Episodes

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2018111320181114 (R4)

Five historians explore the global impact and legacy of the 1918 Armistice.

Five historians challenge the conventional narrative about the end of World War One

2018111420181115 (R4)

Five historians explore the global impact and legacy of the 1918 Armistice.

Five historians challenge the conventional narrative about the end of World War One

2018111520181116 (R4)

Five historians explore the global impact and legacy of the 1918 Armistice.

Five historians challenge the conventional narrative about the end of World War One

2018111620181117 (R4)

Five historians explore the global impact and legacy of the 1918 Armistice.

Five historians challenge the conventional narrative about the end of World War One

Dividing The World's Graves2018111320181114 (R4)

Five historians explore the global impact of the 1918 armistice and the legacy it has left in our world: from the fringes of Europe to the Middle East. They challenge the conventional narrative about the end of the First World War and the peace settlements that followed, with repercussions still felt today.

Today, Santanu Das, Professor of English Literature at King’s College London, explores what the 1918 armistice meant for the victorious Allies’ colonial subjects after the First World War.

He argues that the armistice brought expectations that their war contribution would be rewarded with the granting of dominion status, yet the Paris Peace Conference turned such hopes to dust. Instead of marking peace, the world was convulsed with fresh violence as revolt and reprisal broke out among oppressed subjects in the US, Egypt, Korea, China and, most notably, in India during the Amritsar massacre of April 1919. Here, Professor Das says, the armistice marked the beginning of the end of Empire.

Readings by Will Huggins and Susheel Kumar

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4

Santanu Das explores impact of the armistice on the victorious Allies' colonial subjects.

Five historians challenge the conventional narrative about the end of World War One

Five historians explore the global impact and legacy of the 1918 Armistice.

Feeding The Peace2018111420181115 (R4)

Five historians explore the global impact of the 1918 armistice and the legacy it has left in our world: from the fringes of Europe to the Middle East. They challenge the conventional narrative about the end of the First World War and the peace settlements that followed, with repercussions still felt today.

In this third programme, Patricia Clavin, Professor of International History at Jesus College Oxford, explores the search for peace and international security after the 1918 armistice.

She reminds us that it wasn’t just dominated by men - women were also at the forefront of a practical approach to peace. The ‘hunger catastrophe’ which beset Europe after the war led to British scientists like Dr Harriette Chick tackling the problem of 'feeding the peace' head-on. The spectacle of hungry children and the evidence that want and disease did not recognise national frontiers emerged at the heart of the women’s peace movement.

While the Allied leaders believed that victory gave them authority to re-organise the European state-system, the new world order was also shaped by bread and butter issues on the ground that forced their way into the lofty world of international diplomacy.

Readings by Helen Ayres and Will Hubbard

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4

Patricia Clavin explores the practical approach to peace taken after the 1918 armistice.

Five historians challenge the conventional narrative about the end of World War One

Five historians explore the global impact and legacy of the 1918 Armistice.

Into The Abyss2018111620181117 (R4)

Five historians explore the global impact of the 1918 armistice and the legacy it has left in our world: from the fringes of Europe to the Middle East. They challenge the conventional narrative about the end of the First World War and the peace settlements that followed, with repercussions still felt today.

Today, Jörn Leonhard, Professor of European History at the University of Freiburg, explores the German experience of the 1918 armistice. He explains how most Germans expected victory until the final weeks of the First World War and were unable to imagine defeat. On top of military defeat came the fall of the monarchy and the founding of the German republic. German soldiers returned to a country traumatised by the unexpected defeat, revolution and political polarisation.

Professor Leonhard argues that this combination fuelled what's been called the ‘stab-in-the-back’ legend, which was later used by Adolf Hitler against the hated democracy, and it explains why the armistice centenary has not attracted as much attention in Germany as it has in other countries.

Readings by Helen Ayres and Will Hubbard.

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4

J\u00f6rn Leonhard explores the German experience of the 1918 armistice.

Five historians challenge the conventional narrative about the end of World War One

Five historians explore the global impact of the 1918 armistice and the legacy it has left in our world: from the fringes of Europe to the Middle East. They challenge the conventional narrative about the end of the First World War and the peace settlements that followed, with repercussions still felt today.

