Business Matters [world Service]

Episodes

TitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
20181218

New analysis emerges of Russia's reported involvement in the 2016 US elections. The new report suggests Russia’s interference started years earlier and that it used every major social media platform. We also hear why the World Economic Forum thinks it'll take 202 years to close the gender gap in the workplace. The collective response of the European Union to the question of taxing the world's mega tech firms has been delayed, so France has decided to go it alone - hoping to raise as much as half a billion dollars by declaring its own tech tax. But Ben Parr of Octane AI in San Francisco explains to us that it might be a case of easier said than done. We discuss all this with guests Diane Brady, formerly of Bloomberg BusinessWeek and the Wall Street Journal, now a media entrepreneur, who joins from New York, and Simon Littlewood, President at the Asia Now Consulting Group from Singapore.

(Image: A hand typing on a laptop in a darkened room. Credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images)

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20181219

US President Donald Trump's troubled charity foundation has agreed to close down amid allegations that he and others illegally misused its funds. We hear from Jordan Fabian, White House watcher from thehill.com. Japan's biggest ever initial public offering is happening today. SoftBank is aiming to raise capital, perhaps as much as 3 trillion yen, so that it can keep making investments in tech startups. Also we mark 40 years of economic reform in China. President Xi has said that China will not be dictated to. What does this mean for the future of US China realtions and trade? Plus we visit a care home in Japan to find out what role robots might play in the future of adult care. Fergus Nicoll discusses with guests Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate in Washington DC, and David Kuo of the Motley Fool is in Singapore.

(Image: President Donald Trump, Eric Trump, Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump Jr. Credit: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20181220

The Federal Reserve raises interest rates, citing a strong US economy. We ask what the results will be for people, and if the economy is indeed strong enough to withstand the rise. It's a crunch day for Carlos Ghosn, who was chairman of Nissan and Renault, as Japan decides whether or not to further extend his detention for misreporting company earnings. And we speak about the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) prediction that India’s economy will be bigger than the UK’s in a few years – and what country perceptions have to do with that fact. We discuss all this with guest Alexander Kaufman from the Huffington Post in the US, and Madhavan Narayanan, a political and economic writer in India.

(Image: Coin Quarter Dollar. Credit: Maciej Luczniewski/ NurPhoto / Getty Images)

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20181221

US Defence Secretary Jim Mattis will be retiring "with distinction" at the end of February, President Donald Trump announced on Thursday. His departure seems to have been the result of a sharp disagreement with the president over Mr Trump's decision to pull US troops out of Syria. For the reaction in Washington we speak to Katie Bo Willimas, senior national security correspondent with Defense One. London's Gatwick Airport has cancelled flights in and out after two drones were spotted flying above the runway. About 110,000 passengers have been affected by the ensuing flight disruption. We speak to physicist Kevin Poormon at the University of Dayton Research Institute in Ohio, who's studied the impact drones can have on planes. Every year the average UK household throws away $900 worth of perfectly edible food. It's been described as a "scandal", given the number of starving people in the world. As a result countries and companies are making greater efforts to reduce the amount that's thrown away, as Mike Johnson reports.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Jasper Kim, Director of the Center for Conflict Management, in Seoul. And Erin Delmore, Senior Political Correspondent for the Bustle website in New York.

(Photo: General Jim Mattis. Credit: Getty Images.)

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20181222

People have taken to the streets in Hungary to protest changes to overtime laws. Valerie Hopkins of the Financial Times speaks to us from Budapest. US stocks have suffered one of the worst weekly falls in a decade as trade tensions with China, interest rate rises and a possible government shutdown rattled markets. Chris Low of FTN Financial in New York gives us his take. In Spain, the Christmas lottery, El Gordo, will be held this Saturday. It's one of the biggest jackpots in the world, but our reporter explains that festivities could be marred in some parts of Catalonia as demonstrations are expected against a cabinet meeting being held there. In the centenary year of legislation being passed allowing British women to vote, a third of MPs are now women. But female representation has been slow to filter through to the upper echelons of business. Anne O'Donnell is chief executive of a management consultancy Procorre, and tells us about her plan to increase female representation in senior posts around the world. Plus, we hear why the Christmas jumper business is a year-round operation and how a song celebrating the humble sausage roll has become the UK Christmas number one in the music charts.

(Photo: Demonstrators in front of the Presidential Palace in Budapest, Hungary. Credit: Getty Images.)

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20181225

For a special edition of Business Matters we look back on our best international coverage this year. We visit the Indian state of Punjab known as the "Land of Five Rivers". Punjab was split down the middle between Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan over 70 years ago. We hear about the economic ramifications of that division. We speak to Punjabi women who created an early rumbling of an organic food revolution. We meet the Punjabi film star and singer Babbu Maan, looking to challenge Bollywood and learn how a businessman in a small city in Punjab now provides badges and military insignia to servicemen and women across the globe.

We also travel to the biggest economy in South East Asia, Indonesia. The country is dealing with the aftermath of another natural disaster, after a tsunami hit the coast of Indonesia’s Sunda Strait. We hear how the residents of the capital city, Jakarta face some of the worst road congestion in the world. Also on the programme, could northern Jakarta be completely submerged by 2050? Half of the city is below sea level and it’s said to be sinking by as much as 15 cm a year in some parts, we explore the efforts behind preventing the worst.

