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Zareer Masam

19910609To Have and to Have Not

Where has the ending of East-West conflict left the former Third World?

Peter Hennessy discusses the changing shape of North-South relations, including the role of foreign aid in developing countries.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Peter Hennessy discusses the changing shape of North-South relations, including the role of foreign aid in developing countries.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

19910613Not in My Backyard

With housing needs set to grow in the 90s, David Walker asks why the government has not applied market principles to land use and development. Will it soon have to insist on building in somebody's backyard? Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

Producer: Frank Smith

19910616Not in My Backyard Where is the housing needed for the 1990s to be built? David Walker asks why the government has not applied market principles to land use and development. Will it soon have to insist on building in somebody's backyard?

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker
19910620The Back of the Envelope

Both Conservative and Labour politicians voice public confidence about winning overall majorities at the approaching

General Election. But

Peter Hennessy asks what will happen if the voters dash their hopes? Producer Simon Coates

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Simon Coates

19910623The Back of the Envelope

Both Conservative and Labour politicians voice public confidence about winning overall majorities at the approaching

General Election. But

Peter Hennessy asks what will happen if the voters dash their hopes?

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

19910627Balkan Backwaters

Can the turbulent region, which once sparked a world war, overcome its history of neglect, poverty and strife? Chris Cviic considers how south-eastern Europe is filling the vacuum left by the collapse of communism. Producer Zareer Masani

Contributors

Unknown: Chris Cviic

Producer: Zareer Masani

19910630Balkan Backwaters
19910704Good Money After Bad?

The Germans are the most enthusiastic advocates of supplying the Soviet Union with new capital. But the German economy has plunged into the red. As the top industrialised nations prepare to meet at the G7 summit, David Walker asks: how special will the German-Soviet 'special relationship' turn out to be? Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

Producer: Frank Smith

19910707Good Money after Bad? As the top industrialised nations prepare to meet at the G7 summit, David Walker asks: how special will the German-Soviet

special relationship' turn out to be?

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

'special relationship' turn out to be?

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker'

19910711Little Grey Cells

The 1980s transatlantic boom in ideologically committed private research institutes coincided with the demise of official think tanks.

But, Peter Hennessy asks, how influential were the putative policy-makers and what legacy have they left?

Producer Simon Coates

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Simon Coates

19910714The last in the present series.

Little Grey Cells

The 1980s transatlantic boom in ideologically committed private research institutes coincided with the demise of official think tanks.

But, Peter Hennessy asks, how influential were the putative policy-makers and what legacy have they left?

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

19910919Slow-Slow-Quick-Quick- Slow

At the end of the year,

Europe is meant to move forward as member states agree new treaties. But are we all in step? In the first two programmes of a new series, David Walker asks how much convergence has there really been in Europe?

Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

Producer: Frank Smith

19910922NEW Slow-Slow-Quick-

Quick-Slow At the end of the year,

Europe is meant to move forward as member states agree new treaties on political, economic and monetary union. In the first of two programmes, David Walker asks how much convergence has there really been?

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

19910926Slow-Slow-Quick-Quick-Slow

In the second part of his examination of European convergence,

David Walker looks at the extent to which there is already a two-speed Europe: one moving quickly to integration, the other sticking to the slow lane. And he asks: if there is to be real convergence, how much are the rich members prepared to pay in increased funds for social and regional supports for the poorer brethren?

Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

Producer: Frank Smith

19910929Slow-Slow-Quick-Quick-Slow

In the second part of his examination of European convergence,

David Walker asks: if there is to be real integration, how much are the rich members prepared to pay in increased funds for social and regional support for the poorer brethren?

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

19911003The Bear Unchained

Will post-Communist Russia successfully assimilate western liberal values, or could it revert to the autocracy and chauvinism of the past? Kevin Ruane considers the historical roots and volatile future of Russian nationalism.

