Barry Humphries' Forgotten Musical Masterpieces

Episodes

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Down Under20190331

With his turntable time machine spinning at a rate of 78 RPM, Barry Humphries once again refreshes parts other programmes cannot, or dare not, reach!
In this particular programme, Barry serves up an intriguing selection of Australian long-forgotten musical masterpieces. Song topics range from penal folk ballads to those celebrating the country's top attractions, legendary cricketers and explorers...

BARRY SAYS:
"I’ve only really fallen in love with Australia later in life. When I was young, it seemed, anything of any great worth lay overseas. I blame my parents, who often said things like, 'you’ll like the new school, Barry, there’s quite a lot of teachers there who have been overseas…' Back then, Australia seemed a very boring place. I was constantly hankering after something else. I didn’t know what, but I thought that it might be in this mysterious place which people called ‘overseas’".

Featured tracks include:
The Bridge We've Been Waiting For - written to commemorate the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1932, Our Don Bradman - written about Australia's best known Cricketer and Let's Take A Trip to Melbourne...

Barry Humphries presents some of his favourite Australian early 20th Century Sounds.

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his turntable time machine to transport listeners.

Everybody Dance20190324

In the 2nd programme in this 4-part series, Barry Humphries urges listeners to roll up the carpet and dust of their dancing shoes in anticipation of hearing the finest selection of Dance Classics from the first half of the 20th Century. The Nicholas Brothers, Fred Astaire, Florrie Ford, Victor Silvester, Danny Kaye are among the artists featured in this particular show. Barry takes a brief look at the history of Ballroom dancing and uncovers the origins of dances like the Grizzly Bear, the Turkey Trot and the Kangaroo Hop. Barry also recalls his own traumatic tales of childhood dancing lessons in a church hall in Melbourne given by Mr & Mrs Meyer during the 1940s...

BARRY SAYS:
"I find few tasks more agreeable than assembling a collection of my favourite songs, from the first half of the 20th century and playing them on the wireless. Relaxing and listening to music, is what I most love to do, and sharing my favourites with Radio 2 listeners is an added bonus."

Barry Humphries plays Dance Classics from the first half of the 20th Century.

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his turntable time machine to transport listeners.

Everybody Dance20190324

In the 2nd programme in this 4-part series, Barry Humphries urges listeners to roll up the carpet and dust of their dancing shoes in anticipation of hearing the finest selection of Dance Classics from the first half of the 20th Century. The Nicholas Brothers, Fred Astaire, Florrie Ford, Victor Silvester, Danny Kaye are among the artists featured in this particular show. Barry takes a brief look at the history of Ballroom dancing and uncovers the origins of dances like the Grizzly Bear, the Turkey Trot and the Kangaroo Hop. Barry also recalls his own traumatic tales of childhood dancing lessons in a church hall in Melbourne given by Mr & Mrs Meyer during the 1940s...

BARRY SAYS:
"I find few tasks more agreeable than assembling a collection of my favourite songs, from the first half of the 20th century and playing them on the wireless. Relaxing and listening to music, is what I most love to do, and sharing my favourites with Radio 2 listeners is an added bonus."

Barry Humphries plays Dance Classics from the first half of the 20th Century.

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his turntable time machine to transport listeners.

In the 2nd programme in this 4-part series, Barry Humphries urges listeners to roll up the carpet and dust of their dancing shoes in anticipation of hearing the finest selection of Dance Classics from the first half of the 20th Century. The Nicholas Brothers, Fred Astaire, Florrie Ford, Victor Silvester, Danny Kaye are among the artists featured in this particular show. Barry takes a brief look at the history of Ballroom dancing and uncovers the origins of dances like the Grizzly Bear, the Turkey Trot and the Kangaroo Hop. Barry also recalls his own traumatic tales of childhood dancing lessons in a church hall in Melbourne given by Mr & Mrs Meyer during the 1940s...

BARRY SAYS:
"I find few tasks more agreeable than assembling a collection of my favourite songs, from the first half of the 20th century and playing them on the wireless. Relaxing and listening to music, is what I most love to do, and sharing my favourites with Radio 2 listeners is an added bonus."

Barry Humphries plays Dance Classics from the first half of the 20th Century.

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his turntable time machine to transport listeners.