(Photo: Farmers on their tractor in Punjab, India Credit: BBC)

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20181226

A trade war between the US and China, corruption in Malaysia, tackling climate change and the rise of K-pop were all in the headlines this year.

Martin Webber analyses the main business stories of 2018 with Roger Johnson, president of the National Farmers Union (NFU) in the US, Deborah Elms, executive director of the Asian Trade Centre in Singapore, Bradley Hope at the Wall Street Journal and freelance journalist Taylor Glasby.

Also in the programme, a special report from Cyprus, where the banking system collapsed five years ago. We'll find out how Russian investors have remained a big part of the country's financial system.

Plus, how phone apps have shaken up the dating scene in India.

Picture: BTS perform during the 2018 Billboard Music Awards (Credit: Getty Images).

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20181227

Find out which businesses, industries and technologies were winners and losers in 2018, and which ones will have a good or bad time in the year to come. In this special programme we reunite two guests, the Toronto-based consultant Ralph Silva and the journalist Jyoti Malhotra in Delhi, to find out if their predictions for 2018 were correct and what they think 2019 has in store. All their suggestions face the scrutiny of the futurologist Tracey Follows and Mike Jakeman, senior economist with PWC in London.

Picture: A 2019 illuminated sign in Times Square, New York city. Credit: Getty Images

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20181228

US shares rose on Thursday in the last hour of trading after an earlier dive. The S&P 500 index gained 0.9%, reversing a decline of as much as 2.8% earlier in the day. Cary Leahey of Decision Economics talks about the winners and losers and what may be roiling the markets.

In the UK, traditional post-Christmas spending is down. The main reason is as big discounts have become so commonplace, shoppers are not much swayed by more end of year sales deals in the shops. So what can or should store owners do to save their businesses and try and lure custom back from the lower cost, online competition? Author Mark Pilkington explains.

Mental health in the workplace continues to subject people to symptoms like depression and anxiety. The BBC's Clare Williamson looks at the key figures getting high profile about their own struggles.

Presenter Nigel Cassidy is joined by Peter Morici, Professor of International Business at the University of Maryland in Washington DC and the journalist Sushma Ramachandran in Delhi.

(Picture: Traders and financial professionals work ahead of the closing bell on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Credit: Getty Images.)

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20181228

US shares rose on Thursday in the last hour of trading after an earlier dive. The S&P 500 index gained 0.9%, reversing a decline of as much as 2.8% earlier in the day. Cary Leahey of Decision Economics talks about the winners and losers and what may be roiling the markets.

In the UK, traditional post-Christmas spending is down. The main reason is as big discounts have become so commonplace, shoppers are not much swayed by more end of year sales deals in the shops. So what can or should store owners do to save their businesses and try and lure custom back from the lower cost, online competition? Author Mark Pilkington explains.

Mental health in the workplace continues to subject people to symptoms like depression and anxiety. The BBC's Clare Williamson looks at the key figures getting high profile about their own struggles.

Presenter Nigel Cassidy is joined by Peter Morici, Professor of International Business at the University of Maryland in Washington DC and the journalist Sushma Ramachandran in Delhi.

(Picture: Traders and financial professionals work ahead of the closing bell on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Credit: Getty Images.)

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20181229

BeiDou can pinpoint where you are in the world to within 10 metres. It's China's answer to America's GPS, a satellite positioning system whose global range has now been extended ahead of schedule to many parts of Europe and Asia.

Work on BeiDou started in the 1990s. The multiple satellite system provides navigation for China's military and infrastructure. But its also set to be used by everything from chips in Chinese-built cars and mobile phones to commercial mapping services. Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, explains why it maters.

The US retailer Sears set itself a deadline of Friday to find a buyer. Barbara Kahn, professor of marketing at the Wharton school, at the University of Pennsylvania, explains why that may be an uphill battle.

Modern day slavery is an industry that generates billions of dollars for criminals - the BBC's Russell Padmore looks at efforts by the aviation industry to help the global fight to stop criminals forcing people in to slavery.

Presenter Nigel Cassidy is joined by Colin Peacock from Radio New Zealand, in Wellington.

(Picture: A Long March-3B carrier rocket with two satellites of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) blasts off from Xichang Satellite Launch Center on November 19, 2018 in Xichang, Sichuan Province of China. Credit: Getty Images.)

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190101

Millions of us fly across the world every day, but just how clean is the air at 35,000 feet? In a special edition of Business Matters, Mike Powell investigates claims that an engineering fault on most aircrafts is causing chemicals from the engine to leak into the cabin.

We hear from whistleblowers from the aviation industry who allege that many pilots, crews and passengers are becoming ill – or even dying – because of these possibly toxic fumes.

We hear the guidance issued to coroners after the sudden death of pilots and crew – and talk to the father of one of the flight attendants who died who claims there is a cover up in the airline industry. Politicians and campaigners say the subject has been ignored for decades and that with hundreds of cases going through the courts, so called ‘Aerotoxicity’ could be designated an industrial disease like Asbestosis – with all the implications that brings.

The aviation industry tells us that any ‘rare’ events are dealt with; while we speak to the scientists working on biological solutions and engineers who are developing new aircraft with cleaner air.