ProducerZareerMasani

Contributors

Unknown: Kevin Ruane

19911006The Bear Unchained
19911010The Mind behind the Cross

Over 50 national opinion polls will be published during the next general election campaign, supplementing the political parties' numerous private surveys. But

Peter Hennessy asks: how far do the pollsters know voters' views, and what effect does intensive polling have on our politics? Producer Simon Coates

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Simon Coates

19911013The Mind behind the Cross

Over 50 national opinion polls will be published during the next general election campaign, supplementing the political parties' numerous private surveys. But

Peter Hennessy asks: how far do the pollsters know voters' views, and what effect does intensive polling have on our politics?

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

19911017Not in Front of the Children

With the Children Act coming into force this week, David Walker asks: do public and politicians increasingly prefer to leave sensitive social policy to the professionals? ProducerFrank Smith

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

19911020Not in Front of the Children

As the Children Act comes in to force, David Walker sks: do the public and politicians increasingly prefer to leave sensitive social policy to the professionals?

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

19911024The series that takes an in-depth look at current affairs.

Producer ZareerMasani

19911027An in-depth look at currentaffairs.
19911031Learning Curves

Britain has one of the most elitist systems of higher education in the world.

No society has made the transition to mass provision without strain.

Peter Hennessy asks what awaits the UK as it tries to double student numbers by the year 2000. Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Frank Smith

19911103Learning Curves

Peter Hennessy asks what awaits the UK as it tries to double student numbers by the year 2000.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Peter Hennessy asks what awaits the UK as it tries to double student numbers by the year 2000.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

19911107Pros and Cons

Increasingly, doctors and teachers are coming under the control of lay executives, and the autonomy of accountants and lawyers is being questioned. David Walker asks: what is happening to professionalism as the professional managers take charge? Producer Simon Coates

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

Producer: Simon Coates

19911110Pros and Cons

David Walker asks: what is happening to professionalism as the professional managers take charge?

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

19911114Perestroika in the Desert

The collapse of the Soviet bloc has left its former

Arab allies searching for a new strategy for survival in an American-led world.

John Keay considers how far this is driving states like Egypt and Syria to restructure their political and economic institutions.

Producer Zareer Masani

Contributors

Unknown: John Keay

Producer: Zareer Masani

19911117Perestroika in the Desert

The collapse of the Soviet bloc has left its former

Arab allies searching for a new strategy for survival in an American-led world.

John Keay considers how far this is driving states like Egypt and Syria to restructure their political and economic institutions.

Contributors

Unknown: John Keay

John Keay considers how far this is driving states like Egypt and Syria to restructure their political and economic institutions.

Contributors

Unknown: John Keay

19911121Teething the Watchdogs Whoever forms the next government, the task of reasoned criticism will fall on the House of Commons Select Committees.

Twelve years after their last reform,

Peter Hennessy asks: is it time to sharpen their bite? Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Frank Smith

19911124Teething the Watchdogs Twelve years after the last reform of the House of Commons Select

Committees,

Peter Hennessy asks: is it time to sharpen their bite?

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

19911128A Pleasing Prospect?

Together with his political opponents, John Major advocates creating a single environmental protection agency for Britain. But Dieter Helm asks: is a national, bureaucratic approach the best option for tackling the problems of - and the opportunities for - pollution control? Producer Simon Coates

Contributors

Unknown: John Major

Unknown: Dieter Helm

Producer: Simon Coates

19911201A Pleasing Prospect?
19920206L Dukes of York...?

The series returns with the first of two programmes on economic ups and downs. David Walker asks: when should the next recession be expected, and who or what should be blamed?

Producer Simon Coates

19920209n Dukes of York ..?

In the first of two programmes on economic ups and downs,

David Walker asks: when should the next recession be expected and who or what should be blamed?

n Dukes of York..?

19920213Dukes of Hazard?

The second of two programmes on economic ups and downs.

David Walker asks: does the long wait for even a modest upswing inspire confidence in future global growth and the wealth it will create?

Producer Simon Coates

19920216Dukes of Hazard?

Britain's recession, the country is told, is part of international economic slowdown. In the second of two programmes,

David Walker asks: does Britain's long wait for even a modest upswing mean that it can be sure of future global growth and the wealth it will create?

