Assignment [world Service]

Episodes

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20090702

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20090709
20090716
20090723
20090730
20090806
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20091001
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20091217
20091224
20091231
20100107
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20100304

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

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20100311
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20100708

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20100715
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20100902
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20100916
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20101028
20101104

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20101111

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20101118

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20101125

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20101202

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20101216

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20101223

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20110106

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20110113

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20110127

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20110203

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20110210

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

20110217
20110303
20110317
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20110409

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

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20171102

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

As they retreat from Northern Iraq so-called Islamic State has left thousands of women and children behind. Some are the abandoned families of IS fighters, others are being held as prisoners or slaves. There are also boys who were forced to fight for IS. A desperate effort is now underway to reunite these women and children with the families they have been separated from – and to rehabilitate those whose minds have been stolen by the group.

Tim Whewell reports from Iraq on the children left behind by the fighters of Islamic state.

(Photo: Heifa, aged 19, has just escaped from more than three years as a slave of so-called Islamic State)

01/04/201020100402
01/09/201120110902
01/09/201120110903
01/10/200920091002
01/10/200920091004
01/12/201120111202
02/02/201220120203
02/02/201220120205
02/04/201120110403

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

02/04/201120110404
02/07/200920090703
02/07/200920090705
02/09/201020100903
02/09/201020100905
02/12/201020101203

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

03/02/201120110204

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

03/02/201120110205
03/03/201120110304

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

03/03/201120110305
03/05/201220120504
03/05/201220120505
03/06/201020100604
03/09/200920090904
03/09/200920090906
03/11/201120111104
03/12/200920091204
03/12/200920091205
03/12/200920091206
04/02/201020100205
04/03/201020100305
04/03/201020100306
04/03/201020100307
04/05/2017 Gmt20170504
04/11/201020101105

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

05/01/201220120106
05/01/201220120108
05/05/201120110506
05/05/201120110507
05/05/201120110508
05/05/201120110509
05/08/201020100806
05/11/200920091106
05/11/200920091107
06/01/201120110107

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

06/08/200920090807
06/08/200920090809
06/10/201120111007
06/10/201120111008
07/01/201020100108
07/01/201020100109
07/01/201020100110
07/07/201120110708
07/07/201120110709
07/07/201120110710
07/07/201120110711
07/10/2010

07/10/201020101008
08/03/201220120309
08/03/201220120311
08/04/201020100409
08/07/201020100709
08/09/201120110909
08/10/200920091009
08/10/200920091011
08/12/201120111209
09/02/201220120210
09/02/201220120212
09/04/201120110407

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

09/04/201120110408
09/04/201120110410
09/04/201120110411
09/06/201120110610
09/06/201120110611
09/06/201120110612
09/06/201120110613
09/07/200920090710
09/07/200920090712
09/09/201020100910
09/09/201020100912
10/02/201120110211

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

10/02/201120110212
10/05/201220120511
10/05/201220120512
10/06/201020100611
10/09/200920090911
10/09/200920090913
10/11/201120111111
10/11/201120111113
10/12/200920091211
11/02/201020100212
11/02/201020100213
11/02/201020100214
11/03/201020100312
11/11/201020101112

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

12/01/201220120113
12/01/201220120115
12/05/201120110513
12/05/201120110514
12/05/201120110515
12/05/201120110516
12/08/201020100813
12/08/201020100815
12/11/200920091113
12/11/200920091114
13/01/201120110114

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

13/05/201020100514
13/08/200920090814
13/08/200920090816
13/10/201120111014
14/01/201020100115
14/01/201020100116
14/01/201020100117
14/04/201120110415

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

14/04/201120110416
14/07/201120110715
14/07/201120110716
14/07/201120110718
14/10/2010

14/10/201020101015
15/03/201220120316
15/03/201220120318
15/04/201020100416
15/07/201020100716
15/09/201120110916
15/10/200920091016
15/10/200920091018
15/12/201120111216
15/12/201120111218
16/02/201220120217
16/02/201220120219
16/06/201120110617
16/06/201120110618
16/06/201120110620
16/07/200920090717
16/07/200920090719
16/09/201020100917
16/09/201020100919
16/12/201020101217

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

17/02/201120110218

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

17/02/201120110219
17/03/201120110318

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

17/03/201120110319
17/06/201020100618
17/09/200920090918
17/09/200920090920
17/11/201120111118
17/11/201120111120
17/12/200920091218
17/12/200920091219
17/12/200920091220
18/02/201020100219
18/03/201020100319
18/08/201120110819
18/11/201020101119

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

19/01/201220120120
19/01/201220120122
19/04/201220120420
19/04/201220120421
19/05/201120110520
19/05/201120110521
19/05/201120110522
19/05/201120110523
19/08/201020100820
19/08/201020100822
20/05/201020100521
20/08/200920090821
20/08/200920090823
20/10/201120111021
21/01/201020100122
21/04/201120110422
21/04/201120110423
21/04/201120110424
21/07/201120110722
21/07/201120110723
21/07/201120110724
21/07/201120110725
21/10/2010

21/10/201020101022
21/10/201020101022

21/11/200920091119
22/03/201220120323
22/09/201120110923
22/09/201120110924
22/09/201120110925
22/09/201120110926
22/10/200920091023
23/06/201120110624
23/06/201120110625
23/07/200920090724
23/07/200920090726
23/09/2010

23/09/201020100924
23/12/201020101224

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

24/03/201120110325

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

24/03/201120110326
24/06/201020100625
24/09/200920090925
24/09/200920090927
24/11/201120111125
24/12/200920091225
25/02/201020100226
25/03/201020100326
25/06/200920090628
25/08/201120110826
25/11/201020101126

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

26/01/201220120127
26/01/201220120129
26/05/201120110527
26/05/201120110528
26/08/201020100827
26/08/201020100829
26/11/200920091127
26/11/200920091128
26/11/200920091129
27/01/201120110128

Investigations and journeys into the heart of global events from BBC correspondents.

27/05/201020100528
27/08/200920090828
27/08/200920090830
27/10/201120111028
28/01/201020100129
28/01/201020100130
28/04/201120110429
28/04/201120110430
28/04/201120110501
28/07/201120110729
28/07/201120110730
28/07/201120110731
28/07/201120110801
28/10/2010

28/10/201020101029
29/03/201220120330
29/03/201220120331
29/04/201020100430
29/07/201020100730
29/09/201120110930
29/09/201120111001
29/09/201120111003
29/10/200920091030
29/10/200920091031
30/06/201120110701
30/06/201120110702
30/06/201120110704
30/07/200920090731
30/07/200920090802
31/12/200920100101
31/12/200920100102
31/12/200920100103
A Death In Honduras20120504

Honduras has the highest murder rate in the world. The People's Funeral Service deals daily with the fall-out from these extreme levels of violence in the capital city, Tegucigalpa. Set up by the Mayor of the city, it distributes coffins, maintains two funeral homes, and even offers a mobile service where employees take everything necessary for a wake - including bread and coffee - to someone's house or local church. All of these services are totally free for poor people in the city.

In Assignment, Linda Pressly profiles this unique organisation, and meets some of the families using its services. Among them, is the family of Ramon Orlando Varela, a 26 year old gunned down in the street after dropping his children off at school. It isn't clear why Ramon was targeted. But a toxic mix of gangs, guns, drug cartels - and fear - pervades Honduras. And it's unlikely his killers will ever be caught. Police corruption is endemic, impunity almost a given.

But in spite of the everyday challenges, the workers at the People's Funeral Service offer what help they can. At least they can lend some dignity to proceedings for families who have almost nothing.

A profile of the People's Funeral Service in Honduras, the most murderous nation on earth.

A Death In Honduras20120505

Honduras has the highest murder rate in the world. The People's Funeral Service deals daily with the fall-out from these extreme levels of violence in the capital city, Tegucigalpa. Set up by the Mayor of the city, it distributes coffins, maintains two funeral homes, and even offers a mobile service where employees take everything necessary for a wake - including bread and coffee - to someone's house or local church. All of these services are totally free for poor people in the city.

In Assignment, Linda Pressly profiles this unique organisation, and meets some of the families using its services. Among them, is the family of Ramon Orlando Varela, a 26 year old gunned down in the street after dropping his children off at school. It isn't clear why Ramon was targeted. But a toxic mix of gangs, guns, drug cartels - and fear - pervades Honduras. And it's unlikely his killers will ever be caught. Police corruption is endemic, impunity almost a given.

