Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713)

Episodes

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01Corelli, the European Phenomenon20191223

Donald Macleod delves into the international successes of Arcangelo Corelli.

Arcangelo Corelli was something of a European phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. His compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. Musically, he bridged the gap between the Baroque and the Classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. Even today, Corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. As a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over Europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. Corelli spent most of his career in Rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the Church. During his career he collaborated with many other composers including Alessandro Scarlatti and Handel. Despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about Corelli, and this Composer of the Week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

In this programme, Donald Macleod explores those relationships that propelled Corelli to being something of a European phenomenon. The writer on music Charles Burney thought that Corelli’s fame came from his music being so pure, rich and graceful, and that it withstood the test of time. Corelli’s fame initially originated with his ability as a violinist, and this attracted over time a stream of international students. With the evolution of the printing press, Corelli’s music would also bolster his reputation, with not only copies being produced in Italy, but also Amsterdam, Antwerp and London. Publishers fought over printing music by Corelli, disagreeing over whose publication was more authentic. Myths would grow and surround Corelli, all adding to his celebrity status.

Sonata in G minor, Op 4 No 2 (Corrente)
London Baroque

Concerto Grossi, Op 6 No 3
The Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra
Jean Lamon, director

Sonata in G, Op 1 No 9
Monica Huggett, violin
Alison Bury, violin
Jaap Ter Linden, cello
Hopkinson Smith, theorbo
Ton Koopman, harpsichord

Handel
La Resurrezione (Ho un non so che nel cor)
Nancy Argenta (Maddalena), soprano
The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
Ton Koopman, director

Corelli
Sonata in F major, Op 5 No 10
The Avison Ensemble

Concerto Grosso in D, Op 6 No 1
The English Concert
Trevor Pinnock, director

Produced by Luke Whitlock, for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores Corelli's international successes.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

02Corelli and the Aristocracy20191224

Donald Macleod explores Arcangelo Corelli’s relationships with the nobility and crowned heads

Arcangelo Corelli was something of a European phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. His compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. Musically, he bridged the gap between the Baroque and the Classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. Even today, Corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. As a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over Europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. Corelli spent most of his career in Rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the Church. During his career he collaborated with many other composers including Alessandro Scarlatti and Handel. Despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about Corelli, and this Composer of the Week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

In this programme, Donald Macleod journeys through the many relationships Corelli had with nobles and royals, ranging from the eccentric Queen Christina of Sweden and the Electress Sofia Carlotta of Brandenburg, to Duke Francesco d’Este of Modena and the King of Naples. Corelli was fortunate to be employed by the nobility, to the extent that he would often receive offers from different aristocrats. They tried to poach Corelli from one another, wanting to secure the services of the famed Corelli for themselves.

Fuga con un soggetto solo
London Baroque
Dan Laurin, director

Sonata in G minor, Op 5 No 5
Andrew Manze, violin
Richard Egarr, harpsichord

Sonata in F, Op 1 No 1
The Avison Ensemble

Sonata in A minor, Op 1 No 4
The Avison Ensemble

Sonata in B minor, Op 3 No 4
Monica Huggett, violin
Alison Bury, violin
Jaap Ter Linden, cello
Hopkinson Smith, theorbo
Ton Koopman, harpsichord

Sonata in F minor, Op 3 No 9
Monica Huggett, violin
Alison Bury, violin
Jaap Ter Linden, cello
Hopkinson Smith, theorbo
Ton Koopman, harpsichord

Concerto Grosso in F, Op 6 No 12
The English Concert
Trevor Pinnock, director

Produced by Luke Whitlock, for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod delves into Corelli\u2019s relationships with the nobility and royalty.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

03Corelli's Religious Patrons20191225

Donald Macleod traces Arcangelo Corelli’s relationship with princes of the Roman Catholic Church.

