Boston Calling [World Service]

Episodes

TitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
2019012620190127 (WS)
20190128 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

20190406
2019071320190714 (WS)
20190715 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2020032120200323 (WS)
20200322 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2020032820200330 (WS)
20200329 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

20 Years Of Putin2019082420190825 (WS)
20190826 (WS)

This month marks 20 years since Vladimir Putin first became prime minister of Russia. Now serving his fourth term as Russia’s president, Putin has increased and consolidated his power over the past two decades. We look back at the events that have shaped his leadership and the course of his nation.

Also, we reflect on the past 20 years of diplomacy between the US and Russia; and when Vladimir Putin finishes his fourth term as Russia’s President, what will he do next?

(U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands during a joint press conference after their 2018 summit in Helsinki, Finland. Credit: Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

The man and the moments that defined modern Russia

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

400 Years2019083120190901 (WS)
20190902 (WS)

This year marks four hundred years since slave traders arrived at the Virginia colony with the first captive Africans to be enslaved in what would become the US. It was the start of something that would come to define and divide America. Ghana has declared 2019 the “Year of Return” for African descendants around the globe. Our reporter, Rupa Shenoy, traveled to Ghana to look at how slavery is entangled in both the past and present lives of people there and in the African diaspora.

(A view inside of Christiansborg Castle, Ghana. Credit: Selase Kove-Seyram/The World)

A professor with Ghanaian roots unearths a slave castle's history \u2014 and her own

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Action Plan2019060820190609 (WS)
20190610 (WS)

The US is reported to have plans for a potential cyber attack that would cripple Iran’s cities. Whether such a plan would be implemented is open to question but it would take cyberwarfare to a whole new level. Also, a doctor in Puerto Rico prepares pregnant women for hurricane season; a plan to change the sound New York City; a NASA scientist is caught up in a clampdown on political dissent in Turkey, with severe consequences for his life back in the US; and Latinos in Texas mix a rite of passage with civic duty.

(Image: A man is seen portraying a hacker with binary code symbols on a laptop in this photo illustration on October 15, 2018 in Warsaw, Poland. (Photo by Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Cyberwarfare and the Pentagon's plan for Iran

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Addicted2018122220181223 (WS)
20181224 (WS)

The US opioid epidemic is a major public health crisis that has affected many communities across the United States. We’ll hear from an expert in addiction psychiatry who thinks that doctors bear much of the blame.

Also: What do you do if opioid drugs don't stop the pain? Acupuncture may be the answer; We look at how supervised injection is already saving the lives of heroin users; the Toronto police department launched a social media campaign, reminding people that marijuana is legal in Canada and not a cause for emergency calls; the US and Mexico join forces to crack down on the illicit drug trade; and the story of Steve Hupp's transformation from bank robber to shaman.

(Boston Calling producer Daniel Ofman stands next to a bus stop advertisement of Naloxone, a nasal spray that can counteract and potentially save someone from an opioid overdose. Credit: Diego Lopez/The World)

America is addicted to painkillers and tens of thousands of people are dying of overdoses

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

At What Cost?2019051820190519 (WS)
20190520 (WS)

The amount of weaponry Saudi Arabia buys from the US has risen dramatically over the past decade or so. We take the latest arms sales data and present it as an audio experience. Also, the human cost behind seemingly ordinary groceries; some states in the US are tightening abortion laws, leading some women to buy abortion pills online; a US fast-food chain introduces a new meat-free burger; and why burping cows are causing climate change.

(Image: Supporters of Houthis gather at Babul Yemen street to protest the US government's sale of $1.29 billion in smart bombs to Saudi Arabia, in Sanaa, Yemen on November 20, 2015. (Photo by Mohammed Hamoud/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Have you heard how many weapons the US has sold to Saudi Arabia?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Be You For You2019051120190512 (WS)
20190513 (WS)

A ban went into effect this week on athletes with high testosterone competing in women’s track events. South African runner Caster Semenya last week lost her challenge to a new rule by the International Association of Athletics Federations that keeps her out of women’s competitions because of her hormone levels. Many athletes have expressed opposition to the latest ruling, but we hear from a transgender runner who is happy with the ban. We also speak with the author of a graphic memoir trying to make sense of skin colour and identity; we hear about efforts in California to make police more sensitive to indigenous people; we visit a street in New Jersey City named in honour of an Indian human rights campaigner; and we hear the music of a self-described intergalactic feminist.

(Image: South Africa's Caster Semenya celebrates after winning the women's 800m during the IAAF Diamond League competition on May 3, 2019 in Doha. Credit: KARIM JAAFAR/AFP/Getty Images)

A transgender athlete supports the IAAF's controversial definition of women.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Brain Gain2018121520181216 (WS)
20181217 (WS)

"Brain Drain" is what happens to a country when its best and brightest minds leave and don't return. The flip side of this is called "Brain Gain." But even when countries benefit from new arrivals, they don’t always make it easy for them.

We meet Maria Merza, working hard to overcome bureaucratic and social obstacles standing in the way of her education. Also: We visit a school in California that provides classes for parents as they drop their children off in the morning; We look at new training programmes for skilled trade jobs, aimed at immigrants; Also, Francenette SaintLouis Défonce was a nurse in Haiti, but the US won’t recognise her qualifications or experience; Finally, Harvard University student Jin Park pushes the boundaries of who can become a Rhodes Scholar.

(Ayat Alfares, left, is a “super senior” at Grace M. Davis High School in Modesto, California. Sarah Yousif, right, graduated from the school when she was 21 years old. Both students came to the US as teenagers and began high school later than most of their classmates. Credit: Maria Merza/The World)

When war keeps students from starting high school on time, should they get an extra year?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Breaking With Tradition2019072720190728 (WS)
20190729 (WS)

Next month, roughly two million Muslims will travel to the holy city of Mecca for one of the most important religious rituals in Islam. As long as they are in good health and can afford it, every Muslim must complete the Hajj at least once in their lifetime. But the Hajj can only be done in Saudi Arabia, which is making some people feel conflicted about making the journey.

Also, Dutton Books is trying to reinvent books for the smartphone generation with something called the ‘Dwarsligger’; Disney is remaking a live action version of the hit film ‘Mulan,’ this time though, they’re paying attention to their Chinese audience; Some women in Argentina are challenging gender roles on the dance floor, taking the macho out of tango; and in their new album, three Israeli sisters pay tribute to a family member going three generations back, from Yemen.

