Analysis

Analysis is broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on Thursdays at 2030 GMT and repeated on Sundays at 2130 GMT.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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19700410The War for

Jenkins' Ear

On the eve of the Budget, an examination of Britain's longer-term economic prospects. Those taking part include: JOHN BIFFEN , MP

F. H. R. CATHERWOOD , Director-General Of NEDC

PROFESSOR RICHARD E. CAVES Of Harvard University

GILBERT de BOTTON, Managing Director of Rothschild's. Zurich VICTOR FEATHER, General Secretary of tuc

THE RT HON RICHARD MARSH , MP

PETER OPPENHEIMER , Student Of Christ Church, Oxford

PIERRE-PAUL SCHWEITZER, Managing Director of IMF

Presented by IAN MCINTYRE

Produced by George FISCHER

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Unknown: John Biffen

Unknown: F. H. R. Catherwood

Unknown: Professor Richard E.

Unknown: Richard Marsh

Unknown: Peter Oppenheimer

19700501A programme cf discussion andanatysisofthemainsocial, economic, and potiticatprob)ems of the day.

Each week experts wiU discuss a topic of major importance behind the days news both at home and abroad,

19700619The Government We Deserve

As the dust settles,

Analysis tests some theories on why the Election went the way it did

Taking part:

PAUL foot, political journalist

T. E. UTLEY , leader writer to the Daily Telegraph

BRIAN WALDEN, Member (Labour) for Birmingham All Saints in the last Parliament

ESMOND WRIGHT, Member (Conservative) for Glasgow Pollok in the last Parliament Chairman IAN MCINTYRE

Produced by GEORGE FISCHER

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Leader: T. E. Utley

Unknown: Ian McIntyre

19700710Do comprehensive schools work?

An investigation by ROBERT SKIDELSKY

Are they effective in creating equality of opportunity? Do they provide a good education for the more able pupil? Can a school be truly comprehensive if there is selection inside it? ROBERT SKIDELSKY has visited comprehensive schools and has talked to educationists, sociologists, and local education authority members, including PROFESSOR BRIAN SIMON , and CAROLINE BENN Of ILEA, joint authors of Half Way There. Produced by Richard KEEN

Contributors

Unknown: Robert Skidelsky

Unknown: Professor Brian Simon

Unknown: Caroline Benn

Produced By: Richard Keen

19700717Golda Meir

Israel's Prime Minister in conversation with IAN MCINTYRE

Produced by GEORGE FISCHER

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Unknown: Ian McIntyre

19700731Egypt and the Middle East Written and narrated by JOSEPH HONE

Joseph Hone has recently returned from Egypt. He reports on the political and social mood in Egypt today, the chances of a negotiated settlement with Israel, the Soviet presence and missile build-up. He also enquires what future there is for the Palestinian refugees and their Liberation organisations. Produced by ALAN BURGESS

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Unknown: Joseph Hone

Produced By: Alan Burgess

19700925Times Present

The Times is not what it was. There are people inside and outside Printing House Square who regard that as no bad thing. There are others who think that one more national institution is well down the slippery slope.

With change in the air once more, Analysis takes a critical look at Britain's greatest newspaper.

Introduced by IAN MCINTYRE Produced by GEORGE Fischer

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Introduced By: Ian McIntyre

Produced By: George Fischer

19701120Defending Europe

Herr Helmut Schmidt, West German Defence Minister, talks in his Bonn office to LAURENCE MARTIN , Professor of War Studies, King's College, London. Herr Schmidt, Social Democrat Party leader, is not only one of West Germany's most prominent politicians but also author of a book on strategy. He assesses possible future threats from Eastern Europe. gives his views on NATO'S future, and discusses the logic behind Bonn's defence strategy.

Produced by DAVID WILLEY

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Unknown: Laurence Martin

19701211Lord Carnngton

Secretary of State for Defence, in conversation with LAURENCE W. MARTIN ,

Professor of War Studies, King's College, London about British defence policy and issues arising from it.

Produced by GEORGE FISCHER

S.58 Weather

Contributors

Unknown: Laurence W. Martin

19701218Does Parliament Work? Its critics feel that Parliament has been reduced from a powerful workshop, constantly challenging and checking a powerful Executive, to a mere talk-shop.

The new Administration has complemented changes in government machinery - designed to improve its own efficiency -by a redesigned system of Select Committees which, it is claimed, will increase MPs' ability to scrutinise the Executive's intentions and actions.

Is this enough? Or should Parliament redefine its role? Presented by NORMAN HUNT

Produced by BERNARD TATE

9.58 Weather

Contributors

Presented By: Norman Hunt

19880128The Need to Know

The current tussle in the courts between the Government and the press.

(Details tomorrow at 11. 00am L W)

19880129The Need to Know

The current tussle in the courts between the Government and the press may have implications far beyond the relationship between politicians and the media.

There are arguments about the public's right to know what government is doing in its name, and about the essential ingredients of an open society. Where should the line be drawn between freedom of expression and the security of the state? Who should draw it: the Government, Parliament or the courts?

Presented by Peter Hennessy Producer MARK LAITY

19910328From Clogs to Clogs In the second of his

three-part series on Britain's relative economic decline, Peter Hennessy examines the price paid for victory in 1945 and asks why the UK missed out on Western

Europe's post-war economic miracle.

