BBC Proms 2018 [BBC Proms 2018 On The World Service] [World Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Forty Years Of Bbc Young Musician2018072820180729 (WS)

Nicola Benedetti with Ravel's Tzigane, celebrating 40 years of BBC Young Musician

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

The BBC World Service’s coverage of this year’s BBC Proms opens with a concert celebrating 40 years of BBC Young Musician, a national competition spotlighting some of the best young classical musicians in Britain.

It starts with four former winners of the competition, Natalie Clein, Guy Johnston, Sheku Kanneh-Mason and Laura van der Hijden performing an arrangement for 4 cellos and orchestra of ‘Violoncellos, vibrez!’, by the Italian composer Giovanni Sollima. Next, another former winner and international star, the Scottish violinist Nicola Benedetti, with Maurice Ravel’s ‘Tzigane’, a virtuoso showcase for the soloist, inspired by gypsy music. Closing the concert is one of the French composer Camille Saint-Saens’ most beloved pieces, written in 1886: ‘The Carnival of the Animals’, short individual humorous portraits of the best known ‘characters’ from the natural kingdom, from which we hear a selection. The concert is performed by the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Andrew Gourlay.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by pianist Lucy Parham, the keyboard category winner of BBC Young Musician back in 1984.

Photo: Violinist Nicola Benedetti with the BBC Concert Orchestra Credit: Chris Christodoulou

Nicola Benedetti with Ravel's Tzigane, celebrating 40 years of BBC Young Musician

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

The BBC World Service’s coverage of this year’s BBC Proms opens with a concert celebrating 40 years of BBC Young Musician, a national competition spotlighting some of the best young classical musicians in Britain.

It starts with four former winners of the competition, Natalie Clein, Guy Johnston, Sheku Kanneh-Mason and Laura van der Hijden performing an arrangement for 4 cellos and orchestra of ‘Violoncellos, vibrez!’, by the Italian composer Giovanni Sollima. Next, another former winner and international star, the Scottish violinist Nicola Benedetti, with Maurice Ravel’s ‘Tzigane’, a virtuoso showcase for the soloist, inspired by gypsy music. Closing the concert is one of the French composer Camille Saint-Saens’ most beloved pieces, written in 1886: ‘The Carnival of the Animals’, short individual humorous portraits of the best known ‘characters’ from the natural kingdom, from which we hear a selection. The concert is performed by the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Andrew Gourlay.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by pianist Lucy Parham, the keyboard category winner of BBC Young Musician back in 1984.

Photo: Violinist Nicola Benedetti with the BBC Concert Orchestra Credit: Chris Christodoulou

Nicola Benedetti with Ravel's Tzigane, celebrating 40 years of BBC Young Musician

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

The BBC World Service’s coverage of this year’s BBC Proms opens with a concert celebrating 40 years of BBC Young Musician, a national competition spotlighting some of the best young classical musicians in Britain.

It starts with four former winners of the competition, Natalie Clein, Guy Johnston, Sheku Kanneh-Mason and Laura van der Hijden performing an arrangement for 4 cellos and orchestra of ‘Violoncellos, vibrez!’, by the Italian composer Giovanni Sollima. Next, another former winner and international star, the Scottish violinist Nicola Benedetti, with Maurice Ravel’s ‘Tzigane’, a virtuoso showcase for the soloist, inspired by gypsy music. Closing the concert is one of the French composer Camille Saint-Saens’ most beloved pieces, written in 1886: ‘The Carnival of the Animals’, short individual humorous portraits of the best known ‘characters’ from the natural kingdom, from which we hear a selection. The concert is performed by the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Andrew Gourlay.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by pianist Lucy Parham, the keyboard category winner of BBC Young Musician back in 1984.

Photo: Violinist Nicola Benedetti with the BBC Concert Orchestra Credit: Chris Christodoulou

Nicola Benedetti with Ravel's Tzigane, celebrating 40 years of BBC Young Musician

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

The BBC World Service’s coverage of this year’s BBC Proms opens with a concert celebrating 40 years of BBC Young Musician, a national competition spotlighting some of the best young classical musicians in Britain.