Today, Jorn Leonhard, Professor of European History at the University of Freiburg, explores the German experience of the 1918 armistice. He explains how most Germans expected victory until the final weeks of the First World War and were unable to imagine defeat. On top of military defeat came the fall of the monarchy and the founding of the German republic. German soldiers returned to a country traumatised by the unexpected defeat, revolution and political polarization.

Professor Leonhard argues that this combination fuelled what's been called the ‘stab-in-the-back’ legend, which was later used by Adolf Hitler against the hated democracy, and it explains why the armistice centenary has not attracted as much attention in Germany as it has in other countries.

Readings by Helen Ayres and Will Hubbard.

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4

Jorn Leonhard explores the German experience of the 1918 armistice.

Five historians explore the global impact and legacy of the 1918 Armistice."

Remembering The Silence2018111220181113 (R4)

Five historians explore the global impact of the 1918 armistice and the legacy it has left in our world: from the fringes of Europe to the Middle East. They challenge the conventional narrative about the end of the First World War and the peace settlements that followed, with repercussions still felt today.

In the first episode, Heather Jones, Professor in Modern European History at University College London, takes us back to the French forest of Compiègne where delegates signed the armistice on 'the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month', marking a victory for the Allies against Germany. She argues that, although we think of the armistice today as the end of the First World War, in reality it marked a pause, rather than an ending, as the war continued in Europe in forms which still shape our modern world: paramilitarism, political assassinations, ethnic cleansing and deportations. Interwar Europe never truly moved on from the armistice to peace. Ferdinand Foch, the Supreme Allied Commander during the First World War commented in 1919, "this is not peace; it is an armistice for twenty years."

Readings by Helen Ayres and Will Huggins

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4

Heather Jones argues that the armistice of 1918 marked a pause, not an ending, to the war.

Five historians challenge the conventional narrative about the end of World War One

The Pause, Not The Ending2018111220181113 (R4)

Heather Jones argues that the armistice of 1918 marked a pause, not an ending, to the war.

Five historians challenge the conventional narrative about the end of World War One

Five historians explore the global impact of the 1918 Armistice and the legacy it has left in our world - from the fringes of Europe to the Middle East. They challenge the conventional narrative about the end of the First World War and the peace settlements that followed, with repercussions still felt today.

In the first episode, Heather Jones, Professor in Modern European History at University College London, takes us back to the French forest of Compiègne where delegates signed the armistice on "the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month", marking a victory for the Allies against Germany. She argues that, although we think of the Armistice today as the end of the First World War, in reality it marked a pause, rather than an ending, as the war continued in Europe in forms which still shape our modern world - paramilitarism, political assassinations, ethnic cleansing and deportations. She says that interwar Europe never truly moved on from the Armistice to peace. Ferdinand Foch, the Supreme Allied Commander during the First World War commented in 1919, "This is not peace; it is an Armistice for twenty years."

Readings by Will Huggins

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4

Heather Jones argues that the armistice of 1918 marked a pause, not an ending, to the war.

Five historians challenge the conventional narrative about the end of World War One"

Unmaking The Middle East2018111520181116 (R4)

Five historians explore the global impact of the 1918 armistice and the legacy it has left in our world: from the fringes of Europe to the Middle East. They challenge the conventional narrative about the end of the First World War and the peace settlements that followed, with repercussions still felt today.

Mustafa Aksakal, Associate Professor of History and Chair of Modern Turkish Studies at Georgetown University USA, explores how the armistice had a very different meaning in the Ottoman Empire than on the Western front.

When the armistice was declared in November 1918, the fighting paused for a moment - but the violence resumed quickly across the Middle East as the Ottoman Empire collapsed. In Turkey, the armistice period is now seen as the Great Moment of Defiance, when Mustafa Kemal defied the victorious powers’ heavy peace terms and the Turkish nation was born.

Professor Aksakal argues that the power grab for resources and territory in the Middle East after the First World War has left a legacy of unrest in the region.

Readings by Will Huggins and Susheel Kumar

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4

Mustafa Aksakal explores the Ottoman armistice of 1918 and its legacy in the Middle East.

Five historians challenge the conventional narrative about the end of World War One

Five historians explore the global impact and legacy of the 1918 Armistice."