BBC National Short Story Award 2019 [BBC National Short Story Award]

Episodes

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Broadcast
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Ghillie's Mum by Lynda Clark20190913

In Lynda Clark's fable like story a boy becomes a man in a family of shape-shifters where issues of intolerance are never out of view. The reader is Stephen Campbell Moore.

Now in its fourteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday, 6th September, the five stories in contention for the 2019 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 9th September. To find out who wins this year, listeners should tune into Front Row on Tuesday, 1st October where the hotly anticipated announcement will be made live from the BBC Radio Theatre.

The shortlisted entries for this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University are an eclectic mix, spanning a breadth of themes and topics; from confronting modern social and cultural issues to the contemporary and the political, and then onto the fantastical and escapist. Rich in variety the stories are united in their quest for empathy and understanding in an increasingly intolerant world.

Produced by Elizabeth Allard

Lynda Clark's fable like story about shape-shifting and intolerance.

Stories shortlisted for the National Short Story Award

Ghillie's Mum By Lynda Clark20190913

In Lynda Clark's fable like story a boy becomes a man in a family of shape-shifters where issues of intolerance are never out of view. The reader is Stephen Campbell Moore.

Now in its fourteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday, 6th September, the five stories in contention for the 2019 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 9th September. To find out who wins this year, listeners should tune into Front Row on Tuesday, 1st October where the hotly anticipated announcement will be made live from the BBC Radio Theatre.

The shortlisted entries for this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University are an eclectic mix, spanning a breadth of themes and topics; from confronting modern social and cultural issues to the contemporary and the political, and then onto the fantastical and escapist. Rich in variety the stories are united in their quest for empathy and understanding in an increasingly intolerant world.

Produced by Elizabeth Allard

Lynda Clark's fable like story about shape-shifting and intolerance.

Stories shortlisted for the National Short Story Award

My Beautiful Millennial by Tamsin Grey20190911

Tamsin Grey's shortlisted story about loneliness in a big city. Dido regrets a rash choice she made in an attempt to feel at home in London. She imagines a fate worse than death awaiting her, until a chance encounter with a pigeon offers a glimmer of hope.

Now in its fourteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday, 6th September, the five stories in contention for the 2019 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 9th September. To find out who wins this year, listeners should tune into Front Row on Tuesday, 1st October where the hotly anticipated announcement will be made live from the BBC Radio Theatre.

The shortlisted entries for this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University are an eclectic mix, spanning a breadth of themes and topics; from confronting modern social and cultural issues to the contemporary and the political, and then onto the fantastical and escapist. Rich in variety the stories are united in their quest for empathy and understanding in an increasingly intolerant world.

Abridged by Rowan Routh
Produced by Gemma Jenkins.

Tamsin Grey's story about isolation in a big city and a fateful encounter with a pigeon.

Stories shortlisted for the National Short Story Award

My Beautiful Millennial By Tamsin Grey20190911

Tamsin Grey's shortlisted story about loneliness in a big city. Dido regrets a rash choice she made in an attempt to feel at home in London. She imagines a fate worse than death awaiting her, until a chance encounter with a pigeon offers a glimmer of hope.

Now in its fourteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday, 6th September, the five stories in contention for the 2019 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 9th September. To find out who wins this year, listeners should tune into Front Row on Tuesday, 1st October where the hotly anticipated announcement will be made live from the BBC Radio Theatre.

The shortlisted entries for this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University are an eclectic mix, spanning a breadth of themes and topics; from confronting modern social and cultural issues to the contemporary and the political, and then onto the fantastical and escapist. Rich in variety the stories are united in their quest for empathy and understanding in an increasingly intolerant world.

Abridged by Rowan Routh
Produced by Gemma Jenkins.

Tamsin Grey's story about isolation in a big city and a fateful encounter with a pigeon.

Stories shortlisted for the National Short Story Award

Silver Fish in the Midnight Sea by Jacqueline Crooks20190909

Tamara Lawrance reads Jacqueline Crooks’ shortlisted story. A young family struggles to find its place in a haunting tale about migration and the fear of not belonging. A long hot summer stretches out before three children, each yearns to break free from the back garden but only one dares to cross the line.

Now in its fourteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday, 6th September, the five stories in contention for the 2019 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 9th September. To find out who wins this year, listeners should tune into Front Row on Tuesday, 1st October where the hotly anticipated announcement will be made live from the BBC Radio Theatre.

The shortlisted entries for this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University are an eclectic mix, spanning a breadth of themes and topics; from confronting modern social and cultural issues to the contemporary and the political, and then onto the fantastical and escapist. Rich in variety the stories are united in their quest for empathy and understanding in an increasingly intolerant world.

Produced by Gemma Jenkins

Jacqueline Crooks' haunting tale of migration and wanting to belong.

Stories shortlisted for the National Short Story Award

Silver Fish in the Midnight Sea by Jacqueline Crooks20190909

Tamara Lawrance reads Jacqueline Crooks’ shortlisted story. A young family struggles to find its place in a haunting tale about migration and the fear of not belonging. A long hot summer stretches out before three children, each yearns to break free from the back garden but only one dares to cross the line.