It starts with four former winners of the competition, Natalie Clein, Guy Johnston, Sheku Kanneh-Mason and Laura van der Hijden performing an arrangement for 4 cellos and orchestra of ‘Violoncellos, vibrez!’, by the Italian composer Giovanni Sollima. Next, another former winner and international star, the Scottish violinist Nicola Benedetti, with Maurice Ravel’s ‘Tzigane’, a virtuoso showcase for the soloist, inspired by gypsy music. Closing the concert is one of the French composer Camille Saint-Saens’ most beloved pieces, written in 1886: ‘The Carnival of the Animals’, short individual humorous portraits of the best known ‘characters’ from the natural kingdom, from which we hear a selection. The concert is performed by the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Andrew Gourlay.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by pianist Lucy Parham, the keyboard category winner of BBC Young Musician back in 1984.

Photo: Violinist Nicola Benedetti with the BBC Concert Orchestra Credit: Chris Christodoulou

02Karina Canellakis Conducts Beethoven And Rachmaninov2018080420180805 (WS)

The BBC Symphony Orchestra perform two spirited pieces by Beethoven and Rachmaninov.

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

Two spirited but somewhat bittersweet pieces feature in this concert: first, Beethoven’s overture ‘Coriolan’, written in 1807 to accompany a tragic play set in antiquity, when the brave and proud general ‘Coriolan’ turned his army against the authority of Rome; it’s followed by Sergei Rachmaninov’s last composition, his Symphonic Dances, a magnificent suite of three orchestral pieces. Written in 1940 when he was living in America but painfully homesick, the work summarises his compositional style, deeply infused in the flavours of his native Russia. At the helm of the BBC Symphony Orchestra is the American conductor Karina Canellakis, of Greek and Russian background, winner of the prestigious ‘Sir Georg Solti Conducting Award’ in 2016, and recently named Chief Conductor of the Radio Filharmonisch Orkest in the Netherlands. Canellakis is truly one of the most promising female conductors in today’s international scene.

Presenter Suzy Klein is joined by Helen Wallace to discuss the repertoire, as well as Canellakis career and talents.

Photo: Karina Canellakis Credit: Christo Christodoulou

The BBC Symphony Orchestra perform two spirited pieces by Beethoven and Rachmaninov.

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

Two spirited but somewhat bittersweet pieces feature in this concert: first, Beethoven’s overture ‘Coriolan’, written in 1807 to accompany a tragic play set in antiquity, when the brave and proud general ‘Coriolan’ turned his army against the authority of Rome; it’s followed by Sergei Rachmaninov’s last composition, his Symphonic Dances, a magnificent suite of three orchestral pieces. Written in 1940 when he was living in America but painfully homesick, the work summarises his compositional style, deeply infused in the flavours of his native Russia. At the helm of the BBC Symphony Orchestra is the American conductor Karina Canellakis, of Greek and Russian background, winner of the prestigious ‘Sir Georg Solti Conducting Award’ in 2016, and recently named Chief Conductor of the Radio Filharmonisch Orkest in the Netherlands. Canellakis is truly one of the most promising female conductors in today’s international scene.

Presenter Suzy Klein is joined by Helen Wallace to discuss the repertoire, as well as Canellakis career and talents.

Photo: Karina Canellakis Credit: Christo Christodoulou

The BBC Symphony Orchestra perform two spirited pieces by Beethoven and Rachmaninov.

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

Two spirited but somewhat bittersweet pieces feature in this concert: first, Beethoven’s overture ‘Coriolan’, written in 1807 to accompany a tragic play set in antiquity, when the brave and proud general ‘Coriolan’ turned his army against the authority of Rome; it’s followed by Sergei Rachmaninov’s last composition, his Symphonic Dances, a magnificent suite of three orchestral pieces. Written in 1940 when he was living in America but painfully homesick, the work summarises his compositional style, deeply infused in the flavours of his native Russia. At the helm of the BBC Symphony Orchestra is the American conductor Karina Canellakis, of Greek and Russian background, winner of the prestigious ‘Sir Georg Solti Conducting Award’ in 2016, and recently named Chief Conductor of the Radio Filharmonisch Orkest in the Netherlands. Canellakis is truly one of the most promising female conductors in today’s international scene.

Presenter Suzy Klein is joined by Helen Wallace to discuss the repertoire, as well as Canellakis career and talents.

