Art Of Monarchy, The [world Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Episode 1 - The Documentary20120522

Will examines some of the most personal images in the Royal Collection.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, begins a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE ONE
Will Gompertz begins his investigations by looking at some of the most personal royal images in the collection to see what insights they give us into the lasting power of the monarchy.

From the very earliest royal photographs to the revealing portrait of a seductive Victoria, and the manipulated images of George III, Will asks how important understanding their own image has been to the longevity of Britain's Kings and Queens.

(Image: An intimate portrait of Queen Victoria. This portrait by Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873) was commissioned by the young Queen Victoria as a surprise gift to her husband, Prince Albert (1819-1861), on the occasion of his 24th birthday.)

01Episode 1 - The Documentary20120523

Will examines some of the most personal images in the Royal Collection.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, begins a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE ONE
Will Gompertz begins his investigations by looking at some of the most personal royal images in the collection to see what insights they give us into the lasting power of the monarchy.

From the very earliest royal photographs to the revealing portrait of a seductive Victoria, and the manipulated images of George III, Will asks how important understanding their own image has been to the longevity of Britain's Kings and Queens.

(Image: An intimate portrait of Queen Victoria. This portrait by Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873) was commissioned by the young Queen Victoria as a surprise gift to her husband, Prince Albert (1819-1861), on the occasion of his 24th birthday.)

01Episode 1 - The Documentary20120526

Will examines some of the most personal images in the Royal Collection.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, begins a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE ONE
Will Gompertz begins his investigations by looking at some of the most personal royal images in the collection to see what insights they give us into the lasting power of the monarchy.

From the very earliest royal photographs to the revealing portrait of a seductive Victoria, and the manipulated images of George III, Will asks how important understanding their own image has been to the longevity of Britain's Kings and Queens.

(Image: An intimate portrait of Queen Victoria. This portrait by Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873) was commissioned by the young Queen Victoria as a surprise gift to her husband, Prince Albert (1819-1861), on the occasion of his 24th birthday.)

01The Art Of Monarchy20120522

Will Gompertz explores one thousand years of British monarchs, through objects they collected.

Will Gompertz explores one thousand years of British monarchs, through objects they col.

01The Art Of Monarchy2012052220120523
20120526 (WS)

A look at some of the most personal images in the Royal Collection.

BBC Arts Editor, Will Gompertz, begins a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British Monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE ONE

Will Gompertz begins his investigations by looking at some of the most personal royal images in the collection to see what insights they give us into the lasting power of the monarchy.

From the very earliest royal photographs to the revealing portrait of a seductive Victoria, to the (as you've left out the second from (Henry VIII's son) I think "and the" is better than "to the" manipulated images of George III, Will asks how important understanding their own image has been to the longevity of Britain’s Kings and Queens.

Will Gompertz explores one thousand years of British monarchs, through objects they col.

Will Gompertz explores one thousand years of British monarchs, through objects they collected.

01The Art Of Monarchy2012052220120523

Will Gompertz explores one thousand years of British monarchs, through objects they col...

BBC Arts Editor, Will Gompertz, begins a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British Monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE ONE

Will Gompertz begins his investigations by looking at some of the most personal royal images in the collection to see what insights they give us into the lasting power of the monarchy.

From the very earliest royal photographs to the revealing portrait of a seductive Victoria, to the (as you've left out the second from (Henry VIII's son) I think "and the" is better than "to the" manipulated images of George III, Will asks how important understanding their own image has been to the longevity of Britain’s Kings and Queens.

01The Art Of Monarchy2012052220120526

A look at some of the most personal images in the Royal Collection.

02Episode 2 - The Documentary20120529

Will examines items from the Royal Collection that are associated with war.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE TWO
In part two, Will puts the Royal Collection on a war footing as he examines six very different items covering 700 years, that show how the monarchy has rallied their subjects for war and endeavoured to keep the peace.