But in spite of the everyday challenges, the workers at the People's Funeral Service offer what help they can. At least they can lend some dignity to proceedings for families who have almost nothing.

A profile of the People's Funeral Service in Honduras, the most murderous nation on earth.

A Taliban Class War?20100516
Aid For Arms In Ethiopia20100306
Aid For Arms In Ethiopia20100307

Did Live Aid money raised for Ethiopian famine 25 years ago fall into the wrong hands?

Albania's Munitions Mountain20110318

Albania's paranoid Cold War dictator stockpiled vast amounts of ammunition to threaten potential invaders.

Today, the stocks are old and volatile, threatening Albanians themselves.

Albania now wants to get rid of the ammunition - and quickly. It's even willing to give it away.

Neal Razzell meets those trying to shift what the government calls "the heavy burden of the past."

Neal Razzell travels to Albania, where they're getting rid of an explosive legacy.

Albania's Munitions Mountain20110319

Albania's paranoid Cold War dictator stockpiled vast amounts of ammunition to threaten potential invaders.

Today, the stocks are old and volatile, threatening Albanians themselves.

Albania now wants to get rid of the ammunition - and quickly. It's even willing to give it away.

Neal Razzell meets those trying to shift what the government calls "the heavy burden of the past."

Neal Razzell travels to Albania, where they're getting rid of an explosive legacy.

American And Muslim20100926

America's Muslim minority is coming under considerable pressure these days.

They are experiencing attacks, verbal and at times physical, on their mosques and on the Koran, and from politicians using anti-Islamic sentiment in their election campaigns.

For Assignment, Claire Bolderson asks what's it like to be a young American Muslim in the midst of all of this? And what kind of influence do Muslim community leaders and government officials have with this generation.

What is it like to be a young American muslim with anti-Islamic sentiment on the rise?

Anger In Punjab Province20101126

More than six million people in Pakistan now face the start of winter without adequate shelter because their homes were destroyed in the devastating floods in August.

Many are increasingly angry. They accuse the government of failing to help them.

They also claim that official corruption played a major part in the flood damage itself.

Jill McGivering, who reported on the floods at the time, went back to Pakistan for Assignment to investigate the allegations.

After the floods in Pakistan people accuse the government of not doing enough to help

Anger In Punjab Province20101127

After the floods in Pakistan people accuse the government of not doing enough to help

Arizona's Immigration Law Sb107020100704

Arizona has passed a law cracking down on illegal immigrants - the toughest of its kind in the US.

It allows police officers to check the immigration status of anyone they stop or detain - if there is a suspicion that the person is in America illegally.

The legislation has been driven by frustration both at Arizona’s role as the main hub for illegal entry into America, and the organised cross border crime that has come with it.

Many support the law, but there is anger and fear among the Latino community. Legal citizens say they will be targeted by police just because of their skin.

For Assignment Rob Walker travels to Arizona to explore why immigration has become such a hot political issue in the state.

Getting tough on immigration in the American state of Arizona.

Armenia: The Cleverest Nation On Earth20091018
Assignment: The Art Of Match-fixing20100404
Assignment: Torture Investigation20090802
August Central America20110818

Every year, hundreds of thousands of Central Americans leave home and travel north overland, hoping to make a new life in the United States.

This has always been a difficult journey - now it is perilous.

Mexican drug cartels have seen a business opportunity in the migrants: they are being systematically kidnapped en route, and held to ransom.

Often they have been killed, and Mexico is currently investigating a number of mass graves.

With the Mexican government's hardline military campaign against the cartels, these criminal organisations are moving south.

The northern Guatemalan department of Peten - an area through which many migrants cross to Mexico - is vulnerable.

In May, 27 farmworkers were killed at a remote farm in Peten.

This was apparently revenge for a drug debt, and the killers are believed to be Zetas - the bloodiest Mexican cartel.

The Zetas are battling other organised crime groups to take control of Peten.

There's a fear that if they succeed, not only will they terrorise the local population, but they will begin to kidnap, extort and murder some of the thousands of migrants moving through - as they do routinely in Mexico.

Assignment follows part of the migrants' route, from Peten in Guatemala, to the southern Mexican town of Tenosique.

Linda Pressly meets two Hondurans who were lucky to escape with their lives after an encounter with the Zetas.

She hears from a Franciscan monk dedicated to protecting migrants.

But the story of migration is complex.

Not only do the cartels abuse the migrants, they also recruit them. And alongside the hopeful, innocent travellers travelling north, come criminals.

In Tenosique, she speaks to a local businessman whose son was kidnapped and killed.

Linda Pressly joins migrants on their perilous journey north through Guatemala and Mexico

August Central America20110819
August Central America20110820

Linda Pressly joins migrants on their perilous journey north through Guatemala and Mexico

August Central America20110821
August Central America20110822
Baghdad International Airport - Window On Iraq20110121

A recent bombing in the Iraqi city of Tikrit, which killed at least 45 people, was a reminder - if one were needed - that Iraq remains an unstable and dangerous place. But amid the almost daily violence, there are signs of improvement.

For Assignment, the BBC's Gabriel Gatehouse has been taking the national temperature at Baghdad International Airport.

A snapshot of Iraq as seen through the prism of its main airport

Baghdad International Airport - Window On Iraq20110122

A snapshot of Iraq as seen through the prism of its main airport

Black and Single

Black And Single20100930

It’s hard finding your man in America if you’re black, single and college educated.

It’s hard finding your man in America if you’re black and single. Recent US studies have shown that the number of college educated black women getting married has decreased by a third since the 1970’s. Although part of a wider trend, African American women are facing significantly worse statistics that white women in finding their man and starting a family. For Assignment Nina Robinson travelled to New York to find out what it’s like to be black and single and looking for marriage.

Black And Single20101001

It’s hard finding your man in America if you’re black, single and college educated.

It's hard finding your man in America if you're black and single.

Recent US studies have shown that the number of college educated black women getting married has decreased by a third since the 1970s.

Although part of a wider trend, African American women are facing significantly worse statistics that white women in finding their man and starting a family.

For Assignment Nina Robinson travelled to New York to find out what it’s like to be black and single and looking for marriage.

Why it's hard finding a man in America if you're black, single and college educated

Black And Single20101003

Why it's hard finding a man in America if you're black, single and college educated

Blasphemy - A Matter Of Life And Death20110502

Public debate about Pakistan's controversial blasphemy laws has been stifled since the murders of two men who called for their reform - Punjabi Governor, Salman Taseer and Cabinet Minister Shahbaz Bhatti.

For Assignment Jill McGivering travels to Pakistan to talk to people affected by the law.

Pakistan's controversial blasphemy laws are a matter of life and death for some people

Burma Votes20101105

The people of Burma go to the polls on 7 November for the first time in 20 years.

In 1990, an overwhelming majority voted for pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, and her National League for Democracy. The Generals running the country ignored the result and have imposed strict military rule ever since.

Aung San Suu Kyi is still under house arrest, and thousands of opposition supporters have been jailed, or forced into exile in recent years. But instead of presenting an opportunity to change all that, this election has divided Burma’s opposition movements.

For Assignment, Sue Lloyd Roberts travelled across Burma to investigate, entering the country illegally because the government refused permission for her – and other foreign journalists - to enter officially.

Sue Lloyd-Roberts investigates whether the election in Burma offers any chance of change.

Burma Votes20101106

Sue Lloyd-Roberts investigates whether the election in Burma offers any chance of change.

Chasing The Tax Cheats20090927
Chechnya's Missing Women20090719
Cholera In Haiti20111218

Almost seven thousand people have died of cholera in Haiti over the past year.

It's by far the largest outbreak in the world today.

But how did a disease - which has been absent from Haiti for over a century - arrive in the country?

Poor sanitary conditions at a United Nations camp are being blamed for the outbreak.

The UN has denied this but families of cholera victims are now demanding compensation from the United Nations.

For Assignment, Mark Doyle follows the course of the epidemic and examines the controversy that surrounds it.

This programme which was produced by Piers Scholfield contains a graphic account of cholera symptoms.

(Image: A child undergoing treatment for cholera. Credit: Reuters)

Who is responsible for the deadly cholera outbreak in Haiti?

Colombia's Alzheimer's Family20110626

Early-onset Alzheimer's has stalked a poor extended family in Medellin, Colombia.

