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01Burying Chernobyl - Part One - The Documentary2016011320160116 (WS)
20160117 (WS)

Can the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in April 1986 be made safe?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

A year before the Chernobyl Nuclear disaster in April 1986 Alla Kravchuk, left the nearby town of Pripyat in order to take her place at music college in Kiev. The rest of the family also moved away and so she and her father were together in Kiev when news of the accident broke. Since then Alla has never returned to the site although her parents did go back to help work on the plans to render Chernobyl safe in the long term.

Now, as plans are underway to mark the 30th anniversary of the accident and the huge mobile sarcophagus that will roll over the damaged reactor is nearing completion, Alla returns to both the Chernobyl Station and the deserted satellite town of Pripyat which was once her home.

Now, she travels back to see at first hand the Chernobyl Safe Confinement project, a scheme funded by countries from all over the world and watched by all those with an interest in Nuclear energy and the risks inherent in its production. She talks to those involved in the challenging task of making Chernobyl safe without risking the health of those involved in the task.

Alla also meets up with an old friend who had stayed in Chernobyl and was there at the time of the accident. Her story is a very different one.

(Photo: Workers walk by a shelter and containment area built over the destroyed fourth block of Chernobyl's old nuclear power plant, April 2015. Credit: Antatolii Stepanov/AFP/Getty Images)

"

01The Documentary2016011320160116 (WS)
20160117 (WS)

A year before the Chernobyl Nuclear disaster in April 1986 Alla Kravchuk, left the nearby town of Pripyat in order to take her place at music college in Kiev. The rest of the family also moved away and so she and her father were together in Kiev when news of the accident broke. Since then Alla has never returned to the site although her parents did go back to help work on the plans to render Chernobyl safe in the long term.

Now, as plans are underway to mark the 30th anniversary of the accident and the huge mobile sarcophagus that will roll over the damaged reactor is nearing completion, Alla returns to both the Chernobyl Station and the deserted satellite town of Pripyat which was once her home.

Now, she travels back to see at first hand the Chernobyl Safe Confinement project, a scheme funded by countries from all over the world and watched by all those with an interest in Nuclear energy and the risks inherent in its production. She talks to those involved in the challenging task of making Chernobyl safe without risking the health of those involved in the task.

Alla also meets up with an old friend who had stayed in Chernobyl and was there at the time of the accident. Her story is a very different one.

(Photo: Workers walk by a shelter and containment area built over the destroyed fourth block of Chernobyl's old nuclear power plant, April 2015. Credit: Antatolii Stepanov/AFP/Getty Images)

"Can the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in April 1986 be made safe?

A year before the Chernobyl Nuclear disaster in April 1986 Alla Kravchuk, left the nearby town of Pripyat in order to take her place at music college in Kiev. The rest of the family also moved away and so she and her father were together in Kiev when news of the accident broke. Since then Alla has never returned to the site although her parents did go back to help work on the plans to render Chernobyl safe in the long term.

Now, as plans are underway to mark the 30th anniversary of the accident and the huge mobile sarcophagus that will roll over the damaged reactor is nearing completion, Alla returns to both the Chernobyl Station and the deserted satellite town of Pripyat which was once her home.

Now, she travels back to see at first hand the Chernobyl Safe Confinement project, a scheme funded by countries from all over the world and watched by all those with an interest in Nuclear energy and the risks inherent in its production. She talks to those involved in the challenging task of making Chernobyl safe without risking the health of those involved in the task.

Alla also meets up with an old friend who had stayed in Chernobyl and was there at the time of the accident. Her story is a very different one.

(Photo: Workers walk by a shelter and containment area built over the destroyed fourth block of Chernobyl's old nuclear power plant, April 2015. Credit: Antatolii Stepanov/AFP/Getty Images)

Can the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in April 1986 be made safe?

02Burying Chernobyl - Part Two - The Documentary2016012020160123 (WS)
20160124 (WS)

Alla Kravchuk returns to Pripyat, Ukraine, now a ghost town following Chernobyl

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

In the second part of her trip back to Chernobyl, Alla Kravchuk, the daughter of two former employees at the power station, returns to the nearby town of Pripyat. Now a world famous ghost town with trees growing through the once neat concrete squares and streets, it used to be her hometown.

As well as an emotional journey back, Alla also talks to other people dealing with the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster. Dr Yevgenia Stepanova runs the National Research Centre for Radiation Medicine in Kiev. For her the disaster is ongoing with second generation children still needing all the help that a struggling nation can afford.
She also talks to Ighor Gramotkin the Director General of the Chernobyl plant who arrived in 1988 and has spent his entire working life dealing with the problems left by the catastrophic mistakes made in 1986.

