Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713)

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01Corelli, The European Phenomenon2019122320090330Donald Macleod explores the life and music of the Italian violinist and composer Arcangelo Corelli. He reveals how Corelli's immense reputation rests on a relatively small collection of six publications, with just a handful of accounts about his brilliant playing.

Concerto grosso in D, Op 6 No 7 (opening)

  • Andrew Manze (violin)
  • brandenburg consort
  • chandos chan0692, cd4 trs 17-20

    sonata in f (arr of op 5 no 4)

  • david mings (baroque bassoon)
  • globe glo5094, trs 6-9

    sonata in g, op 1 no 9

  • han tol (recorder)
  • harmonia mundi hmu90729899, trs 1-5

    concerto grosso in f, op 6 no 12

  • hopkinson smith (theorbo)
  • hyperion cda667412, cd2 trs 1-2

    sonata in d, op 5 no 1

  • hyperion cda667412, cd2 trs 30-34

    sonata in a minor, op 4 no 5

  • jaap ter linden (cello)
  • monica huggett, alison bury (violins)
  • patrick ayrton (harpsichord)
  • philips 4166142, trs 1-5.

    Donald Macleod discusses the basis on which corelli's reputation was built

  • purcell quartet
  • richard egarr (harpsichord)
  • roy goodman (director)
  • ton koopman (organ)

    donald macleod delves into the international successes of arcangelo corelli.

    arcangelo corelli was something of a european phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. his compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. musically, he bridged the gap between the baroque and the classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. even today, corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. as a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. corelli spent most of his career in rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the church. during his career he collaborated with many other composers including alessandro scarlatti and handel. despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about corelli, and this composer of the week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

    in this programme, donald macleod explores those relationships that propelled corelli to being something of a european phenomenon. the writer on music charles burney thought that corelli’s fame came from his music being so pure, rich and graceful, and that it withstood the test of time. corelli’s fame initially originated with his ability as a violinist, and this attracted over time a stream of international students. with the evolution of the printing press, corelli’s music would also bolster his reputation, with not only copies being produced in italy, but also amsterdam, antwerp and london. publishers fought over printing music by corelli, disagreeing over whose publication was more authentic. myths would grow and surround corelli, all adding to his celebrity status.

    sonata in g minor, op 4 no 2 (corrente)
    london baroque

    concerto grossi, op 6 no 3
    the tafelmusik baroque orchestra
    jean lamon, director

    sonata in g, op 1 no 9
    monica huggett, violin
    alison bury, violin
    jaap ter linden, cello
    hopkinson smith, theorbo
    ton koopman, harpsichord

    handel
    la resurrezione (ho un non so che nel cor)
    nancy argenta (maddalena), soprano
    the amsterdam baroque orchestra
    ton koopman, director

    corelli
    sonata in f major, op 5 no 10
    the avison ensemble

    concerto grosso in d, op 6 no 1
    the english concert
    trevor pinnock, director

    produced by luke whitlock, for bbc wales

    donald macleod explores corelli's international successes.

    donald macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

    donald macleod delves into the international successes of arcangelo corelli.

    arcangelo corelli was something of a european phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. his compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. musically, he bridged the gap between the baroque and the classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. even today, corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. as a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. corelli spent most of his career in rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the church. during his career he collaborated with many other composers including alessandro scarlatti and handel. despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about corelli, and this composer of the week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

    in this programme, donald macleod explores those relationships that propelled corelli to being something of a european phenomenon. the writer on music charles burney thought that corelli’s fame came from his music being so pure, rich and graceful, and that it withstood the test of time. corelli’s fame initially originated with his ability as a violinist, and this attracted over time a stream of international students. with the evolution of the printing press, corelli’s music would also bolster his reputation, with not only copies being produced in italy, but also amsterdam, antwerp and london. publishers fought over printing music by corelli, disagreeing over whose publication was more authentic. myths would grow and surround corelli, all adding to his celebrity status.