The family carries a dominant gene that means that half are at risk.

The disease strikes family members as young as 25 and by their 40s, sufferers are in the grip of full-blown dementia.

Alzheimer's is by and large a disease of the developed world, if for no other reason than that people in the developing world don't live long enough to suffer from it.

Now by using the Colombian family to trial new drugs, researchers say they may be on the road to a global cure for Alzheimer's.

Bill Law asks if this represents an unfair exploitation of desperate people - many of them barely literate - to benefit those in the West?

Or is it a case of bringing hope to those in a hopeless situation?

Does the key to curing Alzheimer's lie with a poor extended family in Medellin, Colombia?

Colombia's Alzheimer's Family20110627
Congo's Blood Gold20101112

Thomas Fessy investigates for Assignment, allegations that General Gabriel Amisi Kumba - the second-in-command of the Congolese military - profited from the illegal takeover of a gold mine.

Sources have told him that the general used military force to install a favoured company at the Omate gold mine in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The general allegedly received a quarter of the gold mine's revenues in return.

And he hears allegations that mining has continued at Omate, under military protection, despite a ban on gold mining in the east of the country, which was imposed by President Joseph Kabila in September.

Has a senior Congolese general profited from the illegal takeover of a gold mine?

Congo's Blood Gold20101113

Has a senior Congolese general profited from the illegal takeover of a gold mine?

Crushing Dissent In Egypt20180222

A well-known blogger and activist jailed for a peaceful protest, a young man imprisoned and tortured for wearing the wrong T- shirt, a young woman abducted by masked police, and now among more than a thousand people who have been forcibly disappeared – these are just some of the alarming stories from the new Egypt.

Orla Guerin has spent the last four years reporting from Cairo where she has witnessed a systematic assault on freedoms and human rights. The country's ruler, former army chief, President Abdel Fatah al Sisi is standing for re-election (next month) in a climate of fear and intimidation. Seven years after the euphoria in Tahrir Square, Orla asks what happened to the hope born during the revolution, and reports on the abuses which campaigners say are at the heart of the Sisi regime.

(Photo: Egyptian military personnel. Credit: AFP)

A well-known blogger and activist jailed for a peaceful protest, a young man imprisoned and tortured for wearing the wrong T- shirt, a young woman abducted by masked police, and now among more than a thousand people who have been forcibly disappeared – these are just some of the alarming stories from the new Egypt.

Orla Guerin has spent the last four years reporting from Cairo where she has witnessed a systematic assault on freedoms and human rights. The country's ruler, former army chief, President Abdel Fatah al Sisi is standing for re-election (next month) in a climate of fear and intimidation. Seven years after the euphoria in Tahrir Square, Orla asks what happened to the hope born during the revolution, and reports on the abuses which campaigners say are at the heart of the Sisi regime.

(Photo: Egyptian military personnel. Credit: AFP)

Cuba’s Cancer Revolution20170420

In a revolutionary first, one of Cuba’s cancer treatments gets a US drug trial

Defining Hezbollah20111013

In Lebanon many people fear that another war between Hezbollah and Israel is just over the horizon.

But what exactly is Hezbollah and why do people support it?

For Assignment Owen Bennett Jones reports from southern Lebanon on the nature and structure of the Shia movement that is so difficult to define.

(Image Credit: Associated Press)

The challenges of defining the Lebanese Shia movement Hezbollah.

Defining Hezbollah20111014

The challenges of defining the Lebanese Shia movement Hezbollah.

Defining Hezbollah20111015
Defining Hezbollah20111016
Defining Hezbollah20111017
Depicting Detroit20110224

Nina Robinson reports from Detroit on how the media is covering crime there.

The accidental death of a child at the hands of police during the filming of a reality TV programme has people in Detroit asking searching questions about how their city is covered by the media. Are the cameras only looking for bad news...and are some people only too willing to provide it? Nina Robinson reports for Assignment.

Depicting Detroit20110225

Nina Robinson reports from Detroit on how the media is covering crime there.

Depicting Detroit20110226
Dog Fighting In Chicago20090920
Dreams Of A British Education20100206

Lucy Williamson investigates the crisis building behind the dream of a British education.

Dreams Of A British Education20100207
Drugs and Power in Kyrgyzstan

Drugs And Power In Kyrgyzstan20101022

The southern Kyrgyz city of Osh sits on one of the main transit routes for Afghan heroin destined mainly for Russia and Western Europe.

Osh was at the centre of bitter inter-ethnic violence in June which caused the deaths of at least 400 people and destroyed thousands of homes – mostly owned by ethnic Uzbeks.

For Assignment Rayhan Demytrie investigates what role the drugs trade plays in the complex power relationships in Kyrgyzstan.

The BBC's Rayhan Demytrie explores the world of politics and drugs in Kyrgyzstan

Drugs And Power In Kyrgyzstan20101024

The BBC's Rayhan Demytrie explores the world of politics and drugs in Kyrgyzstan

Dying To Give Birth20091031
Europe's Missing Millions20101203

In this episode of Assignment, Angus Stickler, from the Bureau of Investigative Journalism in London, uncovers a trail of undetected waste and corruption drawing on funds from the European Union.

Millions of taxpayers' money has been lost to fraud, plundered by organised crime or simply wasted on questionable projects.

Investigators in Sicily reveal how they uncovered a slick, well thought out and highly complex operation run by the Mafia which has turned to white collar crime and discovered that it can be an extremely profitable activity.

The European Union's own investigators have attempted to keep a grip on corruption but say the final responsibility lies with individual member states, some of which are just not interested in taking action.

How much money has gone astray across the 27 member states of the European Union?

Europe's Missing Millions20101204

How much money has gone astray across the 27 member states of the European Union?

Exposing Bali's Orphanage20111211

Orphanages likes hotels are a growth industry in Bali.

They depend heavily on tourist donations to survive and many have become attractions in themselves.

For Assignment Ed Butler investigates reports that some orphanages are being run as commercial rackets and that children there are being exploited for the owners' benefit.

Ed Butler investigates abuse of children and scamming of volunteers by Bali's orphanages.

Extremes Of Corruption20101209

Pascale Harter looks at extremes of corruption between peaceful, prosperous Sweden and...

Pascale Harter looks at extremes of corruption between peaceful, prosperous Sweden and failed, violent Somalia. Part 1 of 2.

Extremes Of Corruption20101210

Pascale Harter looks at extremes of corruption between peaceful, prosperous Sweden and.

Extremes Of Corruption: Sweden20101210

Extreme World is a new season of coverage on the BBC examining the global differences that divide us.

Over the next few months we will explore eight key themes that illustrate the contrasts in our extreme world.

They include click Hot and Cold, Corruption, Dying, Crime, Education, Business, Pollution and God.

Does Sweden live up to its squeaky clean image?

Extremes Of Corruption: Sweden20101211

Does Sweden live up to its squeaky clean image?

Facing The Future In Greece20120325

What's it like to be a graduate in Greece contemplating the future?

More than half of young people are unemployed and those who can are packing their bags to start new lives abroad, taking their skills and education with them.

Those left behind find themselves locked into a situation without jobs, without hope, and with little support from the state.

Chloe Hadjimatheou reports for Assignment on the prospects for new graduates in Athens who are at the start of their working lives.

(Image: Graduates. Credit: BBC)

Fading Voices20111009

The voices of a choir fade as the voices of a generation fade. Growing old in Britain.

Fading Voices20111010
Favela Pacified20120301

One of Rio de Janeiro's biggest urban slums is being 'pacified'. But can it work longterm?

There's an ambitious government programme underway in one of Rio de Janeiro's biggest slums, or favelas. The aim is to clear Rocinha - home to over 100,000 people - of the drugs gangs that have dominated there for decades. The strategy, known as 'pacification', begins with a raid by Brazilian elite forces to drive out the gangs. It is then followed by investment in public services like water, electricity and waste collection and the installation of permanent police stations, inside the favelas. The strategy has worked well in other smaller favelas where figures indicate that homicide rates have been reduced by half.

But can it work in places like Rocinha where official corruption is widespread and where the lack of trust in the police have marred past attempts to improve the lives of residents? Nina Robinson reports for Assignment.

Favela Pacified20120302

There's an ambitious government programme underway in one of Rio de Janeiro's biggest slums, or favelas.

The aim is to clear Rocinha - home to over 100,000 people - of the drugs gangs that have dominated there for decades.