He starts with a photograph of the young Princess Elizabeth training to be an ATS Officer in 1945, shown to the nation to boost morale but then spools back to the Middle Ages with a clear symbol of martial authority - Edward III's six feet, eight inch long bearing sword.

Henry VIII, Mary Queen of Scots and an elaborate object of apology from the city of Exeter, all form part of the story of the monarchy in arms.

(Image: Ceremonial table salt, known as The Exeter Salt, by Johann Hass. This ceremonial table salt was paid for by the people of Exeter and presented to Charles II (1630-1685) on his restoration in 1660)

02Episode 2 - The Documentary20120530

Will examines items from the Royal Collection that are associated with war.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE TWO
In part two, Will puts the Royal Collection on a war footing as he examines six very different items covering 700 years, that show how the monarchy has rallied their subjects for war and endeavoured to keep the peace.

He starts with a photograph of the young Princess Elizabeth training to be an ATS Officer in 1945, shown to the nation to boost morale but then spools back to the Middle Ages with a clear symbol of martial authority - Edward III's six feet, eight inch long bearing sword.

Henry VIII, Mary Queen of Scots and an elaborate object of apology from the city of Exeter, all form part of the story of the monarchy in arms.

(Image: Ceremonial table salt, known as The Exeter Salt, by Johann Hass. This ceremonial table salt was paid for by the people of Exeter and presented to Charles II (1630-1685) on his restoration in 1660)

02Episode 2 - The Documentary20120602

Will examines items from the Royal Collection that are associated with war.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE TWO
In part two, Will puts the Royal Collection on a war footing as he examines six very different items covering 700 years, that show how the monarchy has rallied their subjects for war and endeavoured to keep the peace.

He starts with a photograph of the young Princess Elizabeth training to be an ATS Officer in 1945, shown to the nation to boost morale but then spools back to the Middle Ages with a clear symbol of martial authority - Edward III's six feet, eight inch long bearing sword.

Henry VIII, Mary Queen of Scots and an elaborate object of apology from the city of Exeter, all form part of the story of the monarchy in arms.

(Image: Ceremonial table salt, known as The Exeter Salt, by Johann Hass. This ceremonial table salt was paid for by the people of Exeter and presented to Charles II (1630-1685) on his restoration in 1660)

02The Documentary2012052920120530

Will examines items from the Royal Collection that are associated with war.

BBC Arts Editor, Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE TWO

In part two, Will puts the Royal Collection on a war footing as he examines six very different items covering 700 years, that show how the monarchy has rallied their subjects for war and endeavoured to keep the peace.

He starts with a photograph of the young Princess Elizabeth training to be an ATS Officer in 1945, shown to the nation to boost morale but then spools back to the Middle Ages with a clear symbol of martial authority - Edward III's six feet, eight inch long bearing sword.

Henry VIII, Mary Queen of Scots and an elaborate object of apology from the city of Exeter, all form part of the story of the monarchy in arms.

Each of these objects in the series as a whole - has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

(Image: Ceremonial table salt, known as The Exeter Salt, by Johann Hass. This ceremonial table salt was paid for by the people of Exeter and presented to Charles II (1630-1685) on his restoration in 1660)

02The Documentary2012052920120530
20120530 (WS)

Will examines items from the Royal Collection that are associated with war.

BBC Arts Editor, Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE TWO

In part two, Will puts the Royal Collection on a war footing as he examines six very different items covering 700 years, that show how the monarchy has rallied their subjects for war and endeavoured to keep the peace.

He starts with a photograph of the young Princess Elizabeth training to be an ATS Officer in 1945, shown to the nation to boost morale but then spools back to the Middle Ages with a clear symbol of martial authority - Edward III's six feet, eight inch long bearing sword.

Henry VIII, Mary Queen of Scots and an elaborate object of apology from the city of Exeter, all form part of the story of the monarchy in arms.