Producer Caroline Anstey

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Caroline Anstey

19910331From Clogs to Clogs? In the second of his

three-part series on Britain's relative economic decline, Peter Hennessy examines the price we paid for victory in 1945 and asks why the UK missed out on Western Europe's postwar economic miracle.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

19910404From Clogs to Clogs? In the last of three programmes on Britain's relative economic decline, Peter Hennessy asks: after a century of political debate about industrial regeneration, are we a nation that really wants to be modernised? Or is it simply lack of business as usual?

Producer Caroline Anstey

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Caroline Anstey

19910407From Clogs to Clogs? In the last of his three programmes on Britain's relative economic decline, Peter Hennessy asks: after a century of political debate about industrial regeneration, is Britain a nation that really wants to be modernised? Or is it simply lack of business as usual?

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy
19910502MEUt Markets a la

NEW Mode

The return of the series.

Tory leaders are now trumpeting the 'social market' and sedulously courting their German counterparts.

David Walker asks: is a new Conservatism being unveiled or old-style Toryism done up in different garb?

Producer Simon Coates

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

Producer: Simon Coates

19910512Over the Rainbow

Latin America's economic prosperity looks more assured now than it has for years, but the region's poor are getting poorer. Roland Dallas asks: will better economic management under democracy ever deliver improved living conditions?

19910516Merchants of the Apocalypse

The Gulf War highlighted the dangers of international arms sales to dubious regimes. Peter Hennessy examines the case for new controls on the trade in lethal weaponry by western arms producers.

Producer Zareer Masani

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Zareer Masani

19910523The series that takes an in-depth look at current affairs.

With David Walker.

Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker.

Producer: Frank Smith

19910526The series that takes an in-depth look at current affairs. Presented by David Walker.

Contributors

Presented By: David Walker.
19910530Fuelling Problems? Britain's energy industries are now largely in private hands, shadowed by small domestic regulators.

But, with international price pressures, Brussels activism and environmental concerns all growing,

Dieter Helm asks: are we equipped to meet the needs of the 1990s?

Producer Simon Coates

Contributors

Unknown: Dieter Helm

Producer: Simon Coates

19910602Fuelling Problems?

Britain's energy industries are now largely in private hands, shadowed by small domestic regulators. But, Dieter Helm asks: are we equipped to meet the needs of the 1990s?

Contributors

Unknown: Dieter Helm

19911006The Bear Unchained
19911020Not in Front of the Children

As the Children Act comes in to force, David Walker sks: do the public and politicians increasingly prefer to leave sensitive social policy to the professionals?

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

19911110Pros and Cons

David Walker asks: what is happening to professionalism as the professional managers take charge?

Contributors

Unknown: David Walker

19911121Teething the Watchdogs Whoever forms the next government, the task of reasoned criticism will fall on the House of Commons Select Committees.

Twelve years after their last reform,

Peter Hennessy asks: is it time to sharpen their bite? Producer Frank Smith

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Hennessy

Producer: Frank Smith

19920223An Unnatural Practice?

Is coalition government as alien to Britain's political culture as many people assume, or could this country be on the threshold of a new politics of consensus at the top? With Peter Hennessy.

19920405Borderline Issues?

David Walker asks how long the old ideas about inviolable boundaries can survive the growing global interdependence of the 90s.

20040725Sanctions: Persuasion or Punishment? Diane Coyle analyses how trade sanctions have been used over the last 20 years, and looks at some unforeseen consequences. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20040815
20040822
20041128Where Have All The Liberals Gone? Felipe Fernandez-Armesto asks whether the liberal consensus has vanished forever. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Weather and

Where Have All The Liberals Gone? Felipe Fernandez-Armesto asks whether the liberal consensus has vanished forever. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Weather and News follows.

2004120920041212President Bush says he wants to work anew with formerly close old allies.

So is a new American love affair with Europe set to blossom?

Quentin Peel examines whether, in the light of the Euro and closer European defence co-operation, the United States will want to work with the Europeans or will pick its friends as it chooses.

20050403Going to the Blogs? The internet is becoming a key political battlefield, with thousands of people debating the issues on their own web pages. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.

Empire Strikes Back: For more than half a century, empire has been a dirty word. Now imperial ideas seem to be in fashion. Zareer Masani investigates. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Followed by Weather."

20050410Empire Strikes Back: For more than half a century, empire has been a dirty word. Now imperial ideas seem to be in fashion. Zareer Masani investigates. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Followed by Weather.
20050417Is Sid dead? In the 1980s, privatisation promised to make Britain a share-owning democracy. But how far did capitalism really spread? Diane Coyle investigates. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Followed by Weather.
20050501The Anxious Voter: John Kampfner asks why insecurity plays such a part in the political process and whether it makes people more or less likely to vote. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Followed by Weather.
20060305Feeling Whose Collars? David Walker asks what the limits of police action in tackling criminality are, and whether greater efficiency comes cost free. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
2006030920060312The growth in China's economic potential has been spectacular and the West is rushing to adjust. But is it inevitable that China's growth will continue at such a rate? Diane Coyle asks whether it's just as likely that the Chinese mix of communism and capitalism will prove increasingly volatile.

The growth in China's economic potential has been spectacular, and the West is rushing to adjust.

But is it inevitable that China's growth will continue at such a rate? Diane Coyle asks whether it's just as likely that the Chinese mix of communism and capitalism will prove increasingly volatile.

The growth in China's economic potential has been spectacular, and the West is rushing to adjust. But is it inevitable that China's growth will continue at such a rate? Diane Coyle asks whether it's just as likely that the Chinese mix of communism and capitalism will prove increasingly volatile.