Photo: Karina Canellakis Credit: Christo Christodoulou

03Anna Prohaska: Two Sides Of The Baroque Era2018081120180812 (WS)

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Il Giardino Armonico in a programme of Baroque music

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Italy’s leading early music ensemble Il Giardino Armonico, under the direction of Giovanni Antonini, for a programme offering opera and concerto grosso, two genres that were born and thrived during the Baroque Era. The concert starts with opera arias that take inspiration from two great tragic women of the ancient world, who became endlessly fascinating to composers of the time. First is Dido, Queen of Carthage, portrayed by Henry Purcell, the most celebrated composer of opera in 17th-century England, who immortalised her in the famous lament as she bids farewell to this world, rejected by her lover Aeneas; next is Cleopatra, the legendary Egyptian queen, as seen by George Frideric Handel and Johann Adolf Hasse in operas inspired in the Italian style, which dominated the Baroque.

Also featured in the Prom is Handel’s Concerto Grosso in C minor, Op. 6 No. 8, a form of chamber music in which material is passed and shared among the members of a small ensemble, as opposed to the concerto for a solo instrument. It became very popular during the 17th and 18th centuries and proved instrumental in the evolution of the modern orchestra. The music then returns to Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, ending the concert with Dido’s famous lament.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by Baroque music expert and singer Elin Manahan Thomas.

Photo: Anna Prohaska Credit: BBC/Christopher Christodoulou

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Il Giardino Armonico in a programme of Baroque music

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Italy’s leading early music ensemble Il Giardino Armonico, under the direction of Giovanni Antonini, for a programme offering opera and concerto grosso, two genres that were born and thrived during the Baroque Era. The concert starts with opera arias that take inspiration from two great tragic women of the ancient world, who became endlessly fascinating to composers of the time. First is Dido, Queen of Carthage, portrayed by Henry Purcell, the most celebrated composer of opera in 17th-century England, who immortalised her in the famous lament as she bids farewell to this world, rejected by her lover Aeneas; next is Cleopatra, the legendary Egyptian queen, as seen by George Frideric Handel and Johann Adolf Hasse in operas inspired in the Italian style, which dominated the Baroque.

Also featured in the Prom is Handel’s Concerto Grosso in C minor, Op. 6 No. 8, a form of chamber music in which material is passed and shared among the members of a small ensemble, as opposed to the concerto for a solo instrument. It became very popular during the 17th and 18th centuries and proved instrumental in the evolution of the modern orchestra. The music then returns to Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, ending the concert with Dido’s famous lament.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by Baroque music expert and singer Elin Manahan Thomas.

Photo: Anna Prohaska Credit: BBC/Christopher Christodoulou

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Il Giardino Armonico in a programme of Baroque music

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Italy’s leading early music ensemble Il Giardino Armonico, under the direction of Giovanni Antonini, for a programme offering opera and concerto grosso, two genres that were born and thrived during the Baroque Era. The concert starts with opera arias that take inspiration from two great tragic women of the ancient world, who became endlessly fascinating to composers of the time. First is Dido, Queen of Carthage, portrayed by Henry Purcell, the most celebrated composer of opera in 17th-century England, who immortalised her in the famous lament as she bids farewell to this world, rejected by her lover Aeneas; next is Cleopatra, the legendary Egyptian queen, as seen by George Frideric Handel and Johann Adolf Hasse in operas inspired in the Italian style, which dominated the Baroque.

Also featured in the Prom is Handel’s Concerto Grosso in C minor, Op. 6 No. 8, a form of chamber music in which material is passed and shared among the members of a small ensemble, as opposed to the concerto for a solo instrument. It became very popular during the 17th and 18th centuries and proved instrumental in the evolution of the modern orchestra. The music then returns to Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, ending the concert with Dido’s famous lament.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by Baroque music expert and singer Elin Manahan Thomas.

Photo: Anna Prohaska Credit: BBC/Christopher Christodoulou

03Two Sides Of The Baroque Era20180811

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Italy's leading early music ensemble Il Giardino Armonico for a programme of Baroque music.

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Italy’s leading early music ensemble Il Giardino Armonico, under the direction of Giovanni Antonini, for a programme offering opera and concerto grosso, two genres that were born and thrived during the Baroque Era. The concert starts with opera arias that take inspiration from two great tragic women of the Ancient world, who became endlessly fascinating to composers of the time. First is Dido, queen of Carthage, portrayed by Henry Purcell, the most celebrated composer of opera in 17th-Century England, who immortalised her in the famous lament as she bids farewell to this world, rejected by her lover Aeneas; next is Cleopatra, the legendary Egyptian queen, as seen by George Frideric Handel and Johann Adolf Hasse in operas inspired in the Italian style, which dominated the Baroque. Closing the Prom is Handel’s Concerto Grosso in C minor, Op. 6 No. 8, a form of chamber music in which material is passed and shared among the members of a small ensemble, as opposed to the concerto for a solo instrument. It became very popular during the 17th and 18th centuries and proved instrumental in the evolution of the modern orchestra.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by Baroque music expert and singer Elin Manahan Thomas.