Each of these objects in the series as a whole - has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

(Image: Ceremonial table salt, known as The Exeter Salt, by Johann Hass. This ceremonial table salt was paid for by the people of Exeter and presented to Charles II (1630-1685) on his restoration in 1660)

02The Documentary2012052920120530
20120530 (WS)

Will examines items from the Royal Collection that are associated with war.

02The Documentary2012052920120602

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE TWO

In part two, Will puts the Royal Collection on a war footing as he examines six very different items covering 700 years, that show how the monarchy has rallied their subjects for war and endeavoured to keep the peace.

He starts with a photograph of the young Princess Elizabeth training to be an ATS Officer in 1945, shown to the nation to boost morale but then spools back to the Middle Ages with a clear symbol of martial authority - Edward III's six feet, eight inch long bearing sword.

Henry VIII, Mary Queen of Scots and an elaborate object of apology from the city of Exeter, all form part of the story of the monarchy in arms.

(Image: Ceremonial table salt, known as The Exeter Salt, by Johann Hass. This ceremonial table salt was paid for by the people of Exeter and presented to Charles II (1630-1685) on his restoration in 1660)

02The Documentary2012052920120602
20120602 (WS)

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE TWO

In part two, Will puts the Royal Collection on a war footing as he examines six very different items covering 700 years, that show how the monarchy has rallied their subjects for war and endeavoured to keep the peace.

He starts with a photograph of the young Princess Elizabeth training to be an ATS Officer in 1945, shown to the nation to boost morale but then spools back to the Middle Ages with a clear symbol of martial authority - Edward III's six feet, eight inch long bearing sword.

Henry VIII, Mary Queen of Scots and an elaborate object of apology from the city of Exeter, all form part of the story of the monarchy in arms.

(Image: Ceremonial table salt, known as The Exeter Salt, by Johann Hass. This ceremonial table salt was paid for by the people of Exeter and presented to Charles II (1630-1685) on his restoration in 1660)

02The Documentary2012052920120602
20120602 (WS)

Will examines items from the Royal Collection that are associated with war.

BBC Arts Editor, Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE TWO

In part two, Will puts the Royal Collection on a war footing as he examines six very different items covering 700 years, that show how the monarchy has rallied their subjects for war and endeavoured to keep the peace.

He starts with a photograph of the young Princess Elizabeth training to be an ATS Officer in 1945, shown to the nation to boost morale but then spools back to the Middle Ages with a clear symbol of martial authority - Edward III's six feet, eight inch long bearing sword.

Henry VIII, Mary Queen of Scots and an elaborate object of apology from the city of Exeter, all form part of the story of the monarchy in arms.

Each of these objects in the series as a whole - has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

(Image: Ceremonial table salt, known as The Exeter Salt, by Johann Hass. This ceremonial table salt was paid for by the people of Exeter and presented to Charles II (1630-1685) on his restoration in 1660)

03Episode 3 - The Documentary20120605

Will examines how the monarchy expresses power with displays of wealth and status.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE THREE
In part three, Will investigates the pivotal aspect of the art of monarchy - the projection of magnificence. An idea as old as monarchy itself, magnificence is the expression of power through the display of wealth and status.

Will's first object unites our current Queen with George III; the Gold State Coach, which has been used for coronations since 1821. Built for George III in 1762, it reflects Britain's new found glory in its richly gilded carvings and painted panels but the glory was to be short lived.

He goes on to explore both Henry VIII's interior design for Hampton Court Palace, by means of the enormous Abraham Tapestries and William and Mary's plans for its exterior.

The idea of magnificence might seem one-dimensional but encoded into the jewels, the gilding, the silver and the marble are stories of political intrigue and personal paranoia.

(Image: The Gold State Coach designed by Sir William Chambers (1723-1796), made by Samuel Butler, with carvings by Joseph Wilton (1722-1803), painted decoration by G.B. Cipriani (1727-1785). The Gold State Coach has been used for every Coronation since 1762 and, in the present reign, has also appeared at the Silver and Golden Jubilees)

03Episode 3 - The Documentary20120606

Will examines how the monarchy expresses power with displays of wealth and status.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE THREE
In part three, Will investigates the pivotal aspect of the art of monarchy - the projection of magnificence. An idea as old as monarchy itself, magnificence is the expression of power through the display of wealth and status.