The growth in China's economic potential has been spectacular, and the West is rushing to adjust. But is it inevitable that China's growth will continue at such a rate? Diane Coyle asks whether it's just as likely that the Chinese mix of communism and capitalism will prove increasingly volatile. Then News.

The growth in China's economic potential has been spectacular and the West is rushing to adjust. But is it inevitable that China's growth will continue at such a rate? Diane Coyle asks whether it's just as likely that the Chinese mix of communism and capitalism will prove increasingly volatile. Then Weather.

20060723Control Orders: David Walker asks whether individualism is diminishing the ability of government to reassure us that someone is in control. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20060903Victims or Villains?: Kenan Malik asks how we can tackle society's confusion about masculinity, with manliness close to becoming a dirty word. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20070101
20070102
20070103
20070104
20070105The background to the stories in the news.
2007110120071104David Kilcullen, an Australian anthropologist and key adviser to the Pentagon, talks to Frank Gardner about the future of the war on terror. He believes that the key to a successful campaign is knowledge rather than weaponry.

David Kilcullen, an Australian anthropologist and key adviser to the Pentagon, talks to Frank Gardner about the future of the war on terror.

Followed by News.

2008041020080413Mukul Devichand meets China's eco-warrriors in Beijing and asks how the rest of the world should understand the significance of their activism.

Polluted China is increasingly seen as a threat to the planet, but many Chinese blame the West for its outsourcing of dirty industries.

They feel the developed countries should stop preaching to China about reducing carbon emissions and start helping to clear up the mess.

Mukul Devichand meets China's eco-warrriors in Beijing and asks how the rest of the world should understand the significance of their activism. Polluted China is increasingly seen as a threat to the planet, but many Chinese blame the West for its outsourcing of dirty industries. They feel the developed countries should stop preaching to China about reducing carbon emissions and start helping to clear up the mess.

Followed by News.

20080706Responsible Journalism

Former editor of the Today programme Kevin Marsh asks how the press can rediscover its public purpose in order to help citizens join the big debates and solve genuine problems at a time when sales and advertising are crashing and readers stopped trusting what they read in the newspapers a long time ago. Many people resent smart editors telling them what to think and only buy their daily paper for the sudoku, celebrity gossip and TV schedules.

20080713Character Factories

Lord Baden-Powell called the scout movement he founded a 'character factory', designed to impart his own public school and military values to the masses. Richard Reeves, commentator and part-time scout master, asks whether it is time for the chattering classes to unashamedly promote their own virtues.

20080720The World's Shifting Balance

Martin Wolf of the Financial Times analyses the crisis facing the global economy, now perceived to be unlike anything seen before. A combination of financial shocks and booming commodity prices have confronted us with the simultaneous threats of inflation and recession. But could the dynamism of the developing world pull rich countries out of the current slowdown?

20080727Bad Elections

Recent months have seen several allegedly flawed elections in various countries. Are they evidence of a dangerous trend for autocratic regimes to seek legitimacy through the ballot box, or are even bad elections better than none at all? Zareer Masani considers the relationship between voting and other democratic rights and asks if we are too obsessed with elections as the key to democracy.

20080803Climate Change: The Quick Fix?

Frances Cairncross investigates geo-engineering, the idea that technology can be developed to cool the world if global warming accelerates. The theory is highly controversial and raises many questions which governments would prefer not to think about. Contributors include US legal expert David Victor of Stanford University, Prof Brian Launder of the University of Manchester and Julian Morris of the International Policy Network.

20080810Al Qaeda's Enemy Within

Could Osama bin Laden's erstwhile comrades be responsible for bringing about the collapse of Al Qaeda? As criticism of the terrorist leader from within the ranks of the Islamist movement itself grows, BBC Security Correspondent Frank Gardner talks to former allies of Osama bin Laden who are now engaged in countering the terrorist leader's agenda.

20080817Fair Play?

Historian Richard Weight asks why many nations with far fewer resources than Britain frequently perform much better at sports. Does the country that invented so many sports take them too seriously or not seriously enough, and does it really matter?

20080824Trust Me, I'm a Patient

Consumer-driven health care is a hot political issue. But as patients, we demand treatments of unproven worth, regardless of cost, in an apparent frenzy of health anxiety. Michael Blastland asks if patients are fit to take charge in what is being described as a historic shift in power.

20081102Do Public Inquiries Work?

Ann Alexander, a lawyer who represented some of the families of relatives killed by Dr Harold Shipman, examines the public inquiries system. She talks to the insiders who have run and worked in major public inquiries and asks if the system now needs reform so that recommendations for the future are fully implemented.

20081109Dead Cert

Michael Blastland examines the damage done by the demand for certainty in politics and asks why our leaders seem unable to say 'I don't know'. He hears calls from former education secretary Estelle Morris that it is time for politicians to admit that the people in charge do not have all the answers.

2011031420110320

The prime minister has proposed a new 'muscular liberalism', aimed at better integrating Britain's Muslims.

It aims to counter the alienation that has led to a few young British Muslim men being prepared to mount terrorist attacks.

David Walker asks what the new policy will mean on the ground, and how easily it can be reconciled with government plans for more local diversity and faith schools.

The prime minister has proposed a new 'muscular liberalism', aimed at better integrating Britain's Muslims. It aims to counter the alienation that has led to a few young British Muslim men being prepared to mount terrorist attacks. David Walker asks what the new policy will mean on the ground, and how easily it can be reconciled with government plans for more local diversity and faith schools.

David Walker examines the prime minister's proposals for 'muscular liberalism'.

#metoo, Moi Non Plus2018052820180603 (R4)Do French women really think differently about sexual harassment?