19920220An Unnatural Practice?

Is coalition government as alien to Britain's political culture as many people assume, or could this country be on the threshold of a new politics of consensus at the top?

Peter Hennessy considers the shape of things to come.

Producer Zareer Masani

19920223An Unnatural Practice?

Is coalition government as alien to Britain's political culture as many people assume, or could this country be on the threshold of a new politics of consensus at the top? With Peter Hennessy.

19920227Sticks and Stones

Peter Hennessy chairs a discussion on the politics of language. Taking part:

Professor Bernard Williams , Renford Bambrough and Edward Pearce.

Producer Caroline Anstey

19920301Sticks and Stones

Peter Hennessy chairs a discussion on the politics of language.

(Broadcastiast Thursday)

19920305Full of Eastern

Promise?

As western managers look enviously at the booming companies run by their Japanese counterparts,

Peter Haynes asks: should we try to copy oriental methods, or is the answer to our firms' shortcomings closer to home?

ProducerSimon Coates

19920308Full Of

Eastern Promise

Peter Haynes investigates whether Western companies should copy Oriental methods.

19920312Unsceptred Isles Are the UK regions farthest from Europe's golden core destined to decline? David Walker asks if we need new policies for the periphery. Producer Zareer Masani
19920315Unsceptred Isles Are the UK regions farthest from Europe's golden core destined to decline? David Walker asks if new policies are needed for the periphery.
19920319No Science Please, We're Politicians

Peter Hennessy asks: how good are government ministers at reaching or scrutinising costly scientific decisions?

How can their advice systems be improved? Producer Chris Westcott

19920322No Science Please, We're Politicians

Peter Hennessy asks: how good are ministers at reaching or scrutinising costly scientific decisions, especially on issues such as global warming?

How can their advice systems be improved?

19920326Back Over There?

Is America First more than a rhetorical gesture of US politicians?

Professor Laurence Martin chairs a discussion on the practicalities of possible US disengagement from the military and economic spheres.

Producer Simon Coates

19920329Back Over There?

Professor Laurence Martin chairs a discussion on the practicalities of possible US disengagement from the military and economic spheres.

19920402Borderline Issues? David Walker asks how long old ideas about inviolable boundaries can survive the growing global interdependence of the 90s. Producer Caroline Anstey
19920405Borderline Issues?

David Walker asks how long the old ideas about inviolable boundaries can survive the growing global interdependence of the 90s.

19920409Public Interest, Private Lives

Peter Hennessy examines the conflicting needs for openness and privacy in political life.

Producer Zareer Masani

19920412Public Interest, Private Lives

How much transparency can be expected in public life, especially during a general election, and do politicians conform to public expectations?

Peter Hennessy examines the conflicting needs for openness and privacy in political life.

19920416In The Mood

David Walker considers how government policy may be affected by shifts in public attitudes to such issues as the environment and women's rights. Producer Chris Westcott

19920419In the Mood

Last in series.

People are rethinking the environment, health, safety and women's rights. David Walker examines the implications of these long-term shifts.

19920514What's Left?

After socialism, social democracy; after social democracy, what? David Walker asks how and on what principles the Left might seek to re-invent itself.

Producer Chris Westcott

19920517What's Left?

In the first of a new series,

David Walker asks how the Left might seek to re-invent itself.

19920521Bluehall, SWl?

British voters, politicians and officials have been accustomed to parties alternating in power. But, Peter Hennessy asks, what will a fourth successive

Conservative term mean for the ways in which we are governed?

Producer Simon Coates

19920524Bluehall, SW1?

Peter Hennessy asks: what will a fourth successive

Conservative term mean for the ways in which we are governed?

19920528Europe is undergoing one of its periodical crises of confidence. David Walker chairs a discussion on the kind of lead Britain should offer when it takes over the presidency of the Community in July. Producer Chris Westcott
19920531Europe In A Major Key? David Walker chairs a discussion on the kind of lead Britain should offer when it takes over the presidency of the European Community in July.
19920604Tiger, Tiger.... Burning Bright Are the booming economies of East Asia converging into a new economic power bloc that could overtake the advanced industrial nations of the West? In the first of two programmes, John Keay examines the competing and complementary interests underlying the Far Eastern economic miracle.

