Astor Piazzolla (1921-1992) [composer Of The Week]

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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01Adventures in the Big Apple20190318

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of bandoneon virtuoso and composer Astor Piazzolla, through five key locations, beginning in New York, the city in which he grew up.

All his life he fought against the tide, and in the end, he was the victor. Astor Piazzolla was a rebel with a cause. A virtuoso bandoneon player and a composer, he set out to break tango free from its roots, and make it a music with a future far beyond the dance halls and cafes of 1950s Buenos Aires. Hits like “Libertango” and collaborations with jazz giants like Gary Burton and Gerry Mulligan made his name beyond the tango world, while his classical compositions brought his instrument, the bandoneon critical acclaim in the concert hall. The secrets of musical technique came, he said, from his studies with French pedagogue, Nadia Boulanger and Argentinian composer, Alberto Ginastera but they also came from his teenage experiences in Buenos Aires, the city where had played bandoneon and arranged music for Anibal Troilo’s famous tango band.

Across the week Donald Macleod traces Astor Piazzolla’s life through the places which played an important part in his musical development: New York, Buenos Aires, Paris, Rome and the Uraguayan resort of Punta del Este.

Piazzolla’s links with tango begin in New York. Living there as a child, it’s where he encountered one of tangos greats, the singer Carlos Gardel and it’s where he was introduced to the instrument with which he conquered the world, the bandoneon.

Tanguedia
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Fernando Suarez Paz, violin
Horacio Malvicino, electric guitar
Hector Console, bass

Tres minutos con la Realidad
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Gerardo Gandini, piano
Horacio Malvicino, guitar
Daniel Binelli, bandoneon
José Bragato, cello
Hector Console, bass

Piano sonata no 1, Op 7
Allison Brewster Franzetti, piano

Sideral
Requiem para un Malandra
Astor Piazzolla,and his New Octet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Antonio Agri, violin
Jaime Gosis, piano
Kicho Díaz, bass
Oscar López Ruiz, electric guitar
José Bragato, cello
Leo Jacobson, percussion
Jorge Barone, flute
Alfredo Alcón, recitation

Adios nonino
Astor Piazzolla and his quintet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Dante Amicarelli, piano
Antonio Agri, violin
Oscar López Ruiz, guitar
Kicho Diaz, bass

Concierto para quinteto
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Fernando Suarez Paz, violin
Horacio Malvicino, electric guitar
Hector Console, bass

Producer: Johannah Smith, BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of tango legend Astor Piazzolla.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

02The secrets of tango20190319

Donald Macleod explores tango legend Astor Piazzolla’s colourful early years playing bandoneon in the tango bands of Buenos Aires

All his life he fought against the tide, and in the end, he was the victor. Born in 1921, Astor Piazzolla was a rebel with a cause. A virtuoso bandoneon player and a composer, he set out to break tango free from its roots, and make it a music with a future far beyond the dance halls and cafes of 1950s Buenos Aires. Hits like “Libertango” and collaborations with jazz giants like Gary Burton and Gerry Mulligan made his name beyond the tango world, while his classical compositions brought his instrument, the bandoneon, and him critical acclaim in the concert hall. The secret of his musical technique came, he said, from his studies with French pedagogue, Nadia Boulanger and Argentinian composer, Alberto Ginastera but there was a third teacher: Buenos Aires, the city which taught him the secrets of tango.

Across the week Donald Macleod traces Astor Piazzolla’s life through five formative locations, New York, Buenos Aires, Paris, Rome and Punta del Este, the coastal resort where he would spend the summer, relaxing and composing.

Piazzolla came to Buenos Aires as a teenager to join one the many tango orchestras, popular in the city during the 1950s. It wasn’t long before he was snapped up by one of the most famous outfits lead by Anibal Troilo and began to see the seamier side of café society.

Buenos Aires hora cera (Buenos Aires zero hour)
Astor Piazzolla and the new Tango Sextet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Gerardo Gandini, piano
Horacio Malvicino, guitar
Daniel Binelli, bandoneon
Carlos Nozzi, cello
Angel Ridolfi, bass

El desbande
arr. Piazzolla: A Bardi-M. Battistella: Tiernamente
arr. Piazzolla: A. Junnissi: El recodo
Aldo Campoamor, vocals
Astor Piazzolla and his Orchestra

Histoire du Tango for flute and guitar
Concert d’aujourd’hui.
Cécile Daroux, flute
Pablo Márquez, guitar

Balada para mi muerte
Amelita Baltar, vocal
Astor Piazzolla

Troileana Suite
Astor Piazzolla and his Orchestra

Sinfonía Buenos Aires, Op.15
Moderato – Allegretto
Daniel Binelli, bandoneon
Nashville Symphony Orchestra
Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor

Producer: Johannah Smith, BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores the links between tango legend Astor Piazzolla and Buenos Aires.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

03The great revelation20190320

Donald Macleod’s exploration of the life and music of Astor Piazzolla moves to Paris, where the tango legend finds his true musical voice.