(Every year, millions of Muslims from around the world descend upon Mecca, Saudi Arabia, for the hajj. Credit: Shirin Jaafari/The World)

Saudi Arabia's human rights record is causing some Muslims to rethink making the hajj

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Caste In America2019031620190317 (WS)
20190318 (WS)

At 30, Suraj Yengde has earned multiple degrees. He has done graduate and post-graduate research at the prestigious Harvard University. But when he travels to India, his socio-economic background doesn’t matter. He remains a so called “untouchable.” Yengde is not alone, many lower caste members struggle to break out of the system, even when they create new lives for themselves in the US.

(Suraj Yengde in his neighborhood, encouraging Dalit women to try to continue their education, in spite of institutional barriers. Credit: Phillip Martin/WGBH News)

Even with his Harvard University education, caste follows Suraj Yengde \u2018like a shadow'

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Consciously Green2019101920191020 (WS)
20191021 (WS)

In recent years, it’s become fairly common for people to take their own bags when they go grocery shopping. But for the past 18 months, Philippa Robb and her son, Haydn, have also been bringing their own containers, to avoid food packaging and other single-use plastics. Now Philippa’s goal is to have a zero-waste home.

Also, Greta Thunberg is now a household name in environmental activism. Find out how she’s been able to inspire an international youth movement; With a camera strapped to his back, Victor the white-tailed eagle is providing a bird’s eye view of how climate change is melting Alpine glaciers; and China has hundreds of thousands of emissions-free electric buses. Now the US is trying to catch up.

(Philippa Robb and her 16-year-old son, Haydn Robb Harries, stand in their London backyard with one of their three chickens. Robb feeds the chickens leftovers in an attempt to cut down on food waste. Credit: Brenna Daldorph/The World)

Could you go plastic free? This London family did

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Covert Affairs2019101220191013 (WS)
20191014 (WS)

An unauthorized Muslim immigrant from Uzbekistan was offered a deal by the FBI: You can remain in the US, but only if you'll spy on your fellow Muslims. He did, but then he decided he wanted to stop.

Also, the Trump administration declassified thousands of documents that reveal details of Argentina's so called ‘dirty war’; In Northern Thailand, the grandchildren of one-time CIA backed Chinese rebels transformed what used to be a secret hideaway to a tea-drinking tourist haven; and the FBI has had agents dedicated to fighting war crimes, but now that team is being disbanded.

(The J. Edgar Hoover Building of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in Washington, DC. Credit: Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images)

An FBI informant pressured to spy on New York mosques seeks a way out

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Covid-192020021520200216 (WS)
20200217 (WS)

There are many considerations to take into account when naming a new disease. We hear about some of the pitfalls the World Health Organization avoided when it came up with Covid-19. Also, an American couple tries to make the best of their cruise ship quarantine; some Chinese people travelling in the US are getting tired of being asked if they’re sick; the long and unfounded history of migrants bringing disease to the US; plus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US has deployed disease detectives to combat the coronavirus.

(Photo: Passengers wear face masks to protect against the spread of the Coronavirus as they arrive on a flight from Asia at Los Angeles International Airport, California, on January 29, 2020. Credit: Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images)

Names matter. That's why the WHO took its time to name the new coronavirus disease.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Every 30 Seconds2020022920200302 (WS)
20200301 (WS)

Approximately every 30 seconds, a United States citizen of Latin American descent, reaches the voting age of 18. This year, 32 million Latinos are projected to be eligible to vote. Latinos are one of the largest demographic groups in the US. We’ll learn about the history of the ‘Latino vote’ in the US, we’ll meet young Latino voters, and we’ll look into how both major US political parties are trying to gain young Latino support in the lead-up to the election.

(From left, Kathleen Hilibish, 68, and Judi Longacre, 79, volunteer at the voter registration booth at the Perry Township Oktoberfest at Hartwick Park in Canton, Ohio. Credit: Dustin Franz/Getty Images)

Every 30 seconds, a young Latino in the US turns 18. Their votes count more than ever

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Exchange And Influence2020030720200309 (WS)
20200308 (WS)

Late last year, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology signed a five-year extension of a multimillion-dollar partnership with Skolkova, a Russian technology research institute. This partnership has long raised espionage fears among foreign policy experts and the FBI. The contract renewal was a reversal in an MIT-Russia partnership that appeared to be dormant. The extension came just three months after the US federal government announced it is investigating MIT’s compliance with reporting requirements for the Russian money it has received in connection with the project.

Also, the Trump administration is taking a closer look at funding from Chinese donors because it suspects widespread economic espionage; and President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines says he's following through on a promise to kick US troops out of his country.

(Russia's Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and Viktor Vekselberg (L-R centre front), Renova Group Board Chairman and Skolkovo Foundation President, visit the Skolkovo Technopark in Moscow. Credit: Alexander Astafyev/Getty Images)

A top US university renews Russian tech partnership despite red flags raised by officials

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

First In The Nation2020020820200209 (WS)
20200210 (WS)

If there’s one lesson to be taken from the Iowa caucuses, it’s that elections and smartphone apps don’t always mix well. An app that was developed to count caucus-goers in the state malfunctioned, and caused major disruption. Officials say no hacking was involved but it has raised questions about moves to take the US election process online. Boston Calling reports from Iowa as we kick off our 2020 election coverage.

(Carl Voss, Des Moines City Councilman and a precinct chair, shows photographers the app that was used for caucus results reporting on his phone after he unsuccessfully attempted to drop off a caucus results packet from Precinct 55 at the Iowa Democratic Party headquarters. Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Despite security concerns, some US voters will cast ballots using their smartphones

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

First Peoples2019113020191201 (WS)
20191202 (WS)

Some people identify as Native American based on family stories. There is a more respected way to check and it does not involve a DNA test. Also, a proposed law would give indigenous people in Canada more say over their own land; during World War Two the US government built Japanese internment camps on tribal land; how the Choctaw Nation helped the Irish during the potato famine; and rock music legend Robbie Robertson recalls his childhood visits to family on the Six Nations Reserve.

(Photo: Native American dancers pose for pictures along the highway on May 11, 2018 in Cherokee, North Carolina. Located near the entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park on the North Carolina side of the Appalachian Mountains, and at the southern end of the Blue Ridge Parkway, the region is home to the Cherokee Nation band of Indians. Credit: George Rose/Getty Images)

The debate over who has the right to call themselves Native American.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Heads Up2019042720190428 (WS)
20190429 (WS)

The US Department of Homeland Security is turning to facial recognition technology to keep track of people leaving and entering the US, but privacy advocates have serious concerns. Now, the Electronic Privacy Information Center has obtained documents from US Customs and Border Protection that backup their fears. Also, we visit a hair salon in Boston strictly for women who wear hijab; Thando Hopa makes history by being the first model with albinism on the cover of Vogue magazine; the phenomenon of blackface persists around the globe; and Orthodox Jewish women in New York observe an old tradition in a very modern way.

