BBC Music On The World Service With Cerys Matthews

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Sir Tom Jones2016072620160726 (6M)Cerys Matthews takes listeners on a musical journey with the help of Sir Tom Jones.

The first in a week long series of programmes that were first broadcast on the BBC World Service.

Cerys Matthews takes listeners on a musical journey with the help of Sir Tom Jones, a charismatic, natural-born performer for whom ""singing is like breathing"". One of Wales' greatest ever cultural exports, he got his first record deal in 1964. And, he has been entertaining the world ever since, adapting as the musical landscape changed, and selling 100 million records along the way.

Beginning with his early days in Pontypridd, South Wales - long before he became a professional singer - Sir Tom remembers dancing along to the radio in his mother's arms and how his Uncle Snowy taught him how to overcome childhood shyness and become the compelling performer he was destined to be.

A huge music fan, Sir Tom also reveals the rich musical mix that has influenced his extensive body of work, from the Yiddish ballad loved by his father, to the exciting new Rock 'n' Roll music that turned his teenage world upside down. We also hear about some of the legendary musicians with whom he has ""let it rip"", from the peerless star of syncopation Jerry Lee Lewis, to a like-minded Dusty Springfield, and the King of Rock 'n' Roll Elvis Presley.

Cerys Matthews takes listeners on a musical journey with the help of Sir Tom Jones.

Cerys Matthews takes listeners on a musical journey with the help of Sir Tom Jones, a charismatic, natural-born performer for whom """"singing is like breathing"""". One of Wales' greatest ever cultural exports, he got his first record deal in 1964. And, he has been entertaining the world ever since, adapting as the musical landscape changed, and selling 100 million records along the way.

A huge music fan, Sir Tom also reveals the rich musical mix that has influenced his extensive body of work, from the Yiddish ballad loved by his father, to the exciting new Rock 'n' Roll music that turned his teenage world upside down. We also hear about some of the legendary musicians with whom he has """"let it rip"""", from the peerless star of syncopation Jerry Lee Lewis, to a like-minded Dusty Springfield, and the King of Rock 'n' Roll Elvis Presley.

The first in a week long series of programmes that were first broadcast on the BBC World Service.

Cerys Matthews takes listeners on a musical journey with the help of Sir Tom Jones, a charismatic, natural-born performer for whom ""singing is like breathing"". One of Wales' greatest ever cultural exports, he got his first record deal in 1964. And, he has been entertaining the world ever since, adapting as the musical landscape changed, and selling 100 million records along the way.

Beginning with his early days in Pontypridd, South Wales - long before he became a professional singer - Sir Tom remembers dancing along to the radio in his mother's arms and how his Uncle Snowy taught him how to overcome childhood shyness and become the compelling performer he was destined to be.

A huge music fan, Sir Tom also reveals the rich musical mix that has influenced his extensive body of work, from the Yiddish ballad loved by his father, to the exciting new Rock 'n' Roll music that turned his teenage world upside down. We also hear about some of the legendary musicians with whom he has ""let it rip"", from the peerless star of syncopation Jerry Lee Lewis, to a like-minded Dusty Springfield, and the King of Rock 'n' Roll Elvis Presley.

Cerys Matthews takes listeners on a musical journey with the help of Sir Tom Jones.

The first in a week long series of programmes that were first broadcast on the BBC World Service.

Cerys Matthews takes listeners on a musical journey with the help of Sir Tom Jones, a charismatic, natural-born performer for whom ""singing is like breathing"". One of Wales' greatest ever cultural exports, he got his first record deal in 1964. And, he has been entertaining the world ever since, adapting as the musical landscape changed, and selling 100 million records along the way.

Beginning with his early days in Pontypridd, South Wales - long before he became a professional singer - Sir Tom remembers dancing along to the radio in his mother's arms and how his Uncle Snowy taught him how to overcome childhood shyness and become the compelling performer he was destined to be.