All his life he fought against the tide, and in the end, he was the victor. Born in 1921, Astor Piazzolla was a rebel with a cause. A virtuoso bandoneon player and a composer, he set out to break tango free from its roots, and make it a music with a future far beyond the dance halls and cafes of 1950s Buenos Aires. Hits like “Libertango” and collaborations with jazz giants like Gary Burton and Gerry Mulligan made his name beyond the tango world, while his classical compositions brought his instrument, the bandoneon, and him critical acclaim in the concert hall. The secret of his musical technique came, he said, from his studies with French pedagogue, Nadia Boulanger and Argentinian composer, Alberto Ginastera but there was a third teacher: Buenos Aires, the city which taught him the secrets of tango.

Across the week Donald Macleod traces Astor Piazzolla’s life through five formative locations, New York, Buenos Aires, Paris, Rome and Punta del Este, the coastal resort where he would spend the summer, relaxing and composing.

Piazzolla moved to Paris in 1954 to study with one of the most renowned teachers of the age, Nadia Boulanger. Apart from receiving a through musical training, it was Boulanger’s insight that showed him where his future lay.

Otoño porteño
Richard Galliano, accordion
Jean Marc Phillips-Varjabédian, violin
Lyonel Schmit, second violin
Jean Marc Apap, violin, viola
Raphael Pidoux,, cello
Stéphane Logerot, bass
Hervé Sellin, piano

Two pieces for clarinet and string orchestra, Op.15
Contemplación. Lento-Tranquillo
Danza. Presto
Robert Bianciotto, clarinet
National Chamber Orchestra of Toulouse
Alain Moglia, conductor

Sinfonía Buenos Aires, Op.15
Lento, con anima
Daniel Binelli, bandoneon
Nashville Symphony Orchestra
Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor

Triunfal
Prepárense
Astor Piazzolla and his Quintet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Elvino Vardaro, violin
Jaime Gosis, piano
Kicho Diaz, bass
Oscar López Ruiz, electric guitar

Tangos, El Exilio de Gardel (excerpts from the original soundtrack)
Tanguedia I
Tanguedia II
Tanguedia III
Astor Piazzolla and his Quintet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Fernando Suarez Paz, violin
Oscar Lopez Ruiz, electric guitar
Hector Console, double bass

Mumuki
Gary Burton, vibraphone
Fernando Suarez-Paz, violin
Marcelo Nisinman, bandoneon
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Horacio Malvicino, guitar
Hector Console, bass

Producer: Johannah Smith, BBC Wales

Donald Macleod\u2019s exploration of tango legend Astor Piazzolla moves to Paris.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

04The Amelita Years20190321

Donald Macleod charts the ups and downs of Astor Piazzolla’s years in Rome, where a fresh new start didn’t quite turn out as he hoped.

All his life he fought against the tide, and in the end, he was the victor. Born in 1921, Astor Piazzolla was a rebel with a cause. A virtuoso bandoneon player and a composer, he set out to break tango free from its roots, and make it a music with a future far beyond the dance halls and cafes of 1950s Buenos Aires. Hits like “Libertango” and collaborations with jazz giants like Gary Burton and Gerry Mulligan made his name beyond the tango world, while his classical compositions brought his instrument, the bandoneon, and him critical acclaim in the concert hall. The secret of his musical technique came, he said, from his studies with French pedagogue, Nadia Boulanger and Argentinian composer, Alberto Ginastera but there was a third teacher: Buenos Aires, the city which taught him the secrets of tango.
Across the week Donald Macleod traces Astor Piazzolla’s life through five formative locations, New York, Buenos Aires, Paris, Rome and Punta del Este, the coastal resort where he would spend the summer, relaxing and composing.

A heart attack and the loss of funding for his band encouraged Piazzolla to seek new pastures. Together with his partner, the tango singer Amelita Baltar, he set up shop in the Eternal City. A new deal with an agent, and some interesting projects beckoned, yet Piazzolla would later describe these years as being full of bad memories.