(Image: A facial recognition program is demonstrated during the 2004 Biometrics exhibition and conference in London. (Photo by Ian Waldie/Getty Images)

The US is fast-tracking facial recognition technology at its major airports

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Hindsight Is 20202020010420200105 (WS)
20200106 (WS)

It's almost been 20 years since the war in Afghanistan started. The Afghan people want a solution and the US is trying to make a deal. Everyone wants to forge a pathway towards peace and stop the threat of nearly daily violence. Currently, peace talks between the US and the Taliban are developing and could be at an important stage.

Also, a cache of previously unpublished documents, including interviews with top US policy makers, describe many of the failures from the war in Afghanistan. The White House’s former top advisor on Afghanistan, Douglas Lute, and a former anti-corruption officer at the US Embassy in Kabul, Sarah Peck, share their thoughts on the Afghanistan papers; As a US military veteran, author CJ Chivers shares his unique perspective on the Afghan war; and Feroza Mushtari grew up during the Taliban era, but she has become a force for change in the country's maternal health system.

(US Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad attends the Intra Afghan Dialogue talks in the Qatari capital Doha. Credit: Karim Jaafar/Getty Images)

The US has been in Afghanistan for almost two decades. Now, it's looking for a way out.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

History In The Making20190413

These days the majority of migrants crossing the US border with Mexico are from Central America. But that wasn’t always the case. For decades, the majority of people crossing the border were Mexicans, seeking jobs and opportunity in the US. Many would stay, without official permission, have families and build new lives. Author Ana Raquel Minian tells us how tighter border regulations had the unintended consequence of encouraging Mexicans to stay.

Also, the city of New Orleans is apologizing for the lynching of eleven Italians in the city in 1891. We hear from Michael Santo, a lawyer who pushed for the city to set the record straight;plus, how records of ritual scarring could help some Americans of African descent learn a little more about their family histories; also the story of Barney, a former slave who was granted freedom by joining the British army in the American revolution; and researchers learn that Casimir Pulaski, the man known as the 'Father of the American Cavalry,' was intersex. It’s a story of gender and identity for the history books.

(The U.S.-Mexico border barrier in Tijuana, Mexico. Credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

The story of Mexican migration to the US goes back decades

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Into The Thaw (part One)2019090720190908 (WS)
20190909 (WS)

Melting of Antarctica's massive Thwaites Glacier could add 60 centimetres to global sea level rise in the next 50 to 100 years, and unlock far more in the years beyond. A voyage by an icebreaker to the remote glacier's face laid the groundwork for a 5-year international research effort to try to answer urgent questions about Thwaites' future. Our reporter Carolyn Beeler takes us onboard the expedition, with deep dives into the science and the stakes for our future.

(The Nathaniel B. Palmer anchored off the Rothera research station near the Antarctic Peninsula. Nearing its destination offshore of the Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica, the ship had to divert back north to the station for a medical emergency. Carolyn Beeler/The World)

Is Thwaites Glacier doomed? Scientists race against time to find out.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Into The Thaw (part Two)2019091420190915 (WS)
20190916 (WS)

How quickly will Antarctica’s massive Thwaites Glacier melt, and what will that mean for global sea levels and coastal cities? Scientists spent several weeks aboard the research ship Nathaniel B Palmer, studying Thwaites as part of a five-year, international effort to try to answer those pressing questions. Our reporter Carolyn Beeler takes us onboard for a deep dive into the science and the stakes for our future.

(An iceberg in the Southern Ocean, is pictured here as the Nathaniel B. Palmer sailed by during its return trip from Antarctica in March 2019. Carolyn Beeler/The World)

If Thwaites Glacier collapses, it would change global coastlines forever.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

(An iceberg in the Southern Ocean, is pictured here as the Nathaniel B. Palmer sailed by during its return trip from Antarctica in March 2019. Carolyn Beeler/The World)

It's Automatic2019110920191110 (WS)
20191111 (WS)

Farmers in the US face a labour shortage, so they’re turning to new technology to fill the gap. Also, meet “Pepper", a robot that’s already replacing thousands of jobs around the world; a researcher from Silicon Valley finds a robot in his hotel room and discovers a potential security breach; how 3D printing could help the global housing crisis; and an instrument that sounds like it’s from outer space, but was invented on earth 100 years ago.

(Robots named “Pepper” work in banks across the US. They help answer basic questions and allow customers to skip the line for a cashier. Credit: Jason Margolis/The World)

Robots are doing jobs humans used to do. Workers in many sectors are worried.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Leading The Way2020022220200224 (WS)
20200223 (WS)

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has made a pledge to dole out $10 billions worth of grants to help slow down climate change. Environmentalists tell us where the money should go. Also, an aid worker knows first hand the danger of landmines; American basketball fans say Slovenia superstar Luka Doncic is the game’s future; an update on why one American couple decided to stay on a cruise ship under quarantine rather than be evacuated; plus, a college course on the late Mexican American singer Selena and what we can learn about Latino identity and culture.

(Photo: Chief Executive Officer of Amazon, Jeff Bezos (R), tours the facility of the Amazon Spheres, in Seattle, Washington on January 29, 2018. Amazon opened its Seattle office space which looks more like a rainforest. Credit: Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images)

What $10 billion can buy to help fight climate change

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Let's Talk2019072020190721 (WS)
20190722 (WS)

There are upwards of 10 million unauthorized immigrants living in the US. Many of those immigrants are children or have children studying in schools throughout the country. For them,fear of deportation and family separation is a constant reality. Students at El Colegio High School in the Midwestern city of Minneapolis know that feeling, so the school has prepared its students and staff for when the immigration agents come knocking.

Also, find out how Trump's hard-line immigration policies build on the history of former US presidents; we meet the teachers of University Open Air where classes are all taught by immigrants; author Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani talks about the legacy of Nigerian slavery and how it affects people’s lives today; and the story of a Uighur family whose members fled China and now own a restaurant in Boston.

(An exterior view of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency headquarters is seen in Washington, DC. Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

For many immigrant students, fear of deportation and family separation is a daily reality

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Living Green In 20192019011220190113 (WS)
20190114 (WS)

The next couple of years will be crucial for governments to take action on climate change. In this edition we hear why and what’s being done about it.

We meet Hilda Heine, a global leader on climate change and President of the Marshall Islands; we’ll look at how Americans recycle and find out why it’s not good enough for China; Economist Michael Greenstone explains how air pollution shaves two years off of the average life expectancy; A team of Israeli students create a new variation of falafel with spirulina, a kind of microalgae, that could be a sustainable food solution of the future; and we check out the environmentally friendly sounds of the Colombian band, Bomba Estereo.