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Italy's leading early music ensemble Il Giardino Armonico for a programme of Baroque music.

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Italy’s leading early music ensemble Il Giardino Armonico, under the direction of Giovanni Antonini, for a programme offering opera and concerto grosso, two genres that were born and thrived during the Baroque Era. The concert starts with opera arias that take inspiration from two great tragic women of the Ancient world, who became endlessly fascinating to composers of the time. First is Dido, queen of Carthage, portrayed by Henry Purcell, the most celebrated composer of opera in 17th-Century England, who immortalised her in the famous lament as she bids farewell to this world, rejected by her lover Aeneas; next is Cleopatra, the legendary Egyptian queen, as seen by George Frideric Handel and Johann Adolf Hasse in operas inspired in the Italian style, which dominated the Baroque. Closing the Prom is Handel’s Concerto Grosso in C minor, Op. 6 No. 8, a form of chamber music in which material is passed and shared among the members of a small ensemble, as opposed to the concerto for a solo instrument. It became very popular during the 17th and 18th centuries and proved instrumental in the evolution of the modern orchestra.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by Baroque music expert and singer Elin Manahan Thomas.

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Italy’s leading early music ensemble Il Giardino Armonico, under the direction of Giovanni Antonini, for a programme offering opera and concerto grosso, two genres that were born and thrived during the Baroque Era. The concert starts with opera arias that take inspiration from two great tragic women of the Ancient world, who became endlessly fascinating to composers of the time. First is Dido, queen of Carthage, portrayed by Henry Purcell, the most celebrated composer of opera in 17th-Century England, who immortalised her in the famous lament as she bids farewell to this world, rejected by her lover Aeneas; next is Cleopatra, the legendary Egyptian queen, as seen by George Frideric Handel and Johann Adolf Hasse in operas inspired in the Italian style, which dominated the Baroque. Closing the Prom is Handel’s Concerto Grosso in C minor, Op. 6 No. 8, a form of chamber music in which material is passed and shared among the members of a small ensemble, as opposed to the concerto for a solo instrument. It became very popular during the 17th and 18th centuries and proved instrumental in the evolution of the modern orchestra.

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Italy's leading early music ensemble Il Giardino Armonico for a programme of Baroque music.

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

Austrian soprano Anna Prohaska joins Italy’s leading early music ensemble Il Giardino Armonico, under the direction of Giovanni Antonini, for a programme offering opera and concerto grosso, two genres that were born and thrived during the Baroque Era. The concert starts with opera arias that take inspiration from two great tragic women of the Ancient world, who became endlessly fascinating to composers of the time. First is Dido, queen of Carthage, portrayed by Henry Purcell, the most celebrated composer of opera in 17th-Century England, who immortalised her in the famous lament as she bids farewell to this world, rejected by her lover Aeneas; next is Cleopatra, the legendary Egyptian queen, as seen by George Frideric Handel and Johann Adolf Hasse in operas inspired in the Italian style, which dominated the Baroque. Closing the Prom is Handel’s Concerto Grosso in C minor, Op. 6 No. 8, a form of chamber music in which material is passed and shared among the members of a small ensemble, as opposed to the concerto for a solo instrument. It became very popular during the 17th and 18th centuries and proved instrumental in the evolution of the modern orchestra.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by Baroque music expert and singer Elin Manahan Thomas.

04Havana Meets Kingston2018081820180819 (WS)

Mista Savona with some of today's most influential Cuban and Jamaican musicians

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

Australia’s leading reggae and dancehall producer Mista Savona (aka Jake Savona) gathers together some of today’s most influential Cuban and Jamaican musicians for this concert, to create a fresh and modern take on the music of both cultures, which share a strong African heritage dating back centuries. Drawing from the styles of roots reggae, dub and dancehall coming from Jamaica, on the one hand, and son, salsa, rumba hailing from Cuba, on the other, Havana Meets Kingston sees a top-flight group of musicians come together in an effortless meeting of genres. Energetic and passionate vocals in Spanish, English and Jamaican ‘patois’ twist and turn over distinctly Cuban rhythms and melodies, while the typically deep bass lines of Jamaica pulse beneath.