Michelangelo 70
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Jaime Gosis, piano
Antonio Agri, violin
Hugo Baralis, violin
Victor Pontino, cello
Nestor Panik, viola
Kicho Diaz, double bass
Cacho Tirao, guitar
Arturo Schneider, flute
Josè Correale, percussion
Tito Bisio, vibraharp, xylophone, carillon

Amelitango
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Horacio Malvicino, electric guitar
Juan Carlos Cirigliano, piano
Alberto Cevasco, electric bass
Santiago Giacobbe, organ
Enrique Roizner, percussion
Daniel Piazzolla, synthesiser and percussion
Arturo Schneider, saxophone and flute

Maria de Buenos Aires (excerpt)
Scenes 4 to 6
Valentina Montoya Martínez, Maria
Juanjo Lopez Vidal, the Duende, narrator
Nicholas Mulroy, vocal, sleepy Buenos Aires sparrow
Mr. McFall’s Chamber
Victor Villena, musical director and bandoneón

Summit
Close your eyes and listen
Gerry Mulligan, baritone sax
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Angel “Pocho” Gatti, piano, organ
Tullio de Piscopo, drums
Giuseppe Prestipino, electric bass
Alberto Baldani, Gianni Zilioli, marimba
Filippo Dacco, Bruno de Fillippi, electric guitar
Ennio Miori, first cello

3 Movimientos Tanguisticos Portenos (1963)
Tango No. 1. Allegretto - Meno mosso e pesante
Württembergische Philharmonie Reutlingen
Gabriel Castagna, conductor

Tristezas de un Doble A
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Fernando Suárez Paz, violin
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Oscar López Ruiz, electric guitar
Héctor Console, bass

Producer: Johannah Smith, BBC Wales

Donald Macleod\u2019s survey of Astor Piazzolla follows the tango legend\u2019s rocky road to Rome.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

05Paradise at last20190322

Donald Macleod explores the significance of tango legend Astor Piazzolla’s summer retreat, a spot which proved to be both a source of inspiration and a bolthole for a world weary traveller.

All his life he fought against the tide, and in the end, he was the victor. Astor Piazzolla was a rebel with a cause. A virtuoso bandoneon player and a composer, he set out to break tango free from its roots, and make it a music with a future far beyond the dance halls and cafes of 1950s Buenos Aires. Hits like “Libertango” and collaborations with jazz giants like Gary Burton and Gerry Mulligan made his name beyond the tango world, while his classical compositions brought his instrument, the bandoneon critical acclaim in the concert hall. The secrets of musical technique came, he said, from his studies with French pedagogue, Nadia Boulanger and Argentinian composer, Alberto Ginastera but they also came from his teenage experiences in Buenos Aires, the city where had played bandoneon and arranged music for Anibal Troilo’s famous tango band.

Across the week Donald Macleod traces Astor Piazzolla’s life through five formative locations, New York, Buenos Aires, Paris, Rome and Punta del Este, all of which played an important part in shaping his music.

Bringing tango to an ever widening and appreciative audience, the constant touring began to take its toll on Piazzolla. The Uraguayan coastal resort of Punta del Este became the place where, in later years, he discovered he could compose and enjoy the fruits of this hard earned success.

Jeanne y Paul
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Antonio Agri, violin
Hugo Baralis, violin
Néstor Panik, viola
José Bragato, cello
Enrique “Kicho” Díaz, bass
Oscar López Ruiz, electric guitar
Osvaldo Tarantino, piano
José Correale, drums, percussion

Resurreccion del Angel
Isabelle van Keulen Ensemble
Isabelle van Keulen violin
Christian Gerber bandoneon
Ulrike Payer piano
Rüdiger Ludwig double bass

Concerto for Bandoneon, String Orchestra & Percussion
First movement: Allegro marcato
Daniel Binelli, bandoneon
Nashville Symphony Orchestra
Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor

Le Grand Tango
Alban Gerhardt, cello
Rina Dokshinsky, piano

La Camorra II
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Fernando Suarez Paz, violin
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Horacio Malvicino, guitar
Hector Console, bass

Five Tango Sensations
Asleep
Kronos Quartet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon

Libertango
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Fernando Suarez Paz, violin
Oscar Lopez Ruiz, guitar
Hector Console, bass

Producer: Johannah Smith, BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores the significance of tango legend Astor Piazzolla\u2019s summer retreat.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201901Adventures In The Big Apple20190318

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of bandoneon virtuoso and composer Astor Piazzolla, through five key locations, beginning in New York, the city in which he grew up.