(Photo: The leaves of a Russian River Valley pinot noir vineyard begin to turn colour near Sebastopol, California. A cool spring and mild summer have contributed to a later-than-usual harvest and a bumper crop of premium wine grapes throughout the state of California. Credit: George Rose/Getty Images)

Deforestation, wildfires, and hurricanes characterised 2018. What can we expect in 2019?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Means Of Destruction2019080320190804 (WS)
20190805 (WS)

In 1987, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev and US President Ronald Reagan signed the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. It led to the elimination of more than 2,500 nuclear missile. But as of this week, the INF treaty is no more after the Trump administration announced its withdrawal. Former Secretary of State George Schulz thinks today’s politicians underestimate the threat posed by nuclear weapons.

Also, roughly a year after the US announced that it’s creating a military space force, now France is following suit. It’s a 21st century military version of the space race; how hypersonic missiles could transform the future of war and diplomacy; and the widespread use of Agent Orange during the Vietnam war has consequences beyond Vietnam’s borders.

(U.S. President Ronald Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev signing the INF Treaty in the East Room at the White House in 1987. Credit: Universal History Archive/Getty Images)

People have somehow forgotten what happens when a nuclear weapon hits

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Notes From A New World2019061520190616 (WS)
20190617 (WS)

It wasn’t easy for Elton John to get producers to keep all the scenes in his new fantasy-biopic, “Rocketman.” He was determined that the Paramount film not gloss over his sexuality or past drug use. Despite his efforts, Russia’s version appears to be missing about five minutes-worth of footage..

Also, we meet the American singer who teaches Italian kids how to sing like Beyoncé; plus the story of how Lucia Lucas became the first transgender person to sing a lead part in a standard operatic work in the US; why Lincoln, Nebraska is a great place to hear traditional Yazidi music; and Filipina-American musician Ruby Ibarra tells her family story with rap.

(Elton John (R) and David Furnish attend the "Rocketman" UK Premiere at Odeon Leicester Square in London, United Kingdom. Credit: Jeff Spicer/Getty Images)

Rocketman, the Elton John biopic, gets toned down in Russia

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

It wasn’t easy for Elton John to get producers to keep all the scenes in his new fantasy-biopic, “Rocketman.” He was determined that the Paramount film not gloss over his sexuality or past drug use. Despite his efforts, Russia’s version appears to be missing about five minutes-worth of footage..

(Elton John (R) and David Furnish attend the "Rocketman" UK Premiere at Odeon Leicester Square in London, United Kingdom. Credit: Jeff Spicer/Getty Images)

Oath Of Allegiance2019060120190602 (WS)
20190603 (WS)

The United States census gets underway next year and the Trump administration wants to ask everyone if they're a US citizen. Critics say the question will discourage some immigrants from participating and lead to an inaccurate census. The Supreme Court will rule on the matter later this month. Also, a same-sex married couple has two sons ; one gets US citizenship while his brother does not; immigrants in New York find it harder to win asylum; a Russian grandmother becomes a US citizen; and a Brazilian-born musician took the oath of allegiance a year ago and now calls Texas home.

(Image: Demonstrators rally at the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on April 23, 2019, to protest a proposal to add a citizenship question in the 2020 Census. (Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Controversy over US citizenship, privacy, and next year's census. Who will be counted?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Pandemic2020031420200316 (WS)
20200315 (WS)

The World Health Organization says every effort is now needed to contain the coronavirus disease, COVID-19. Some nations have well-developed plans for dealing with the outbreak of a new virus, others are just starting to catch up. Jane Halton, the former health secretary of Australia, and a past chair of WHO’s executive board says there’s a lot to be learned from models that simulate similar outbreaks.

Also: health officials have warned people not to touch their face, but that’s easier said than done; understanding personal versus collective responsibility around coronavirus; millions of kids are home from school and they have some thoughts to share; after being on lockdown, a California family stranded in China ventures outside; and three Mexican nurses have become heroes in the global fight against coronavirus, thanks to a video they made on the correct way to wash hands.

(From L) World Health Organization (WHO) Health Emergencies Programme Director Michael Ryan, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and WHO Technical Lead Maria Van Kerkhove attend a daily press briefing on COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, at the WHO headquarters in Geneva. Credit: Fabrice Coffrini/Getty Images)

Coronavirus is officially a pandemic. Nations step up their efforts to contain it

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Persian Projects2020011820200119 (WS)
20200120 (WS)

The Trump administration insists that the president has a firm legal basis for ordering the attack that killed Iranian general Qasem Soleimani. Legal scholars, though, are skeptical. We look into the American constitutional issues surrounding the president’s use of force.

Also, the United States and Iran may no longer be on the brink of war, but Iran’s proxies, like Hezbollah, are armed and ready for revenge; An Israeli spy thriller goes on location in Iran, the story behind the production is a thriller unto itself; In Los Angeles, thousands of kilometres from Tehran, Muslim and Jewish Iranians come together for a long-awaited high school reunion; and Iranian-American author Dina Nayeri reflects on her refugee experience.

(Anti-war activist march from the White House to the Trump International Hotel in Washington, DC. Demonstrators are protesting the US drone attack which killed Iran's Major General Qasem Soleimani in Iraq. Credit: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)

Was the killing of Qasem Soleimani legal? US officials and legal scholars disagree

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Power And Diplomacy2019110220191103 (WS)
20191104 (WS)

The impeachment inquiry has exposed some of the ways in which the US diplomatic corps feels undermined and undervalued by the Trump administration. We visit two US universities training a future generation of US diplomats to find out whether students there are reconsidering their career choice. Also, Samantha Power reflects on some of the toughest decisions she had to make while US Ambassador to the UN; we visit the Museum of the Palestinian People that is just blocks away from the White House; the rise and fall of Richard Holbrooke, a statesman known for his diplomatic breakthroughs and outsized ego; and beatboxers on a musical mission to bring the world together.

(Photo: A view of the Washington Monument and the US Department of State's flag in Washington, DC. Credit: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Are students of diplomacy reconsidering their choice and impeachment's teachable moment

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Power Balance2020011120200112 (WS)
20200113 (WS)

Retired US Army General David Petraeus has vast military and intelligence experience in the Middle East. He led US troops during some of the most critical years in Iraq and Afghanistan. Now, with the assasination of Iranian General Qasem Soleimani, General Petraeus has some thoughts about the significance of this action.