(Image: a plane taking off from Heathrow airport. Credit: Mike Powell/BBC)

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190102

In this special edition of Business Matters, Roger Hearing looks back to when he travelled to Mongolia, visiting one of the world's largest and deepest copper mines, as well as looking at the environmental impact of the mine on the Gobi desert. He also looks at two of the most popular pastimes in Mongolia; ballet and wrestling.

In the second half of the programme, a look at the faltering economic recovery in Zimbabwe after the downfall of president Robert Mugabe; and Zambia's opportunities and problems in its complicated financial relations with China.

(Image: Camels in the Gobi desert. Credit: BBC/Joshua Thorpe).

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190103

Apple has warned investors about its growth in the most recent quarter, citing weaker sales in China. Share prices sank more than 7% in after hours trade, extending their more than 28% slide since November. The BBC's North America Technology correspondent Dave Lee gives us the latest. Having lost nearly 400 points, the Dow Jones index finished the session today much where it had been at the start. Susan Schmidt, head of US equities at Aviva Investors in Chicago, explains why US shares are currently going nowhere. For the first time in nearly 100 years lots of copyrighted works have lost their protection and become public property in the United States. Jennifer Jenkins, a law professor at Duke University and co-author of ‘Bound By Law’, a comic book about copyright, fair use, and intellectual property tells us about the significance of unfreezing the US public domain. Plus, Rebecca MacKinnon from the New America think tank on Netflix's decision to pull an episode of the show Patriot Act from its service in Saudi Arabia.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Tony Nash, Chief Economist at the consultancy Complete Intelligence, in Houston, Texas.And Jyoti Malhotra, Editor, National & Strategic Affairs at The Print website, in Delhi.

(Photo: Tim Cook, CEO of Apple Credit: Getty Images.)

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190104

The US government shutdown has now entered its 14th day. 800,000 workers are either at home, or going into work without pay, thanks to the disagreement between President Trump and the Democrats over a border wall with Mexico. Moody’s has estimated the shutdown might wipe $8.7 billion off the country’s gross domestic product if it runs until the end of the month. Gary Hufbauer of the Peterson Institute for International Economics explains how this might look.

Also in the show, two of America's largest pharmaceutical companies, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Celgene, have announced a blockbuster merger. Professor Gino Martini of the UK's Royal Pharmaceutical Society explains what drove these two pharma giants together.

Then, there are thousands of small islands off the coast of Europe. But many of them are no longer inhabited. For decades, authorities have battled to stop population decline of those small island communities as young people are lured away by more exciting opportunities on the mainland. The BBC's Vincent Dowd has been to Ireland to see what the future holds for three windswept islands on the country's western coast.

Amidst a global trade war and a government shutdown, it might be no wonder why markets are jittery, but let’s take a closer look. Helen Thomas was an adviser to the former British Chancellor, or UK finance minister, George Osborne. She now runs the Blonde Money consultancy, and explains how she views the deep uncertainty in the global economy.

And finally, video games have long been big business, but figures out in the UK show gaming now accounts for over half of all entertainment revenue, meaning it has doubled in value since 2007. One single downloadable game, Fortnite, already boasts over 200 million players worldwide. Piers Harding-Rolls, Head of Games Research at the industry consultancy IHS Markit, gives his take on this market explosion.

All through the show we’ll be joined by Eleanor Jones, Managing Partner for Dogwood Advisory Services from Singapore, and Paddy Hirsch, Supervising Editor of The Indicator from NPR’s Planet Money, in Los Angeles.

PHOTO DESCRIPTION: A young boy looks inside the National Museum of African American History that is closed due to the partial shutdown of the U.S. government. January 2, 2019, Washington, DC.
PHOTO CREDIT: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190122

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190123

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190124

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190125

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190126

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190129

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190130

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190131

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190201

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190402

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190403
20190404
20190405
20190406
20190409
20190410
20190411
20190412
20190416
20190417
20190418
20190419

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

20190420
20190423
Aerotoxicity: the hidden dangers of flying20190101

Millions of us fly across the world every day, but just how clean is the air at 35,000 feet? In a special edition of Business Matters, Mike Powell investigates claims that an engineering fault on most aircrafts is causing chemicals from the engine to leak into the cabin.

We hear from whistleblowers from the aviation industry who allege that many pilots, crews and passengers are becoming ill – or even dying – because of these possibly toxic fumes.

We hear the guidance issued to coroners after the sudden death of pilots and crew – and talk to the father of one of the flight attendants who died who claims there is a cover up in the airline industry. Politicians and campaigners say the subject has been ignored for decades and that with hundreds of cases going through the courts, so called ‘Aerotoxicity’ could be designated an industrial disease like Asbestosis – with all the implications that brings.

The aviation industry tells us that any ‘rare’ events are dealt with; while we speak to the scientists working on biological solutions and engineers who are developing new aircraft with cleaner air.

(Image: a plane taking off from Heathrow airport. Credit: Mike Powell/BBC)

How toxic is the air on board planes?