The strategy, known as 'pacification', begins with a raid by Brazilian elite forces to drive out the gangs.

It is then followed by investment in public services like water, electricity and waste collection and the installation of permanent police stations, inside the favelas.

The strategy has worked well in other smaller favelas where figures indicate that homicide rates have been reduced by half.

But can it work in places like Rocinha where official corruption is widespread and where the lack of trust in the police have marred past attempts to improve the lives of residents?

Nina Robinson reports for Assignment.

One of Rio de Janeiro's biggest urban slums is being 'pacified'. But can it work longterm?

Favela Pacified20120304

One of Rio de Janeiro's biggest urban slums is being 'pacified'. But can it work longterm?

Forcible Sterlisation In Uzbekistan20120412

Natalia Antelava reports on Uzbekistan where women are being sterilised.

Natalia Antelava reports on Uzbekistan where women have become the new target of one of the most repressive regimes on earth.

She uncovers evidence that women are being sterilised, often without their knowledge, in an effort by the government to control the population.

The programme speaks to victims and doctors and highlights the fear and paranoia that have made this such a difficult story to tell.

Women have fled the country in order to escape the practise.

Only a few brave Uzbeks have been willing to speak, often telling horrific stories the government don't want told.

Forcible Sterlisation In Uzbekistan20120413

Natalia Antelava reports on Uzbekistan where women are being sterilised.

Forcible Sterlisation In Uzbekistan20120414
Forty Years In Solitary, Louisana Style20120405

Tim Franks looks at the case of two US inmates who have been held in solitary confinement in Louisiana for what will be 40 years this month.

It's believed to be the longest period of time in US penal history.

For most of their confinement Albert Woodfox and Herman Wallace were held in the Louisiana State Penitentiary, a prison often known as "Angola", after the origin of the people who worked there when it was a slave plantation.

The two were originally imprisoned for armed robbery.

The men who later became known as the Angola 2 were linked to the Black Panther party, and fought for better prison conditions for the black inmates, and an end to the widespread rape and harsh work conditions.

While in prison there, they were charged with the murder of a prison guard, and convicted on the evidence of a prison inmate who had been promised his freedom if he testified against them.

For most of the time since then they have been held in solitary confinement.

The official reason has remained the same for 40 years: fear that the men would re-start their Black Panther-type activism and organise younger inmates as militants.

The use of solitary confinement is on the increase in the US - we ask are there good reasons for its use, and whether it is compatible with US and international law.

Why have two Louisiana prison inmates been held in solitary confinement for 40 years?

Forty Years In Solitary, Louisana Style20120406

Why have two Louisiana prison inmates been held in solitary confinement for 40 years?

Forty Years In Solitary, Louisana Style20120407
France's Burqa Controversy20100411
French Food Fights20111222

Assignment comes from the front line of the battle between old and new cuisine in France.

France has long been a country with a reputation for some of the best food in the world. But in recent years, many critics have argued that French cuisine has lost its way. Now there's a new generation of food-lovers hoping to reclaim France's place at the top table. But what do the traditionalists make of it all? Robyn Bresnahan reports for Assignment.

French Food Fights20111223

Assignment comes from the front line of the battle between old and new cuisine in France.

French Food Fights20111225

Assignment reports on the battle between old and new cuisine in France.

Assignment comes from the front line of the battle between old and new cuisine in France.

France has long been a country with a reputation for some of the best food in the world.

But in recent years, many critics have argued that French cuisine has lost its way.

Now there's a new generation of food-lovers hoping to reclaim France's place at the top table.

But what do the traditionalists make of it all?

Robyn Bresnahan reports for Assignment.

Gay Pride And Prejudice In Kenya20100620
Goldmine Sachs20100509
Guangzhou - China's Migrant Metropolis20111229

Tales of discontent and reform from Guangzhou, China's mega-city of migrants.

The world economy has pinned its hopes on China's economy, which depends on over 150 million migrant workers and their labour. The system of internal migration, based on the idea that workers do not settle in the places they work, has sustained an economic miracle and rapid development. But the country has seen a summer of unrest, with rioting among migrants in the Pearl River Delta and angry reactions to the injustices of the system. Mukul Devichand visits Guangzhou, the southern metropolis where 7 million migrants form half the population. There is anger and frustration with the hukou, China's "internal passport." Meanwhile, the city is now also home to communities from around the world, with 100,000 Africans adding to the already sensitive ethnic mix. How will the city change under the pressure of migration, and will its economic success survive the social tensions?

Guangzhou - China's Migrant Metropolis20111230

Tales of discontent and reform from Guangzhou, China's mega-city of migrants.

Guangzhou - China's Migrant Metropolis20120101
Guantanamo Reunited20100122
Guantanamo Reunited20100123

A former guard at Guantanamo Bay comes face-to-face with two of his ex-prisoners.

Guantanamo Reunited20100124
Guinea On The Brink20091107

Assignment hears harrowing eye-witness accounts of a massacre in Guinea.

Hackers For Hire20100313

Russian hackers have a fearsome reputation, but what makes them so good?

Hackers For Hire20100314
High Frequency Trading20091114

An investigation into new dealing practices by some banks.

In The Shadow Of Charles Taylor20120426

Sierra Leonean journalist Amara Bangura travels through Sierra Leone and Liberia for Assignment to meet those who remember the brutality of the Charles Taylor era. A special court in the Hague has found the former president of Liberia guilty of aiding and abetting crimes against humanity, murder, rape and terrorism in neighbouring Sierra Leone during the brutal civil war in the 1990s.

Stories from Sierre Leone and Liberia on the brutality of the Charles Taylor era.

In The Shadow Of Charles Taylor20120427

Stories from Sierre Leone and Liberia on the brutality of the Charles Taylor era.

In The Shadow Of Charles Taylor20120428
India's Commonwealth Games - the winners and losers

India's Infamous Hospital

On the night of August 10 2017, India went into mourning. 30 patients lost their lives in 24 hours when the oxygen supply to a hospital in Uttar Pradesh was suddenly cut. Images of the dead children and stories of parents trying to resuscitate their loved ones became emblematic of corruption and mismanagement in the country’s public health system. BRD hospital where the tragedy took place is no stranger to high rates of infant mortality. The hospital’s catchment includes some of India’s poorest and most medically vulnerable citizens. A primary centre for treating encephalitis, it’s common to see up to 400 children dying per month in the peak monsoon season. But the events of August 10th were different. With the state authorities now having made arrests and vowing to punish those responsible for the hospital’s lethal dysfunction, Assignment tracks down those who witnessed the original tragedy, to build an illuminating picture of what happened on one infamous night. Allegations - vehemently denied - abound of theft, corruption and simple non-payment of bills, including those of the oxygen supply company.

Reporter: Krupa Padhy
Producer: Mike Gallagher

Photo Credit: Photo by Travel Stock / ShutterStock

India's Infamous Hospital20180315

On the night of August 10 2017, India went into mourning. 30 patients lost their lives in 24 hours when the oxygen supply to a hospital in Uttar Pradesh was suddenly cut. Images of the dead children and stories of parents trying to resuscitate their loved ones became emblematic of corruption and mismanagement in the country’s public health system. BRD hospital where the tragedy took place is no stranger to high rates of infant mortality. The hospital’s catchment includes some of India’s poorest and most medically vulnerable citizens. A primary centre for treating encephalitis, it’s common to see up to 400 children dying per month in the peak monsoon season. But the events of August 10th were different. With the state authorities now having made arrests and vowing to punish those responsible for the hospital’s lethal dysfunction, Assignment tracks down those who witnessed the original tragedy, to build an illuminating picture of what happened on one infamous night. Allegations - vehemently denied - abound of theft, corruption and simple non-payment of bills, including those of the oxygen supply company.

Reporter: Krupa Padhy
Producer: Mike Gallagher

Photo Credit: Photo by Travel Stock / ShutterStock

India's Maoist Insurgency20100613
India's Working Children20110804

The children in India who work as domestic servants in the homes of the middle classes.

The BBC's Nina Robinson reports from India where the booming economy has fuelled a demand for cheap domestic labour. She finds that children are filling the gaps, with evidence of trafficking and youngsters being set to work in households, where they are open to abuse with little hope of ever going to school. This is despite a law brought in just over a year ago which gave every child from age 6-14 the right to a free education.

India's Working Children20110805

The children in India who work as domestic servants in the homes of the middle classes.