    sonata in g minor, op 4 no 2 (corrente)
    london baroque

    concerto grossi, op 6 no 3
    the tafelmusik baroque orchestra
    jean lamon, director

    sonata in g, op 1 no 9
    monica huggett, violin
    alison bury, violin
    jaap ter linden, cello
    hopkinson smith, theorbo
    ton koopman, harpsichord

    handel
    la resurrezione (ho un non so che nel cor)
    nancy argenta (maddalena), soprano
    the amsterdam baroque orchestra
    ton koopman, director

    corelli
    sonata in f major, op 5 no 10
    the avison ensemble

    concerto grosso in d, op 6 no 1
    the english concert
    trevor pinnock, director

    produced by luke whitlock, for bbc wales

  • 02Corelli And The Aristocracy2019122420090331Donald Macleod explores the life and music of the Italian violinist and composer Arcangelo Corelli. He tells the story of Corelli's first years in Rome, where he begins to find his feet among the musical glitterati in Europe's grandest cultural capital.

    Sonata in E, Op 5 No 11

  • Elizabeth Wallfisch (violin)
  • accent acc9177d, trs 1-4

    sonata, op 1 no 3

  • archiv 4196142, tr 5

    corelli: concerto grosso, op 6 no 6

  • barthold kuijken (transverse flute)
  • chiara banchini, jesper christensen (directors)
  • ensemble 415
  • harmonia mundi hmc90134445, cd2 trs 45-49

    sonata in e minor, op 5 no 8

  • harmonia mundi hmc90140607, cd2 trs 9-12.

    Donald Macleod follows corelli to rome, where he begins to make his mark as a rising star

  • hyperion cda663812, cd2 trs 18-22

    sonata in a minor, op 3 no 12

  • locatelli trio:
  • london baroque
  • members of the english concert
  • paul nicholson (harpsichord)
  • richard tunnicliffe (cello)
  • robert kohnen (harpsichord)
  • wieland kuijken (cello)

    donald macleod explores arcangelo corelli’s relationships with the nobility and crowned heads

    arcangelo corelli was something of a european phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. his compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. musically, he bridged the gap between the baroque and the classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. even today, corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. as a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. corelli spent most of his career in rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the church. during his career he collaborated with many other composers including alessandro scarlatti and handel. despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about corelli, and this composer of the week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

    in this programme, donald macleod journeys through the many relationships corelli had with nobles and royals, ranging from the eccentric queen christina of sweden and the electress sofia carlotta of brandenburg, to duke francesco d’este of modena and the king of naples. corelli was fortunate to be employed by the nobility, to the extent that he would often receive offers from different aristocrats. they tried to poach corelli from one another, wanting to secure the services of the famed corelli for themselves.

    fuga con un soggetto solo
    london baroque
    dan laurin, director

    sonata in g minor, op 5 no 5
    andrew manze, violin
    richard egarr, harpsichord

    sonata in f, op 1 no 1
    the avison ensemble

    sonata in a minor, op 1 no 4
    the avison ensemble

    sonata in b minor, op 3 no 4
    monica huggett, violin
    alison bury, violin
    jaap ter linden, cello
    hopkinson smith, theorbo
    ton koopman, harpsichord

    sonata in f minor, op 3 no 9
    monica huggett, violin
    alison bury, violin
    jaap ter linden, cello
    hopkinson smith, theorbo
    ton koopman, harpsichord

    concerto grosso in f, op 6 no 12
    the english concert
    trevor pinnock, director

    produced by luke whitlock, for bbc wales

    donald macleod delves into corelli's relationships with the nobility and royalty.

    donald macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

    donald macleod explores arcangelo corelli’s relationships with the nobility and crowned heads

    arcangelo corelli was something of a european phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. his compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. musically, he bridged the gap between the baroque and the classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. even today, corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. as a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. corelli spent most of his career in rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the church. during his career he collaborated with many other composers including alessandro scarlatti and handel. despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about corelli, and this composer of the week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

    in this programme, donald macleod journeys through the many relationships corelli had with nobles and royals, ranging from the eccentric queen christina of sweden and the electress sofia carlotta of brandenburg, to duke francesco d’este of modena and the king of naples. corelli was fortunate to be employed by the nobility, to the extent that he would often receive offers from different aristocrats. they tried to poach corelli from one another, wanting to secure the services of the famed corelli for themselves.

