Angry, Sexy And Working Class

Presented by Christopher Eccleston , this series is a tribute to the sexy 'angry young men', the working class heroes and anti-heroes who defined the golden age of British films from the late 50s and early 60s.films such as Room at the Top, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, A Taste of Honey, This Sporting Life and Billy Liar. The series is shot through with many film clips and soundtracks plus interviews with Rita Tushingham, Shirley-Anne Field, Sir Richard Rodney Bennett, Dora Bryan, Albert Finney, David Storey, Wendy Craig, Ken Loach, the legendary cinematographer Walter Lassally and many more.

Sex and class came to the big screen around fifty years ago and changed British movie making (and British television) for ever. John Osborne's anti- establishment movie Look Back in Anger rocked the world of traditional culture in 1957. It questioned the class structure of England. It gave a voice to the post war generation who rebelled against the 'Establishment' and the stifling snobberies and sexual hypocrisies of the 1950s. Suddenly 'kitchen sink' dramas, the stories of (outspoken, cheeky, ambitious, sexy) working class heroes and their lives revolutionized cinema in Britain. Relaxation of censorship meant audiences could see, for the first time, that characters had sex lives, money worries and social problems. Our young heroes dealt with poverty, prostitution, pregnant girlfriends, homosexuality, loneliness, racial prejudice and the marriage trap. Those subjects spawned at wonderful decade of film; not just dramas, but comedies and musicals. These four programmes deal with that decade. - the films and their musical settings.

Episodes

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20070622

Christopher Eccleston pays tribute to the working-class heroes and anti-heroes who defined the golden age of British films in the late Fifties and early Sixties. They appeared in classics such as Room at the Top, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, A Taste of Honey, This Sporting Life and Billy Liar.

Featuring interviews with Rita Tushingham, Shirley Anne Field, Sir Richard Rodney Bennett, Dora Bryan, Albert Finney, David Storey, Wendy Craig, Ken Loach and legendary cinematographer Walter Lassally, among others.

20070629

2/4. Christopher Eccleston pays tribute to the working-class heroes and anti-heroes who defined the golden age of British films in the late 1950s and early 60s. They appeared in classics such as Room at the Top, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, A Taste of Honey, This Sporting Life and Billy Liar.

Featuring interviews with Rita Tushingham, Shirley Anne Field, Sir Richard Rodney Bennett, Dora Bryan, Albert Finney, David Storey, Wendy Craig, Ken Loach and legendary cinematographer Walter Lassally, among others.

20070706

Christopher Eccleston presents a series paying tribute to the working-class heroes and anti-heroes who defined the golden age of British films in the late Fifties and early Sixties. They appeared in classics such as Room at the Top, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, A Taste of Honey, This Sporting Life and Billy Liar.

Featuring interviews with Rita Tushingham, Shirley Anne Field, Sir Richard Rodney Bennett, Dora Bryan, Albert Finney, David Storey, Wendy Craig, Ken Loach and legendary cinematographer Walter Lassally.

3/4. Eccleston looks at the ways in which the British New Wave cinema dealt with the issues of sex, marriage, unwanted pregnancy and homosexuality.

20070713

Christopher Eccleston presents a series paying tribute to the working-class heroes and anti-heroes who defined the golden age of British films in the late Fifties and early Sixties. They appeared in classics such as Room at the Top, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, A Taste of Honey, This Sporting Life and Billy Liar.

Featuring interviews with Rita Tushingham, Shirley Anne Field, Sir Richard Rodney Bennett, Dora Bryan, Albert Finney, David Storey, Wendy Craig, Ken Loach and legendary cinematographer Walter Lassally.

4/4. Eccleston explains how the British New Wave responded to growing affluence in Britain in the early to mid-Sixties. Ken Loach and actor Malcolm McDowell explain why the New Wave was a vitally important milestone in the history of British film.

0120070622

Presented by Christopher Eccleston , this series is a tribute to the sexy 'angry young men', the working class heroes and anti-heroes who defined the golden age of British films from the late 50s and early 60

0120070622

Presented by Christopher Eccleston , this series is a tribute to the sexy 'angry young men', the working class heroes and anti-heroes who defined the golden age of British films from the late 50s and early 60s.films such as Room at the Top, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, A Taste of Honey, This Sporting Life and Billy Liar. The series is shot through with many film clips and soundtracks plus interviews with Rita Tushingham, Shirley-Anne Field, Sir Richard Rodney Bennett, Dora Bryan, Albert Finney, David Storey, Wendy Craig, Ken Loach, the legendary cinematographer Walter Lassally and many more.

Sex and class came to the big screen around fifty years ago and changed British movie making (and British television) for ever. John Osborne's anti- establishment movie Look Back in Anger rocked the world of traditional culture in 1957. It questioned the class structure of England. It gave a voice to the post war generation who rebelled against the 'Establishment' and the stifling snobberies and sexual hypocrisies of the 1950s. Suddenly 'kitchen sink' dramas, the stories of (outspoken, cheeky, ambitious, sexy) working class heroes and their lives revolutionized cinema in Britain. Relaxation of censorship meant audiences could see, for the first time, that characters had sex lives, money worries and social problems. Our young heroes dealt with poverty, prostitution, pregnant girlfriends, homosexuality, loneliness, racial prejudice and the marriage trap. Those subjects spawned at wonderful decade of film; not just dramas, but comedies and musicals. These four programmes deal with that decade. - the films and their musical settings.Christopher Eccleston introduces this 4 part celebration of British New Wave cinema. Films such as Room at the Top, The Entertainer, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning and This Sporting Life which broke upon the cinema like a storm in the late 50s and early 60s. We hear how the films took their cue from a brilliant season of documentary films grouped under the title Free Cinema. These films, directed by young rebellious directors such as Tony Richardson and Lindsay Anderson, were about working class people in real situations - they made films in teenagers' clubs, at Margate, at Convent Garden. They took the camera on location and made movies that were a world away from the stagey, middle class films of the 1950s. In the programme there are contributions from Shirley Ann Field, Murray Melvin, Albert Finney, Wendy Craig, Lindsay Anderson, Matthew Sweet, John Braine, Christopher Dupin (who's written the film history of Free Cinema) and the legendary cinematographer Walter Lassally who reveals how he gave those black and white films their characteristic grainy, melancholy look.

Presented by Christopher Eccleston , this series is a tribute to the sexy 'angry young men', the working class heroes and anti-heroes who defined the golden age of British films from the late 50s and early 60

0220070629
0320070706

Eccleston looks at the ways in which the British New Wave cinema dealt with the issues of sex, marriage, unwanted pregnancy and homosexuality.

04 LAST20070713

Eccleston explains how the British New Wave responded to growing affluence in Britain in the early to mid-Sixties. Ken Loach and actor Malcolm McDowell explain why the New Wave was a vitally important milestone in the history of British film.