India's Working Children20110806
India's Working Children20110807
India's Working Children20110808

The BBC's Nina Robinson reports from India where the booming economy has fuelled a demand for cheap domestic labour.

She finds that children are filling the gaps, with evidence of trafficking and youngsters being set to work in households, where they are open to abuse with little hope of ever going to school.

This is happening, despite a law brought in just over a year ago which gave every child from the age of six to 14, the right to a free education.

The children in India who work as domestic servants in the homes of the middle classes

Inside Britain's Class System20100502
Inside California's Porn Industry20110602

Ed Butler reports on the challenges facing California's porn industry.

California produces some eight five per cent of the world's commercial pornographic movies with revenues that run into billions of dollars. But the industry has hit challenging times caused by the global downturn and by piracy. DVD sales have collapsed, some companies have gone bust and now a new get-tough approach by regulators and campaigners is pressurising the industry to conform to basic health and safety standards. For Assignment Ed Butler visits film sets and talks to porn stars and industry insiders about the challenges ahead.

Inside California's Porn Industry20110603

Ed Butler reports on the challenges facing California's porn industry.

Inside California's Porn Industry20110604

California produces some 85% of the world's commercial pornographic movies with revenues that run into billions of dollars.

But the industry has hit challenging times caused by the global downturn and by piracy.

DVD sales have collapsed, some companies have gone bust and now a new get-tough approach by regulators and campaigners is pressurising the industry to conform to basic health and safety standards.

For Assignment Ed Butler visits film sets and talks to porn stars and industry insiders about the challenges ahead.

Ed Butler reports on the challenges facing California's porn industry

Inside California's Porn Industry20110605

California produces some 85% of the world's commercial pornographic movies with revenues that run into billions of dollars.

But the industry has hit challenging times caused by the global downturn and by piracy.

DVD sales have collapsed, some companies have gone bust and now a new get-tough approach by regulators and campaigners is pressurising the industry to conform to basic health and safety standards.

For Assignment Ed Butler visits film sets and talks to porn stars and industry insiders about the challenges ahead.

Ed Butler reports on the challenges facing California's porn industry

Inside California's Porn Industry20110606
Irish Anger20101029

As Ireland faces up to one of Europe's most punishing financial crises, Ed Butler looks at the growing anger amongst its citizens. In September tax-payers were asked to underwrite, proportionately, the biggest bank bail-out of all time. For Assignment Ed meets casualties of the crisis, and asks if this typically quiet, conservative population, will continue meekly to bear the burden of the nation’s dramatic boom and bust.

Ed Butler charts the depths of Irish anger as they face up to their financial crisis.

Ivory Coast: A Family Divided20111021

Ivory Coast was once one of the most prosperous nations in Africa - but it was brought to its knees earlier this year by post-election violence.

An estimated 3,000 people died and many more lost their homes or businesses when supporters of the incumbent president Laurent Gbagbo and his political rival Alassane Ouattara fought for control of the country.

Eventually, Mr Gbagbo was forced to concede defeat and Alassane Outtara took up the post as President.

The BBC's Robyn Bresnahan travels to the commercial capital Abidjan to find out how two families on either side of the political divide are doing now.

(Image Credit: Getty)

How politics is dividing families in Ivory Coast.

Ivory Coast: A Family Divided20111022

How politics is dividing families in Ivory Coast.

Ivory Coast: A Family Divided20111023
Ivory Coast: A Family Divided20111024
Jamaica's 'godfather'20100530
Jamaica's Sprint Factory20100801

Jamaica has a reputation for producing world class athletes, the most famous being the record breaking Usain Bolt who won the 100m sprint at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Athletes in Jamaica are nurtured from a young age: boys and girls as young as six enter competitions and train intensively throughout their school years to compete in fiercely contested national athletics championships.

Most of these children come from poor socio-economic backgrounds and their knowledge of the risks of drug taking - whether for medicinal or performance enhancement - is limited.

There is a debate now in Jamaica about how early young children should be introduced to the world of anti-doping and even whether it is time to start testing children as young as 10 years old.

Nina Robinson reports.

The pressures on Jamaica's generation of junior athletes aiming for Olympic success

Jos: A City Still Divided20110411

Two years ago, Assignment visited the Nigerian city of Jos and found a city riven with sectarian divisions. Since then more than 1,000 people have been killed in fresh violence between Muslims and Christians.

In the run up to Nigeria's presidential election, Rob Walker returns to the city to meet residents he met on his last visit.

He finds the city is even more polarised, with shocking new elements to the violence: in the middle of a riot, some young men brag to him about burning the corpses and eating the flesh of their enemies.

Rob examines why the government has failed to contain the violence. But also finds signs of hope in one neighbourhood where Christians and Muslims have come together to prevent violence.

Can this offer a model for the rest of the city?

This programme contains graphic descriptions of violence

Photo: Reverend Noah Maikano in the ruins of his house in Jos

Assignment reports on the shocking sectarian violence in the Nigerian city of Jos

Keeping The Peace In South Sudan20100320

Disarming South Sudan's warring ethnic groups is no easy task. Assignment investigates.

Keeping The Peace In South Sudan20100321
Korea's People Smugglers20110711

Defecting from North Korea is a dangerous business.

It comes at a high price and there's no guarantee of success.

Many make the journey to South Korea with the help of brokers - individuals and organisations who smuggle people along the illegal overland route known as the "Underground Railroad".

For Assignment, Lucy Williamson meets some of the brokers in Seoul who make a living helping people escape North Korea.

The shadowy world of the brokers who smuggle people out of North Korea

Land Grab Cambodia20090712
Louisiana Deepwater - Bp Gulf Of Mexico Oil Spill20110417

A year ago, the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico creating a huge oil spill.

In the aftermath, the BBC's Robyn Bresnahan spent a month in the American state of Louisiana with fishing families to see how they were affected.

She found many communities on the brink, with fishermen fearing they would never fish again.

One year on, she has returned to meet with some of the same families.

Robyn Bresnahan revisits the fishing families who were affected by the oil spill

Louisiana Deepwater - Bp Gulf Of Mexico Oil Spill20110418

Robyn Bresnahan revisits the fishing families who were affected by the oil spill

Love And Morals In Mangalore20100327

Why holding hands in public in India's coastal town of Mangalore can get you into trouble.

Love And Morals In Mangalore20100328
Luis Posada Carriles20110725

is a Cuban exile, and former CIA operative.

To fellow Cuban militants, he's a hero - but the Cuban government calls him the 'Bin Laden of the Americas', and says he's responsible for a string of terrorist attacks during the half century he's spent fighting against Fidel Castro.

For Assignment, Rob Walker goes on the trail of Luis Posada Carriles, and asks why - despite evidence of his involvement in bombings and assassination attempts - he's able to live freely today in the United States. 

Rob Walker goes on the trail of Luis Posada Carriles - Cuba's public enemy number one

Magic And Murder In Venezuela20101217

Venezuela now has one of the highest, if not the highest murder rate in the world.

Many Venezuelan criminals believe they receive protection from the Santos Malandros, or Holy Thugs.

For Assignment, Will Grant goes to Caracas to investigate the connection between crime and cult.

The criminals who pray to the spirits - the Santos Malandros or Holy Thugs - in Venezuela

Magic And Murder In Venezuela20101218

The criminals who pray to the spirits - the Santos Malandros or Holy Thugs - in Venezuela

Malvinas War Crimes20091128
Malvinas War Crimes20091129

Did Argentine officers commit war crimes against their own troops in the Falklands War?

Masters In Business20090913
Mexico's Drug War20100218

Katya Adler reports on the shocking consequences of Mexico's drug war on Mexican society.

Mexico's Drug War20100219
Mexico's Drug War20100220
Mexico's Drug War20100221
Mexico's Toughest Cop20101224

For the Mexican President Felipe Calderon, there's clear evidence his war against the drug cartels can be won - and it's to be found in the border city of Tijuana.

Two years ago a tough, new police chief took over and joined forces with the military to aggressively attack the cartels. He also turned his sights on his own officers – many of whom were in league with the drug barons.

As a result, violence in the city centre has dramatically reduced. But there's a darker side to the war.

Some who claim they are innocent of working for the cartels say they have been tortured by the authorities. And in the poorer suburbs violence continues.

For Assignment, Rob Walker, investigates whether the war is being won or lost in Tijuana.