    fuga con un soggetto solo
    london baroque
    dan laurin, director

    sonata in g minor, op 5 no 5
    andrew manze, violin
    richard egarr, harpsichord

    sonata in f, op 1 no 1
    the avison ensemble

    sonata in a minor, op 1 no 4
    the avison ensemble

    sonata in b minor, op 3 no 4
    monica huggett, violin
    alison bury, violin
    jaap ter linden, cello
    hopkinson smith, theorbo
    ton koopman, harpsichord

    sonata in f minor, op 3 no 9
    monica huggett, violin
    alison bury, violin
    jaap ter linden, cello
    hopkinson smith, theorbo
    ton koopman, harpsichord

    concerto grosso in f, op 6 no 12
    the english concert
    trevor pinnock, director

    produced by luke whitlock, for bbc wales

  • 03Corelli's Religious Patrons2019122520090401Donald Macleod explores the life and music of the Italian violinist and composer Arcangelo Corelli. He discovers how, although Corelli has established himself as Rome's hottest musical property, the 'affair of the fifths' threatens to ruin his hard-won reputation.

    Sonata, Op 1 No 1

  • accademia bizantina:
  • arcana a402, cd1 trs 9-12

    concerto grosso, op 6 no 5

  • brandenburg consort
  • carlo chiarappa (violin)
  • chandos chan0692, cd2 trs 8-11

    sonata, op 3 no 1 (arr. roland gallery)

  • charles medlam (cello)
  • english guitar quartet
  • enrico gatti (director)
  • ensemble aurora
  • europa musica 350202, cd1 trs 1-4

    sonata, op 2 no 4

  • franco andrini (violin)
  • harmonia mundi hmc90134243, cd1, trs 12-16

    sonata, op 2 no 3

  • hyperion cda667412, cd1 trs 21-25.

    Donald Macleod discovers how a musical row disturbed corelli's famous equilibrium

  • ingrid seifert, richard gwilt (violins)
  • lars ulrik mortensen (harpsichord)
  • london baroque:
  • mauro valli (cello)
  • paolo cherici (archlute)
  • purcell quartet
  • romano valentini (organ)
  • roy goodman (director)
  • saydisc cdsdl386, trs 9-12

    sonata in g, op 3 no 6

    donald macleod traces arcangelo corelli’s relationship with princes of the roman catholic church.

    arcangelo corelli was something of a european phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. his compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. musically, he bridged the gap between the baroque and the classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. even today, corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. as a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. corelli spent most of his career in rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the church. during his career he collaborated with many other composers including alessandro scarlatti and handel. despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about corelli, and this composer of the week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

    in this programme, donald macleod delves into the opportunities open to corelli through his relationship with the roman catholic church. two of his more prominent patrons were cardinal pamphili and cardinal ottoboni. corelli was employed in sequence by these two cardinals, and was held in high esteem. he not only composed music for them, but was able to live in their palaces in some splendour, often writing incidental music for their private theatres and annual festivities.

    sonata in d
    helmut hunger, trumpet
    i solisti veneti
    claudio scimone, director

    sonata in b major, op 2 no 5
    london baroque

    sonata in e flat major, op 2 no 11
    london baroque

    sinfonia to santa beatrice d’este in d minor, woo1
    la serenissima
    adrian chandler, director

    concerto in g minor, op 6 no 8 (christmas concerto)
    the tafelmusik baroque orchestra
    jean lamon, director

    sonata in c, op 5 no 9
    michala petri, recorder
    george malcolm, harpsichord

    produced by luke whitlock, for bbc wales

    donald macleod explores corelli's relationship with the church.

    donald macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

    donald macleod traces arcangelo corelli’s relationship with princes of the roman catholic church.

    arcangelo corelli was something of a european phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. his compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. musically, he bridged the gap between the baroque and the classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. even today, corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. as a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. corelli spent most of his career in rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the church. during his career he collaborated with many other composers including alessandro scarlatti and handel. despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about corelli, and this composer of the week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

    in this programme, donald macleod delves into the opportunities open to corelli through his relationship with the roman catholic church. two of his more prominent patrons were cardinal pamphili and cardinal ottoboni. corelli was employed in sequence by these two cardinals, and was held in high esteem. he not only composed music for them, but was able to live in their palaces in some splendour, often writing incidental music for their private theatres and annual festivities.