Also, after its initial retaliation for the killing of general Soleimani, Iran still has other options, like cyber-attacks against US targets; we’ll also take a look at how governments around the world use internet shutdowns to control the free flow of information; next, like with Iran, US-North Korea relations are also tense, but how did we get to this point?; and our own Rupa Shenoy looks back at a decade of protests around the world.

(Iranian Quds Force commander Qasem Soleimani (C) attends Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's meeting with the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) in Tehran. Credit: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

\u2018This is much more substantial than the killing of Osama Bin Laden'

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Refugee Story2019062920190630 (WS)
20190701 (WS)

When Wajed al-Khalifa and her family arrived in the US as refugees in 2015, everything about the United States seemed foreign. They were now far away from their home in Syria and it was time to acclimate to a new life. It wasn’t long though before they started hitting milestones: Khalifa and her husband got driving licences, their four children excelled in school, quickly overcoming barriers such as English-language instruction and a new education system. Over the past 4 years reporter Monica Campbell has been checking in with the family and their story is still unfolding.

Also, US congresswoman Ilhan Omar tells us about her experience as a refugee from Somalia, and how this informs what she thinks about the US migration crisis.

(Gasem Al Hamad and his children in their new home in Turlock, California. He and his wife fled Syria with their kids after several family members were tortured or killed as the civil war rages on. Al Hamad is now a halal butcher at a nearby slaughterhouse. Credit: Monica Campbell/The World)

How one refugee family from Syria is starting over in California

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Safe Spaces2019042020190421 (WS)
20190422 (WS)

Migrant families are being released to communities around the US. They often have no money and no support. Volunteers are stepping in to help.

Also: the White House is considering a plan that would send immigrants to so-called sanctuary cities; climate refugees arrive in a small city in the state of Georgia; a peek inside a KGB Spy Museum in New York City, and the Turkish embassy in Washington DC was once a place to hear jazz legends.

(Image: A sign welcomes arrivals at the Refugee Coffee Shop in Clarkston, Georgia. Credit:Jason Margolis)

Volunteers in the US form underground networks to house migrants with nowhere else to go

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Scoring Points2019081020190811 (WS)
20190812 (WS)

The US-China trade war has been going on for almost two years now. Both countries have imposed hundreds of billions of dollars worth of tariffs on each other, and that number has only been growing. Right now, we may be entering a new, potentially dangerous, phase of the dispute: currency warfare.

Also, we’ll take a look at real life consequences that the US-China trade war is already having, both for small businesses and for Chinese-Americans who are now experiencing unwanted scrutiny; and we’ll also explore China’s so called social credit system, and why it’s been mostly misunderstood in the West.

(An aerial view of a port in Qingdao, east China's Shandong province. Credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

The US-China trade dispute may be entering a dangerous new phase: currency warfare

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Screen Time2019122820191229 (WS)
20191230 (WS)

Several former contractors, who did content moderation work for Facebook, are suing in Europe over the psychological trauma they say the work has caused them. The lawsuit is bringing new scrutiny to the content moderation ecosystem that Facebook and other platforms rely on to police what gets posted on their platforms. Author Sarah T. Roberts says that human content moderation isn’t going away anytime soon.

Also, a North Korean cartoon called ‘Bunny Brothers and the Wolf’, may not be the thinly disguised anti-American propaganda it appears to be; Sesame Street, revolutionized children's television in the US, now it’s doing the same and around the world; and Blue’s Clues, an iconic kids TV program in the US has a new host, Filipino actor Josh Dela Cruz. He tells Marco what the reaction has been like among Asian-American kids.

(Woman looking at the internet site of the online network Facebook. Credit: Classen/ullstein bild/Getty Images)

Facebook content moderators in Europe are suing over alleged psychological trauma

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Signs And Signals2019050420190505 (WS)
20190506 (WS)

Seattle, Washington, is widely seen as a pro-immigrant city. So many residents were shocked to learn that a nearby airport has been used to deport some 34,000 people in the last eight years. Now King County, where the airport is located, is signalling its opposition to those deportations. We also learn about a subversive hand sign adopted from Hollywood and used in Thailand; we visit a radio program whose signals connect families split between central California and southern Mexico; we meet a teacher who’s helping kids feel proud to communicate in their native tongues; we hear from a man who learned how to deal with a misreading of his name; and we hear the music of a man who won’t yield to pressure to spell it all out.

(Detainees are loaded onto a Swift Air charter flight at King County International Airport (Boeing Field) in Seattle, WA, for a February 26 ICE Air flight. Credit: Still image from video by Alex Montalvo and Wadii Boughdir for the University of Washington Center for Human Rights)

A sanctuary city tries to stop deportation flights

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

State Of Anxiety2019070620190707 (WS)
20190708 (WS)

In recent months, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and other Trump Administration officials have been trying to convince Congress that Iran has ties with al-Qaeda and the Taliban. Some say that the Administration is trying to establish this connection because of a law that the US Congress passed three days after the 9/11 attacks. That law gave then President George W. Bush the authority to go to war with al-Qaeda and any related organisation without Congressional approval.

Also, we meet Iranian-Americans who are feeling particularly anxious as tension between the US and Iran escalates; and we find out what possessions people in Tehran are looking to sell, to find out how sanctions are affecting ordinary Iranians.

(President Donald Trump signs an executive order imposing fresh sanctions on Iran in the Oval Office of the White House. Next to Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. Credit: Oliver Contreras/Getty Images)

A post-9/11 law could allow President Trump to bypass Congress to wage war with Iran

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Taboos, Bans And Barriers2019011920190120 (WS)
20190121 (WS)

Ada Hegerberg is a professional football player from Norway. In December Hergerberg won the first Ballon d'Or for women, one of football's most prestigious awards. Hergerberg sees this moment as an opportunity to encourage young girls all over the world.

Also we’ll hear from Japanese student Kazuna Yamamoto about her petition that forced a tabloid magazine to apologize for a sexist article; In Afghanistan we visit filmmaker and activist Sahar Fetrat; we meet a ballet dancer bringing a much needed change to ballet slippers; plus we take a trip down memory lane to ‘Soul Alley’, a hangout spot for African-American GI's during the Vietnam war.

(Olympique Lyonnais' Norwegian forward Ada Hegerberg brandishes her trophy after receiving the 2018 Women's Ballon d'Or award for best player of the year. Credit: Franck Fife/Getty Images)

Ada Hegerberg has been named best female football player in the world

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Taking Responsibility2020012520200127 (WS)
20200126 (WS)

An impeachment trial is a rare event in the United States but there is something unprecedented about this one. President Trump's troubles are rooted in his approach to US foreign policy and diplomacy. The president is accused of pressuring Ukraine's president to investigate his political rival Joe Biden and his son, in exchange for US military assistance. The implications of the senate's verdict will be felt far beyond America's borders. Former US ambassador Nicholas Burns says that despite the pressure, diplomats from the US state department have acted courageously and have set a positive example for a new generation of foreign service officers.

