The Art Of Australia

Episodes

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0120161201

In a major new three part series, academic Corin Throsby returns to her native Australia to explore the rich cultural life of this vast nation we think we know so well, but which in fact belies many of our misconceptions. She describes how the dominant stereotypes of the country formed by soaps like Neighbours and Home and Away, as well as movies like Crocodile Dundee, bear little resemblance to the real life of Australia and the culture being created there. This is a country that's highly multi-cultural and increasingly keen to dwell on its own stories rather than forever hark back to its colonial parent, and home to a great swathe of major figures in the international arts scene; it is also, though, a place wrestling with issues around race and sexuality, where ingrained prejudice against immigrants and indigenous communities still acts both as a brake and an inspiration for many of its most powerful cultural voices, and where the mainstream domestic media continues to present a very white, mono-cultural face.

In the first episode, Corin hears from the likes of Baz Luhrmann, Geoffrey Rush, Courtney Barnett, Christos Tsiolkas and Richard Flanagan, as well as Maya Newell, the director of the documentary'Gayby Baby' that was banned in schools for supposedly promoting same-sex families.

PRODUCER: Geoff Bird.

012016120120170605

First episode of a major three-part series exploring the contemporary culture of Australia

In a major new three part series, academic Corin Throsby returns to her native Australia to explore the rich cultural life of this vast nation we think we know so well, but which in fact belies many of our misconceptions. She describes how the dominant stereotypes of the country formed by soaps like Neighbours and Home and Away, as well as movies like Crocodile Dundee, bear little resemblance to the real life of Australia and the culture being created there. This is a country that's highly multi-cultural and increasingly keen to dwell on its own stories rather than forever hark back to its colonial parent, and home to a great swathe of major figures in the international arts scene; it is also, though, a place wrestling with issues around race and sexuality, where ingrained prejudice against immigrants and indigenous communities still acts both as a brake and an inspiration for many of its most powerful cultural voices, and where the mainstream domestic media continues to present a very white, mono-cultural face.
In the first episode, Corin hears from the likes of Baz Luhrmann, Geoffrey Rush, Courtney Barnett, Christos Tsiolkas and Richard Flanagan, as well as Maya Newell, the director of the documentary'Gayby Baby' that was banned in schools for supposedly promoting same-sex families.
PRODUCER: Geoff Bird.

In a major new three part series, academic Corin Throsby returns to her native Australia to explore the rich cultural life of this vast nation we think we know so well, but which in fact belies many of our misconceptions. She describes how the dominant stereotypes of the country formed by soaps like Neighbours and Home and Away, as well as movies like Crocodile Dundee, bear little resemblance to the real life of Australia and the culture being created there. This is a country that's highly multi-cultural and increasingly keen to dwell on its own stories rather than forever hark back to its colonial parent, and home to a great swathe of major figures in the international arts scene; it is also, though, a place wrestling with issues around race and sexuality, where ingrained prejudice against immigrants and indigenous communities still acts both as a brake and an inspiration for many of its most powerful cultural voices, and where the mainstream domestic media continues to present a very white, mono-cultural face.

In the first episode, Corin hears from the likes of Baz Luhrmann, Geoffrey Rush, Courtney Barnett, Christos Tsiolkas and Richard Flanagan, as well as Maya Newell, the director of the documentary'Gayby Baby' that was banned in schools for supposedly promoting same-sex families.

PRODUCER: Geoff Bird.

0120170605

First episode of a major three-part series exploring the contemporary culture of Australia

In a major new three part series, academic Corin Throsby returns to her native Australia to explore the rich cultural life of this vast nation we think we know so well, but which in fact belies many of our misconceptions. She describes how the dominant stereotypes of the country formed by soaps like Neighbours and Home and Away, as well as movies like Crocodile Dundee, bear little resemblance to the real life of Australia and the culture being created there. This is a country that's highly multi-cultural and increasingly keen to dwell on its own stories rather than forever hark back to its colonial parent, and home to a great swathe of major figures in the international arts scene; it is also, though, a place wrestling with issues around race and sexuality, where ingrained prejudice against immigrants and indigenous communities still acts both as a brake and an inspiration for many of its most powerful cultural voices, and where the mainstream domestic media continues to present a very white, mono-cultural face.
In the first episode, Corin hears from the likes of Baz Luhrmann, Geoffrey Rush, Courtney Barnett, Christos Tsiolkas and Richard Flanagan, as well as Maya Newell, the director of the documentary'Gayby Baby' that was banned in schools for supposedly promoting same-sex families.
PRODUCER: Geoff Bird.

0220161208

In part two of this three part series, Corin Throsby explores the influence of Aboriginal voices as well as those from recent immigrant populations within Australian culture. She hears from Christos Tsiolkas, who suggests that the UK has a distorted vision of Australia, as many of the influential voices who've been telling us the story of the Australian nation are actually ex-pats who often left before large numbers of immigrants, particularly from Asia, but also more recently the Middle East, started to make Australia their home. Corin hears how racism has played a significant part in Australian culture and society, and how it is only recently that mainstream media has begun to represent the true nature of the population more accurately. Corin hears from indigenous artists including the rapper Briggs, artist Jonathan Jones and poet Ellen Van Neerven about the particular struggles and responsibilities they feel - as well as their belief in the power of culture to empower groups who for so long have been subject to discrimination. Corin also hears how Australia's position next to Asia has the potential to position it at the heart of a global cultural life as the 21st century develops.

022016120820170606

How Australian culture is reflecting and engaging with an ever-more diverse population.