Will's first object unites our current Queen with George III; the Gold State Coach, which has been used for coronations since 1821. Built for George III in 1762, it reflects Britain's new found glory in its richly gilded carvings and painted panels but the glory was to be short lived.

He goes on to explore both Henry VIII's interior design for Hampton Court Palace, by means of the enormous Abraham Tapestries and William and Mary's plans for its exterior.

The idea of magnificence might seem one-dimensional but encoded into the jewels, the gilding, the silver and the marble are stories of political intrigue and personal paranoia.

(Image: The Gold State Coach designed by Sir William Chambers (1723-1796), made by Samuel Butler, with carvings by Joseph Wilton (1722-1803), painted decoration by G.B. Cipriani (1727-1785). The Gold State Coach has been used for every Coronation since 1762 and, in the present reign, has also appeared at the Silver and Golden Jubilees)

03Episode 3 - The Documentary20120609

Will examines how the monarchy expresses power with displays of wealth and status.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE THREE
In part three, Will investigates the pivotal aspect of the art of monarchy - the projection of magnificence. An idea as old as monarchy itself, magnificence is the expression of power through the display of wealth and status.

Will's first object unites our current Queen with George III; the Gold State Coach, which has been used for coronations since 1821. Built for George III in 1762, it reflects Britain's new found glory in its richly gilded carvings and painted panels but the glory was to be short lived.

He goes on to explore both Henry VIII's interior design for Hampton Court Palace, by means of the enormous Abraham Tapestries and William and Mary's plans for its exterior.

The idea of magnificence might seem one-dimensional but encoded into the jewels, the gilding, the silver and the marble are stories of political intrigue and personal paranoia.

(Image: The Gold State Coach designed by Sir William Chambers (1723-1796), made by Samuel Butler, with carvings by Joseph Wilton (1722-1803), painted decoration by G.B. Cipriani (1727-1785). The Gold State Coach has been used for every Coronation since 1762 and, in the present reign, has also appeared at the Silver and Golden Jubilees)

03The Documentary2012060520120606
20120606 (WS)

Will examines how the monarchy expresses power with displays of wealth and status.

Will Gompertz explores one thousand years of British monarchs, through objects they col...

Will Gompertz explores one thousand years of British monarchs, through objects they collected.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE THREE

In part three, Will investigates the pivotal aspect of the art of monarchy - the projection of magnificence. An idea as old as monarchy itself, magnificence is the expression of power through the display of wealth and status.

Will's first object unites our current Queen with George III; the Gold State Coach, which has been used for coronations since 1821. Built for George III in 1762, it reflects Britain's new found glory in its richly gilded carvings and painted panels but the glory was to be short lived.

He goes on to explore both Henry VIII's interior design for Hampton Court Palace, by means of the enormous Abraham Tapestries and William and Mary's plans for its exterior.

The idea of magnificence might seem one-dimensional but encoded into the jewels, the gilding, the silver and the marble are stories of political intrigue and personal paranoia.

(Image: The Gold State Coach designed by Sir William Chambers (1723-1796), made by Samuel Butler, with carvings by Joseph Wilton (1722-1803), painted decoration by G.B. Cipriani (1727-1785). The Gold State Coach has been used for every Coronation since 1762 and, in the present reign, has also appeared at the Silver and Golden Jubilees)

03The Documentary2012060520120606

Will examines how the monarchy expresses power with displays of wealth and status.

Will Gompertz explores one thousand years of British monarchs, through objects they collected.

Will Gompertz explores one thousand years of British monarchs, through objects they col...

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE THREE

In part three, Will investigates the pivotal aspect of the art of monarchy - the projection of magnificence. An idea as old as monarchy itself, magnificence is the expression of power through the display of wealth and status.