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Amazon is Now the World's Most Valuable Public Company20190109

Amazon, formed 25 years ago, has eclipsed Microsoft to become the world's most valuable listed company. The online giant was worth $797bn when the US stock market closed on Monday after rising 3.4% and moved past Microsoft, valued at $789bn. Cynthia Stine of E-Growth partners gives her perspective on the role of Amazon’s Marketplace in the company’s ascent. Then we hear how cannabis farmers in those US states where growing is legal are being squeezed back into the black market by over saturation. Also in the programme, the World Bank’s annual report on the state of the global economy is out. With a caption of “Darkening Skies” the report forecasts economic growth will slow down a little, though no fears of a recession just yet. Franziska Ohnsorge, the lead author of the report, explains some of the outlook. Vint Cerf, one of the pioneers of internet protocol development, joins the show to talk about the dramatic development in machine learning since those early days of the web. And finally, the BBC’s Jane Wakefield explores how businesses can accommodate those on the autistic spectrum. All through the show we’ll be joined by Dante Disparte, founder and CEO of Risk Cooperative from Washington DC, and Sushma Ramachandran, columnist at The Tribune from Delhi.

(Picture: the Amazon logo is seen on an android mobile phone. Picture credit: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Amazon has eclipsed Microsoft to become the world's most valuable listed company

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Apple Blames China As It Cuts Forecast20190103

Apple has warned investors about its growth in the most recent quarter, citing weaker sales in China. Share prices sank more than 7% in after hours trade, extending their more than 28% slide since November. The BBC's North America Technology correspondent Dave Lee gives us the latest. Having lost nearly 400 points, the Dow Jones index finished the session today much where it had been at the start. Susan Schmidt, head of US equities at Aviva Investors in Chicago, explains why US shares are currently going nowhere. For the first time in nearly 100 years lots of copyrighted works have lost their protection and become public property in the United States. Jennifer Jenkins, a law professor at Duke University and co-author of ‘Bound By Law’, a comic book about copyright, fair use, and intellectual property tells us about the significance of unfreezing the US public domain. Plus, Rebecca MacKinnon from the New America think tank on Netflix's decision to pull an episode of the show Patriot Act from its service in Saudi Arabia.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Tony Nash, Chief Economist at the consultancy Complete Intelligence, in Houston, Texas.And Jyoti Malhotra, Editor, National & Strategic Affairs at The Print website, in Delhi.

(Photo: Tim Cook, CEO of Apple Credit: Getty Images.)

Share prices sank more than 7% in after hours trading.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Apple focuses on services expansion20190326

Apple hires a roomful of Hollywood's finest to launch its much-vaunted digital leap in to the entertainment industry.

Flight training is in question after the death of 157 people aboard an Ethiopia Airlines plane; we look at the concerns regarding lack of practice for pilots flying the largely grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 planes.

Plus, we look at artificial intelligence-made music. We discuss all this with Alexis Goldstein in Washington, and from the Indian capital Delhi, Madhavan Narayanan, formerly of The Hindu, and a finance specialist.

(Photo: Oprah Winfrey speaks during an Apple product launch event at the Steve Jobs Theater at Apple Park, 2019. Credit: Michael Short/Getty Images)

Apple hires Hollywood's finest for its launch into the entertainment industry

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Boeing Grounds 737 Max Fleet20190314

Boeing has grounded its entire global fleet of 737 Max aircraft after investigators uncovered new evidence at the scene of the fatal Ethiopian Airlines crash; we hear from Dr Todd Curtis, an aviation risk assessment expert at AirSafe.com.

Also in the programme, MPs have rejected the UK leaving the EU without a deal. We get analysis from our economics correspondent.
Nigerian online retailer Jumia is set to become the first African startup to list on the New York Stock Exchange, Irwin Stelzer of the Hudson Institute discusses the White House's 2020 budget plan, plus it's a secretive industry that impacts on the lives of millions of people every day but few of us ever consider where painkilling drugs come from.The Australian island of Tasmania is actually responsible for growing around half of the world's legal opium supply but as Hywel Griffith has been finding out, it is an industry feeling pain of its own.

The BBC's Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme from Washington DC by Dante Disparte, founder and CEO of Risk Cooperative, and from Singapore by Eleanor Jones, tech consultant and founder of Dogwood Advisory Services. They'll also be joined from Sydney by the BBC's Phil Mercer.

Pic description: All Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are grounded
Photo credit: JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

Boeing has grounded its entire global fleet of 737 Max aircraft.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

British MPs fail to back Brexit proposals again20190402

With no majority for a Brexit solution and a no-deal departure looming on April 12, how can business plan? We get analysis from George Parker at the Financial Times. Meanwhile, climate change protesters disrupted proceedings with a semi-naked protest inside the House of Commons. But how effective are such tactics? Also, elections in Turkey dealt a blow to President Erdogan's ruling AK party in big cities. We examine if the struggling economy influenced voters at the ballot box. Plus, we hear how voice assistants could change the whole way we use the internet. And our regular workplace commentator Heather McGregor of Edinburgh Business School considers the benefits or otherwise in workplaces of trying to measure co-operation and attitude.

Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by Simon Littlewood, President of AC Growth Delivered in Singapore and journalist Diane Brady in New York.

(Picture: British Prime Minister Theresa May leaving 10 Downing Street on 01 April 2019. Credit: AFP)

As a no-deal departure looms on April 12, how can business plan?