Do French women really think differently about sexual harassment - and if so, does feminism have national borders?

Catherine Deneuve was one of 100 prominent women who signed an open letter to Le Monde critiquing the #metoo movement.

We believe that the freedom to say yes to a sexual proposition cannot exist without the freedom to pester, they wrote.

Have the French mastered a more sophisticated approach to relations between men and women, based around seduction - or is this a myth that sustains male power?

Parisian journalist Catherine Guilyardi investigates.

Producer: Estelle Doyle

Contributors:

Claude Habib - historian and author of Galanterie francaise

Elaine Sciolino - ex New York Times Paris bureau chief and author of La Seduction and Rue des Martyrs

Eric Fassin - professor of sociology, Paris-8 University

Sylvie Kauffman - editorial director and columnist at Le Monde

Sandra Muller - journalist and founder of #balancetonporc

Cécile Fara and Julie Marangé - feminist activists, organisers of the Street Art and Feminism tour in Paris

Fatima El Ouasdi - feminist activist and founder of Politiqu'elles

Peggy Sastre - philosopher of science and author of Male Domination Doesn't Exist.

Do French women really think differently about sexual harassment - and if so, does feminism has national borders? Catherine Deneuve was one of 100 prominent women who signed an open letter to Le Monde critiquing the #metoo movement. We believe that the freedom to say yes to a sexual proposition cannot exist without the freedom to pester, they wrote. Have the French mastered a more sophisticated approach to relations between men and women, based around seduction - or is this a myth that sustains male power? Parisian journalist Catherine Guilyardi investigates.

14/03/201120110320

The prime minister has proposed a new 'muscular liberalism', aimed at better integrating Britain's Muslims. It aims to counter the alienation that has led to a few young British Muslim men being prepared to mount terrorist attacks. David Walker asks what the new policy will mean on the ground, and how easily it can be reconciled with government plans for more local diversity and faith schools.

David Walker examines the prime minister's proposals for 'muscular liberalism'.

1707: Bravehearts And Bankers2007040520070408The Act of Union between England and Scotland in 1707 provided opportunities for Scots to become key players in the nascent British Empire, which brought wealth to Scotland and power to many Scots.

Is there a link between the end of Empire and the resurgence of Scottish nationalism? Dr Richard Weight examines the relationship between patriotism and economics.

1707: Bravehearts and Bankers

The Act of Union between England and Scotland in 1707 provided opportunities for Scots to become key players in the nascent British Empire, which brought wealth to Scotland and power to many Scots. Is there a link between the end of Empire and the resurgence of Scottish nationalism? Dr Richard Weight examines the relationship between patriotism and economics.

A Dictatorship Of Relativism2010062820100704

The idea that no one has a monopoly on the truth seems to be fixed in the modern Western psyche.

But it's an idea that is under attack.

Pope Benedict claims that we are now living in a dictatorship of relativism - a place where nothing is certain and we are all slaves to our own desires.

Meanwhile, fundamentalist Islam is on the rise and the philosophy of objectivism has become something of a cult among City traders.

Edward Stourton examines claims that the tolerance which moral relativism is supposed to foster has in fact morphed into a new form of extremism.

Have we replaced one set of moral absolutes with another which are threatening religious freedom? Could moral relativism go out of style in secular Western societies? Or does the mere fact that its opponents have such different versions of the truth mean its long-term acceptance is guaranteed?

Producer: Helen Grady.

Edward Stourton asks if relativism has bred a new form of extremism.

But his critics say he is just confusing relativism with liberalism.

He speaks to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, and to the former Tory minister Ann Widdecombe - hotly-tipped to become the UK's next ambassador to the Holy See.

We also hear from the Italian politician and philosopher, Marcello Pera, philosophers Simon Blackburn, Leslie Green and Stephen Wang and the Sunni Islamic scholar Ruzwan Mohammed.

Edward Stourton asks if we are living in a dictatorship of relativism.

A Dictatorship Of Relativism20100704The idea that no one has a monopoly on the truth seems to be fixed in the modern Western psyche. But it's an idea that is under attack.

Pope Benedict claims that we are now living in a dictatorship of relativism - a place where nothing is certain and we are all slaves to our own desires. But his critics say he is just confusing relativism with liberalism.

Edward Stourton examines claims that the tolerance which moral relativism is supposed to foster has in fact morphed into a new form of extremism.

He speaks to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, and to the former Tory minister Ann Widdecombe - hotly-tipped to become the UK's next ambassador to the Holy See.

We also hear from the Italian politician and philosopher, Marcello Pera, philosophers Simon Blackburn, Leslie Green and Stephen Wang and the Sunni Islamic scholar Ruzwan Mohammed.

Producer: Helen Grady.

Edward Stourton asks if we are living in a dictatorship of relativism.

A Human Politics2006031620060319Kenan Malik asks whether humanism still has any meaning - and what politics might look like without a humanist impulse.

A Human Politics: Kenan Malik asks whether humanism still has any meaning - and what politics might look like without a humanist impulse. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]

A Human Politics: Kenan Malik asks whether humanism still has any meaning - and what politics might look like without a humanist impulse. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm]

A Human Politics: Kenan Malik asks whether humanism still has any meaning - and what politics might look like without a humanist impulse. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm] Then News.

A Human Politics: Kenan Malik asks whether humanism still has any meaning - and what politics might look like without a humanist impulse. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.