Will's first object unites our current Queen with George III; the Gold State Coach, which has been used for coronations since 1821. Built for George III in 1762, it reflects Britain's new found glory in its richly gilded carvings and painted panels but the glory was to be short lived.

He goes on to explore both Henry VIII's interior design for Hampton Court Palace, by means of the enormous Abraham Tapestries and William and Mary's plans for its exterior.

The idea of magnificence might seem one-dimensional but encoded into the jewels, the gilding, the silver and the marble are stories of political intrigue and personal paranoia.

(Image: The Gold State Coach designed by Sir William Chambers (1723-1796), made by Samuel Butler, with carvings by Joseph Wilton (1722-1803), painted decoration by G.B. Cipriani (1727-1785). The Gold State Coach has been used for every Coronation since 1762 and, in the present reign, has also appeared at the Silver and Golden Jubilees)

03The Documentary2012060520120606
20120606 (WS)

Will Gompertz explores one thousand years of British monarchs, through objects they col...

03The Documentary2012060520120609
20120609 (WS)

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE THREE

In part three, Will investigates the pivotal aspect of the art of monarchy - the projection of magnificence. An idea as old as monarchy itself, magnificence is the expression of power through the display of wealth and status.

Will's first object unites our current Queen with George III; the Gold State Coach, which has been used for coronations since 1821. Built for George III in 1762, it reflects Britain's new found glory in its richly gilded carvings and painted panels but the glory was to be short lived.

He goes on to explore both Henry VIII's interior design for Hampton Court Palace, by means of the enormous Abraham Tapestries and William and Mary's plans for its exterior.

The idea of magnificence might seem one-dimensional but encoded into the jewels, the gilding, the silver and the marble are stories of political intrigue and personal paranoia.

(Image: The Gold State Coach designed by Sir William Chambers (1723-1796), made by Samuel Butler, with carvings by Joseph Wilton (1722-1803), painted decoration by G.B. Cipriani (1727-1785). The Gold State Coach has been used for every Coronation since 1762 and, in the present reign, has also appeared at the Silver and Golden Jubilees)

03The Documentary2012060520120609

Will examines how the monarchy expresses power with displays of wealth and status.

04Episode 4 - The Documentary20120612

Will looks beyond the British isles to see the monarchy as a global force.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE FOUR
In part four, Will looks beyond the British isles to see the monarchy as a global force. Centuries ago, the Queen's predecessor and namesake Elizabeth I, presided over the very beginning of England's experiment in empire.

We see the world as she understood it, in the form of an early atlas. And as Will explores Britain's involvement in world affairs, he examines a shard of wood from the coffin of George Washington, a print of a merino ram which illustrates George III's impact on the Australian wool trade, a small woven cloth made with yarn spun by Gandhi - which contains an anti-imperial message written in Hindi - and a brightly painted chess set, presented to the Duke of Edinburgh by President Mandela in 1996.

(Image: A Peep at the Train, Bakshiram, Dorsaywala Gordenji and Sirinbai Ardeshir from a series of 82 portraits depicting Indians by Rudolph Swoboda (1859-1914). The sitters in this extensive series of portraits are generally ordinary Indian subjects. Bakshiram was a potter, alleged to be over 102 years old, from Agra; Dorsayawala Gordenji was a 50 year old tailor in the service of the Maharaja; and Sirinbai Ardeshir was a 14 year old Parsi from Nemuch)

04Episode 4 - The Documentary20120613

Will looks beyond the British isles to see the monarchy as a global force.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE FOUR
In part four, Will looks beyond the British isles to see the monarchy as a global force. Centuries ago, the Queen's predecessor and namesake Elizabeth I, presided over the very beginning of England's experiment in empire.

We see the world as she understood it, in the form of an early atlas. And as Will explores Britain's involvement in world affairs, he examines a shard of wood from the coffin of George Washington, a print of a merino ram which illustrates George III's impact on the Australian wool trade, a small woven cloth made with yarn spun by Gandhi - which contains an anti-imperial message written in Hindi - and a brightly painted chess set, presented to the Duke of Edinburgh by President Mandela in 1996.