Producer Zareer Masani

19920607Tiger, Tiger.... Burning Bright

John Keay presents the first of two programmes. Are the booming economies of East Asia converging into a new economic power block?

19920611Tiger, Tiger....

In the Shadows of the Night

In the second of two programmes John Keay considers whether economic success is enough to guarantee political stability and military security in East Asia, or could we see a new struggle for mastery? Producer Zareer Masani

Tiger, Tiger - In the Shadows of the Night

19920618Down to Business

What exactly does British business want from the government? As the leadership changes at the CBI and the DTI, David Walker asks whether we are entering a new phase of cosy corporatism. Producer Simon Coates

19920621Down To Business

What exactly does British business want from the government - more or less? As the leadership changes at the CBI and the DTI, David Walker asks whether we are entering a new phase of cosy corporatism.

19920625The Last Right

John Major is pledged to reduce Whitehall secrecy. But, Peter Hennessy asks, can Britain achieve genuine open government without a Freedom of Information Act?

Producer Chris Wescott

19920628John Major is pledged to reduce Whitehall secrecy. But, Peter Hennessy asks, can Britain achieve genuine open government without a Freedom of Information Act?

'John Major is pledged to reduce Whitehall secrecy. But, Peter Hennessy asks, can Britain achieve genuine open government without a Freedom of Information Act?'

19920702Chaired by Peter Hennessy. Producer Zareer Masani
19920705Chaired by Peter Hennessy.
19920709The Matrimonial State The institution of marriage is out of fashion. David Walker asks whether what's happening to the traditional, formal bonding of men and women is any business of the policy-makers Producer Simon Coates

'The Matrimonial State The institution of marriage is out of fashion. David Walker asks whether what's happening to the traditional, formal bonding of men and women is any business of the policy-makers Producer Simon Coates'

19920712The Matrimonial State

David Walker asks whether what's happening to the traditional bonding of men and women is any business of the policy-makers.

19920716The Municipal Consumer?

Local self government has traditionally been seen as one of the bulwarks of British democracy. In recent years however, local democracy has increasingly been replaced by consumer choice. So, asks Vernon Bogdanor , does this amount to the weakening of the vote and strengthening of the purse?

Producer Chris Westcott

19920719The Municipal Consumer?

In recent years local democracy has been replaced by consumer choice. So, asks Vernon Bogdanor , is this a weakening of the vote and strengthening of the purse?

19920723Out of the Midday Sun? Despite the end of the empire and the passing of the Cold War, Britain's desire for a special world role lives on. Peter Hennessy considers whether ambitions are realistic or affordable for a medium-sized nation. Producer Zareer Masani

'Out of the Midday Sun? Despite the end of the empire and the passing of the Cold War, Britain's desire for a special world role lives on. Peter Hennessy considers whether ambitions are realistic or affordable for a medium-sized nation. Producer Zareer Masani'

19920726Out of the Midday Sun? Britain's desire for a special world role lives on. Peter Hennessy considers whether such ambitions are realistic.
19921008Passing the Buck

Did Treasury economists get it wrong? To what extent should officials share responsibility with politicians for Britain's economic woes? In the first of a new series, David Walker audits the performance and mindset of the guardians of Treasury orthodoxy.

Producer Zareer Masani. Stereo

19921011Passing The

NEW Buck

David Walker audits the performance and mindset of the guardians of Treasury orthodoxy. Stereo

19921015Not Playing in Peoria Godfrey Hodgson examines why America's politicians seem to be part of her problems and how they might become part of the solution. Stereo
19921018Not Playing in Peoria Godfrey Hodgson examines why America's politicians seem to be part of her problems.
19921022Whither Welfare?

One of the most potent messages of the last election was 'No more tax', so whither the Welfare State?

Andrew Adonis asks whether universal benefits might be replaced by new ways of targeting to help those most in need.