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

British PM suffers new Brexit defeat20190313

British lawmakers have voted by a majority of 149 against Theresa May's EU withdrawal deal. We get reaction from John Longworth, chairman of pro-Brexit group Leave Means Leave and Allie Renison, from the Institute of Directors. We also hear from Clemens Fuest, who heads the Institute for Economic Research in Munich; and what is the reaction amongst businesses in Northern Ireland? John Campbell is the BBC's business editor in Belfast. Professor Raghuram Rajan who has recently been linked to the upcoming vacancy at the Bank of England, has just written a book warning about the shortcomings of capitalism; the BBC's Rob Young asked him if capitalism is broken. And in Canada, the province of Alberta is making a drive to increase oil production, we hear from Kat Eschner who's been covering the story for CNBC.com. Also on the programme, makers of traditional camembert cheese are upset with French lawmakers amid a labelling row; we hear from Veronique Richez-Lerouge, president of the Association of Terroir Cheese. And joining us throughout the programme are Sushma Ramachandran, the former Business Editor of The Hindu - she's with us from Delhi, Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network is with us from Toronto and the economics commentator Dr Stephanie Hare is in the London studio.

(Image: Theresa May leaving 10 Downing Street. Credit: Getty Images.)

British MPs have voted against Theresa May's EU withdrawal deal for the second time

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Can Theresa May salvage Brexit?20190403

Britain's embattled prime minister invites the opposition leader in for talks in a last-ditch attempt to find some way ahead on Brexit. Air pollution in Thailand has caused embarrassment for the government. With face masks being handed out to visiting ASEAN country finance ministers and central bankers, the prime minister has ordered the problem dealt with in seven days. How creative can you be with limited space to build new homes? In Hong Kong, they're planning to build an artificial island, while in the UK, one company has developed a mini pizza oven to fit in with shrinking average home sizes. Also, we hear stories of student debt in the United States and how it causes real financial pain for millions of borrowers. Plus our reporter explains why the music industry is celebrating an increase of more than a third in the amount earned from music streaming in the past year.

Roger Hearing is joined on the programme by Nisid Hajari from Bloomberg in Bangkok and Maya K. van Rossum, Director of the Delaware Riverkeeper Network in Philadelphia.

(Picture: British Prime Minister Theresa May speaking after an extended cabinet meeting. Credit: Reuters)

Britain's embattled prime minister invites the opposition leader in for talks

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Could G20 See End of Tariff War?20181130

As the G20 summit gets underway in Buenos Aires, what are the odds of Donald Trump and Xi Jinping reaching an agreement that could end the US-China trade dispute? Meanwhile, a bilateral trade deal that's nearly completed could see Argentinian beef back on American supermarket shelves. Daniel Gallas reports from Buenos Aires where local producers say the comeback is not that simple. In Italy, government ministers want to be released from eurozone budget rules so they can spend more, which they say will lead to much-needed growth. Manuela Saragosa takes the temperature with businesses in Milan. Also in the programme, how hyper connectivity can help promote collectively intelligent systems, so-called 'superminds'. We ask MIT Professor Thomas Malone to explain what it's all about. Plus, as UNESCO adds reggae to its list of cultural treasures, we hear from author Chris Salewicz on the Jamaican music often associated with Bob Marley.

Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme by Jonathan Cheng of the Wall Street Journal, from Seoul, and by Erin Delmore, Senior Political Correspondent at Bustle.com, in New York.

(Picture: President Xi Jinping arriving at the G20 summit in Buenos Aires. Credit: JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images)

What are the odds of Donald Trump and Xi Jinping reaching an agreement in Buenos Aires?

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Could Italy Be Next Stop On New Silk Road?20190321

Italy and China are set to sign a Memorandum of Understanding to expand China's ambitious One Belt One Road initiative all the way to Western Europe. Dr Yu Jie of Chatham House explains what could be in the deal for both sides.

Also in the show: It's the only thing economists on Twitter seem to care about, but what is Modern Monetary Theory? The independent banking analyst Frances Coppola joins to unpick the theory and explain why it's so controversial.

A new law proposed in Uganda would require musicians, film-makers and playwrights to submit their work for government approval before it's allowed to be performed. As Paul Moss reports, it's not just Uganda, protest music is increasingly seen as a threat by rulers across Africa.

Plus we consider the prospects for jeans maker Levi Strauss, which lists shares in New York this Thursday, with Matthew Townsend, global business reporter for Bloomberg News. And our reporter in New York looks at a controversial proposal to introduce a congestion charge for drivers in the city.

All through the show we'll be joined by Lulu Chen, technology reporter for Bloomberg in Hong Kong, and Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland in Washington DC.

(Picture: Chinese and Italian flags at a meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on February 22, 2017. Picture credit: WU HONG/AFP/Getty Images)

President Xi arrives in Italy to discuss the One Belt One Road initiative

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Could Russia and China become Boeing's competitors?20190319

Could Russia and China launch planes to compete with Boeing in the aircraft market? Following the Ethiopian Airlines accident last week when a Boeing 737 Max crashed just after take-off, aviation analyst Sally Gethin tells us how other market players could soon become major competitors. As Brazil's President Bolsonaro travels to Washington this week to meet with President Trump, our reporter Daniel Gallas analyses what the historic meeting is likely to mean for the two countries. And our regular contributor Professor Heather McGregor on why networking is so important.
Vivienne Nunis is joined throughout the programme by business journalist and author Diane Brady in New York, and Andrew Peaple, Asia markets editor for the Wall Street Journal in Hong Kong.

(Picture: Boeing logo. Credit: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Could Russia and China launch planes to compete with Boeing in the aircraft market?