All his life he fought against the tide, and in the end, he was the victor. Astor Piazzolla was a rebel with a cause. A virtuoso bandoneon player and a composer, he set out to break tango free from its roots, and make it a music with a future far beyond the dance halls and cafes of 1950s Buenos Aires. Hits like “Libertango” and collaborations with jazz giants like Gary Burton and Gerry Mulligan made his name beyond the tango world, while his classical compositions brought his instrument, the bandoneon critical acclaim in the concert hall. The secrets of musical technique came, he said, from his studies with French pedagogue, Nadia Boulanger and Argentinian composer, Alberto Ginastera but they also came from his teenage experiences in Buenos Aires, the city where had played bandoneon and arranged music for Anibal Troilo’s famous tango band.

Across the week Donald Macleod traces Astor Piazzolla’s life through the places which played an important part in his musical development: New York, Buenos Aires, Paris, Rome and the Uraguayan resort of Punta del Este.

Piazzolla’s links with tango begin in New York. Living there as a child, it’s where he encountered one of tangos greats, the singer Carlos Gardel and it’s where he was introduced to the instrument with which he conquered the world, the bandoneon.

Tanguedia
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Fernando Suarez Paz, violin
Horacio Malvicino, electric guitar
Hector Console, bass

Tres minutos con la Realidad
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Gerardo Gandini, piano
Horacio Malvicino, guitar
Daniel Binelli, bandoneon
José Bragato, cello
Hector Console, bass

Piano sonata no 1, Op 7
Allison Brewster Franzetti, piano

Sideral
Requiem para un Malandra
Astor Piazzolla,and his New Octet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Antonio Agri, violin
Jaime Gosis, piano
Kicho Díaz, bass
Oscar López Ruiz, electric guitar
José Bragato, cello
Leo Jacobson, percussion
Jorge Barone, flute
Alfredo Alcón, recitation

Adios nonino
Astor Piazzolla and his quintet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Dante Amicarelli, piano
Antonio Agri, violin
Oscar López Ruiz, guitar
Kicho Diaz, bass

Concierto para quinteto
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Fernando Suarez Paz, violin
Horacio Malvicino, electric guitar
Hector Console, bass

Producer: Johannah Smith, BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of tango legend Astor Piazzolla.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201902The Secrets Of Tango20190319

Donald Macleod explores tango legend Astor Piazzolla’s colourful early years playing bandoneon in the tango bands of Buenos Aires

All his life he fought against the tide, and in the end, he was the victor. Born in 1921, Astor Piazzolla was a rebel with a cause. A virtuoso bandoneon player and a composer, he set out to break tango free from its roots, and make it a music with a future far beyond the dance halls and cafes of 1950s Buenos Aires. Hits like “Libertango” and collaborations with jazz giants like Gary Burton and Gerry Mulligan made his name beyond the tango world, while his classical compositions brought his instrument, the bandoneon, and him critical acclaim in the concert hall. The secret of his musical technique came, he said, from his studies with French pedagogue, Nadia Boulanger and Argentinian composer, Alberto Ginastera but there was a third teacher: Buenos Aires, the city which taught him the secrets of tango.

Across the week Donald Macleod traces Astor Piazzolla’s life through five formative locations, New York, Buenos Aires, Paris, Rome and Punta del Este, the coastal resort where he would spend the summer, relaxing and composing.

Piazzolla came to Buenos Aires as a teenager to join one the many tango orchestras, popular in the city during the 1950s. It wasn’t long before he was snapped up by one of the most famous outfits lead by Anibal Troilo and began to see the seamier side of café society.

Buenos Aires hora cera (Buenos Aires zero hour)
Astor Piazzolla and the new Tango Sextet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Gerardo Gandini, piano
Horacio Malvicino, guitar
Daniel Binelli, bandoneon
Carlos Nozzi, cello
Angel Ridolfi, bass

El desbande
arr. Piazzolla: A Bardi-M. Battistella: Tiernamente
arr. Piazzolla: A. Junnissi: El recodo
Aldo Campoamor, vocals
Astor Piazzolla and his Orchestra

Histoire du Tango for flute and guitar
Concert d’aujourd’hui.
Cécile Daroux, flute
Pablo Márquez, guitar

Balada para mi muerte
Amelita Baltar, vocal
Astor Piazzolla

Troileana Suite
Astor Piazzolla and his Orchestra

Sinfonía Buenos Aires, Op.15
Moderato – Allegretto
Daniel Binelli, bandoneon
Nashville Symphony Orchestra
Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor

Producer: Johannah Smith, BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores the links between tango legend Astor Piazzolla and Buenos Aires.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201903The Great Revelation20190320

Donald Macleod’s exploration of the life and music of Astor Piazzolla moves to Paris, where the tango legend finds his true musical voice.