A Hundred Glorious Years?2021062820210704 (R4)The first, modest Congress of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) took place in late July 1921. Of the twelve original members, only Mao Zedong and one of his closest aides survived to take part in the founding of the People's Republic in 1949. The others were killed by political opponents, lost factional struggles or took up other creeds. And the CCP's history has been punctuated by in-fighting, purges, jailings, defections and sudden deaths.

The Party itself sees things differently. Only it was able to push China into the future, the CCP claims, after earlier abortive attempts to modernise the country - and to secure the global eminence that it now enjoys. Its narrative also insists on the CCP's seamless triumph over obstacles placed in its path by malevolent foreign powers and reactionary domestic forces.

A hundred years on from the CCP's foundation, the eminent China-watcher Isabel Hilton assesses the importance of the Party's centenary and asks why control of its view of its history is so important. She shows which events and ideological shifts the CCP prefers not to highlight or to ignore altogether. She considers why so much of the Party's history swings between periods of repression and liberalisation. And she explores how Xi Jinping, its current leader, is using the centenary. What will preoccupy the CCP in the years ahead?

Producer Simon Coates

Editor Jasper Corbett

What view of its history does China's Communist Party present, what does it omit and why?

A Is For Anonymous2014021720140223

The wish to be anonymous in our dealings with private companies or governments, in commenting on the news or in daily life seems to be increasing.

For some, anonymity is an ironic response to the cult of celebrity that usually preoccupies us. For others, being anonymous enables us to reject the endless celebration of the individual that characterises our times and instead to find comfort and ease in the unidentifiable mass.

Frances Stonor Saunders examines if the desire for being unknown - whether by the NHS or your search engine - is set to be the new trend of our times.

She explores with those who use the cloak of anonymity - including whistleblowers, authors and medical practitioners - the benefits which concealing your identity can confer. But she also considers the dangers of not being identifiable and how these pitfalls may affect the rest of society.

Producer Simon Coates.

A Nation Of Billy Elliots?2008041720080420The government is promoting the arts, including a proposed five hours of culture per week in schools.

Yet recent Arts Council cuts have caused uproar, and the arts in the UK now receive more money from private donors than from the public purse.

Camilla Cavendish asks why our cultural industries are now so attractive to the government and whether the agenda is to encourage creativity or simply to entertain.

A Nation of Billy Elliots?

The government is promoting the arts, including a proposed five hours of culture per week in schools. Yet recent Arts Council cuts have caused uproar, and the arts in the UK now receive more money from private donors than from the public purse. Camilla Cavendish asks why our cultural industries are now so attractive to the government and whether the agenda is to encourage creativity or simply to entertain.

Followed by News.

A New Black Politics?2011103120111106The 2010 general election saw the largest influx of black and minority ethnic MPs to the Commons that Britain has ever seen.

There are currently 27 sitting on the Conservative and Labour benches - up from 14 in the last Parliament.

But are we starting to see a 'new black politics'? Some suggest that the radical left-wing politics of the 1980s is no longer relevant in twenty-first century Britain, where there is a growing black middle class, a multitude of different black communities, and where black people are represented at the highest levels.

David Goodhart meets the black politicians adopting a more socially conservative standpoint to their predecessors and also talks to their critics: those who say that some of the country's most vulnerable people have been forgotten by the establishment; that institutionalised racism still exists; and that many of today's politicians do not represent the people they are meant to serve.

Producer: Hannah Barnes.

How the ideologies of British black politics in Britain have changed since the 1980s.

Interviewees include:

David Lammy, Labour MP for Tottenham

Shaun Bailey, former Conservative parliamentary candidate

Linda Bellos OBE, leader of Lambeth Council 1986-1988

Bill Bush, chief of staff to GLC leader Ken Livingstone until 1986

Trevor Phillips OBE, Chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC)

Kwasi Kwarteng, Conservative MP for Spelthorne

Stafford Scott, race equality consultant in Tottenham

David Goodhart is editor at large of Prospect magazine and was recently appointed as director of the think tank Demos.

The 2010 general election saw the largest influx of black and minority ethnic MPs to the Commons that Britain has ever seen. There are currently 27 sitting on the Conservative and Labour benches - up from 14 in the last Parliament.

A New Black Politics?20111106The 2010 general election saw the largest influx of black and minority ethnic MPs to the Commons that Britain has ever seen. There are currently 27 sitting on the Conservative and Labour benches - up from 14 in the last Parliament.

But are we starting to see a 'new black politics'? Some suggest that the radical left-wing politics of the 1980s is no longer relevant in twenty-first century Britain, where there is a growing black middle class, a multitude of different black communities, and where black people are represented at the highest levels.

David Goodhart meets the black politicians adopting a more socially conservative standpoint to their predecessors and also talks to their critics: those who say that some of the country's most vulnerable people have been forgotten by the establishment; that institutionalised racism still exists; and that many of today's politicians do not represent the people they are meant to serve.

Interviewees include:

David Lammy, Labour MP for Tottenham

Shaun Bailey, former Conservative parliamentary candidate

Linda Bellos OBE, leader of Lambeth Council 1986-1988

Bill Bush, chief of staff to GLC leader Ken Livingstone until 1986

Trevor Phillips OBE, Chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC)

Kwasi Kwarteng, Conservative MP for Spelthorne

Stafford Scott, race equality consultant in Tottenham

David Goodhart is editor at large of Prospect magazine and was recently appointed as director of the think tank Demos.

Producer: Hannah Barnes.

How the ideologies of British black politics in Britain have changed since the 1980s.