A huge music fan, Sir Tom also reveals the rich musical mix that has influenced his extensive body of work, from the Yiddish ballad loved by his father, to the exciting new Rock 'n' Roll music that turned his teenage world upside down. We also hear about some of the legendary musicians with whom he has ""let it rip"", from the peerless star of syncopation Jerry Lee Lewis, to a like-minded Dusty Springfield, and the King of Rock 'n' Roll Elvis Presley.

Cerys Matthews takes listeners on a musical journey with the help of Sir Tom Jones.

The first in a week long series of programmes that were first broadcast on the BBC World Service.

Cerys Matthews takes listeners on a musical journey with the help of Sir Tom Jones, a charismatic, natural-born performer for whom ""singing is like breathing"". One of Wales' greatest ever cultural exports, he got his first record deal in 1964. And, he has been entertaining the world ever since, adapting as the musical landscape changed, and selling 100 million records along the way.

Beginning with his early days in Pontypridd, South Wales - long before he became a professional singer - Sir Tom remembers dancing along to the radio in his mother's arms and how his Uncle Snowy taught him how to overcome childhood shyness and become the compelling performer he was destined to be.

A huge music fan, Sir Tom also reveals the rich musical mix that has influenced his extensive body of work, from the Yiddish ballad loved by his father, to the exciting new Rock 'n' Roll music that turned his teenage world upside down. We also hear about some of the legendary musicians with whom he has ""let it rip"", from the peerless star of syncopation Jerry Lee Lewis, to a like-minded Dusty Springfield, and the King of Rock 'n' Roll Elvis Presley.

Cerys Matthews takes listeners on a musical journey with the help of Sir Tom Jones.

A series of programmes first broadcast on the BBC World Service.

03Mulatu Astatke2016072820160728 (6M)Cerys Matthews talks to musician, composer and cultural ambassador Mulatu Astatke.

As part of 6 music's celebration of World Music and the WOMAD festival listeners have chance to hear a series of shows first broadcast on the World Service.

In this show Cerys is in conversation with musical legend Mulatu Astatke, a multi-instrumentalist, composer and cultural ambassador who, in his 70s, is still busy touring and sharing his funky vibes with the world.

Born in the western Ethiopian city of Jimma in 1943, Mulatu was all set for a career in engineering when he headed to college in North Wales. But he quickly discovered a natural aptitude for music that would lead to further studies in London, Boston.

Mulatu's music is firmly rooted in his native Ethiopia. But, fiercely intellectual and creative, he's travelled the world to further his musical education. Along the way, he's picked up new instruments, soaked up different rhythms and sounds, and created his own musical Ethio-Jazz.

Mulatu talks to Cerys about switching from science to music; how he learned to combine traditional Ethiopian music with American jazz and Latin rhythms; and performing with his hero Duke Ellington.

With music from Mulatu himself. plus Dave Pike, Nas and Damien Marley, Frank Holder, Duke Ellington and more.

Cerys Matthews talks to musician, composer and cultural ambassador Mulatu Astatke.

As part of 6 music's celebration of World Music and the WOMAD festival listeners have chance to hear a series of shows first broadcast on the World Service.

In this show Cerys is in conversation with musical legend Mulatu Astatke, a multi-instrumentalist, composer and cultural ambassador who, in his 70s, is still busy touring and sharing his funky vibes with the world.

Born in the western Ethiopian city of Jimma in 1943, Mulatu was all set for a career in engineering when he headed to college in North Wales. But he quickly discovered a natural aptitude for music that would lead to further studies in London, Boston.

Mulatu's music is firmly rooted in his native Ethiopia. But, fiercely intellectual and creative, he's travelled the world to further his musical education. Along the way, he's picked up new instruments, soaked up different rhythms and sounds, and created his own musical Ethio-Jazz.

Mulatu talks to Cerys about switching from science to music; how he learned to combine traditional Ethiopian music with American jazz and Latin rhythms; and performing with his hero Duke Ellington.