The Eyes of the World Are on You20190317

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his critically acclaimed vintage music series. In this particular programme, Barry offers musical therapy to distressed 21st Century souls on both sides of the Brexit debate. With his Turntable Time Machine spinning at 78 r.p.m., Barry transports listeners back to the sound of the early 20th Century with an exciting assortment of wonderfully quirky British and Continental songs.

BARRY SAYS:

“Through these programmes, I’m seeking to give new life to old songs - vintage tracks, which, in my opinion have been undeservedly cast aside, overlooked and forgotten. Many of the songs in these programmes, offer fascinating snapshots of social history and contain advice, which, should any of us choose to listen, is still of great value today. The first half of the 20th century saw great change and challenges, which were reflected upon by many songwriters.”

“Since I was last here at Radio 2, I’ve been hunting far and wide - in caves, caverns, cellars, as well as the odd county-house attic, rescuing 78 r.p.m. gems, so I can, once again, fill the nation’s ears with delight.”

This vintage music series presented by Barry Humphries refreshes parts others cannot, or dare not, reach!

Tracks in this programme include:
The Eyes of the World Are On You - Louis Levy & His Gaumont British Symphony, Breakaway - Jack Hylton, Rule Britannia A Travestry - Norman Long, Buy British - Clarkson Rose, The Continong & We're Riding the Tunnel to Gay Paris - North & South (Tommy Handley & Ronald Frankau), The Channel Swimmer - Horace Kenney, The Continental - Nat Gonella, The Cockney Amorist - Sir John Betjeman with music by Jim Parker... Plus, Barry uncovers the dark fictional plot of the Gershwins' 1927 musical Strike Up the Band which saw America at war with Switzerland over a trivial trade dispute.

Early 20th Century Sounds presented by Barry Humphries.

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his turntable time machine to transport listeners.

The Eyes Of The World Are On You20190317

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his critically acclaimed vintage music series. In this particular programme, Barry offers musical therapy to distressed 21st Century souls on both sides of the Brexit debate. With his Turntable Time Machine spinning at 78 r.p.m., Barry transports listeners back to the sound of the early 20th Century with an exciting assortment of wonderfully quirky British and Continental songs.

BARRY SAYS:

“Through these programmes, I’m seeking to give new life to old songs - vintage tracks, which, in my opinion have been undeservedly cast aside, overlooked and forgotten. Many of the songs in these programmes, offer fascinating snapshots of social history and contain advice, which, should any of us choose to listen, is still of great value today. The first half of the 20th century saw great change and challenges, which were reflected upon by many songwriters.”

“Since I was last here at Radio 2, I’ve been hunting far and wide - in caves, caverns, cellars, as well as the odd county-house attic, rescuing 78 r.p.m. gems, so I can, once again, fill the nation’s ears with delight.”

This vintage music series presented by Barry Humphries refreshes parts others cannot, or dare not, reach!

Tracks in this programme include:
The Eyes of the World Are On You - Louis Levy & His Gaumont British Symphony, Breakaway - Jack Hylton, Rule Britannia A Travestry - Norman Long, Buy British - Clarkson Rose, The Continong & We're Riding the Tunnel to Gay Paris - North & South (Tommy Handley & Ronald Frankau), The Channel Swimmer - Horace Kenney, The Continental - Nat Gonella, The Cockney Amorist - Sir John Betjeman with music by Jim Parker... Plus, Barry uncovers the dark fictional plot of the Gershwins' 1927 musical Strike Up the Band which saw America at war with Switzerland over a trivial trade dispute.

Early 20th Century Sounds presented by Barry Humphries.

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his turntable time machine to transport listeners.

The Sound of the Wind in the Willows20190407

In this final programme in the series, Barry Humphries recalls the soundtrack to his early life growing up in Melbourne, Australia during the 1930s & '40s. Barry's preferred childhood listening was Fraser Simpson's music for 'Toad of Toad Hall'. Barry says: "to this day, that music has a near-hypnotic effect on me. It is utterly charming. We didn't have a river-bank in Healsville, just outside of Melbourne, but we did have a creek and, in my mind, I somehow transplanted the setting of The Wind in the Willows to where I lived in Australia. The Wild Wood, where the stoats and the weasels lived, brought to my mind, the terrifying Australian Bush."