(Image: A Peep at the Train, Bakshiram, Dorsaywala Gordenji and Sirinbai Ardeshir from a series of 82 portraits depicting Indians by Rudolph Swoboda (1859-1914). The sitters in this extensive series of portraits are generally ordinary Indian subjects. Bakshiram was a potter, alleged to be over 102 years old, from Agra; Dorsayawala Gordenji was a 50 year old tailor in the service of the Maharaja; and Sirinbai Ardeshir was a 14 year old Parsi from Nemuch)

04 LASTThe Documentary2012061220120613

Will looks beyond the British isles to see the monarchy as a global force.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE FOUR

In part four, Will looks beyond the British isles to see the monarchy as a global force. Centuries ago, the Queen's predecessor and namesake Elizabeth I, presided over the very beginning of England's experiment in empire.

We see the world as she understood it, in the form of an early atlas. And as Will explores Britain's involvement in world affairs, he examines a shard of wood from the coffin of George Washington, a print of a merino ram which illustrates George III's impact on the Australian wool trade, a small woven cloth made with yarn spun by Gandhi - which contains an anti-imperial message written in Hindi - and a brightly painted chess set, presented to the Duke of Edinburgh by President Mandela in 1996.

(Image: A Peep at the Train, Bakshiram, Dorsaywala Gordenji and Sirinbai Ardeshir from a series of 82 portraits depicting Indians by Rudolph Swoboda (1859-1914). The sitters in this extensive series of portraits are generally ordinary Indian subjects. Bakshiram was a potter, alleged to be over 102 years old, from Agra; Dorsayawala Gordenji was a 50 year old tailor in the service of the Maharaja; and Sirinbai Ardeshir was a 14 year old Parsi from Nemuch)

04 LASTThe Documentary2012061220120613

Will looks beyond the British isles to see the monarchy as a global force.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, presents a four-part exploration of almost 1000 years of the British monarchy as told through the objects of art they collected.

In a weekly journey that takes him from the wilds of Balmoral in Scotland to the isolation of Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, from the State Rooms in Buckingham Palace to the Royal Library at Windsor Castle, he selects choice items from the Royal Collection to see what they betray about the art of statecraft and a successful reign.

In each programme historians, academics and Royal Collection curators shed light on the mystery of kingship and the importance of faith, war, magnificence, progress and the people in the minds of monarchs. Each object in the series has its own story to tell and each reveals another aspect to the art of monarchy.

EPISODE FOUR

In part four, Will looks beyond the British isles to see the monarchy as a global force. Centuries ago, the Queen's predecessor and namesake Elizabeth I, presided over the very beginning of England's experiment in empire.

We see the world as she understood it, in the form of an early atlas. And as Will explores Britain's involvement in world affairs, he examines a shard of wood from the coffin of George Washington, a print of a merino ram which illustrates George III's impact on the Australian wool trade, a small woven cloth made with yarn spun by Gandhi - which contains an anti-imperial message written in Hindi - and a brightly painted chess set, presented to the Duke of Edinburgh by President Mandela in 1996.

(Image: A Peep at the Train, Bakshiram, Dorsaywala Gordenji and Sirinbai Ardeshir from a series of 82 portraits depicting Indians by Rudolph Swoboda (1859-1914). The sitters in this extensive series of portraits are generally ordinary Indian subjects. Bakshiram was a potter, alleged to be over 102 years old, from Agra; Dorsayawala Gordenji was a 50 year old tailor in the service of the Maharaja; and Sirinbai Ardeshir was a 14 year old Parsi from Nemuch)

04 LASTThe Documentary2012061220120613
20120613 (WS)

Will looks beyond the British isles to see the monarchy as a global force.

04 LASTThe Documentary2012061220120616

Will looks beyond the British isles to see the monarchy as a global force.