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0120170726
0120170726

Andrew Scott presents the remarkable story of how gay people transformed pop culture.

Your love - forbidden.

Your way of life - against the law.

That was the chilling reality for countless gay people in the UK.

To mark the 50th anniversary of the Sexual Offences Act of 1967 which partially decriminalised sex between men, Andrew Scott tells the remarkable story of how gay people and gay culture came to transform pop culture in the face of persistent oppression.

This first episode covers some of the pioneering queer entertainers such as Fred Barnes and Noel Coward, both of whom managed to incorporate coded references to their sexuality within their music and writing.

The Kinks biographer, Jon Savage, details how the band enjoyed challenging conventional ideas of 1960s masculinity, whilst Ex-Rolling Stones manager, Andrew Loog Oldham reveals his pride in teaching Mick Jagger to dare to be himself - incorporating a camp on-stage swagger which would go on to inspire a generation.

Broadcaster and Scissor Sister, Ana Matronic details the liberation that gripped the nation when disco hit in the 1970s. Spandau Ballet bass guitarist, Martin Kemp reminisces the post-punk attitude of the New Romantics in the 1980s, genres would eschew traditional masculinity, favouring a heavily made-up look and outrageous outfits that drew heavily on the aesthetics of gay culture.

Professor Matt Cook and Dr Rebecca Jennings give insight in to the unique challenges faced by gay men and women throughout, alongside activist Peter Tatchell who explains the acts which began the journey towards equal rights for queer people, as well as giving a first-hand account of London's first Gay Pride event in 1972.

0220170802
0220170802

Andrew Scott presents the remarkable story of how gay people transformed pop culture.

Your love - forbidden.

Your way of life - against the law.

That was the chilling reality for countless LGBT people in the UK.

To mark the 50th anniversary of the Sexual Offences Act of 1967 which partially decriminalised sex between men, Andrew Scott tells the remarkable story of how gay people and gay culture came to transform pop culture in the face of persistent oppression.

In this second episode Andrew documents the horror of the AIDS crisis, which threatened to tear the gay scene apart in the 1980s. However, when surrounded by death, gay culture stood firm. Richard Coles (The Communards) and Andy Bell (Erasure) provide first hand accounts of being part of a new stock of proud LGBT performers who utilised their sexuality to push boundaries, tackle social issues and helped to define the sound of their generation.

Super-producers Trevor Horn (Frankie Goes To Hollywood - 'Relax') and Mike Thorne (Bronski Beat - 'Smalltown Boy') detail the process of creating two songs which helped showcase two very different sides of gay identity in the mid 1980s.

Will Young explores the experience of coming out under the spotlight of reality TV, and how the depiction of gay culture on TV in the early 2000s was an important step towards to society becoming more tolerant of gay people.

Even in recent years it's been far from plain sailing for gay people in the entertainment industry. Markus Feehily, one of the lead singers in Westlife, tells of the pressures of being in the closet whilst also being in one of the most successful boy bands in the UK.

Finally, Years and Years frontman Olly Alexander talks about being part of the new wave of 'always out' pop-stars, daring to use male pronouns in his song-writing and the future of LGBT themes in pop.