BBC National Short Story Award - BBC National Short Story Award 2016

Episodes

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Role Contributor
AuthorClaire-Louise Bennett
ReaderVanessa Kirby
AbridgerSally Marmion
ProducerElizabeth Allard
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"Morning, Noon and Night"20170913 (BBC7)

"By Claire-Louise Bennett. The rhythms of the everyday lead a young woman to sanctuary.

Announced as runner-up, Claire-Louise Bennett's story the rhythms of the everyday lead a young woman to solace and sanctuary. Read by Vanessa Kirby.

Claire-Louise Bennett was born in Wiltshire but now lives in Galway. Her first book, Pond was published in 2015 and has been translated into Spanish, Dutch and Norwegian. It was recently shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize. Claire-Louise's stories and essays have appeared in The White Review, Guernica, The Irish Times, gorse, and Paper Visual Art Journal, among others. This year she has produced art writing for Temple Bar Gallery & Studios, Nottingham Contemporary, the Tate, and 126 Artist-Led Gallery.

The five shortlisted stories for the BBC National Short Story Award 2016 comprised a mix of established and new writers of this most inventive and imaginative of genres. Human connection, the desire for it, and what happens when it falls away are at the heart of this year's shortlist, which takes us across the globe and the generations, shining a light on the intimate inner lives of each story's protagonist.

The winner and the runner up were announced on Tuesday 4th October 2016

Abridged by Sally Marmion
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

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Disappearances20170915 (BBC7)

"By KJ Orr. Reinvention and disguise offer a retired professional another way to be.

KJ Orr's winning story. Reinvention and disguise offer a retired professional another way to be. Read by David Horovitch.

KJ Orr was born, and lives, in London. Light Box, her first collection of short stories, was published in February 2016. Her stories have appeared in publications including Best British Short Stories 2015, the Irish Times, the Dublin Review, the White Review and the Sunday Times Magazine, and have been recognised by numerous awards including the BBC National Short Story Award and the Bridport Prize. K J Orr was previously shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award with BookTrust in 2011.

The five shortlisted stories for the BBC National Short Story Award 2016 comprised a mix of established and new writers of this most inventive and imaginative of genres. Human connection, the desire for it, and what happens when it falls away are at the heart of this year's shortlist, which takes us across the globe and the generations, shining a light on the intimate inner lives of each story's protagonist.

KJ Orr's Disappearances was announced as the winner on Tuesday 4th October 2016

Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

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Garments20170912 (BBC7)

"By Tahmima Anam. An impoverished woman pays a high price for seeking a better life.

Tahmima Anam's shortlisted tale of an impoverished woman paying a high price for seeking a better life. Read by Ayesha Dharker.

Tahmima Anam was born in Dhaka, Bangladesh, educated at Mount Holyoke College and Harvard University and now lives in Hackney, London. An anthropologist and novelist, her debut novel, A Golden Age, was winner of the 2008 Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best First Book. In 2013, she was named one of Granta's Best Young British Novelists. She is a Contributing Opinion Writer for The New York Times and a judge for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize.

The five shortlisted stories for the BBC National Short Story Award 2016 comprised a mix of established and new writers of this most inventive and imaginative of genres. Human connection, the desire for it, and what happens when it falls away are at the heart of this year's shortlist, which takes us across the globe and the generations, shining a light on the intimate inner lives of each story's protagonist.

The winner and the runner up were announced on Tuesday 4th October 2016

Abridged by Sally Marmion
Produced by Julian Wilkinson.

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In a Right State20170911 (BBC7)

"By Hilary Mantel. Comic tale full of unlikely memories, lost lives and the odd bad joke.

Hilary Mantel's shortlisted comic story is filled with unlikely memories, lost lives and the odd bad joke. Read by Miriam Margolyes.

Hilary Mantel was born in Derbyshire, educated at a Cheshire convent and now lives in Devon. She graduated in law in 1973 and was briefly a hospital social worker, and later a teacher in Africa and the Middle East. She has been a full-time writer since the mid-1980s, reviewing books and films and producing contemporary and historical fiction. She has won two Man Booker prizes, the Costa Book of the Year Award and the Walter Scott Prize (among others). In 2015 she received a joint Tony nomination for the Broadway version of Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies. Hilary Mantel was previously shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award with BookTrust in 2015.

The five shortlisted stories for the BBC National Short Story Award 2016 comprised a mix of established and new writers of this most inventive and imaginative of genres. Human connection, the desire for it, and what happens when it falls away are at the heart of this year's shortlist, which takes us across the globe and the generations, shining a light on the intimate inner lives of each story's protagonist.

The winner and the runner up were announced on Tuesday 4th October 2016

Produced by Julian Wilkinson.

"

The Darkest Place in England20170914 (BBC7)

"By Lavinia Greenlaw. A teenage girl on a deep dark moor is drawn into a different darkness

Lavinia Greenlaw's shortlisted tale. A teenage girl on a dark moor is drawn into a different darkness. Read by Kate O'Flynn.

Lavinia Greenlaw was born, and still lives, in London. She has published five collections of poetry, most recently A Double Sorrow: Troilus and Criseyde. Her other works include two novels and the memoir, The Importance of Music to Girls. Audio Obscura, her immersive soundwork for Artangel/Manchester International Festival won the 2011 Ted Hughes Award. She has also completed her first short film, The Sea is an Edge and an Ending, a study of the impact of dementia on our sense of time and place, drawing on Shakespeare's Tempest. Her work for radio includes documentaries about vision and light, she has also written and directed several radio dramas. Lavinia Greenlaw was previously shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award with BookTrust in 2013.

The five shortlisted stories for the BBC National Short Story Award 2016 comprised a mix of established and new writers of this most inventive and imaginative of genres. Human connection, the desire for it, and what happens when it falls away are at the heart of this year's shortlist, which takes us across the globe and the generations, shining a light on the intimate inner lives of each story's protagonist.

The winner and the runner up were announced on Tuesday 4th October 2016

Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

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