Join presenter Andrew McGregor for this unforgettable Caribbean party, with a contemporary twist.

Photo: Percussion player Brenda Navarrete Credit: Mark Allan

Mista Savona with some of today's most influential Cuban and Jamaican musicians

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

Australia’s leading reggae and dancehall producer Mista Savona (aka Jake Savona) gathers together some of today’s most influential Cuban and Jamaican musicians for this concert, to create a fresh and modern take on the music of both cultures, which share a strong African heritage dating back centuries. Drawing from the styles of roots reggae, dub and dancehall coming from Jamaica, on the one hand, and son, salsa, rumba hailing from Cuba, on the other, Havana Meets Kingston sees a top-flight group of musicians come together in an effortless meeting of genres. Energetic and passionate vocals in Spanish, English and Jamaican ‘patois’ twist and turn over distinctly Cuban rhythms and melodies, while the typically deep bass lines of Jamaica pulse beneath.

Join presenter Andrew McGregor for this unforgettable Caribbean party, with a contemporary twist.

Photo: Percussion player Brenda Navarrete Credit: Mark Allan

05World War One2018082520180826 (WS)

Music by Lili Boulanger and Edward Elgar with a repertoire influenced by World War One

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

World War One, which ended a hundred years ago, strongly permeates the repertoire of this concert. First, there’s a composition by Lili Boulanger, whose premature death on the same year of 1918, aged only 24, robbed France of one of the most promising female composers of the 20th-century. ‘For the Funeral of a soldier’ is a short, moving piece for baritone, choir and orchestra, which Boulanger wrote in 1912, all too premonitory of the death and destruction which was to cover most of Europe in the not too distant future… it’s performed by Alexandre Duhamel and the BBC Symphony Chorus and Orchestra, under the baton of Edward Gardner.

Then, the conductor and orchestra return as they’re joined by the French virtuoso Jean-Guihen Queyras to perform Elgar’s elegiac and reflective Cello Concerto, one of the most famous for the instrument, written just on the wake of this conflict, and his last major composition.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by musicologist Kate Kennedy to discuss the repertoire and its context.

Music by Lili Boulanger and Edward Elgar with a repertoire influenced by World War One

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

World War One, which ended a hundred years ago, strongly permeates the repertoire of this concert. First, there’s a composition by Lili Boulanger, whose premature death on the same year of 1918, aged only 24, robbed France of one of the most promising female composers of the 20th-century. ‘For the Funeral of a soldier’ is a short, moving piece for baritone, choir and orchestra, which Boulanger wrote in 1912, all too premonitory of the death and destruction which was to cover most of Europe in the not too distant future… it’s performed by Alexandre Duhamel and the BBC Symphony Chorus and Orchestra, under the baton of Edward Gardner.

Then, the conductor and orchestra return as they’re joined by the French virtuoso Jean-Guihen Queyras to perform Elgar’s elegiac and reflective Cello Concerto, one of the most famous for the instrument, written just on the wake of this conflict, and his last major composition.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by musicologist Kate Kennedy to discuss the repertoire and its context.

Music by Lili Boulanger and Edward Elgar with a repertoire influenced by World War One

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

World War One, which ended a hundred years ago, strongly permeates the repertoire of this concert. First, there’s a composition by Lili Boulanger, whose premature death on the same year of 1918, aged only 24, robbed France of one of the most promising female composers of the 20th-century. ‘For the Funeral of a soldier’ is a short, moving piece for baritone, choir and orchestra, which Boulanger wrote in 1912, all too premonitory of the death and destruction which was to cover most of Europe in the not too distant future… it’s performed by Alexandre Duhamel and the BBC Symphony Chorus and Orchestra, under the baton of Edward Gardner.

Then, the conductor and orchestra return as they’re joined by the French virtuoso Jean-Guihen Queyras to perform Elgar’s elegiac and reflective Cello Concerto, one of the most famous for the instrument, written just on the wake of this conflict, and his last major composition.

Presenter Georgia Mann is joined by musicologist Kate Kennedy to discuss the repertoire and its context.

06Debussy And Ravel2018090120180902 (WS)

A concert featuring two masters of orchestration, painting colours and managing light and shade in sound: Debussy and Ravel.