Producer David Levy

One of the most potent messages of the last election was No more tax, so whither the Welfare State?

19921025Whither Welfare?

Andrew Adonis asks whether universal benefits might be replaced by new ways of targeting to help those most in need.

19921029Brittle Bonds of Friendship

Britain's economic, military and political future in Europe hinges on the German connection.

David Walker asks how the British people are to relate to a country about which many of them continue to have mixed feelings.

Producer David Hendy

19921101Brittle Bonds of Friendship

Britain's economic, military and political future in Europe hinges on the German connection. David Walker asks how the British people are to relate to a country about which many of them continue to have mixed feelings.

19921105An in-depth look at public policy and political ideas at home and abroad.

Producer David Levy

19921108The programme that takes an in-depth look at public policy and political ideas at home and abroad.
19921112Mittel-Europa Unlimited For Czechoslovakia,

Hungary and Poland, the transition to free markets is proving uneven and risky. Chris Cviic asks if the liberalising economies of central Europe would do better to find their own road to capitalism, instead of copying western models. Producer Zareer Masani

19921115Mittel Europa Unlimited Chris Cviic asks if the liberalising economies of Central Europe would do better to find their own road to capitalism, instead of copying western models.

'Mittel Europa Unlimited Chris Cviic asks if the liberalising economies of Central Europe would do better to find their own road to capitalism, instead of copying western models.'

19921119Through the Roof?

Growth is back in favour with the Government. But David Walker asks if increased national prosperity depends on the housing market, and a new bout of rising prices. Producer Simon Coates

19921122Through the Roof? David Walker asks if increased national prosperity depends on the housing market, and a new bout of rising prices.

'Through the Roof? David Walker asks if increased national prosperity depends on the housing market, and a new bout of rising prices.'

19921126A Place Apart

Northern Ireland remains one of the most violently divided parts of Europe, despite the politicians' efforts. So can there ever be a constitutional settlement in which both communities have their aspirations satisfied?

Brendan O'Leary assesses the options for progress in Britain's own ethnic conflict.

Producer David Hendy

19921129A Place Apart

Northern Ireland remains one of the most divided parts of Europe. Brendan O'Leary asks if there will ever be a settlement in which both communities have their aspirations satisfied.

19921203A Class of Their Own?

Britain seems to be acquiring an American-style under-class, without job prospects, decent education and housing, or stable family relationships. Melanie Phillips considers the perils for policy-makers of ignoring this uncomfortable social reality.

Producer Zareer Masani

19921206A Class of their Own? Britain seems to be acquiring an American-style 'underclass'. Melanie Phillips considers the perils for policy makers of ignoring this uncomfortable social reality.

A Class of their Own? Britain seems to be acquiring an American-style underclass. Melanie Phillips considers the perils for policy makers of ignoring this uncomfortable social reality.

19921210Hard Words in the Classroom

What educational thinking has inspired the Government's marathon effort to remake the schools? David Walker asks whether the Tories have finally killed the post-war progressive impulse in the classrooms. Producer David Hendy

19921213David Walker asks if the Tories have finally killed the post-war progressive impulse in the classrooms.
19921217The last programme in the series which examines issues of public policy. Producer Simon Coates
19921220
199301281m

Cultivating the Nation

There's a National Heritage, a National Curriculum and a National Arts and Media Strategy. But does it add up to a vision of national identity? In the first of a new series, David Walker asks what government can and ought to do about the national culture.

Producer David Hendy.

19930131Cultivating the Nation There's a National

Heritage, a National

Curriculum and a National Arts and Media Strategy. But does it all add up to a vision of national identity? David Walker asks what government ought to do about the national culture.

19930204The New Masters?

The European Court of Justice overrides British MPs, forces ministers to change policy and even rules against

Jacques Delors. Paul Craig asks why the judges in Luxembourg are becoming so powerful and if they or Britain will decide how the country's future in Europe unfolds.

19930207The New Masters?