With music from Mulatu himself. plus Dave Pike, Nas & Damien Marley, Frank Holder, Duke Ellington and more.

Cerys Matthews talks to musician, composer and cultural ambassador Mulatu Astatke.

As part of 6 music's celebration of World Music and the WOMAD festival listeners have chance to hear a series of shows first broadcast on the World Service.

In this show Cerys is in conversation with musical legend Mulatu Astatke, a multi-instrumentalist, composer and cultural ambassador who, in his 70s, is still busy touring and sharing his funky vibes with the world.

Born in the western Ethiopian city of Jimma in 1943, Mulatu was all set for a career in engineering when he headed to college in North Wales. But he quickly discovered a natural aptitude for music that would lead to further studies in London, Boston.

Mulatu's music is firmly rooted in his native Ethiopia. But, fiercely intellectual and creative, he's travelled the world to further his musical education. Along the way, he's picked up new instruments, soaked up different rhythms and sounds, and created his own musical Ethio-Jazz.

Mulatu talks to Cerys about switching from science to music; how he learned to combine traditional Ethiopian music with American jazz and Latin rhythms; and performing with his hero Duke Ellington.

With music from Mulatu himself. plus Dave Pike, Nas and Damien Marley, Frank Holder, Duke Ellington and more.

With music from Mulatu himself. plus Dave Pike, Nas & Damien Marley, Frank Holder, Duke Ellington and more.

Cerys Matthews talks to musician, composer and cultural ambassador Mulatu Astatke.

A series of programmes first broadcast on the BBC World Service.

04Peggy Seeger20160729Cerys Matthews celebrates the career of Peggy Seeger.

In a programme first broadcast on the BBC World Service Cerys Matthews talks to one of the most influential figures in modern folk music, Peggy Seeger.

Whilst travelling around the world in her 20s, Peggy Seeger received a phone call from the folk song collector Alan Lomax, who was in London and needed a banjo player. She eventually settled in London, where she met Ewan MacColl, a future musical partner, collaborator, and husband.

They performed together, organised regular club nights, branched into political theatre and activism, and created the Radio Ballads for BBC Radio, an innovative project that used real voices to tell stories about the working class British.

Since then Peggy has made over 20 solo records and contributed to more than one hundred recordings with other performers. In her 80th year, these energetic endeavours continue apace. In 2015 she won a prestigious BBC Radio 2 Folk Award for Swim To The Star, an original song about the sinking of the Titanic. That same year, she helped mark the centenary of Ewan MacColl's birth, and between gigs and lectures, she has somehow found time to write her memoirs.

Amongst the incredible stories, we hear some of Peggy's own compositions, as well as recordings from Ewan MacColl and those of her brother Pete.

Cerys Matthews celebrates the career of Peggy Seeger.

In a programme first broadcast on the BBC World Service Cerys Matthews talks to one of the most influential figures in modern folk music, Peggy Seeger.

Whilst travelling around the world in her 20s, Peggy Seeger received a phone call from the folk song collector Alan Lomax, who was in London and needed a banjo player. She eventually settled in London, where she met Ewan MacColl, a future musical partner, collaborator, and husband.

They performed together, organised regular club nights, branched into political theatre and activism, and created the Radio Ballads for BBC Radio, an innovative project that used real voices to tell stories about the working class British.

Since then Peggy has made over 20 solo records and contributed to more than one hundred recordings with other performers. In her 80th year, these energetic endeavours continue apace. In 2015 she won a prestigious BBC Radio 2 Folk Award for Swim To The Star, an original song about the sinking of the Titanic. That same year, she helped mark the centenary of Ewan MacColl's birth, and between gigs and lectures, she has somehow found time to write her memoirs.

Amongst the incredible stories, we hear some of Peggy's own compositions, as well as recordings from Ewan MacColl and those of her brother Pete.

04Peggy Seeger2016080420160729 (6M)Cerys Matthews celebrates the career of Peggy Seeger.

A series of programmes first broadcast on the BBC World Service.