In the 1930s and '40s, inhabitants of Barry's home city of Melbourne were convinced they were living in a rather remote part of the English home counties. This was reflected in many ways, not least, in the music they listened to on the wireless or gramophone.

Musical delights on offer in this programme include:
'Just Like in a Story Book' - Layton and Johnstone, 'Other People's Babies' - Norah Howard, and the highly risqué 'I'm an Old Norman Castle' - Annette Mills, 'Everything Stops for Tea' - Jack Buchanan...

In the last programme in the series, Barry recalls his favourite childhood listening.

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his turntable time machine to transport listeners.

The Sound of the Wind in the Willows20190407

In this final programme in the series, Barry Humphries recalls the soundtrack to his early life growing up in Melbourne, Australia during the 1930s & '40s. Barry's preferred childhood listening was Fraser Simpson's music for 'Toad of Toad Hall'. Barry says: "to this day, that music has a near-hypnotic effect on me. It is utterly charming. We didn't have a river-bank in Healsville, just outside of Melbourne, but we did have a creek and, in my mind, I somehow transplanted the setting of The Wind in the Willows to where I lived in Australia. The Wild Wood, where the stoats and the weasels lived, brought to my mind, the terrifying Australian Bush."

In the 1930s and '40s, inhabitants of Barry's home city of Melbourne were convinced they were living in a rather remote part of the English home counties. This was reflected in many ways, not least, in the music they listened to on the wireless or gramophone.

Musical delights on offer in this programme include:
'Just Like in a Story Book' - Layton and Johnstone, 'Other People's Babies' - Norah Howard, and the highly risqué 'I'm an Old Norman Castle' - Annette Mills, 'Everything Stops for Tea' - Jack Buchanan...

In the last programme in the series, Barry recalls his favourite childhood listening.

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his turntable time machine to transport listeners.

In this final programme in the series, Barry Humphries recalls the soundtrack to his early life growing up in Melbourne, Australia during the 1930s & '40s. Barry's preferred childhood listening was Fraser Simpson's music for 'Toad of Toad Hall'. Barry says: "to this day, that music has a near-hypnotic effect on me. It is utterly charming. We didn't have a river-bank in Healsville, just outside of Melbourne, but we did have a creek and, in my mind, I somehow transplanted the setting of The Wind in the Willows to where I lived in Australia. The Wild Wood, where the stoats and the weasels lived, brought to my mind, the terrifying Australian Bush."

In the 1930s and '40s, inhabitants of Barry's home city of Melbourne were convinced they were living in a rather remote part of the English home counties. This was reflected in many ways, not least, in the music they listened to on the wireless or gramophone.

Musical delights on offer in this programme include:
'Just Like in a Story Book' - Layton and Johnstone, 'Other People's Babies' - Nora Howard, and the highly risqué 'I'm an Old Norman Castle' - Annette Mills, 'Everything Stops for Tea' - Jack Buchanan...

In the last programme in the series, Barry recalls his favourite childhood listening.

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his turntable time machine to transport listeners.

The Sound Of The Wind In The Willows20190407

In this final programme in the series, Barry Humphries recalls the soundtrack to his early life growing up in Melbourne, Australia during the 1930s & '40s. Barry's preferred childhood listening was Fraser Simpson's music for 'Toad of Toad Hall'. Barry says: "to this day, that music has a near-hypnotic effect on me. It is utterly charming. We didn't have a river-bank in Healsville, just outside of Melbourne, but we did have a creek and, in my mind, I somehow transplanted the setting of The Wind in the Willows to where I lived in Australia. The Wild Wood, where the stoats and the weasels lived, brought to my mind, the terrifying Australian Bush."

In the 1930s and '40s, inhabitants of Barry's home city of Melbourne were convinced they were living in a rather remote part of the English home counties. This was reflected in many ways, not least, in the music they listened to on the wireless or gramophone.

Musical delights on offer in this programme include:
'Just Like in a Story Book' - Layton and Johnstone, 'Other People's Babies' - Nora Howard, and the highly risqué 'I'm an Old Norman Castle' - Annette Mills, 'Everything Stops for Tea' - Jack Buchanan...

In the last programme in the series, Barry recalls his favourite childhood listening.

Barry Humphries returns to Radio 2 with his turntable time machine to transport listeners.