The European Court of Justice overrides British MPs, forces Ministers to change policy and even rules against

Jacques Delors. Paul Craig asks why the judges in Luxembourg are becoming so powerful and just who will decide how Britain's future in Europe unfolds.

19930211Freedom for

Frankenstein?

With a growing proportion of scientific research being carried out by private companies, is there a danger that commercial considerations are eroding the openness and accountability of British science? Hugh Prysor -Jones asks if the Government's current review of science policy - its first in two decades - is already too late to stem the tide.

Producer Zareer Masani.

19930214Freedom for

Frankenstein?

With a growing proportion of scientific research being carried out by private companies, are commercial considerations eroding the accountability of British science? Hugh Prysor-Jones asks if the government's current review of science policy is too late to stem the tide.

19930218Bully for the Boys in Blue

The government is about to create a new structure for the police.

David Walker asks if the new order will cut crime, and considers its possible political consequences. Producer David Hendy

19930221Bully for the Boys in Blue

David Walker asks if the government's new structure for the police will cut crime, and what the political consequences might be.

19930225Greening World Trade Whether the goal is

dolphin-friendly' tuna, or saving the rainforest, Western greens are increasingly advocating trade sanctions to eliminate environmentally unfriendly activities across the globe.

Frances Caimcross asks if the world trading system can be given a greener hue without opening the way to protectionism. Producer David Levy

dolphin-friendly tuna, or saving the rainforest, Western greens are increasingly advocating trade sanctions to eliminate environmentally unfriendly activities across the globe.

19930228Greening World Trade Frances Caimcross asks if the world trading system can be given a greener hue.
19930304Breaking Up is Hard to Do?

Some of the world's major corporations are finding their size a barrier to growth. Peter Haynes asks what makes some large companies more nimble than others and what future giant firms have. Producer Simon Coates

19930307Breaking Up Is Hard to Do?

Peter Haynes asks what makes some large companies more adaptable than others.

19930311Rites of Passage The 1990s are fast becoming the decade of refugees and asylum-seekers. David Walker considers how claims for shelter in Britain should be assessed and the relevance of borders in a single European market. Producer Zareer Masani
19930318The Revisionist

Tendency

Since its electoral defeat, Labour has gained a new leader and started reassessing policies. Hugo Young asks how far the revisionists should go, what their values are, and whether they can rescue Labour from permanent opposition. Producer David Levy

19930321The Revisionist

Tendency

Hugo Young asks whether the new revisionists can hope to rescue the Labour party from permanent opposition.

19930325Out of the Red

Russia is trying to pull itself out of its communist past. But with living standards falling almost as fast as the rouble, should Russia think again about western shock therapy to reform its economy? John Lloyd investigates whether market reforms should be intensified, modified or thrown out altogether. Producer David Hendy

19930328Out of the Red

John Lloyd investigates whether radical market reforms in Russia should be intensified, modified or thrown out altogether.

19930401Losing Our Marbles? The problems of youth have been a recent preoccupation. But David Walker asks: how long before we need to worry about the coming age of the old, when the baby-boom generation retires on private pensions, while its parents grow ever older? Producer Simon Coates

'Losing Our Marbles? The problems of youth have been a recent preoccupation. But David Walker asks: how long before we need to worry about the coming age of the old, when the baby-boom generation retires on private pensions, while its parents grow ever older? Producer Simon Coates'

19930404Losing Our Marbles? David Walker asks: how long before we need to worry about the coming age of the old when the baby-boom generation retires on private pensions, while its parents grow ever older?

'Losing Our Marbles? David Walker asks: how long before we need to worry about the coming age of the old when the baby-boom generation retires on private pensions, while its parents grow ever older?'

19930408Flexible Friends?

The world's most powerful lending institutions, the International Monetary

Fund and the World Bank, have been using their leverage to press major economic reforms on debtor countries. In the last programme of the series, Tony Killick asks whether such policies have been effective in the Third

World and how they should be improved. Producer Zareer Masani

19930411Flexible Friends?
19930513The Commanding Heights?