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Crucial Brexit Vote Delayed20181211

Uncertainty continues over Brexit as the UK government delays a crucial vote, which it admits it was doomed to lose. The head of the Central Bank of India quits mid-term amidst complaints of government interference. And 'Welcome to Japan' is the new message to working immigrants - but how many other nations are so appreciative of new arrivals? We discuss all this with Mark Blyth, Professor of International Political Economy at Brown University in Rhode Island, and Sushma Ramachandran, the former Business Editor of The Hindu in Delhi.

(Image: A protest sign of the Queen's head silhouetted with the word 'Brexit' in red stamped across it. Credit: Getty Images)

Uncertainty continues over Brexit as the UK government delays a crucial vote

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

EU leaders agree Brexit delay plan20190322

EU leaders have agreed on a plan to delay the Article 50 process, postponing Brexit beyond 29 March. The UK will be offered a delay until 22 May, if MPs approve the withdrawal deal negotiated with the EU next week. If they do not, the EU will back a shorter delay until 12 April. We hear from Dr. Dominic Ponattu, a specialist on growth, productivity and innovation in the EU single market. He's produced a report for the German organisation Bertelsmann Stiftung, which concludes that Brexit will cost EU citizens up to $45bn per year.

Also in the show, former Brazilian President Michel Temer has been arrested in São Paulo as part of a massive corruption investigation. The BBC's Daniel Gallas has the latest.

Shares in Levi Strauss were flying off the shelves as the blue jeans company made its return to the stock market. The price shot higher immediately after Wall Street opened, and closed up 31.8%, valuing the company at $8.7bn. The BBC's Michelle Fleury spoke to the CEO Chip Bergh on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

A number of wealthy Americans, including actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, have been charged in a US college cheating scam to get their children into top US universities. Kay Hymowitz at Vanity Fair and Sahil Desai at The Atlantic join to discuss their coverage of the scandal.

And finally, rapper Jay-Z's sixth album, The Blueprint, has been added to a list of "culturally, historically, or aesthetically important" recordings in the American Library of Congress collection known as the National Recording Registry. Empire Distribution's Justin Hunte joins to discuss the significance of the album and what the selection means for recognition of hip-hop as an at form.

All through the show we'll be joined by Fresh Dialogues host Alison Van Digglen from San Francisco and Stephanie Studer, China Business correspondent for The Economist, from Shanghai.

(Picture: British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks to the media at the end of the first of a two-day summit of European Union leaders on March 21, 2019 in Brussels, Belgium. Picture credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

EU leaders have agreed on a plan to delay the Article 50 process.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Expectations Rise in US-China Trade Talks20190110

American markets have responded positively to the latest negotiations over tariffs, which were extended into a third day. As Amazon boss Jeff Bezos and his wife MacKenzie announce plans to divorce, we ask Bloomberg's Brad Stone what kind of settlement could Mrs Bezos expect from the world's richest man? Also in the programme, police say the wife of one of Norway's richest men has been kidnapped. We hear from Mark Harris of security firm Blindside, who advises many big companies on how to prevent kidnapping and deal with ransom demands. Conspiracy theories as ways to explain the world and strange events have been around for a long time. Were the moon landings faked? Joe Uscinski, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Miami, has long made a study of many weird and wonderful theories. And could eco-friendly pet food help save our planet? We hear from entrepreneur Tom Neish whose company makes dog food from insects.

Roger Hearing is joined on the programme by Peter Morici, Professor at the Robert H. Smith School of Business, in Maryland and Yuan Yang, Beijing Correspondent with the Financial Times.

(Picture: US and Chinese flags over Tiananmen Square. Credit: Getty Images)

American stocks responded positively to the third day of negotiations over tariffs

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

FAA will bring 'significant change' in its oversight approach20190327

The Federal Aviation Administration, responsible for air traffic safety in the United States, has said it will significantly change its oversight approach to air safety, after two fatal crashes involving Boeing 737 MAX passenger jets. Richard Aboulafia is an aviation analyst and tells us where the FAA was going wrong and how it can look to reform.

Also, prosecutors have dropped all charges against US actor Jussie Smollett for allegedly staging a racist and homophobic attack. Miles Bryan at WBEZ in Chicago was at the court and tells us exactly what happened.

Susannah Streeter takes us on a deep dive into the EU's controversial new copyright directive, and the BBC’s Ed Butler takes a look at what life is like for the roughly four million people living in the cut-off eastern region of Ukraine.

And finally, it’s not common to see portrayals of authentic family drama on Chinese television, but the new series, All is Well, is full of such portrayals, and it is gripping the nation. Emily Newman at Texas A&M University-Commerce joins to discuss the show, and the power of family dramas.

(Photo: A Boeing 737 MAX 9 test plane is pictured at Boeing Field on March 22, 2019. Credit: Getty Images)

The Federal Aviation Administration said it will change its oversight approach

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Faa Will Bring 'significant Change' In Its Oversight Approach20190327

The Federal Aviation Administration, responsible for air traffic safety in the United States, has said it will significantly change its oversight approach to air safety, after two fatal crashes involving Boeing 737 MAX passenger jets. Richard Aboulafia is an aviation analyst and tells us where the FAA was going wrong and how it can look to reform.

Also, prosecutors have dropped all charges against US actor Jussie Smollett for allegedly staging a racist and homophobic attack. Miles Bryan at WBEZ in Chicago was at the court and tells us exactly what happened.