A New Iraq?2009061520090621As British forces complete their withdrawal from Iraq and the government declares the mission a success, Bronwen Maddox considers the prospects of lasting peace for the Iraqi people.

Have lessons been learnt that will change the way in which similar missions are tackled in the future?

A New Iraq?20090621As British forces complete their withdrawal from Iraq and the government declares the mission a success, Bronwen Maddox considers the prospects of lasting peace for the Iraqi people. Have lessons been learnt that will change the way in which similar missions are tackled in the future?
A New Unionism?2021062120210627 (R4)Unionism in Northern Ireland is facing a highly uncertain future. Its divided party politics make the headlines. But beyond that, post-Brexit border rules and talk of a possible vote on Irish reunification is causing much anxiety. Even more profoundly, changes in the province’s population and attitudes among different generations are weakening traditional loyalties. Pessimists fear all this could be seriously destabilising. Others argue that a new kind of unionism, focused on the practical benefits of links to Britain, can revive the cause. Chris Bowlby listens in to a debate with major implications for the UK as a whole.

Producer: Jim Frank

Editor: Jasper Corbett

Chris Bowlby assesses the future of Unionism in Northern Ireland

A Price Worth Paying?2010020120100207

Investment banks warn that if British taxpayers cease to guarantee to bail them out, they will leave the UK.

That, according to a senior Bank of England official, might be 'a price worth paying'.

Edward Stourton talks to the growing band of experts who believe that risk-taking investment banks should be forced to face the consequences of their losses and finds out why the government remains unconvinced.

The experts who say investment banks should face the consequences of their losses.

Should the taxpayer bail out so-called casino banking? Edward Stourton explores the arguments for and against the return of Glass-Steagall, a 1930s American law which split the banks into high street and investment banks.

President Obama's recent declaration of willingness to fight the banks has pushed the issue of whether taxpayers should bail out so-called casino banking to centre stage in America and across the world.

There are growing calls for a British version of an American post-Depression law called the Glass-Steagall Act.

In this new banking world there would be retail banks which would look after the needs of ordinary customers and there would be separate investment banks which could play the stock markets without putting depositors' savings at risk.

Edward speaks to Professor Niall Ferguson of Harvard University, a specialist in financial history and author of The Ascent of Money, about how banking activities in the UK used to be separate.

He talks to the former Chancellor Nigel Lawson about the events that led to the creation of 'universal' banks in the UK, banks that take ordinary people's money, lend and invest.

He admits that at the time he did not think twice about the consequences.

Lord Lawson is now one of the most prominent people calling for a British-style Glass-Steagall.

As is Liam Halligan, the chief economist at the investment fund Prosperity Capital Management, who outlines the case for a new separation of banking activities.

Another surprising person calling for Glass-Steagall to be resurrected is former Wall Street banker John S Reed.

Back in the 1980s and 90s he was one of the people calling for the original law to be repealed.

Now he's convinced that some kind of separation is crucial to protect taxpayers from future bank bail-outs.

But critics like Brandon Davies, a former head of retail risk at Barclays Retail, fear that splitting the banks would severely damage the economy.

Angela Knight, chief executive of the British Bankers' Association warns that Britain could not take this kind of action alone.

Professor John Kay, formerly of Oxford University, the London Business School and the Institute for Fiscal Studies - probably the most prominent academic economist making the Glass-Steagall case - tells the programme why he thinks there is not more political support for the idea of splitting the banks.

Investment banks warn that if British taxpayers cease to guarantee to bail them out, they will leave the UK. That, according to a senior Bank of England official, might be 'a price worth paying'. Edward Stourton talks to the growing band of experts who believe that risk-taking investment banks should be forced to face the consequences of their losses and finds out why the government remains unconvinced.

A Price Worth Paying?20100207Should the taxpayer bail out so-called casino banking? Edward Stourton explores the arguments for and against the return of Glass-Steagall, a 1930s American law which split the banks into high street and investment banks.

President Obama's recent declaration of willingness to fight the banks has pushed the issue of whether taxpayers should bail out so-called casino banking to centre stage in America and across the world. There are growing calls for a British version of an American post-Depression law called the Glass-Steagall Act. In this new banking world there would be retail banks which would look after the needs of ordinary customers and there would be separate investment banks which could play the stock markets without putting depositors' savings at risk.

Edward speaks to Professor Niall Ferguson of Harvard University, a specialist in financial history and author of The Ascent of Money, about how banking activities in the UK used to be separate. He talks to the former Chancellor Nigel Lawson about the events that led to the creation of 'universal' banks in the UK, banks that take ordinary people's money, lend and invest. He admits that at the time he did not think twice about the consequences. Lord Lawson is now one of the most prominent people calling for a British-style Glass-Steagall. As is Liam Halligan, the chief economist at the investment fund Prosperity Capital Management, who outlines the case for a new separation of banking activities. Another surprising person calling for Glass-Steagall to be resurrected is former Wall Street banker John S Reed. Back in the 1980s and 90s he was one of the people calling for the original law to be repealed. Now he's convinced that some kind of separation is crucial to protect taxpayers from future bank bail-outs.

But critics like Brandon Davies, a former head of retail risk at Barclays Retail, fear that splitting the banks would severely damage the economy. Angela Knight, chief executive of the British Bankers' Association warns that Britain could not take this kind of action alone. Professor John Kay, formerly of Oxford University, the London Business School and the Institute for Fiscal Studies - probably the most prominent academic economist making the Glass-Steagall case - tells the programme why he thinks there is not more political support for the idea of splitting the banks.

The experts who say investment banks should face the consequences of their losses.