    sonata in d
    helmut hunger, trumpet
    i solisti veneti
    claudio scimone, director

    sonata in b major, op 2 no 5
    london baroque

    sonata in e flat major, op 2 no 11
    london baroque

    sinfonia to santa beatrice d’este in d minor, woo1
    la serenissima
    adrian chandler, director

    concerto in g minor, op 6 no 8 (christmas concerto)
    the tafelmusik baroque orchestra
    jean lamon, director

    sonata in c, op 5 no 9
    michala petri, recorder
    george malcolm, harpsichord

    produced by luke whitlock, for bbc wales

  • 04Corelli's Contemporaries2019122620090402Donald Macleod explores the life and music of the Italian violinist and composer Arcangelo Corelli. He describes how the compser is taken on by one of Rome's most flamboyant cultural celebrities, the young and extremely weathly Cardinal Ottoboni, who becomes his lifelong employer and personal friend.

    Sinfonia in D minor, WoO 1

  • Trevor Pinnock (director)
  • accademia bizantina
  • archiv 4236262, cd2 trs 7-12

    sonata iv in f (arr. schickhardt after concerti grossi 1 and 2)

  • carlo chiarappa (director)
  • charles medlam (cello)
  • danny bond (bassoon)
  • english concert
  • europa musica 350202, cd9 trs 1-5

    sonata in d, op 4 no 4

  • harmonia mundi hmc90134243, cd2 trs 13-16

    concerto grosso, op 6 no 8 (christmas concerto)

  • hugo reyne, sebastien marq (recorders)
  • hyperion cda 66226, trs 5-9.

    Donald Macleod explores how corelli was taken on by one of rome's cultural celebrities

  • ingrid seifert, richard gwilt (violins)
  • lars ulrik mortensen (harpsichord)
  • london baroque:
  • opus ops549118, trs 15-18

    sonata, op 5 no 3

  • pierre hantai (harpsichord)
  • purcell quartet
  • rainer zipperling (cello)

    donald macleod traces the relationship between arcangelo corelli and his musical contemporaries

    arcangelo corelli was something of a european phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. his compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. musically, he bridged the gap between the baroque and the classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. even today, corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. as a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. corelli spent most of his career in rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the church. during his career he collaborated with many other composers including alessandro scarlatti and handel. despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about corelli, and this composer of the week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

    in this programme, donald macleod discovers more details about corelli's life and character through his relationship with other composers. including stories of alessandro scarlatti's jealousy over corelli’s exulted position in rome and handel's visit with the great master, made when he travelled to rome as a young man. handel not only composed music based on some of corelli’s own themes but also probably composed a violin concerto for corelli to play.

    sonata in a minor, op 4 no 5
    london baroque

    sonata in b minor, op 4 no 12
    london baroque

    sonata in c, op 2 no 3
    the avison ensemble
    pavlo beznosiuk, director

    sonata in f major, op 2 no 7
    the avison ensemble
    pavlo beznosiuk, director

    handel
    sonata a 5, hwv288 (violin concerto in b flat)
    academy of ancient music
    richard egarr, director

    corelli
    sonata in g minor woo2
    la stagione
    michael schneider, director

    corelli arr. j. c. schickhardt
    concerto grosso op 6 no 3
    le concert francais

    produced by luke whitlock, for bbc wales

    donald macleod explores corelli and his contemporaries.

    donald macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

    donald macleod traces the relationship between arcangelo corelli and his musical contemporaries

    arcangelo corelli was something of a european phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. his compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. musically, he bridged the gap between the baroque and the classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. even today, corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. as a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. corelli spent most of his career in rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the church. during his career he collaborated with many other composers including alessandro scarlatti and handel. despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about corelli, and this composer of the week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

    in this programme, donald macleod discovers more details about corelli's life and character through his relationship with other composers. including stories of alessandro scarlatti's jealousy over corelli’s exulted position in rome and handel's visit with the great master, made when he travelled to rome as a young man. handel not only composed music based on some of corelli’s own themes but also probably composed a violin concerto for corelli to play.