Also, the death of a US citizen in an Egyptian prison raises questions about US diplomacy; the internet has made cheating by students more digital and more global than ever before, and that has opened up business opportunities in places like Kenya; we look to the Mexico-Guatemala border where a new migrant caravan has been stopped by Mexican security forces; and we compare the cost of maternity healthcare in the US with other countries around the world.

(Former Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Nicholas Burns testifies during a hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Impeachment is in full swing, but US diplomacy and the work of the State Dept. carries on

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

An impeachment trial is a rare event in the United States but there is something unprecedented about this one. President Trump's troubles are rooted in his approach to US foreign policy and diplomacy. The president is accused of pressuring Ukraine's president to investigate his political rival Joe Biden and his son, in exchange for US military assistance. The implications of the senate's verdict will be felt far beyond America's borders. Former US ambassador Nicholas Burns says that despite the pressure, diplomats from the US state department have acted courageously and have set a positive example for a new generation of foreign service officers.

Also, the death of a US citizen in an Egyptian prison raises questions about US diplomacy; the internet has made cheating by students more digital and more global than ever before, and that has opened up business opportunities in places like Kenya; we look to the Mexico-Guatemala border where a new migrant caravan has been stopped by Mexican security forces; and we compare the cost of maternity healthcare in the US with other countries around the world.

(Former Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Nicholas Burns testifies during a hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Impeachment is in full swing, but US diplomacy and the work of the State Dept. carries on

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

An impeachment trial is a rare event in the United States but there is something unprecedented about this one. President Trump's troubles are rooted in his approach to US foreign policy and diplomacy. The president is accused of pressuring Ukraine's president to investigate his political rival Joe Biden and his son, in exchange for US military assistance. The implications of the senate's verdict will be felt far beyond America's borders. Former US ambassador Nicholas Burns says that despite the pressure, diplomats from the US state department have acted courageously and have set a positive example for a new generation of foreign service officers.

Also, the death of a US citizen in an Egyptian prison raises questions about US diplomacy; the internet has made cheating by students more digital and more global than ever before, and that has opened up business opportunities in places like Kenya; we look to the Mexico-Guatemala border where a new migrant caravan has been stopped by Mexican security forces; and we compare the cost of maternity healthcare in the US with other countries around the world.

(Former Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Nicholas Burns testifies during a hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Impeachment is in full swing, but US diplomacy and the work of the State Dept. carries on

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The Allegiance Edition2019122120191222 (WS)
20191223 (WS)

Susan Rice, National Security Advisor and UN ambassador during the Obama administration, joins us to talk about impeachment, Hunter Biden’s work in Ukraine, and the enduring legacy of Benghazi. Also, we look into President Trump’s latest executive order, which relies on a controversial definition of anti-Semitism; and there’s been a surge in applications for US citizenship ahead of elections in 2020 but wait times are getting longer and longer.

(Former National Security Advisor Susan Rice speaks at the J Street 2018 National Conference in Washington, DC. Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

\u201cIt's an extraordinary circumstance, unlike any other we've had in our history.\u201d

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The Evangelical Edition2019092820190929 (WS)
20190930 (WS)

As the 2020 presidential campaign in America heats up, evangelical Christians will be getting more and more attention in the US news media. They always do during election season as they have long been seen as reliable Republican voters. But people who identify as evangelical or born-again Christians are more than just a voting bloc. Evangelicals make up a huge swath of the US population and they are rapidly becoming more diverse than ever before.

(Jason Petty is shown on stage performing under his spoken word artist and rapper name, Propaganda. Credit: Matthew Bell/The World)

Megachurches, hip hop, and podcasts: American evangelical Christians are \u2018not a monolith'

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

(Jason Petty is shown on stage performing under his spoken word artist and rapper name, Propaganda. Credit: Matthew Bell/The World)

The Friendship Edition2019010520190106 (WS)
20190107 (WS)

El Salvador is one of just a handful of countries where abortion is banned in all circumstances. The ban is so comprehensive, that every miscarriage is considered suspicious and at least a dozen Salvadoran women who say they suffered a miscarriage are serving lengthy jail terms. Professor Michelle Oberman, a leading scholar on legal issues around pregnancy, tells the story of two such women who had recently been freed from prison.

Also: The story of two Somali girls in Boston who formed a friendship through writing poetry together; the tale of an unlikely bond between a guard and a prisoner at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp; We hear from a Syrian superfan of the 90s hit TV programme ‘Friends’; and Marco Werman visits a local school in Boston to hear from some very young news consumers.

(Teodora Vasquez hugs her parents shortly after being released from the women's Readaptation Centre, in Ilopango, El Salvador where she was serving a sentence since 2008. Credit: Marvin Recinos/Getty Images)

The Salvadoran women imprisoned for losing their unborn children

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The Innovation Edition2019112320191124 (WS)
20191125 (WS)

Cooling down our addiction to air conditioning by building a more energy efficient AC. Also, it’s a “wind, wind, wind” for cargo ships powered by sails; engineering students in Los Angeles design quality-of-life solutions for refugee camps; a navigation app helps drivers get around Nigeria; the drive to thwart diseases like malaria and dengue by altering the genes of mosquitoes.

(Photo: Air conditioning units in Antwerp, Belgium on Tuesday, July 23, 2019. Credit: Dirk Waem/AFP via Getty Images)

Saving our planet at an affordable cost with the latest innovations.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The Legacy Edition2019033020190331 (WS)
20190401 (WS)

The legacy of racial segregation and institutionalized racism still persists in the US. Wesleyan College in Georgia was once a whites-only school, now most of its new students are non-white and they have been raising big questions about some school traditions.

Also, in the wake of the documentary, ‘Leaving Neverland’,, a popular museum in Germany is not cancelling its Michael Jackson exhibit, the museum director tells us why; we look back at the career of Ichiro Suzuki the greatest Japanese baseball player of all time; we compare some of the biggest politicians in the US to Roman emperors; and we try out a new millennial version of the popular Latin American board game,‘Loteria’.

(A crowd of over 250 fill a CSULB ballroom to voice concerns over what many groups feel is racism on campus in Long Beach, CA on March 23, 2016. Credit: Scott Varley/Getty Images)

\u2018There was a lot of discord around campus. They couldn't keep sweeping it under the rug.'