A Question Of Artefacts2019101420191020 (R4)Why does Europe house so much of Africa's heritage?

Two years since the French President, Emmanuel Macron, called for the restitution of objects taken at the height of Europe's empires, some French and Dutch museums have started the processes of restitution. However, most of the UK's main institutions remain reluctant.

Should we empty our museums to make amends for our colonial past? In this edition of Analysis, David Baker speaks to two of the UK's biggest museums to ask whether they'd be willing to repatriate any artefacts.

Producer: Matt Russell

Editor: Jasper Corbett

Why does Europe house so much of Africa's heritage? And should we start handing it back?

How should museums deal with contentious legacies?

Two years since the French President, Emmanuel Macron, called for the restitution of objects taken at the height of Europe's empires, some French and Dutch museums have started the process to hand back some artefacts. However, most of the UK's main institutions remain reluctant.

Should we empty our museums to make amends for our colonial past? In this edition of Analysis, David Baker speaks to people on all sides of the argument to get to the bottom of a topic that is pitching the art world up against global politics.

Picture Credit: Crown, gold and gilded copper with glass beads, pigment and fabric, made in Ethiopia, 1600-1850 (c) Victoria and Albert Museum

A Scottish Pound?2013012820130203

The cash question facing an independent Scotland.Chris Bowlby discovers the key role of currency in debate ahead of the Scottish referendum next year. With the SNP proposing to keep using sterling if Scotland becomes independent, what will this mean in the world of eurozone crises and financial panics? We discover the mysterious story of Scottish money - how its banknotes are guaranteed by so called giants and titans at the Bank of England. And we ask whether sterling can continue to work smoothly and keep popular confidence if the UK splits. What's the thinking behind the scenes as politicians and officials worry about a British version of the eurozone drama? With Scotland preparing to vote next year, and London wondering what could happen, Analysis reveals the key role of currency in the UK's political future.

Producer Mark Savage

Editor Innes Bowen.

The cash question facing an independent Scotland. Chris Bowlby discovers the key role of currency in debate ahead of the Scottish referendum next year. With the SNP proposing to keep using sterling if Scotland becomes independent, what will this mean in the world of eurozone crises and financial panics? We discover the mysterious story of Scottish money - how its banknotes are guaranteed by so called giants and titans at the Bank of England. And we ask whether sterling can continue to work smoothly and keep popular confidence if the UK splits. What's the thinking behind the scenes as politicians and officials worry about a British version of the eurozone drama? With Scotland preparing to vote next year, and London wondering what could happen, Analysis reveals the key role of currency in the UK's political future.

A Shorter Working Week2019072220190728 (R4)Throughout the first half of the 20th century, the working week gradually got shorter and shorter. As technological advances powered economic growth, workers reaped the gains not just in the form of higher pay, but more leisure time. The economist John Maynard Keynes predicted we'd eventually all be working a 15-hour week. Even in the 1970s the expectation that 8 hour days would be reduced to 6 was widely held across the political spectrum. But this all ground to a halt in the 1980s.

In this edition of Analysis Sonia Sodha explores the great leisure mystery: whatever happened to this dream of working less? And why is the idea of a 4-day working week gaining traction on the political left in Britain? What would a society that ditches the long-hours culture, and re-embraces the leisure dream look like, and is it really possible to achieve this without increasing inequality between the haves and have-nots of the labour market?

What happened to the dream of working less? Sonia Sodha investigates the four-day week.

A Subversive History Of School Reform2016071820160724 (R4)

Professor Alison Wolf on the surprising story of postwar school reform in England.

Change, change, change - conventional wisdom is that the classroom is the site of an endless set of reforms, a constant stream of White Papers and directives that promise 'revolution' and sudden changes in direction. Yet is the real story of school reform really one of continuity?

Professor Alison Wolf of King's College London explores the post-war history of school reform in England. Speaking to former secretaries of state, historians, and teachers, she explores the forces and events that have shaped schools. She argues that real changes have been surprisingly few and that despite a great deal of fiery rhetoric, they have generally continued across party lines. And she asks if that means that governments have perhaps been listening to what parents genuinely want?

Producer: Gemma Newby.

A Very British Battle2018021220180218 (R4)Caroline Wyatt explores the big questions facing the UK's armed forces.



The latest round in the fight over the future of the UK armed forces is raging in the corridors of Whitehall. As politicians and military top brass argue about money, wider questions about what we want the Army, Navy and RAF to do once again top the defence agenda.

Caroline Wyatt spent many years covering defence for the BBC and has heard warnings from retired generals about chronic under-funding many times. But with army numbers already down to a level not seen since before the Napoleonic Wars, big projects like the F-35 fighter jets in trouble, and a £2bn a year black hole in the defence budget, further salami slicing seems untenable. How then to prioritise which capabilities the UK must maintain and improve?

The UK faces an intensified threat from Russia, 'hybrid' warfare where cyber attacks and political destabilisation are used alongside military force, and advances in missile technology. Post Brexit, the UK's strategic position both globally and within the European defence space is unclear. How we want to deploy our armed forces - where, with whom, and at what cost - is once again up for debate.

Producer: Lucy Proctor.

Africa's Chance2007121320071216Many African nations may be experiencing the opportunity to lift themselves out of poverty.

Thanks to the boom in prices for raw materials, coupled with major Chinese investment, countries such as Kenya and Mozambique are now among the world's fastest-growing economies.

Richard Dowden asks whether this windfall can be channelled into a long-term path to development.