Assignment goes on the trail of one of Mexico's toughest cops.

Mexico's Toughest Cop20101225

Assignment goes on the trail of one of Mexico's toughest cops.

Mutiny In Bangladesh20090830
Oil City Takoradi20110310

The port city of Takoradi is being transformed by Ghana's new oil industry

In December, Ghana turned on the taps and joined the ranks of Africa's oil producers.

Production is expected to top 100,000 barrels a day this year - enough, the government believes, to double the country’s rate of economic growth.

At the centre of this oil rush is the once-sleepy city of Takoradi.

Already things are starting to change here: new businesses setting up to service the offshore oil industry, an increase in population, and, spiralling expectations. But can Ghana - one of the most stable countries in Africa - escape the curse of instability and corruption that has afflicted other big oil producers on the continent?

In Assignment Rob Walker visits Takoradi to find out.

Oil City Takoradi20110311

The port city of Takoradi is being transformed by Ghana's new oil industry

In December, Ghana turned on the taps and joined the ranks of Africa's oil producers.

Production is expected to top 100,000 barrels a day this year - enough, the government believes, to double the country’s rate of economic growth.

At the centre of this oil rush is the once-sleepy city of Takoradi.

Already things are starting to change here: new businesses setting up to service the offshore oil industry, an increase in population, and, spiralling expectations. But can Ghana - one of the most stable countries in Africa - escape the curse of instability and corruption that has afflicted other big oil producers on the continent?

In Assignment Rob Walker visits Takoradi to find out.

Oil City Takoradi20110312

The port city of Takoradi is being transformed by Ghana's new oil industry

On The Road With Hillary Clinton20110715

For Assignment the BBC's State Department Correspondent Kim Ghattas has gained rare behind-the-scenes access to one of Hillary Clinton's recent overseas trips.

Join her on "special air mission 883" as it heads from the US to the Middle East and Africa.

Expect surprising insights and unguarded moments with aides, officials and the special protection team as they try - and sometimes fail - to control the messy world around them.

Get up close and personal with the American Secretary of State in this week's Assignment.

Assignment gets behind-the-scenes access to Hillary Clinton on the road

On The Road With Hillary Clinton20110718
One Day In Syria20111028

We've seen the demonstrations in Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain and in Libya.

But Syria has tried hard to close itself off from the world's gaze.

There are regular demonstrations across the country - but finding out exactly what's happening is hard - even though some activists are prepared to tell their stories of protest and violence.

For Assignment, Bill Law paints a portrait of a single day in Syria, talking via the internet and phone to people across the country.

He speaks to the demonstrators who want President Assad to go, to government supports who say the protests are the work of foreign agitators, to the businessmen who want tourists to return to their country and to the ordinary people who say they just want a quiet life.

(Image: A boy wearing a headband reading 'Free Syria'. Credit: AFP/Getty)

Bill Law paints a portrait of one day in the Syrian revolution.

One Day In Syria20111029

Bill Law paints a portrait of one day in the Syrian revolution.

One Day In Syria20111031
Politics In Rwanda20100808

Next week Rwanda's President Paul Kagame is standing for re-election. But the run up to the vote has been overshadowed by a series of attacks on government opponents.

Rob Walker travels to Rwanda to investigate. Listeners may find some scenes in this programme disturbing.

Opponents of the Rwandan government have come under attack in the run up to elections

Protecting Britain's Children20091025
Reporting Mindanao20101230

Life as a reporter on the troubled island of Mindanao in the Philippines.

The Philippines is one of the most dangerous places in the world to report from. More than thirty journalists were killed there in a single incident at the end of 2009. Kate McGeowan travels to the troubled southern island of Mindanao to meet one of the reporters whose job it is to cover the daily violence there.

Reporting Mindanao20101231

Life as a reporter on the troubled island of Mindanao in the Philippines.

The Philippines is one of the most dangerous places in the world to report from. More than thirty journalists were killed there in a single incident at the end of 2009.

Kate McGeowan travels to the troubled southern island of Mindanao to meet one of the reporters whose job it is to cover the daily violence there.

Reporting Mindanao20110101

Life as a reporter on the troubled island of Mindanao in the Philippines.

Return To Nablus20091212

Alan Johnston returns to the Palestinian city of Nablus - once a hotbed of militancy.

Return To Nablus20091213
Roubles And Radicals In Dagestan20111124

A Dagestani billionaire is trying to find an economic solution to his country's troubles.

The main focus of the violence in the North Caucasus these days is in Dagestan, Chechnya's neighbour.

Shoot-outs between police and Islamist militants occur almost daily, and suicide bombings and assassinations have become common.

In response, the authorities use what many see as excessive force and the violence spirals still further.

In the past two years suicide bombings in the Moscow metro and a Moscow airport have been traced to the region.

In Dagestan it's a war that has touched almost every community and family, and one where differences between the opposing sides are apparently irreconcilable.

For the authorities, Dagestan is part of Russia and subject to its secular laws; for the militants the region should be a sharia state independent of Moscow.

After ten years trying to combat the militants and their appeal, Russian businessman Suleiman Kerimov has hit on a new idea - football.

Sports facilities and pitches are being built across this impoverished and deeply conservative Muslim republic, encouraging young boys and men to play on the pitch rather than join the militants in the forest, and girls to watch them instead of withdrawing behind the veil.

Dagestan's top club Anzhi Makhachkala has been bought up by the pro-Kremlin Dagestani billionaire and now he is buying world-class footballers, including Samuel Eto'o, currently the highest-paid player on the planet.

Lucy Ash asks whether this is just bread and circuses for the masses or whether it is making a real difference in this restive Russian republic.

Roubles And Radicals In Dagestan20111125

A Dagestani billionaire is trying to find an economic solution to his country's troubles.

Roubles And Radicals In Dagestan20111127
Russia’s ‘Fake’ Election

Ksenia Sobchak is young, wealthy and famous. Her father helped bring down the Soviet Union. Now she’s challenging ex-KGB officer Vladimir Putin for the Russian presidency. A perfect pedigree? Perhaps. But some say she’s a fake candidate, running a no-hope race to boost the Kremlin’s democratic credentials. Gabriel Gatehouse travels to Russia to unravel a tale of family loyalties, a death in suspicious circumstances, and double dealings in the quest for power.

Producer: Mike Gallagher

Photo Credit: Photography by Dmitriy Kandinskiy

Russia’s €fake’ Election20180308

Ksenia Sobchak is young, wealthy and famous. Her father helped bring down the Soviet Union. Now she’s challenging ex-KGB officer Vladimir Putin for the Russian presidency. A perfect pedigree? Perhaps. But some say she’s a fake candidate, running a no-hope race to boost the Kremlin’s democratic credentials. Gabriel Gatehouse travels to Russia to unravel a tale of family loyalties, a death in suspicious circumstances, and double dealings in the quest for power.

Producer: Mike Gallagher

Photo Credit: Photography by Dmitriy Kandinskiy

Saving In China20090906
Sierra Leone: Blood Mining

In 2010, a UK-listed company began developing a mining concession in Sierra Leone it said could transform the economic fortunes of the local population. But instead of benefiting the most immediate communities, hundreds found their homes destroyed, their livelihoods uprooted. And among the people who protested, many found themselves violently beaten and detained, and in one or two cases shot at and killed. Ed Butler investigates some of the untold stories of one of west Africa’s most dramatic recent abuses of corporate power. We hear from those who suffered, investigate allegations of police brutality, and look at the supposedly well-regulated system of corporate governance which was supposed to prevent abuses taking place.

Presenter: Ed Butler
Producer: Anna Meisel
Editor: Penny Murphy

Sierra Leone: Blood Mining20180301

In 2010, a UK-listed company began developing a mining concession in Sierra Leone it said could transform the economic fortunes of the local population. But instead of benefiting the most immediate communities, hundreds found their homes destroyed, their livelihoods uprooted. And among the people who protested, many found themselves violently beaten and detained, and in one or two cases shot at and killed. Ed Butler investigates some of the untold stories of one of west Africa’s most dramatic recent abuses of corporate power. We hear from those who suffered, investigate allegations of police brutality, and look at the supposedly well-regulated system of corporate governance which was supposed to prevent abuses taking place.

Presenter: Ed Butler
Producer: Anna Meisel
Editor: Penny Murphy

Spain's Stolen Babies20111106

The heartbroken families in Spain searching for their stolen babies

Katya Adler reports on the impact of Spain's stolen baby scandal.