    sonata in a minor, op 4 no 5
    london baroque

    sonata in b minor, op 4 no 12
    london baroque

    sonata in c, op 2 no 3
    the avison ensemble
    pavlo beznosiuk, director

    sonata in f major, op 2 no 7
    the avison ensemble
    pavlo beznosiuk, director

    handel
    sonata a 5, hwv288 (violin concerto in b flat)
    academy of ancient music
    richard egarr, director

    corelli
    sonata in g minor woo2
    la stagione
    michael schneider, director

    corelli arr. j. c. schickhardt
    concerto grosso op 6 no 3
    le concert francais

    produced by luke whitlock, for bbc wales

  • 05 LASTCorelli And His Followers2019122720090403Donald Macleod explores the life and music of the Italian violinist and composer Arcangelo Corelli. He describes how Corelli planned to crown his stellar career with a final collection of Concerti grossi, but his sudden death led to a battle over the proceeds of this guaranteed bestseller.

    Sonata, Op 4 No 12

  • Andrew Manze (violin)
  • Trevor Pinnock (conductor)
  • alison bury (violin)
  • archiv 4236262, cd2 trs 19-24

    sonata, op 5 no 12 (la folia)

  • chiara banchini, jesper christensen (director)
  • english concert
  • ensemble 415
  • harmonia mundi hmc90140607, cd1 trs 14-15

    sonata in d for trumpet, two violins and continuo

  • harmonia mundi hmu90729899, cd1 tr 23.

    Donald Macleod reveals how corelli's best friend scrabbled to cash in following his death

  • hopkinson smith (theorbo)
  • hyperion cda 66255, trs 33-37

    concerto grosso, op 6 no 10

  • jaap ter linden (cello)
  • monica huggett (violin)
  • parley of instruments
  • philips 4166142, trs 26-28

    concerto grosso, op 6 no 3

  • richard egarr (harpsichord)
  • stephen keavy (trumpet)
  • ton koopman (harpsichord)

    Donald Macleod explores the Arcangelo Corelli craze after the composer’s death

    Arcangelo Corelli was something of a European phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. His compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. Musically, he bridged the gap between the Baroque and the Classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. Even today, Corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. As a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over Europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. Corelli spent most of his career in Rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the Church. During his career he collaborated with many other composers including Alessandro Scarlatti and Handel. Despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about Corelli, and this Composer of the Week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

    In this final programme, Donald Macleod explores the craze for the music of Corelli after the composer’s death. He was held in such high esteem that not only was he buried in the Pantheon near the painter Raphael, but also yearly recitals of his music were held there before the tomb. Composers like Couperin tried to emulate Corelli and the Italian style, and Locatelli would claim to be in direct musical lineage. Others took works by Corelli and tried to capitalise upon their popularity by embellishing them further in print. In modern times, Tippett and Rachmaninov have paid musical homage to Corelli, by creating variations on themes by the great master.

    Sonata No 2 in D minor, Op 2 No 2
    London Baroque

    Concerto Grosso in F, Op 6 No 2
    The Brandenburg Consort
    Roy Goodman, director

    Corelli Arr. Geminiani
    Concerto Grosso VII in D minor
    Academy of Ancient Music
    Andrew Manze, director

    Sonata in D minor, Op 5 No 12 (Follia)
    Andrew Manze, violin
    Richard Egarr, harpsichord

    Concerto Grosso in F, Op 6 No 9
    The English Concert
    Trevor Pinnock, director

    Produced by Luke Whitlock, for BBC Wales

    Donald Macleod delves into the Corelli craze.

    Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

    Donald Macleod explores the Arcangelo Corelli craze after the composer’s death

    Arcangelo Corelli was something of a European phenomenon not only during his lifetime, but also after his death. His compositional output was not large, but the development of the printing press enabled his music to be widely circulated. Musically, he bridged the gap between the Baroque and the Classical periods, and is seen as pivotal in the development of the sonata and the concerto. Even today, Corelli’s music is held in high esteem, with composers still inspired by his music. As a violinist he was also legendary, and people flocked from all over Europe to not only hear him play, but to also be taught by him. Corelli spent most of his career in Rome, maintained in some luxury by royalty, nobility and the Church. During his career he collaborated with many other composers including Alessandro Scarlatti and Handel. Despite his fame and continued popularity, we still know relatively little about Corelli, and this Composer of the Week series seeks to explore the man and his music through his personal and professional relationships.

    In this final programme, Donald Macleod explores the craze for the music of Corelli after the composer’s death. He was held in such high esteem that not only was he buried in the Pantheon near the painter Raphael, but also yearly recitals of his music were held there before the tomb. Composers like Couperin tried to emulate Corelli and the Italian style, and Locatelli would claim to be in direct musical lineage. Others took works by Corelli and tried to capitalise upon their popularity by embellishing them further in print. In modern times, Tippett and Rachmaninov have paid musical homage to Corelli, by creating variations on themes by the great master.

    Sonata No 2 in D minor, Op 2 No 2
    London Baroque

    Concerto Grosso in F, Op 6 No 2
    The Brandenburg Consort
    Roy Goodman, director

    Corelli Arr. Geminiani
    Concerto Grosso VII in D minor
    Academy of Ancient Music
    Andrew Manze, director

    Sonata in D minor, Op 5 No 12 (Follia)
    Andrew Manze, violin
    Richard Egarr, harpsichord

    Concerto Grosso in F, Op 6 No 9
    The English Concert
    Trevor Pinnock, director

    Produced by Luke Whitlock, for BBC Wales

  • 0120090330Donald Macleod discusses the basis on which Corelli's reputation was built.

    Synopsis

    Donald Macleod explores the life and music of the Italian violinist and composer Arcangelo Corelli. He reveals how Corelli's immense reputation rests on a relatively small collection of six publications, with just a handful of accounts about his brilliant playing.

    Concerto grosso in D, Op 6 No 7 (opening)

  • andrew manze (violin)

  • brandenburg consort

  • chandos chan0692, cd4 trs 17-20

    sonata in f (arr of op 5 no 4)

  • david mings (baroque bassoon)

  • globe glo5094, trs 6-9

    sonata in g, op 1 no 9

  • han tol (recorder)

  • harmonia mundi hmu90729899, trs 1-5

    concerto grosso in f, op 6 no 12

  • hopkinson smith (theorbo)

  • hyperion cda667412, cd2 trs 1-2

    sonata in d, op 5 no 1

  • hyperion cda667412, cd2 trs 30-34

    sonata in a minor, op 4 no 5

  • jaap ter linden (cello)

  • monica huggett, alison bury (violins)

  • patrick ayrton (harpsichord)

  • philips 4166142, trs 1-5.

    purcell quartet

  • richard egarr (harpsichord)

  • roy goodman (director)

  • ton koopman (organ)

  • 0220090331Donald Macleod follows Corelli to Rome, where he begins to make his mark as a rising star.

    Synopsis

    Donald Macleod explores the life and music of the Italian violinist and composer Arcangelo Corelli. He tells the story of Corelli's first years in Rome, where he begins to find his feet among the musical glitterati in Europe's grandest cultural capital.

    Sonata in E, Op 5 No 11

  • accent acc9177d, trs 1-4

    sonata, op 1 no 3

  • archiv 4196142, tr 5

    corelli: concerto grosso, op 6 no 6

  • barthold kuijken (transverse flute)

  • chiara banchini, jesper christensen (directors)

  • elizabeth wallfisch (violin)

  • ensemble 415

  • harmonia mundi hmc90134445, cd2 trs 45-49

    sonata in e minor, op 5 no 8

  • harmonia mundi hmc90140607, cd2 trs 9-12.

    hyperion cda663812, cd2 trs 18-22

    sonata in a minor, op 3 no 12

  • locatelli trio:

  • london baroque

  • members of the english concert

  • paul nicholson (harpsichord)

  • richard tunnicliffe (cello)

  • robert kohnen (harpsichord)

  • wieland kuijken (cello)

  • 0320090401Donald Macleod discovers how a musical row disturbed Corelli's famous equilibrium.