Susannah Streeter takes us on a deep dive into the EU's controversial new copyright directive, and the BBC’s Ed Butler takes a look at what life is like for the roughly four million people living in the cut-off eastern region of Ukraine.

And finally, it’s not common to see portrayals of authentic family drama on Chinese television, but the new series, All is Well, is full of such portrayals, and it is gripping the nation. Emily Newman at Texas A&M University-Commerce joins to discuss the show, and the power of family dramas.

(Photo: A Boeing 737 MAX 9 test plane is pictured at Boeing Field on March 22, 2019. Credit: Getty Images)

The Federal Aviation Administration said it will change its oversight approach

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Fatal Shooting in Strasbourg, France20181212

We report on the latest developments on a fatal shooting in Strasbourg, France. Also in the programme, Google’s CEO, Sunder Pichai is answering questions to Congress members regarding many of its operations, including in China. We speak to reporter at Recode, Shirin Ghaffary, on the reception the tech giant is getting. Taiwanese businesses are heading back home from mainland China - it is partly about tariffs, but there is more to the story. We also look at a Huawei arrest in Canada - and what seems like a tit-for-tat detention in China, as the telecoms firm’s woes deepen. We'll ask why the world has forgotten about a country in which people are still dying - Libya, where cities are still under siege, despite it being nearly 8 years after western governments helped overthrow Colonel Gaddafi. We discuss all this with guests Nisid Hajari, Asia Editor for Bloomberg View in Bangkok, and Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network in Toronto.

(Image: Police stand in the streets of Strasbourg, eastern France, after a shooting breakout, on December 11, 2018. Credit: Sebastien Bozon / AFP / Getty Images)

Latest developments on a fatal shooting in Strasbourg, France.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Further Brexit Delay Agreed20190411

The British Prime Minister is given another extension for Britain's departure from the EU. India embarks on its massive election process with seven rounds of voting. Residents near Fukushima are permitted to move back home, eight years after the nuclear disaster – we debate the merits or otherwise of nuclear power. We discuss all this with guests Jyoti Malhotra, National & Strategic Affairs Editor at The Print, in Delhi, and the radical activist Jose Martin also joins us from New York.

(Image: Theresa May. Credit: Leon Neal / Getty Images)

The British Prime Minister is given another extension for Britain's departure from the EU

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

General Motors Announces Job Cuts20181127

General Motors announces job cuts and factory closures as it seeks to further its pace in technology. NASA has landed a robot on Mars, intended to explore the planet's interior. The International Labour Organisation's (ILO) latest report shows that global growth in wages has stagnated to its slowest since 2008. Plus, why are people clueless when including female contributions in tech and coding industries? All this is discussed with Simon Littlewood, president of the Asia Now Consulting Group in Singapore, and professor Peter Morici from the University of Maryland in in Washington DC.

(Photo: GM factory in Russia. Credit: Anton Vaganov/ Tass/ Getty Images)

General Motors announces job cuts and factory closures

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Germany pledges support for avoiding Irish hard border20190405

Angela Merkel has visited Dublin for the first time in five years in a show of solidarity with her Irish counterpart, Leo Varadkar on Brexit. Kevin Doyle, political editor of the Irish Independent, takes us behind the scenes. Also in the programme, Australia has passed a law to curb the dissemination of violent content online in the wake of the tragedy in Christchurch, New Zealand. Tech executives could now get jail terms and their employees huge fines for their employers. But not everyone's happy about the new law though, including billionaire Scott Farquhar. And, we hear how rules used by pension funds can help improve risk management in some very unlikely places.

(Picture: Leo Varadkar and Angela Merkel. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

Angela Merkel visits Dublin for the first time in five years.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Google reveals gaming platform Stadia20190320

Stadia will be available to users on smartphones, PCs, laptops and TVs. Its Google's first foray into gaming, and we hear from technology correspondent Zoe Kleinman what this means for the industry. Indian airline Jet Airways is forced to ground planes as it runs into financial trouble - we get the latest from Mumbai. And Paris is the world's most expensive city, according to the Economist's annual survey. Roxana Slavcheva helped to compile the list and she tells us how it was calculated.
Vivienne Nunis is joined throughout the programme by Laura Lynch, correspondent at CBC in Vancouver, and David Kuo of the Motley Fool website in Singapore.

(Picture: the Stadia logo. Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Stadia will be available to users on smartphones, PCs, laptops and TVs.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Highlights of 2018: Mongolia, Zimbabwe and Zambia20190102

In this special edition of Business Matters, Roger Hearing looks back to when he travelled to Mongolia, visiting one of the world's largest and deepest copper mines, as well as looking at the environmental impact of the mine on the Gobi desert. He also looks at two of the most popular pastimes in Mongolia; ballet and wrestling.

In the second half of the programme, a look at the faltering economic recovery in Zimbabwe after the downfall of president Robert Mugabe; and Zambia's opportunities and problems in its complicated financial relations with China.

(Image: Camels in the Gobi desert. Credit: BBC/Joshua Thorpe).