The country is reeling from an avalanche of allegations of baby theft and baby trafficking.

It is thought that the trade began at the end of the Spanish civil war and continued for 50 years, with hundreds of thousands of babies traded by nuns, priests and doctors up to the 1990s.

Exhumations of the supposed graves of babies and positive DNA tests are proof that baby theft has happened.

Across Spain, people are queuing up to take a DNA test and thousands of Spaniards are asking 'Who am I?'

Katya meets the heartbroken mothers searching for their children and the trafficked babies, now grown up, searching for their biological relatives and their true identities.

Stalin's Toxic Legacy In Georgia20110529

For Assignment Angus Crawford travels to a remote valley in north west Georgia where a disused arsenic mine is polluting the area and posing a real threat to the health of the local population.

But how much do they know and what is the government willing or able to do about it?

Dangerous levels of arsenic are polluting a community in Georgia - but who knows or cares?

Stalin's Toxic Legacy In Georgia20110530

Dangerous levels of arsenic are polluting a community in Georgia - but who knows or cares?

Sweden’s Child Migrant Mystery20171026

Why do asylum-seeking children in Sweden withdraw from the world and how do they recover?

For nearly two decades, Swedish health professionals have been treating asylum-seeking children who fall into a deeply listless state. They withdraw from the world, refuse to speak, walk and eat - most end up being tube-fed. They are known as “the apathetic children” in Sweden. More recently this illness has been termed Resignation Syndrome. Experts agree it is children who have experienced deep trauma who are vulnerable. Doctors link the condition to an uncertain migration status. But why, asks Linda Pressly, does it only seem to happen to children in Sweden, and how can they recover?

(Photo: This seven-year old girl has been withdrawn and unresponsive for 6 months. She is fed via a plastic tube through her nose)

Swine Flu: Panic Or Pandemic?20100523
Syrian Stories20120316

It's a year since the uprising began against the government of President Assad in Syria.

News bulletins have been dominated by the rising number of casualties and a slide towards civil war.

For Assignment Owen Bennett Jones brings you the human stories behind the headlines.

Stories of friends and families divided, couples on opposite sides of the divide whose relationships have almost reached breaking point, and personal accounts of key moments in the conflict.

Divided by conflict. The human stories behind the Syria's uprising.

Syrian Stories20120318

Divided by conflict. The human stories behind the Syria's uprising.

Taxing Questions For Greeks20100227

Tax evasion is big in Greece - Ed Butler asks why?

Taxing Questions For Greeks20100228
Ten Days In Haiti20100130
Ten Days In Haiti20100131

Mark Doyle reports on the devastation of the Haiti earthquake.

Thawil - The Red Shirt Protestor20100606
The Afghan Governors20110801

As international forces begin to hand back power in Afghanistan, exactly who are the Afghans in charge?

Lyse Doucet, with more than 20 years experience there and an incredible contact book, travelled to three different cities to meet three very different men trying to build the new Afghanistan.

She found hope, frustration and in one case, tragedy.

The programme contains one of the last broadcast interviews of Ahmad Wali Karzai (pictured), who was assassinated by his bodyguard earlier this month.

Lyse Doucet travels around Afghanistan to meet the men in charge of the country

The Congo Connection20091121
The Families Of Manshiyet Nasser20100711

In September 2008 huge boulders rained down on the Manshiyet Nasser slum in Cairo.

The slum had built up at the foot of the steep slopes of the Mokattam Hill in the centre of Cairo. At least 107 people died in the disaster but it is believed many more were buried beneath the rocks.

In the wake of the disaster, the government promised to re-house people away from the danger of the rocks into modern homes.

Two years on the re-housing policy has proved controversial and, according to the slum dwellers, inadequate.

For Assignment Catherine Miller spends time with families in Manshiyet Nasser.

Life after a deadly rockslide in one of Cairo's biggest slums, Manshiyet Nasser.

The Indignant Of Greece20110909

In this Assignment programme Ed Butler investigates the growing influence of the so-called Indignant Movement in Greece. Opposition to the Greek government's austerity measures, backed by the European Union and IMF, have seen widespread protests in recent months. Some opinion polls indicate 80% support from a Greek public, frustrated by cuts and the suggestion that they are to blame for the Europe's economic woes.

But is there any choice for Greece? Ed Butler looks at the increasingly fractured relationship between the rulers and the ruled in Greece, and asks: where next for the Indignants?

People in Greece are angry - but is the protest movement, the Indignants, the answer?

The Indignant Of Greece20110910

People in Greece are angry - but is the protest movement, the Indignants, the answer?

The Indignant Of Greece20110912
The Missing In Kashmir20111202

Thousands of bodies have been buried in unmarked graves in Indian administered Kashmir.

Who are these people and what happened to them?

For Assignment Jill McGivering reports on the human cost of the conflict in Kashmir.

The producer for this edition of Assignment was Michael Gallagher.

(Image: Members of the Association of Parents of Disappeared People (APDP) cry in front of banner of missing people. Credit: Getty)

A dark secret lies beneath the earth in Indian Kashmir - bodies - thousands of them.

The Missing In Kashmir20111204

A dark secret lies beneath the earth in Indian Kashmir - bodies - thousands of them.

The Mystery Of Dirar Abu Sisi20110903

On the 18 of February 2011, a Palestinian engineer by the name of Dirar Abu Sisi boarded a train in eastern Ukraine. He was travelling to Kiev, where he hoped to apply for Ukrainian citizenship. But when the train arrived at its destination the following morning, Mr Abu Sisi was no longer on board - he had vanished.

For more than a week, nothing was heard from Mr Abu Sisi, a manager at Gaza's main power plant - then his wife got a phone call, her husband was in an Israeli jail. Now he is awaiting trial, accused of being the brains behind Hamas' rocket programme.

Only twice in the country's history has Israel abducted someone on foreign soil to bring them back to face trial at home. Adolf Eichmann, one of the principal organizers of the Holocaust, was kidnapped in Argentina in 1960, and subsequently tried and executed. In 1986, Mordechai Vanunu was drugged and smuggled out of Italy after revealing the existence of Israel's nuclear programme.

So who is Dirar Abu Sisi? Did he really study rocket science at a Ukrainian military academy, as the Israeli indictment claims? Is he a senior Hamas operative? Or is he an innocent victim of mistaken identity? What role if any did the Ukrainian authorities play in his disappearance from that train?

In this edition of Assignment, Gabriel Gatehouse unravels the mystery of Dirar Abu Sisi, tracking his journey across Ukraine and beyond, to Israel and Gaza. It's a story that involves the secret services of at least two nations, and goes to the very heart of the conflict between the Israelis and the Palestinians.

Gabriel Gatehouse investigates the mysterious disappearance of Dirar Abu Sisi.

The Mystery Of Dirar Abu Sisi20110904
The Mystery Of Dirar Abu Sisi20110905

Gabriel Gatehouse investigates the mysterious disappearance of Dirar Abu Sisi.

The Mystery Of The Arctic Sea20091004
The Opus Dei Enigma20090705
The Pardon Game20090816
The Rise And Fall Of Wikileaks20110107

The founder of Wikileaks Julian Assange is currently in England fighting extradition to Sweden. Despite this he remains defiant that his whistle-blowing website will continue to publish sensitive material.

For Assignment Simon Cox investigates the rise of Wikileaks and asks if it can recover from its recent troubles.

Simon Cox investigates the recent troubles of Wikileaks - the whistle-blowing website.

The Rise And Fall Of Wikileaks20110108

Simon Cox investigates the recent troubles of Wikileaks - the whistle-blowing website.

The Road To Tripoli20110827

Events in Libya have reached a dramatic conclusion.

After a six month uprising, rebel forces have swept into the capital Tripoli.

The Leader Colonel Gaddafi, after almost 42 years in power, has been forced from power.

In this week's Assignment our Correspondent James Reynolds reports how this happened and what were the key turning points in Libya's conflict.

James Reynolds reports on the key turning points in Libya's conflict.

The Road To Tripoli20110828

James Reynolds reports on the key turning points in Libya's conflict.

The Road To Tripoli20110829
The schoolboy beggars of Senegal

The Schoolboy Beggars Of Senegal20100919

In the West African state of Senegal every day, tens of thousands of schoolboys are forced to beg by their own teachers. These boys are the Talibes, pupils at Islamic boarding schools.