    Synopsis

    Donald Macleod explores the life and music of the Italian violinist and composer Arcangelo Corelli. He discovers how, although Corelli has established himself as Rome's hottest musical property, the 'affair of the fifths' threatens to ruin his hard-won reputation.

    Sonata, Op 1 No 1

  • accademia bizantina:

  • arcana a402, cd1 trs 9-12

    concerto grosso, op 6 no 5

  • brandenburg consort

  • carlo chiarappa (violin)

  • chandos chan0692, cd2 trs 8-11

    sonata, op 3 no 1 (arr. roland gallery)

  • charles medlam (cello)

  • english guitar quartet

  • enrico gatti (director)

  • ensemble aurora

  • europa musica 350202, cd1 trs 1-4

    sonata, op 2 no 4

  • franco andrini (violin)

  • harmonia mundi hmc90134243, cd1, trs 12-16

    sonata, op 2 no 3

  • hyperion cda667412, cd1 trs 21-25.

    ingrid seifert, richard gwilt (violins)

  • lars ulrik mortensen (harpsichord)

  • london baroque:

  • mauro valli (cello)

  • paolo cherici (archlute)

  • purcell quartet

  • romano valentini (organ)

  • roy goodman (director)

  • saydisc cdsdl386, trs 9-12

    sonata in g, op 3 no 6

  • 0420090402Donald Macleod explores how Corelli was taken on by one of Rome's cultural celebrities.

    Synopsis

    Donald Macleod explores the life and music of the Italian violinist and composer Arcangelo Corelli. He describes how the compser is taken on by one of Rome's most flamboyant cultural celebrities, the young and extremely weathly Cardinal Ottoboni, who becomes his lifelong employer and personal friend.

    Sinfonia in D minor, WoO 1

  • accademia bizantina

  • archiv 4236262, cd2 trs 7-12

    sonata iv in f (arr. schickhardt after concerti grossi 1 and 2)

  • carlo chiarappa (director)

  • charles medlam (cello)

  • danny bond (bassoon)

  • english concert

  • europa musica 350202, cd9 trs 1-5

    sonata in d, op 4 no 4

  • harmonia mundi hmc90134243, cd2 trs 13-16

    concerto grosso, op 6 no 8 (christmas concerto)

  • hugo reyne, sebastien marq (recorders)

  • hyperion cda 66226, trs 5-9.

    ingrid seifert, richard gwilt (violins)

  • lars ulrik mortensen (harpsichord)

  • london baroque:

  • opus ops549118, trs 15-18

    sonata, op 5 no 3

  • pierre hantai (harpsichord)

  • purcell quartet

  • rainer zipperling (cello)

  • trevor pinnock (director)

  • 05 LAST20090403Donald Macleod reveals how Corelli's best friend scrabbled to cash in following his death.

    Donald Macleod explores the life and music of the Italian violinist and composer Arcangelo Corelli. He describes how Corelli planned to crown his stellar career with a final collection of Concerti grossi, but his sudden death led to a battle over the proceeds of this guaranteed bestseller.

    Sonata, Op 4 No 12

  • alison bury (violin)

  • andrew manze (violin)

  • archiv 4236262, cd2 trs 19-24

    sonata, op 5 no 12 (la folia)

  • chiara banchini, jesper christensen (director)

  • english concert

  • ensemble 415

  • harmonia mundi hmc90140607, cd1 trs 14-15

    sonata in d for trumpet, two violins and continuo

  • harmonia mundi hmu90729899, cd1 tr 23.

    hopkinson smith (theorbo)

  • hyperion cda 66255, trs 33-37

    concerto grosso, op 6 no 10

  • jaap ter linden (cello)

  • monica huggett (violin)

  • parley of instruments

  • philips 4166142, trs 26-28

    concerto grosso, op 6 no 3

  • richard egarr (harpsichord)

  • stephen keavy (trumpet)

  • ton koopman (harpsichord)

  • trevor pinnock (conductor)