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The Long Wait2019081720190818 (WS)
20190819 (WS)

The US and the Taliban are reportedly inching closer to a breakthrough in peace talks. But the Afghan government has been notably missing from these negotiations. Afghanistan's first female ambassador to the US, Roya Rahmani, says that the Afghan government's position regarding the talks is that ‘peace is the highest desire.’

Also, we’ll take you Tijuana, Mexico, just south of the US border, where migrants from all over the world are waiting for a chance to enter the US; and long lost relatives reunite and share their family history after being seperated by a legacy of slavery.

(Afghan Ambassador to the United States Roya Rahmani. Credit: Shirin Jaafari/The World)

'Peace is the highest desire' says Roya Rahmani, Afghanistan's ambassador to the US

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

(Afghan Ambassador to the United States Roya Rahmani. Credit: Shirin Jaafari/The World)

The Lungs Of The World2018122920181230 (WS)
20181231 (WS)

The fate of the Amazon is in jeopardy. Logging, cattle ranching, and soya bean farming are threatening its very existence. But the threat doesn’t end there; carbon dioxide coming from cities thousands of miles away is altering tropical forests and the climate on a much larger scale. In this special edition we travel to Brazil to find out why the fate Amazon is more consequential than ever and meet some of the people fighting to preserve it.

(Claudio da Silva and the Guajajara Guardians of the Forest ride up the Caru River to investigate a report of illegal cutting on Guajajara land. Credit: Sam Eaton/The World)

The Amazon rainforest used to absorb greenhouse gases. Now, it may be emitting them

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The Migrant Caravan2018120820181209 (WS)
20181210 (WS)

President Trump has been determined that the migrant caravan not be allowed to enter the US. Now his administration has extended the deployment of more than 5,000 troops on the US-Mexico border to the end of January, 2019. Many of the migrants are now waiting in the Mexican border town of Tijuana for a chance to seek asylum in the US. We find out what life is like for them.

Also: A group of gay and transgender migrants find safety in numbers as they wait to seek asylum in the US; we find out how the US government is using biometric data to gather intelligence on members of the migrant caravan; we hear the story behind the now-iconic photo of a mother and her two daughters running away from tear gas on the US-Mexico border; also we learn about the tiny American town where tear gas is big business; Plus, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Sonia Nazario shares her thoughts about possible solutions to the Central American migrant crisis.

(Central American migrants rest after being relocated to a new temporary shelter in east Tijuana, Mexico. Credit: Guillermo Arias/Getty Images)

Thousands of migrants have reached the US-Mexico border. Now what?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The Mississippi: Pushed To The Brink2019092120190922 (WS)
20190923 (WS)

The Mississippi river could be called America’s inland hydro highway. It carries US goods and commodities out to the rest of the world and allows trade flows to return. But up and down the Mississippi River, there are new pressures. The strain on the river system is only becoming more acute with the impacts of climate change. Reporter Jason Margolis recently traveled nearly 1800 kilometres down the Mississippi to assess the health of the river, its economy and its people.

(A fish is pulled from the Mississippi River near Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Further south, oysters thrive in brackish water, a mix of freshwater and saltwater in coastal Louisiana. Credit: Leyland Cecco/The World)

With globalization and climate change, life on the Mississippi river is under threat

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

(A fish is pulled from the Mississippi River near Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Further south, oysters thrive in brackish water, a mix of freshwater and saltwater in coastal Louisiana. Credit: Leyland Cecco/The World)

Time To Act2019032320190324 (WS)
20190325 (WS)

Patricia Okoumou does not shy away from action. Last year, on 4 July, Ms Okoumou climbed up the Statue of Liberty to protest against the detention of children arriving at the US-Mexico border. Now she is facing the legal consequences, yet she remains undeterred from her risky style of activism.

Also, immigrant activists draw attention to the stories of immigrants facing deportation by turning themselves in to be detained themselves. We also hear from Claudio Rojas, an unauthorised immigrant whose deportation date is just days away. Plus school children here in Boston have joined a global movement - they are skipping classes on Fridays to demand that adults take action on climate change. And the harrowing story of how former US Marine Ken Kraus saved more than 20 lives 40 years ago, as Iran was on the brink of revolution.

(Photo: Patricia Okoumou, climbed the Statue of Liberty in protest of the Trump administration's immigration policy. This week, she appeared in court after her arrest in Austin, Texas where she climbed on a building which houses immigrant children separated from their parents. Credit: Gabriele Holtermann/Getty Images)

Activism has consequences; good and bad

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Travel Plans2019052520190526 (WS)
20190527 (WS)

Immigrants and refugees from Syria and Iraq lead tours at Philadelphia’s Penn Museum. They help visitors understand where the museum’s artefacts come from and add historical context to the objects. Also, “voluntourism” is a growing part of the travel industry, but critics say there’s sometimes a human cost for volunteer’s good deeds; we meet Terry Tickhill Terrell, who in 1969 became one of the first women to join a US scientific expedition to Antarctica; a long, lost manuscript and its connection to Christopher Columbus; and a restaurant in Casablanca inspired by the classic Hollywood film.

(Image: Abdulhadi Al-Karfawi, a Global Guide at the Penn Museum, talks about an ornate headdress, which was found with the body of Queen Puabi in the Royal Cemetery at Ur, on a Sunday afternoon tour of the Middle East Galleries in 2018. Photo by Raffi Berberian, Penn Museum.)

Immigrants and refugees make ideal guides for a museum in Philadelphia.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Two Sides To A Story2020020120200202 (WS)
20200203 (WS)

Carbon dioxide isn't the only greenhouse gas that's a threat to the planet. Nitrous oxide, emitted when farmers fertilise their fields, is a growing climate change threat as well. We find out about an environmentally-friendly potential solution.

Also, in Africa the agriculture sector wants more fertiliser so that farmers can boost crop yields; a controversial new novel about a Mexican woman forced to flee from drug cartels shines light on the world of American publishing; on the border between Venezuela and Colombia, a Colombian volunteer opens up her home to desperate migrants; and on opposite sides of the world, two guys try to make a planet Earth sandwich.

(David Melevsky, owner of Go Green Organic Land Care, treats grass areas that have been reseeded to repair winter damage with fertilizer at Ocean Park Meadow condos. Credit: Derek Davis/Getty Images)

A growing problem: how overuse of fertilizer harms the climate and endangers the public

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Ukraine Under Pressure2019121420191215 (WS)
20191216 (WS)

At the center of the impeachment showdown in the US, is nearly 400 million dollars in military aid that the Trump administration temporarily withheld from Ukraine. At a US military base in western Ukraine, business goes on as usual but Ukrainian military veterans are worried that they may be losing support. President Trump has been a reluctant supporter of Ukraine, and he has called Ukraine a corrupt country on numerous occasions. Ukrainians are under pressure, as they fight to overcome corruption and continue to seek US support in their conflict with Russia.