Arcangelo Corelli was something of a European phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. His compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. Musically, he bridged the gap between the Baroque and the Classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. Even today, Corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. As a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over Europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. Corelli spent most of his career in Rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the Church. During his career he collaborated with many other composers including Alessandro Scarlatti and Handel. Despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about Corelli, and this Composer of the Week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

In this programme, Donald Macleod delves into the opportunities open to Corelli through his relationship with the Roman Catholic Church. Two of his more prominent patrons were Cardinal Pamphili and Cardinal Ottoboni. Corelli was employed in sequence by these two cardinals, and was held in high esteem. He not only composed music for them, but was able to live in their palaces in some splendour, often writing incidental music for their private theatres and annual festivities.

Sonata in D
Helmut Hunger, trumpet
I Solisti Veneti
Claudio Scimone, director

Sonata in B major, Op 2 No 5
London Baroque

Sonata in E flat major, Op 2 No 11
London Baroque

Sinfonia to Santa Beatrice d’Este in D minor, WoO1
La Serenissima
Adrian Chandler, director

Concerto in G minor, Op 6 No 8 (Christmas Concerto)
The Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra
Jean Lamon, director

Sonata in C, Op 5 No 9
Michala Petri, recorder
George Malcolm, harpsichord

Produced by Luke Whitlock, for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores Corelli's relationship with the Church.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

04Corelli's Contemporaries20191226

Donald Macleod traces the relationship between Arcangelo Corelli and his musical contemporaries

Arcangelo Corelli was something of a European phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. His compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. Musically, he bridged the gap between the Baroque and the Classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. Even today, Corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. As a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over Europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. Corelli spent most of his career in Rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the Church. During his career he collaborated with many other composers including Alessandro Scarlatti and Handel. Despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about Corelli, and this Composer of the Week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

In this programme, Donald Macleod discovers more details about Corelli's life and character through his relationship with other composers. Including stories of Alessandro Scarlatti's jealousy over Corelli’s exulted position in Rome and Handel's visit with the great master, made when he travelled to Rome as a young man. Handel not only composed music based on some of Corelli’s own themes but also probably composed a violin concerto for Corelli to play.

Sonata in A minor, op 4 No 5
London Baroque

Sonata in B minor, op 4 No 12
London Baroque

Sonata in C, Op 2 No 3
The Avison Ensemble
Pavlo Beznosiuk, director

Sonata in F major, Op 2 No 7
The Avison Ensemble
Pavlo Beznosiuk, director

Handel
Sonata a 5, HWV288 (Violin Concerto in B flat)
Academy of Ancient Music
Richard Egarr, director

Corelli
Sonata in G minor WoO2
La Stagione
Michael Schneider, director

Corelli Arr. J. C. Schickhardt
Concerto Grosso Op 6 No 3
Le Concert Francais

Produced by Luke Whitlock, for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores Corelli and his contemporaries.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

05Corelli and his Followers20191227

Donald Macleod explores the Arcangelo Corelli craze after the composer’s death

Arcangelo Corelli was something of a European phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. His compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. Musically, he bridged the gap between the Baroque and the Classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. Even today, Corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. As a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over Europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. Corelli spent most of his career in Rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the Church. During his career he collaborated with many other composers including Alessandro Scarlatti and Handel. Despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about Corelli, and this Composer of the Week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

In this final programme, Donald Macleod explores the craze for the music of Corelli after the composer’s death. He was held in such high esteem that not only was he buried in the Pantheon near the painter Raphael, but also yearly recitals of his music were held there before the tomb. Composers like Couperin tried to emulate Corelli and the Italian style, and Locatelli would claim to be in direct musical lineage. Others took works by Corelli and tried to capitalise upon their popularity by embellishing them further in print. In modern times, Tippett and Rachmaninov have paid musical homage to Corelli, by creating variations on themes by the great master.

Sonata No 2 in D minor, Op 2 No 2
London Baroque

Concerto Grosso in F, Op 6 No 2
The Brandenburg Consort
Roy Goodman, director

Corelli Arr. Geminiani
Concerto Grosso VII in D minor
Academy of Ancient Music
Andrew Manze, director

Sonata in D minor, Op 5 No 12 (Follia)
Andrew Manze, violin
Richard Egarr, harpsichord

Concerto Grosso in F, Op 6 No 9
The English Concert
Trevor Pinnock, director

Produced by Luke Whitlock, for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod delves into the Corelli craze.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.