Professor Timothy Mouseau heads the Chernobyl Research initiative, an attempt to make some detailed sense of the impact the accident had on humans and the plant and animal life within the exclusion zone.

Alla asks them about their reading of the situation and whether the old slogan that still stands above the main square in Pripyat still applies, that the atom should be 'a worker not a soldier'.

(Photo: A photo showing the city of Pripyat's main square and the 'Polissya' hotel before 1986, and the same site that today is abandoned and overgrown with trees. Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

"

02The Documentary2016012020160123 (WS)
20160124 (WS)

Alla Kravchuk returns to Pripyat, Ukraine, now a ghost town following Chernobyl"

"In the second part of her trip back to Chernobyl, Alla Kravchuk, the daughter of two former employees at the power station, returns to the nearby town of Pripyat. Now a world famous ghost town with trees growing through the once neat concrete squares and streets, it used to be her hometown.

As well as an emotional journey back, Alla also talks to other people dealing with the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster. Dr Yevgenia Stepanova runs the National Research Centre for Radiation Medicine in Kiev. For her the disaster is ongoing with second generation children still needing all the help that a struggling nation can afford.

She also talks to Ighor Gramotkin the Director General of the Chernobyl plant who arrived in 1988 and has spent his entire working life dealing with the problems left by the catastrophic mistakes made in 1986.

Professor Timothy Mouseau heads the Chernobyl Research initiative, an attempt to make some detailed sense of the impact the accident had on humans and the plant and animal life within the exclusion zone.

Alla asks them about their reading of the situation and whether the old slogan that still stands above the main square in Pripyat still applies, that the atom should be 'a worker not a soldier'.

(Photo: A photo showing the city of Pripyat's main square and the 'Polissya' hotel before 1986, and the same site that today is abandoned and overgrown with trees. Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

In the second part of her trip back to Chernobyl, Alla Kravchuk, the daughter of two former employees at the power station, returns to the nearby town of Pripyat. Now a world famous ghost town with trees growing through the once neat concrete squares and streets, it used to be her hometown.

As well as an emotional journey back, Alla also talks to other people dealing with the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster. Dr Yevgenia Stepanova runs the National Research Centre for Radiation Medicine in Kiev. For her the disaster is ongoing with second generation children still needing all the help that a struggling nation can afford.

She also talks to Ighor Gramotkin the Director General of the Chernobyl plant who arrived in 1988 and has spent his entire working life dealing with the problems left by the catastrophic mistakes made in 1986.

Professor Timothy Mouseau heads the Chernobyl Research initiative, an attempt to make some detailed sense of the impact the accident had on humans and the plant and animal life within the exclusion zone.

Alla asks them about their reading of the situation and whether the old slogan that still stands above the main square in Pripyat still applies, that the atom should be 'a worker not a soldier'.

(Photo: A photo showing the city of Pripyat's main square and the 'Polissya' hotel before 1986, and the same site that today is abandoned and overgrown with trees. Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Alla Kravchuk returns to Pripyat, Ukraine, now a ghost town following Chernobyl

"

Alla Kravchuk returns to Pripyat, Ukraine, now a ghost town following Chernobyl

In the second part of her trip back to Chernobyl, Alla Kravchuk, the daughter of two former employees at the power station, returns to the nearby town of Pripyat. Now a world famous ghost town with trees growing through the once neat concrete squares and streets, it used to be her hometown.

As well as an emotional journey back, Alla also talks to other people dealing with the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster. Dr Yevgenia Stepanova runs the National Research Centre for Radiation Medicine in Kiev. For her the disaster is ongoing with second generation children still needing all the help that a struggling nation can afford.

She also talks to Ighor Gramotkin the Director General of the Chernobyl plant who arrived in 1988 and has spent his entire working life dealing with the problems left by the catastrophic mistakes made in 1986.

Professor Timothy Mouseau heads the Chernobyl Research initiative, an attempt to make some detailed sense of the impact the accident had on humans and the plant and animal life within the exclusion zone.

Alla asks them about their reading of the situation and whether the old slogan that still stands above the main square in Pripyat still applies, that the atom should be 'a worker not a soldier'.

(Photo: A photo showing the city of Pripyat's main square and the 'Polissya' hotel before 1986, and the same site that today is abandoned and overgrown with trees. Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)