As British government fragments in a welter of new quangos and agencies, David Walker asks: what powers and accountability do secretaries of state and other ministers retain? Producer Simon Coates

19930516The Commanding Heights?

David Walker asks: what powers and accountability do secretaries of state and other ministers retain?

19930520When the Party's Over Political parties are usually seen as essential to the healthy functioning of parliamentary democracy. But many are heavily in debt, and fewer and fewer people are joining them. So is the 'mass' party dead? Are members losing control to the professionals?

Sarah Benton asks: what happens to democracy then? Producer David Hendy

When the Party's Over Political parties are usually seen as essential to the healthy functioning of parliamentary democracy. But many are heavily in debt, and fewer and fewer people are joining them. So is the mass party dead? Are members losing control to the professionals?

19930523When the Party's Over Is the mass political party dead? If so, asks

Sarah Benton , what happens to democracy?

19930527Monarchs to Measure According to the opinion polls, the British public wants the monarchy to continue, but in a more democratic form.

Anthony King considers how far Britain's oldest institution needs to re-invent itself to survive the next century.

Producer Zareer Masani

19930530Monarchs to Measure Anthony King considers how far the monarchy needs to re-invent itself. Producer Zareer Masani
19930603Social Europe? How relevant is Maastricht to the arrival in Britain of the EC's 'social dimension'? David Walker asks how far the European style is already influencing jobs and pensions. Might

Europe itself now be going cold on employee rights? Producer David Levy

Social Europe? How relevant is Maastricht to the arrival in Britain of the EC's social dimension? David Walker asks how far the European style is already influencing jobs and pensions. Might

19930610The Sleeping Giants?

City institutions invest much of the nation's savings, yet their challenges to poor company results and soaring executive salaries often seem muted.

Evan Davis asks: is ittime forthe money men to stir themselves and hold the boardroom bosses to greater account and, if so, how?

Producer Simon Coates

19930613The Sleeping Giants?

Evan Davis asks if it is time for the city institutions to stir themselves.

19930617Slouching towards Bethlehem

Are Britain's young people being brought up in an alarming moral vacuum? If so, what can be done to revitalise the agents of moral guidance without resorting to the rigid strictures of the past? Melanie Phillips examines how a common set of values might be provided for the next generation.

Producer David Hendy

19930620Slouching Towards Bethlehem

Melanie Phillips examines how a common set of values might be provided for the next generation.

19930624More Equal than Others?

At a time when egalitarianism as a political force appears dead, equality continues to figure prominently on Britain's social agenda. David Walker examines the motives behind equal opportunity policies today. Producer Zareer Masani

19930627More Equal than Others?

At a time when egalitarianism as a political force appears dead, equality continues to figure prominently on Britain's social agenda. David Walker examines the motives behind equal opportunities and what the policies mean in practice.

19930701Now What, Chancellor?

The economy hovers between recession and recovery, there are issues of budgetary balance to be settled, and the questions of E R M membership and a European single currency are waiting in the wings. Peter Jay chairs a discussion analysing the problems involved in steering the economy through the 90s. Producer David Levy

19930704Now What, Chancellor?

Peter Jay chairs a discussion analysing the problems involved in steering the economy through the 90s.

19930708Workshop of the World?

What will Britain's economic role be in the increasingly competitive world of the 21st Century? Can manufacturing ever again provide enough jobs to go round? If not, what takes its place? Frances Cairncross asks what strategy Britain, as a small English-speaking island off the coast of Europe, should adopt. Producer David Hendy

19930718All Sound and Fury?

Ian Davidson asks if there is sufficient agreement or the political will to make a common European foreign and security policy a reality.

19930722Off With Their Heads!

Britain has a tradition of treating its intellectuals with scepticism and irreverence. David Walker asks if the price we pay for our suspicion of big ideas is political and cultural mediocrity.

Last programme in the current series.

Producer ZareerMasani

19930725Off with Their Heads!

David Walker asks if Britain pays the price for its suspicion of big ideas. The last in the present series.