(US military personnel from the Wisconsin National Guard participate in a transfer of authority ceremony at the Joint Multinational Training Group-Ukraine base in Yavoriv, Ukraine. Credit: Daniel Ofman/The World)

What does US military aid for Ukraine look like? We meet US troops stationed there

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Unmade In America2018120220181203 (WS)

The history of the US auto industry goes back more than a century, and Americans take a lot of pride in it. It’s part of the American psyche. So when this past week, General Motors announced that it is shutting down 5 North American factories and ending much of its passenger car production, that was big news and auto workers aren’t happy.

Also: A Spanish property developer has plans for the Packard auto Plant in Detroit, abandoned more than 60 years ago; then we check out Boston’s City hall, the archetype of brutalism; plus we visit a bagpipe factory, right here in New England.

(A woman holds a sign during a press conference with union leaders at in Oshawa, Ontario. In a massive restructuring, US auto giant General Motors announced it will cut 15 percent of its workforce to save $6 billion and adapt to 'changing market conditions.' Credit: Lars Hagberg/Getty Images)

General Motors is closing 5 factories, but the ripple effects will go beyond auto workers

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Un-thanksgiving2018112420181126 (WS)

In November of 1969, a group of Native Americans occupied the notorious prison island of Alcatraz to protest about federal policies that discriminated against their people. The movement gained momentum on Thanksgiving when hundreds of Native American activists joined the occupation. To this day, every Thanksgiving, Native American groups hold an event on the island that they call Unthanksgiving Day.

Also: We tell the real story of Squanto, the Native American at the centre of the Thanksgiving legend; We look into the history of Native Americans being forcefully separated from their families; We recount the ongoing case of the indigenous Sinixt, a tribe that the Canadian government says doesn’t exist; Finally, we dive deep into a story about the lost language of the Miami tribe.

(The welcome sign at the entrance to Alcatraz Island, in San Francisco Bay Credit: Timothy A. Clary/Getty Images)

Not all Americans celebrate Thanksgiving; for many native people, it's a day of sorrow

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Unwanted Attention2019111620191117 (WS)
20191118 (WS)

Impeachment hearings have entered the public phase in Washington DC. Congress is investigating allegations that President Trump withheld aid to Ukraine to pressure it to deliver political favours. But in Ukraine they are focused on the conduct of their president, Volodymyr Zelensky, in a now infamous phone call with Trump.

Also, star basketball player Enes Kanter tells us how he became an enemy of Turkey’s president; a student suing the Trump Administration has her day in court; a controversial meme in the US gets a rebranding in Hong Kong; millennials tell boomers the world they have inherited is not okay; a song that got protesters in Lebanon to dance.

(Photo: Members of the media gather as State Department deputy assistant secretary, George Kent and acting US ambassador to Ukraine, William B. Taylor appear for a House Intelligence Committee impeachment hearing in Washington, DC. Credit: Matt McClain/The Washington Post/Getty Images)

The impeachment hearings go public

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Wars And Peace2019120720191208 (WS)
20191209 (WS)

A US hacker faces criminal charges for allegedly helping North Korea launder money through cryptocurrencies, but those who know him have a different story to tell. Also, President Donald Trump’s long obsession over tariffs; the long, tempestuous history of NATO; the fight against drug cartels smuggling narcotics across the US-Mexico border; plus the band Che Apalache wants to make bluegrass music more inclusive.

(Photo: In this photo illustration a double exposure picture with bitcoin coin and American flag. Credit: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

An American computer expert is arrested for allegedly helping North Korea launder money.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Waste Land2019062220190623 (WS)
20190624 (WS)

The coastal lowlands along Malaysia’s side of the Strait of Malacca are a mostly lush place, studded with fat palms and forest canopies dripping with vines. But over the past year and a half, black pillars of smoke have appeared above the treetops. We investigate how plastic waste American municipalities send for recycling, is piling up in illegal dumps thousands of miles away.

Also, tiny plastic pellets, called 'nurdles' are the product of plastics producers, but why are these pellets appearing on the US Gulf Coast?; Americans have few options when it comes to recycled tissue products and that's having a devastating impact on Canada's northern forests; Meal kits are becoming very popular in the US, but are they helping us to reduce waste?

(Plastic waste at an abandoned factory in Jenjarom, a district of Kuala Langat, outside Kuala Lumpur. From grubby packaging engulfing small Southeast Asian communities to waste piling up in plants from the US to Australia, China's ban on accepting the world's used plastic has plunged global recycling into turmoil. Credit: Mohd Rasfan/Getty Images)

America's 'recycled' plastic is creating illegal wastelands in South East Asia

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Who's Listening?2019100520191006 (WS)
20191007 (WS)

When US presidents get on the phone to speak with foreign leaders, staff are on hand to take diligent notes. But is there a set procedure of how calls with foreign dignitaries are handled? Tom Blanford from the National Security Archives in Washington, DC says that Trump’s style has been very different compared with his predecessors.

Also, TikTok, is one of the most popular social media apps in the world but the company that owns it is based in China, and some say that's leading to censorship; When you think about the Soviet Union, you don’t often think about comedy, Michael Idov’s film ‘The Humorist’ delves into the life of a Soviet comic; the power of comedy is something stand-up comedian Noam Shuster-Eliassi is trying to harness in order to start a more honest conversation between Israelis and Palestinians; and the tale of a Russian ship captain whose message in a bottle was recently discovered on a beach in Alaska.

Image: Volodymyr Zelensky and Donald Trump (Credit: Ukraine Presidential Press Service via EPA)

\u2018I would like you to do us a favour': The phone call that ignited a political storm

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Who's To Judge?2019102620191027 (WS)
20191028 (WS)

About 4,000 Liberians could be at risk of deportation after the Trump administration terminated their legal status. Earlier this month, they finally got their day in federal court in Massachusetts. They’re still waiting for a ruling, but in the meantime, many of these Liberian families are stuck in limbo. They’re hanging between the prospect of life going on as usual and a new reality in which they would be forced to return to Liberia.

Also, we hear from an unauthorized immigrant who is suing the Trump administration for the right to stay in the US; Facebook is looking to set up a supreme court like system to moderate content; French chef Marc Veyrat is taking Michelin to court after losing a coveted star; and there’s a new kind of trainer that supposedly makes you faster, but some competitive runners think it offers an unfair advantage.

(A group of Liberian DED holders and their allies protest in Worcester, Massachusetts prior to a court hearing. Credit: Tania Karas/The World)

The immigration status of thousands of Liberians in the US hangs on a court decision

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.