All his life he fought against the tide, and in the end, he was the victor. Born in 1921, Astor Piazzolla was a rebel with a cause. A virtuoso bandoneon player and a composer, he set out to break tango free from its roots, and make it a music with a future far beyond the dance halls and cafes of 1950s Buenos Aires. Hits like “Libertango” and collaborations with jazz giants like Gary Burton and Gerry Mulligan made his name beyond the tango world, while his classical compositions brought his instrument, the bandoneon, and him critical acclaim in the concert hall. The secret of his musical technique came, he said, from his studies with French pedagogue, Nadia Boulanger and Argentinian composer, Alberto Ginastera but there was a third teacher: Buenos Aires, the city which taught him the secrets of tango.

Across the week Donald Macleod traces Astor Piazzolla’s life through five formative locations, New York, Buenos Aires, Paris, Rome and Punta del Este, the coastal resort where he would spend the summer, relaxing and composing.

Piazzolla moved to Paris in 1954 to study with one of the most renowned teachers of the age, Nadia Boulanger. Apart from receiving a through musical training, it was Boulanger’s insight that showed him where his future lay.

Otoño porteño
Richard Galliano, accordion
Jean Marc Phillips-Varjabédian, violin
Lyonel Schmit, second violin
Jean Marc Apap, violin, viola
Raphael Pidoux,, cello
Stéphane Logerot, bass
Hervé Sellin, piano

Two pieces for clarinet and string orchestra, Op.15
Contemplación. Lento-Tranquillo
Danza. Presto
Robert Bianciotto, clarinet
National Chamber Orchestra of Toulouse
Alain Moglia, conductor

Sinfonía Buenos Aires, Op.15
Lento, con anima
Daniel Binelli, bandoneon
Nashville Symphony Orchestra
Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor

Triunfal
Prepárense
Astor Piazzolla and his Quintet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Elvino Vardaro, violin
Jaime Gosis, piano
Kicho Diaz, bass
Oscar López Ruiz, electric guitar

Tangos, El Exilio de Gardel (excerpts from the original soundtrack)
Tanguedia I
Tanguedia II
Tanguedia III
Astor Piazzolla and his Quintet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Fernando Suarez Paz, violin
Oscar Lopez Ruiz, electric guitar
Hector Console, double bass

Mumuki
Gary Burton, vibraphone
Fernando Suarez-Paz, violin
Marcelo Nisinman, bandoneon
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Horacio Malvicino, guitar
Hector Console, bass

Producer: Johannah Smith, BBC Wales

Donald Macleod\u2019s exploration of tango legend Astor Piazzolla moves to Paris.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201904The Amelita Years20190321

Donald Macleod charts the ups and downs of Astor Piazzolla’s years in Rome, where a fresh new start didn’t quite turn out as he hoped.

All his life he fought against the tide, and in the end, he was the victor. Born in 1921, Astor Piazzolla was a rebel with a cause. A virtuoso bandoneon player and a composer, he set out to break tango free from its roots, and make it a music with a future far beyond the dance halls and cafes of 1950s Buenos Aires. Hits like “Libertango” and collaborations with jazz giants like Gary Burton and Gerry Mulligan made his name beyond the tango world, while his classical compositions brought his instrument, the bandoneon, and him critical acclaim in the concert hall. The secret of his musical technique came, he said, from his studies with French pedagogue, Nadia Boulanger and Argentinian composer, Alberto Ginastera but there was a third teacher: Buenos Aires, the city which taught him the secrets of tango.
Across the week Donald Macleod traces Astor Piazzolla’s life through five formative locations, New York, Buenos Aires, Paris, Rome and Punta del Este, the coastal resort where he would spend the summer, relaxing and composing.

A heart attack and the loss of funding for his band encouraged Piazzolla to seek new pastures. Together with his partner, the tango singer Amelita Baltar, he set up shop in the Eternal City. A new deal with an agent, and some interesting projects beckoned, yet Piazzolla would later describe these years as being full of bad memories.