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

This concert features two French composers of the early 20th century, both unique masters of orchestration, painting colours and managing light and shade in sound, in order to create atmospheres and emotions. First, it’s Claude Debussy, who died a hundred years ago this year, with his ‘Nocturnes’ in which he skilfully draws on the perfumes and mysteries of the night, to mesmerising effect. Then, Maurice Ravel’s most famous composition, ‘Boléro’, a hypnotic Spanish dance with its constant rhythmic pulse on top of which every instrument of the orchestra take turns to play a catchy, sensual tune as the tension irresistibly builds up until it reaches a wonderful climatic end! Ludovic Morlot conducts the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.

Presenter Andrew McGregor is joined by French music expert Richard Langham-Smith to discuss the repertoire and its context.

A concert featuring two masters of orchestration, painting colours and managing light and shade in sound: Debussy and Ravel.

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

This concert features two French composers of the early 20th century, both unique masters of orchestration, painting colours and managing light and shade in sound, in order to create atmospheres and emotions. First, it’s Claude Debussy, who died a hundred years ago this year, with his ‘Nocturnes’ in which he skilfully draws on the perfumes and mysteries of the night, to mesmerising effect. Then, Maurice Ravel’s most famous composition, ‘Boléro’, a hypnotic Spanish dance with its constant rhythmic pulse on top of which every instrument of the orchestra take turns to play a catchy, sensual tune as the tension irresistibly builds up until it reaches a wonderful climatic end! Ludovic Morlot conducts the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.

Presenter Andrew McGregor is joined by French music expert Richard Langham-Smith to discuss the repertoire and its context.

07Budapest Festival Orchestra2018090820180909 (WS)

Iv\u00e1n Fischer and his Budapest Festival Orchestra explore the spirit of Hungarian music.

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

In this concert renowned conductor Iván Fischer and his critically acclaimed Budapest Festival Orchestra are joined by a small Gypsy band led by violinist József Lendvay Sr., in a programme exploring the spirit of Hungarian music, as seen through the eyes of three 19th-Century composers: Franz Liszt, Johannes Brahms and Pablo de Sarasate. Hungarian folk tunes mixed with gypsy rhythms to create an intoxicating blend of dances and rhapsodies, like the ones we’re hearing in this Prom, which became so popular during the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in Central Europe, that they even managed to crawl into the repertoire of Classical Music’s big symphony orchestra. While Liszt was Hungarian himself and always found inspiration in the music of his fatherland, Brahms loved the gypsy music he heard with increasing confidence in his adopted Vienna, and used it in some of his festive pieces. The Spanish Pablo de Sarasate completes the picture with his Zigeunerweisen (Gypsy Airs), only to testify how popular these local tunes and rhythms had become well beyond the boundaries of Hungary.

Presenter Suzy Klein is joined by 19th-Century music expert Nicholas Baragwanath to discuss the repertoire and its cultural context.

Image: Hungarian violinists József Csócsi Lendvai and József Lendvay perform Brahms with the Budapest Festival Orchestra under conductor Iván Fischer (Credit: BBC/Chris Christodoulou)

Iv\u00e1n Fischer and his Budapest Festival Orchestra explore the spirit of Hungarian music.

Highlights from the 2018 season of BBC Proms, the UK's greatest classical music festival.

In this concert renowned conductor Iván Fischer and his critically acclaimed Budapest Festival Orchestra are joined by a small Gypsy band led by violinist József Lendvay Sr., in a programme exploring the spirit of Hungarian music, as seen through the eyes of three 19th-Century composers: Franz Liszt, Johannes Brahms and Pablo de Sarasate. Hungarian folk tunes mixed with gypsy rhythms to create an intoxicating blend of dances and rhapsodies, like the ones we’re hearing in this Prom, which became so popular during the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in Central Europe, that they even managed to crawl into the repertoire of Classical Music’s big symphony orchestra. While Liszt was Hungarian himself and always found inspiration in the music of his fatherland, Brahms loved the gypsy music he heard with increasing confidence in his adopted Vienna, and used it in some of his festive pieces. The Spanish Pablo de Sarasate completes the picture with his Zigeunerweisen (Gypsy Airs), only to testify how popular these local tunes and rhythms had become well beyond the boundaries of Hungary.

Presenter Suzy Klein is joined by 19th-Century music expert Nicholas Baragwanath to discuss the repertoire and its cultural context.

Image: Hungarian violinists József Csócsi Lendvai and József Lendvay perform Brahms with the Budapest Festival Orchestra under conductor Iván Fischer (Credit: BBC/Chris Christodoulou)