The government has just prosecuted a group of teachers, but none were sent to prison. For Assignment, Angus Crawford travels to Dakar to see what progress is being made in protecting the rights of these children.

In Senegal tens of thousands of schoolboys are forced to beg by their own teachers

The State Of Israel20111113

As the Arab Spring rolled across the Middle East, protestors were also out on the streets in Israel.

But they weren't demonstrating about human rights or democracy - they were shouting slogans about poverty and the price of cottage cheese.

And all this at a time when Israel has one of the fastest-growing economies in the world - what's going on?

In this week's Assignment, former BBC Middle East correspondent Tim Franks returns to Israel to examine the dramatic social changes within the country.

The numbers of ultra-orthodox and settlers are rising rapidly - and the old European leftist elite is looking increasingly irrelevant.

Will the new Israeli power structure make the chance of peace in the region more or less likely - or will the country become increasingly concerned with its own internal struggles?

Join Tim Franks for Assignment as he unravels the complexities of the state of Israel.

(Image: An Israeli flag. Credit: Getty)

How are the changes sweeping through the Arab world affecting Israel?

The Story Of Rafiq Hariri20110704

In February 2005, a powerful truck bomb killed Lebanon's former Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri and 20 other people.

Six years on the Special Tribunal for Lebanon - tasked with bringing the killers to justice - is preparing to issue indictments against those it suspects of being involved.

Reporting from Beirut Owen Bennett Jones looks back at the life of the man they called Mr Lebanon and at the legal process that has lasted so long.

Who was Rafiq Hariri and who might have wanted to kill him?

Three Strike Lifers20091011
Total Recall: The Toyota Story20100425
Toyota20100422

The trouble with Toyota.

Toyota20100423
Trouble In Dagestan20101119

Think of conflict in the North Caucasus, and most people would think of Chechnya. But it's the neighbouring Russian republic of Dagestan which, today, is the epicentre of violence in the region; violence which officials now admit is a war.

Dagestan lies between the Caucasus mountains and the Caspian sea. There are almost daily clashes here between police and militants fighting to turn the Caucasus into an Islamic state.

In the last couple of months, 200 people have been killed; there have been suicide bombings, kidnappings, assassinations and the authorities have carried out thousands of anti terror operations in an attempt to put down the fundementalist insurgency.

Russia says the rebels have links to Al-Qaeda and have undergone training in 'Taliban camps' in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

For Assignment Steve Rosenberg travels to Dagestan to try to find out what is fuelling the conflict.

Is it simply religion? Or is it poverty, corruption and police brutality which explain why people are taking up arms against the state?

Russia's hidden war in Dagestan

Uganda To Iraq: Trafficked Into Slavery20110425

For Assignment Anna Cavell tells the extraordinary story of the rescue of a group of Ugandan women who were trafficked into Iraq.

They were told they would get decent jobs but instead found themselves working as slaves and subject to violence and even rape.

They were saved by an unlikely pair of heroes - a Ugandan security guard and an American military officer.

The story of the rescue of a group of Ugandan women who were trafficked into Iraq

Ukraine’s Stolen Billions and the Riddle of the Helipad

How the circle of Ukraine's disgraced ex-president continues to profit from his people.

The Parkovy Conference and Exhibition Centre, a huge modernist structure of concrete and glass, stands boldly on the banks of the Dnieper River in central Kiev, a helipad on the roof. It hosted the official after party for last year’s Eurovision Song Contest and was meant to be a symbol of Ukraine’s economic development. Instead, four years after President Yanukovych was overthrown by a people sick of corruption, it has become a focus of efforts to reclaim the billions of dollars said to have been stolen by the ex-president’s regime. In this edition of Assignment, Tim Whewell attempts to unpick the tangled global web of companies behind the building’s ownership. Who does the helipad actually belong to and what does it tell us about Ukraine’s attempts to bring its corrupt politicians to account?

Producer: Simon Maybin
Presenter: Tim Whewell

Photo credit: Parkovy / Parkovy Congress and Exhibition Centre

Ukraine’s Stolen Billions And The Riddle Of The Helipad20180215

How the circle of Ukraine's disgraced ex-president continues to profit from his people.

The Parkovy Conference and Exhibition Centre, a huge modernist structure of concrete and glass, stands boldly on the banks of the Dnieper River in central Kiev, a helipad on the roof. It hosted the official after party for last year’s Eurovision Song Contest and was meant to be a symbol of Ukraine’s economic development. Instead, four years after President Yanukovych was overthrown by a people sick of corruption, it has become a focus of efforts to reclaim the billions of dollars said to have been stolen by the ex-president’s regime. In this edition of Assignment, Tim Whewell attempts to unpick the tangled global web of companies behind the building’s ownership. Who does the helipad actually belong to and what does it tell us about Ukraine’s attempts to bring its corrupt politicians to account?

Producer: Simon Maybin
Presenter: Tim Whewell

Photo credit: Parkovy / Parkovy Congress and Exhibition Centre

Unlawful Detention20100213

Assignment investigates claims that the UK government is breaking its own asylum rules.

Unlawful Detention20100214
Vancouver Gangland20091226

A report on the growing problem of drug and gun crimes in Vancouver.

Vancouver Gangland20091227
Waiting For Omar20101015

For the past few weeks the BBC's Piers Scholfield has been camped above the San Jose mine in Chile where 33 miners have been trapped underground since 5 August 2010.

One of the miners is Omar Reygadas - father, grandfather and great grandfather - and team leader of one of the three groups of miners.

The Reygadas family have invited Piers to spend time with them as they endure the long wait for Omar.

They have given Piers unique access to the letters they exchanged with Omar down the mine and through them we get a moving and intimate account of their anxieties and hopes as they wait for the rescue to succeed.

An intimate account of one family's long wait for the rescue of the Chilean miners.

Waiting For Omar20101017

Waiting For Omar20101017

An intimate account of one family's long wait for the rescue of the Chilean miners.

Who Jails The Pirates?20100725

Why are so few captured pirates brought to trial?

Each year hundreds of ships are attacked by pirate gangs, many off the coast of Somalia. They target cargo and also passengers and crew who are held for ransom, sometimes for years.

An international Combined Task Force now patrols the region and its ships regularly witness boarding raids and seize pirates, yet most are just released or returned to the Somali shore - probably to participate in further attacks.

For Assignment, Simon Cox investigates the highly-charged political, social and legal issues which enable pirates to operate with relative impunity.

Simon Cox reports on the difficulties of bringing pirates to justice.

Why Europe's Roma stay poor

Why Europe's Roma Stay Poor20101008

It’s halfway through the European 'Decade of Roma Inclusion' but millions of euros in EU funding have failed to make a dent in Roma exclusion.

For Assignment Nick Thorpe travels to Romania - home to an estimated two million Roma, 10 % of the population - to find out why.

Assignment investigates efforts to tackle poverty among the Roma minority in Romania

Why Europe's Roma Stay Poor20101010

Assignment investigates efforts to tackle poverty among the Roma minority in Romania

Winning The Peace In Pakistan20090726
Wives Wanted In The Faroe Islands20170427

Men in the Faroe Islands are having to look far beyond their shores for marriage

Zimbabwe's Child Migrants20110916

Mukul Devichand goes on the road with young children travelling alone on a journey of desperation, danger and hope - south from Zimbabwe and across the border to South Africa.

On the road with children travelling alone on a journey of desperation, danger and hope

Zimbabwe's Child Migrants20110917
Zimbabwe's Child Migrants20110918
Zimbabwe's Child Migrants20110919
Zimbabwe's Diamond Fields20110811

Assignment investigates killings and torture in Zimbabwe's diamond fields.

Have you bought a diamond recently? Would you really know where it came from? Assignment goes into Zimbabwe's Marange diamond fields and uncovers evidence of torture camps and widescale killings. As the international community argues over whether these diamonds should be sold on the open market, we ask if President Robert Mugabe will ever face prosecution for these crimes. Hilary Andersson reports.

Zimbabwe's Diamond Fields20110812
Zimbabwe's Diamond Fields20110813

Assignment investigates killings and torture in Zimbabwe's diamond fields.

Zimbabwe's Diamond Fields20110814
Zimbabwe's Diamond Fields20110815
Zimbabwe's New Farmers20100418
3India's Commonwealth Games - the winners and losers

4The schoolboy beggars of Senegal