Now in its fourteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday, 6th September, the five stories in contention for the 2019 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 9th September. To find out who wins this year, listeners should tune into Front Row on Tuesday, 1st October where the hotly anticipated announcement will be made live from the BBC Radio Theatre.

The shortlisted entries for this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University are an eclectic mix, spanning a breadth of themes and topics; from confronting modern social and cultural issues to the contemporary and the political, and then onto the fantastical and escapist. Rich in variety the stories are united in their quest for empathy and understanding in an increasingly intolerant world.

Produced by Gemma Jenkins

Jacqueline Crooks' haunting tale of migration and wanting to belong.

Stories shortlisted for the National Short Story Award

The Children by Lucy Caldwell20190910

In Lucy Caldwell’s powerful story where past and present collide and reflections on motherhood and loss lead to disquieting parallels between the story of nineteenth century writer and activist, Caroline Norton, and the present day plight of immigrant families on the border between the US and Mexico. The reader is Jessica Raine.

Now in its fourteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday, 6th September, the five stories in contention for the 2019 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 9th September. To find out who wins this year, listeners should tune into Front Row on Tuesday, 1st October where the hotly anticipated announcement will be made live from the BBC Radio Theatre.

The shortlisted entries for this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University are an eclectic mix, spanning a breadth of themes and topics; from confronting modern social and cultural issues to the contemporary and the political, and then onto the fantastical and escapist. Rich in variety the stories are united in their quest for empathy and understanding in an increasingly intolerant world.

Abridged and produced by Elizabeth Allard

Lucy Caldwell\u2019s powerful story about motherhood and loss.

Stories shortlisted for the National Short Story Award

The Children By Lucy Caldwell20190910

In Lucy Caldwell’s powerful story where past and present collide and reflections on motherhood and loss lead to disquieting parallels between the story of nineteenth century writer and activist, Caroline Norton, and the present day plight of immigrant families on the border between the US and Mexico. The reader is Jessica Raine.

Now in its fourteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday, 6th September, the five stories in contention for the 2019 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 9th September. To find out who wins this year, listeners should tune into Front Row on Tuesday, 1st October where the hotly anticipated announcement will be made live from the BBC Radio Theatre.

The shortlisted entries for this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University are an eclectic mix, spanning a breadth of themes and topics; from confronting modern social and cultural issues to the contemporary and the political, and then onto the fantastical and escapist. Rich in variety the stories are united in their quest for empathy and understanding in an increasingly intolerant world.

Abridged and produced by Elizabeth Allard

Lucy Caldwell's powerful story about motherhood and loss.

Stories shortlisted for the National Short Story Award

The Invisible by Jo Lloyd20190912

Aimee-Ffion Edwards reads Jo Lloyd's shortlisted story. A remote Welsh community hovers on the brink of poverty in this hypnotic tale about the fantasies people embrace to make life bearable and what happens when the cracks begin to show in the carefully constructed illusion they’ve created.

Now in its fourteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday, 6th September, the five stories in contention for the 2019 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 9th September. To find out who wins this year, listeners should tune into Front Row on Tuesday, 1st October where the hotly anticipated announcement will be made live from the BBC Radio Theatre.

The shortlisted entries for this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University are an eclectic mix, spanning a breadth of themes and topics; from confronting modern social and cultural issues to the contemporary and the political, and then onto the fantastical and escapist. Rich in variety the stories are united in their quest for empathy and understanding in an increasingly intolerant world.

Abridged by Rowan Routh
Produced by Gemma Jenkins

Jo Lloyd's hypnotic tale about the fantasies people embrace to make life bearable.

Stories shortlisted for the National Short Story Award

The Invisible by Jo Lloyd20190912

Aimee-Ffion Edwards reads Jo Lloyd's shortlisted story. A remote Welsh community hovers on the brink of poverty in this hypnotic tale about the fantasies people embrace to make life bearable and what happens when the cracks begin to show in the carefully constructed illusion they’ve created.

Now in its fourteenth year, the BBC National Short Story Award is one of the most prestigious for a single short story. Following the announcement of the shortlist on Radio 4's Front Row, on Friday, 6th September, the five stories in contention for the 2019 award will be broadcast each weekday afternoon on Radio 4 at half past three from Monday, 9th September. To find out who wins this year, listeners should tune into Front Row on Tuesday, 1st October where the hotly anticipated announcement will be made live from the BBC Radio Theatre.

The shortlisted entries for this year's BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University are an eclectic mix, spanning a breadth of themes and topics; from confronting modern social and cultural issues to the contemporary and the political, and then onto the fantastical and escapist. Rich in variety the stories are united in their quest for empathy and understanding in an increasingly intolerant world.

Abridged by Rowan Routh
Produced by Gemma Jenkins

Jo Lloyd's hypnotic tale about the fantasies people embrace to make life bearable.

Stories shortlisted for the National Short Story Award