Africa's Chance

Many African nations may be experiencing the opportunity to lift themselves out of poverty. Thanks to the boom in prices for raw materials, coupled with major Chinese investment, countries such as Kenya and Mozambique are now among the world's fastest-growing economies. Richard Dowden asks whether this windfall can be channelled into a long-term path to development.

Followed by News.

Agenda For The Next Pope20031228As Pope John Paul becomes increasingly frail, Vatican-watchers are speculating about the identity of the next Pontiff and the challenges he will face.

In the West, the Roman Catholic Church has been weakened by falling numbers of priests, scandals and galloping secularisation.

Andrew Brown asks whether the next Pope can reassert the Church's political and moral authority, and whether Roman Catholicism can survive as a truly global faith.

Aid Or Immigration?2011100320111009The government is committed to protecting the aid budget.

Frances Cairncross asks whether a more relaxed policy on economic migration might help the developing world more.

Could a more relaxed policy on immigration help the developing world more than aid?

Despite a general policy of austerity and cut backs, the budget for development aid has been ring fenced by the coalition government.

Frances Cairncross asks whether a more relaxed immigration policy might be a better way for the UK to help the developing world.

The official aid budget is dwarfed by a private form of help for the developing world: remittances sent home by immigrants working in richer countries.

So should governments keen to help the developing world encourage migration and remittances as a replacement for state-funded aid? They have the key advantage that the people who send them know the people who are supposed to be receiving them...

There's less opportunity for corruption and for waste...

and they might have lower overhead costs, argues Owen Barder of the Center for Global Development.

Frances Cairncross, rector of Exeter College, Oxford and former managing editor of The Economist, explores the limits of this free market alternative to state-funded development aid.

Contributors include:

Steve Baker

Conservative MP for Wycombe

Dilip Ratha

Migration and remittances expert from the World Bank and the University of Sussex

Senior fellow of Washington DC think-tank, the Center for Global Development

Hetty Kovach

Senior policy adviser to Oxfam

Devesh Kapur

Director of the Centre for the Advanced Study of India at the University of Pennsylvania

Onyekachi Wambu

From the African Foundation for Development, or AFFORD

Alex Oprunenco

Head of international programmes with Moldovan think-tank, Expert Grup

Professor Paul Collier

Author of The Bottom Billion and director at the Oxford University Centre for the study of African Economies

Producers: Helen Grady and Daniel Tetlow.

Could a more relaxed policy on immigration help the developing world more than state aid?

The government is committed to protecting the aid budget. Frances Cairncross asks whether a more relaxed policy on economic migration might help the developing world more.

Aid Or Immigration?20111009Despite a general policy of austerity and cut backs, the budget for development aid has been ring fenced by the coalition government. Frances Cairncross asks whether a more relaxed immigration policy might be a better way for the UK to help the developing world.

The official aid budget is dwarfed by a private form of help for the developing world: remittances sent home by immigrants working in richer countries.

So should governments keen to help the developing world encourage migration and remittances as a replacement for state-funded aid? They have the key advantage that the people who send them know the people who are supposed to be receiving them... There's less opportunity for corruption and for waste... and they might have lower overhead costs, argues Owen Barder of the Center for Global Development.

Frances Cairncross, rector of Exeter College, Oxford and former managing editor of The Economist, explores the limits of this free market alternative to state-funded development aid.

Contributors include:

Steve Baker

Conservative MP for Wycombe

Dilip Ratha

Migration and remittances expert from the World Bank and the University of Sussex

Senior fellow of Washington DC think-tank, the Center for Global Development

Hetty Kovach

Senior policy adviser to Oxfam

Devesh Kapur

Director of the Centre for the Advanced Study of India at the University of Pennsylvania

Onyekachi Wambu

From the African Foundation for Development, or AFFORD

Alex Oprunenco

Head of international programmes with Moldovan think-tank, Expert Grup

Professor Paul Collier

Author of The Bottom Billion and director at the Oxford University Centre for the study of African Economies

Producers: Helen Grady and Daniel Tetlow.

Could a more relaxed policy on immigration help the developing world more than state aid?

Aid: Something To Boast About?2017052920170604 (R4)Why is the UK such a generous global aid donor, and should it be? Jo Coburn investigates.



Why is the UK such a generous global aid donor and should it be? The coalition government legislated to ensure Britain spent 0.7% of its national income on international development and it is now one of the very few countries to meet this United Nations target for such spending. With financial pressures on public services at home remaining acute, Jo Coburn asks why most politicians still support the idea, despite public criticism and press campaigns about wasted money. In her quest, she investigates the history of the UK's support for overseas aid and examines what makes so many politicians willing to risk voters' displeasure on the issue.

Producer: Simon Coates.

Al Qaeda's Enemy Within2008080720080810Could Osama bin Laden's erstwhile comrades be responsible for bringing about the collapse of Al Qaeda? As criticism of the terrorist leader from within the ranks of the Islamist movement itself grows, BBC Security Correspondent Frank Gardner talks to former allies of Osama bin Laden who are now engaged in countering the terrorist leader's agenda.

Al Qaeda's Enemy Within

Could Osama bin Laden's erstwhile comrades be responsible for bringing about the collapse of Al Qaeda? As criticism of the terrorist leader from within the ranks of the Islamist movement itself grows, BBC Security Correspondent Frank Gardner talks to former allies of Osama bin Laden who are now engaged in countering the terrorist leader's agenda.

Algorithm Overlords2018060420180610 (R4)Are we giving machines too much power over our lives?



How can we be sure that the technology we are creating is going to do the right thing? Ma