19931007Beyond Our Means? With growii ig pre-budget speculation about higher taxes, spending curbs and pay freezes, Britain's budget deficit has replaced the recession as economic enemy number one. Stuart Simon asks if the government's overdraft is really out of control or whether it's a false alarm. Producer Zareer Masani

'Beyond Our Means? With growii ig pre-budget speculation about higher taxes, spending curbs and pay freezes, Britain's budget deficit has replaced the recession as economic enemy number one. Stuart Simon asks if the government's overdraft is really out of control or whether it's a false alarm. Producer Zareer Masani'

19931010Beyond Our Means? Stuart Simon asks if the Government's overdraft is out of control.
19931014More, Wiser and Wealthier?

The Government plans an increase in the numbers of people in higher education. Andrew Adonis asks whether expansion is a good thing, and what will it mean for students, universities and the economy? Producer Simon Coates

19931017More, Wiser and Wealthier?

Andrew Adonis asks whether further expansion in higher education is necessarily a good thing.

19931021A Mother's Work

Lack of decent childcare traps many mothers at home, or in low-paid part-time jobs. But Frances Cairncross asks whether government should help women go out to work when their children are small? And what help works best -forwomen, for their children, and for the economy?

ProducerNicolaMeyrick

19931031UnrnMon. Trade unions have been driven from political influence by 14 years of Conservative rule and deprived of economic power by high unemployment.

Hugo Young asks the TUC's new General

Secretary John Monks what he's learned from the 1980s and whether unions will matter in the 1990s. Producer David Levy

19931104Stuart Simon asks how much can really be expected if the current GATT talks are successful and whether changes in the world economy require a new trade regime. Producer ZareerMasani
19931107Trading Blows. How much we can really expect to gain from the current round of Gatt talks? Stuart Simon reports.
19931111Tractors on the Lawn. British agriculture faces intensifying economic, social and political pressures from Whitehall, Brussels and further afield. Hugh Prysor -Jones asks what changes will be wrought on farming and with what consequences for the rural economy and way of life.

Producer Simon Coates

19931114Tractors on the Lam. British agriculture faces intensifying pressures from Whitehall, Brussels and further afield. Hugh Prysor-Jones looks at the consequences of change for the rural economy and way of life.

'Tractors on the Lam. British agriculture faces intensifying pressures from Whitehall, Brussels and further afield. Hugh Prysor-Jones looks at the consequences of change for the rural economy and way of life.'

19931118To Do No Harm?

A House of Lords committee is expected to report within weeks on whether the law prohibiting euthanasia should be changed. Melanie Phillips examines how Britain resolves this and other ethical issues such as abortion and embryo research.

Producer Nicola Meyrick

19931121With a House of Lords committee about to report on whether the law prohibiting euthanasia should be changed, Melanie Phillips examines how Britain resolves this and other ethical issues.

'With a House of Lords committee about to report on whether the law prohibiting euthanasia should be changed, Melanie Phillips examines how Britain resolves this and other ethical issues.'

19931125Paved with Good Intentions

What lies behind President Clinton's spectacular foreign policy reverses? Stuart Simon asks whether the world is too unpredictable to be managed, even by an unrivalled superpower, or whether America has simply failed to find the right goals? Producer David Levy

19931128Paved with Good Intentions. What lies behind President Clinton's spectacular foreign policy reverses? Why has he failed to define a doctrine that sounds as cred,ble as those of his predecessors? Stuart Simon asks if the world is too unpredictable and complicated to be managed even by an unrivalled superpower, or whether America has simply failed to find the right goals?

'Paved with Good Intentions. What lies behind President Clinton's spectacular foreign policy reverses? Why has he failed to define a doctrine that sounds as cred,ble as those of his predecessors? Stuart Simon asks if the world is too unpredictable and complicated to be managed even by an unrivalled superpower, or whether America has simply failed to find the right goals?'

19931202Russian Roulette. As Russians prepare for their first post-Communist general election, Analysis discusses how western policy-makers should be addressing the outcome...

Producer Zareer Masani

19931205Russian Roulette. A look at how western policy-makers should be addressing the outcome of the first post-Communi