Michelangelo 70
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Jaime Gosis, piano
Antonio Agri, violin
Hugo Baralis, violin
Victor Pontino, cello
Nestor Panik, viola
Kicho Diaz, double bass
Cacho Tirao, guitar
Arturo Schneider, flute
Josè Correale, percussion
Tito Bisio, vibraharp, xylophone, carillon

Amelitango
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Horacio Malvicino, electric guitar
Juan Carlos Cirigliano, piano
Alberto Cevasco, electric bass
Santiago Giacobbe, organ
Enrique Roizner, percussion
Daniel Piazzolla, synthesiser and percussion
Arturo Schneider, saxophone and flute

Maria de Buenos Aires (excerpt)
Scenes 4 to 6
Valentina Montoya Martínez, Maria
Juanjo Lopez Vidal, the Duende, narrator
Nicholas Mulroy, vocal, sleepy Buenos Aires sparrow
Mr. McFall’s Chamber
Victor Villena, musical director and bandoneón

Summit
Close your eyes and listen
Gerry Mulligan, baritone sax
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Angel “Pocho” Gatti, piano, organ
Tullio de Piscopo, drums
Giuseppe Prestipino, electric bass
Alberto Baldani, Gianni Zilioli, marimba
Filippo Dacco, Bruno de Fillippi, electric guitar
Ennio Miori, first cello

3 Movimientos Tanguisticos Portenos (1963)
Tango No. 1. Allegretto - Meno mosso e pesante
Württembergische Philharmonie Reutlingen
Gabriel Castagna, conductor

Tristezas de un Doble A
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Fernando Suárez Paz, violin
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Oscar López Ruiz, electric guitar
Héctor Console, bass

Producer: Johannah Smith, BBC Wales

Donald Macleod\u2019s survey of Astor Piazzolla follows the tango legend\u2019s rocky road to Rome.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201905 LASTParadise At Last20190322

Donald Macleod explores the significance of tango legend Astor Piazzolla’s summer retreat, a spot which proved to be both a source of inspiration and a bolthole for a world weary traveller.

All his life he fought against the tide, and in the end, he was the victor. Astor Piazzolla was a rebel with a cause. A virtuoso bandoneon player and a composer, he set out to break tango free from its roots, and make it a music with a future far beyond the dance halls and cafes of 1950s Buenos Aires. Hits like “Libertango” and collaborations with jazz giants like Gary Burton and Gerry Mulligan made his name beyond the tango world, while his classical compositions brought his instrument, the bandoneon critical acclaim in the concert hall. The secrets of musical technique came, he said, from his studies with French pedagogue, Nadia Boulanger and Argentinian composer, Alberto Ginastera but they also came from his teenage experiences in Buenos Aires, the city where had played bandoneon and arranged music for Anibal Troilo’s famous tango band.

Across the week Donald Macleod traces Astor Piazzolla’s life through five formative locations, New York, Buenos Aires, Paris, Rome and Punta del Este, all of which played an important part in shaping his music.

Bringing tango to an ever widening and appreciative audience, the constant touring began to take its toll on Piazzolla. The Uraguayan coastal resort of Punta del Este became the place where, in later years, he discovered he could compose and enjoy the fruits of this hard earned success.

Jeanne y Paul
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Antonio Agri, violin
Hugo Baralis, violin
Néstor Panik, viola
José Bragato, cello
Enrique “Kicho” Díaz, bass
Oscar López Ruiz, electric guitar
Osvaldo Tarantino, piano
José Correale, drums, percussion

Resurreccion del Angel
Isabelle van Keulen Ensemble
Isabelle van Keulen violin
Christian Gerber bandoneon
Ulrike Payer piano
Rüdiger Ludwig double bass

Concerto for Bandoneon, String Orchestra & Percussion
First movement: Allegro marcato
Daniel Binelli, bandoneon
Nashville Symphony Orchestra
Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor

Le Grand Tango
Alban Gerhardt, cello
Rina Dokshinsky, piano

La Camorra II
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Fernando Suarez Paz, violin
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Horacio Malvicino, guitar
Hector Console, bass

Five Tango Sensations
Asleep
Kronos Quartet
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon

Libertango
Astor Piazzolla, bandoneon
Pablo Ziegler, piano
Fernando Suarez Paz, violin
Oscar Lopez Ruiz, guitar
Hector Console, bass

Producer: Johannah Smith, BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores the significance of tango legend Astor Piazzolla\u2019s summer retreat.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.