In part two of this three part series, Corin Throsby explores the influence of Aboriginal voices as well as those from recent immigrant populations within Australian culture. She hears from Christos Tsiolkas, who suggests that the UK has a distorted vision of Australia, as many of the influential voices who've been telling us the story of the Australian nation are actually ex-pats who often left before large numbers of immigrants, particularly from Asia, but also more recently the Middle East, started to make Australia their home. Corin hears how racism has played a significant part in Australian culture and society, and how it is only recently that mainstream media has begun to represent the true nature of the population more accurately. Corin hears from indigenous artists including the rapper Briggs, artist Jonathan Jones and poet Ellen Van Neerven about the particular struggles and responsibilities they feel - as well as their belief in the power of culture to empower groups who for so long have been subject to discrimination. Corin also hears how Australia's position next to Asia has the potential to position it at the heart of a global cultural life as the 21st century develops.

In part two of this three part series, Corin Throsby explores the influence of Aboriginal voices as well as those from recent immigrant populations within Australian culture. She hears from Christos Tsiolkas, who suggests that the UK has a distorted vision of Australia, as many of the influential voices who've been telling us the story of the Australian nation are actually ex-pats who often left before large numbers of immigrants, particularly from Asia, but also more recently the Middle East, started to make Australia their home. Corin hears how racism has played a significant part in Australian culture and society, and how it is only recently that mainstream media has begun to represent the true nature of the population more accurately. Corin hears from indigenous artists including the rapper Briggs, artist Jonathan Jones and poet Ellen Van Neerven about the particular struggles and responsibilities they feel - as well as their belief in the power of culture to empower groups who for so long have been subject to discrimination. Corin also hears how Australia's position next to Asia has the potential to position it at the heart of a global cultural life as the 21st century develops.

0220170606

How Australian culture is reflecting and engaging with an ever-more diverse population.

In part two of this three part series, Corin Throsby explores the influence of Aboriginal voices as well as those from recent immigrant populations within Australian culture. She hears from Christos Tsiolkas, who suggests that the UK has a distorted vision of Australia, as many of the influential voices who've been telling us the story of the Australian nation are actually ex-pats who often left before large numbers of immigrants, particularly from Asia, but also more recently the Middle East, started to make Australia their home. Corin hears how racism has played a significant part in Australian culture and society, and how it is only recently that mainstream media has begun to represent the true nature of the population more accurately. Corin hears from indigenous artists including the rapper Briggs, artist Jonathan Jones and poet Ellen Van Neerven about the particular struggles and responsibilities they feel - as well as their belief in the power of culture to empower groups who for so long have been subject to discrimination. Corin also hears how Australia's position next to Asia has the potential to position it at the heart of a global cultural life as the 21st century develops.

0320161215

In the final part of this three part series, Corin Throsby speaks to author Richard Flanagan - author of the prize-winning 'Narrow Road to the Deep North' - about the place of literature in Australian culture, which, he says, differs significantly to its place in European culture. Corin then goes on to explore the extent to which the grandeur and scale of the Australian landscape have an effect upon the work that's being done by the country's artists, writers and musicians - hearing from Baz Luhrmann that even those Australians who've never been near the outback are indelibly marked by its proximity. Corin visits the mining town of Coober Pedy, five hundred kilometres in any direction from the nearest town, to see for herself why so many film makers have been drawn to the landscape as a location and inspiration. She also talks with author Charlotte Wood about why the outback has so long featured as a dystopian setting in so much Australian culture.

0320170607

The impact of the Australian landscape on the country's popular culture.

In the final part of this three part series, Corin Throsby speaks to author Richard Flanagan - author of the prize-winning 'Narrow Road to the Deep North' - about the place of literature in Australian culture, which, he says, differs significantly to its place in European culture. Corin then goes on to explore the extent to which the grandeur and scale of the Australian landscape have an effect upon the work that's being done by the country's artists, writers and musicians - hearing from Baz Luhrmann that even those Australians who've never been near the outback are indelibly marked by its proximity. Corin visits the mining town of Coober Pedy, five hundred kilometres in any direction from the nearest town, to see for herself why so many film makers have been drawn to the landscape as a location and inspiration. She also talks with author Charlotte Wood about why the outback has so long featured as a dystopian setting in so much Australian culture.

03 LAST2016121520170607

The impact of the Australian landscape on the country's popular culture.

In the final part of this three part series, Corin Throsby speaks to author Richard Flanagan - author of the prize-winning 'Narrow Road to the Deep North' - about the place of literature in Australian culture, which, he says, differs significantly to its place in European culture. Corin then goes on to explore the extent to which the grandeur and scale of the Australian landscape have an effect upon the work that's being done by the country's artists, writers and musicians - hearing from Baz Luhrmann that even those Australians who've never been near the outback are indelibly marked by its proximity. Corin visits the mining town of Coober Pedy, five hundred kilometres in any direction from the nearest town, to see for herself why so many film makers have been drawn to the landscape as a location and inspiration. She also talks with author Charlotte Wood about why the outback has so long featured as a dystopian setting in so much Australian culture.

In the final part of this three part series, Corin Throsby speaks to author Richard Flanagan - author of the prize-winning 'Narrow Road to the Deep North' - about the place of literature in Australian culture, which, he says, differs significantly to its place in European culture. Corin then goes on to explore the extent to which the grandeur and scale of the Australian landscape have an effect upon the work that's being done by the country's artists, writers and musicians - hearing from Baz Luhrmann that even those Australians who've never been near the outback are indelibly marked by its proximity. Corin visits the mining town of Coober Pedy, five hundred kilometres in any direction from the nearest town, to see for herself why so many film makers have been drawn to the landscape as a location and inspiration. She also talks with author Charlotte Wood about why the outback has so long featured as a dystopian setting in so much Australian culture.