A look back to when the Business Matters team reported from around the world.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Hotel Data Hack Hits 500 Million Records20181201

Marriott hotels says a cyber attacker has accessed data for hundreds of millions of customers. The online security expert Graham Cluley tells us what's known about the data breach. Also, with leaders of the G20 group of countries gathered in Buenos Aires, Argentina, trade is at the top of the agenda. Our correspondent discusses the deal that has been signed between the US, Canada and Mexico, and tells us whether any progress is likely on the dispute between the US and China. We're in the Polish city of Poznan, to hear what people there think about their country's membership of the European Union. Would you turn down an offer of billions of dollars from Coca-Cola to buy out your drinks business? Phuong Uyen Tran of drinks company Tan Hiep Phat tells us how their business prospered alongside Vietnam's post-war economy. Plus, an American smart mattress company is reassuring customers its beds do collect data, but they don't record sound. Ann Cavoukian from the Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence in Canada is concerned about having so many smart devices connected to the internet.

Rob Young is joined throughout the programme by Peter Ryan of ABC News in Australia.

(Picture: A tram passes a Marriott Hotel in San Francisco. Credit: Getty Images)

Marriott Hotels says a cyber attacker has accessed data for millions of guests

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

How Much Will the Government Shutdown Cost?20190104

The US government shutdown has now entered its 14th day. 800,000 workers are either at home, or going into work without pay, thanks to the disagreement between President Trump and the Democrats over a border wall with Mexico. Moody’s has estimated the shutdown might wipe $8.7 billion off the country’s gross domestic product if it runs until the end of the month. Gary Hufbauer of the Peterson Institute for International Economics explains how this might look.

Also in the show, two of America's largest pharmaceutical companies, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Celgene, have announced a blockbuster merger. Professor Gino Martini of the UK's Royal Pharmaceutical Society explains what drove these two pharma giants together.

Then, there are thousands of small islands off the coast of Europe. But many of them are no longer inhabited. For decades, authorities have battled to stop population decline of those small island communities as young people are lured away by more exciting opportunities on the mainland. The BBC's Vincent Dowd has been to Ireland to see what the future holds for three windswept islands on the country's western coast.

Amidst a global trade war and a government shutdown, it might be no wonder why markets are jittery, but let’s take a closer look. Helen Thomas was an adviser to the former British Chancellor, or UK finance minister, George Osborne. She now runs the Blonde Money consultancy, and explains how she views the deep uncertainty in the global economy.

And finally, video games have long been big business, but figures out in the UK show gaming now accounts for over half of all entertainment revenue, meaning it has doubled in value since 2007. One single downloadable game, Fortnite, already boasts over 200 million players worldwide. Piers Harding-Rolls, Head of Games Research at the industry consultancy IHS Markit, gives his take on this market explosion.

All through the show we’ll be joined by Eleanor Jones, Managing Partner for Dogwood Advisory Services from Singapore, and Paddy Hirsch, Supervising Editor of The Indicator from NPR’s Planet Money, in Los Angeles.

PHOTO DESCRIPTION: A young boy looks inside the National Museum of African American History that is closed due to the partial shutdown of the U.S. government. January 2, 2019, Washington, DC.
PHOTO CREDIT: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The US government shutdown continues. What will it cost the US economy?

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Israeli election: Netanyahu and Gantz both claim victory20190410

Israel's election has ended, but the result is anything but clear. Both the current prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, who leads the conservative Likud grouping, and his main rival, Benny Gantz, who leads the Blue and White group, have claimed victory despite exit polls that suggested they are neck and neck. Lahav Harkov, senior editor at the Jerusalem Post speaks to us from Likud headquarters in Jerusalem. Prisoners at Lowdham Grange prison in England are running their own television channel. It's designed to teach inmates valuable skills. But staff say it's also helping to keep the jail safe, as the BBC's Jeremy Ball explains. Plus, feeling stressed about work? You're not alone - poor management style and increased workloads are contributing to a rise in overall stress in the workplace, according to the latest study by The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Ralph Silva of the Silva Network, in Toronto. And Catherine Yeung, Investment Director at Fidelity International in Hong Kong.

Photo: Benny Gantz (L) is seeking to prevent Benjamin Netanyahu (R) winning a fifth term in office. Credit: Reuters.)

Exit polls suggest there will be no clear winner in the closely fought general election.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Johnson & Johnson denies baby powder contained asbestos20181215

Shares in Johnson & Johnson plunged more than 10% on Friday, after Reuters reported that the US pharmaceutical giant had known about asbestos tainting its talcum powder for decades.
The report comes as the company faces thousands of lawsuits claiming that its talc products caused cancer.
Reuters' review of documents found the company was aware of trace amounts of asbestos since at least 1971. Lisa Girion talks to the programme.
J&J lawyers said: "Johnson & Johnson's baby powder is safe and asbestos-free... The Reuters article is one-sided, false and inflammatory."

A deal at global climate talks in Poland looks more likely after a new draft was released. Frank Jordans is a reporter for the Associated Press at the talks in Katowice, and fills us in on the latest developments. And the environmental campaigner George Monbiot considers the future for environmental policy in France, after President Macron cancelled a proposed fuel tax rise in response to the 'yellow vest' protests in Paris over recent weekends. Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business headlines with Jessica Dye of the Financial Times in New York, and Dani Burger of Bloomberg in London.

(Picture: Johnson's baby powder. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

The company faces lawsuits claiming that its talc products caused cancer, which it denies

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Johnson And Johnson Denies Baby Powder Contained Asbestos20181215

Shares in Johnson & Johnson plunged more than 10% on Friday, after Reuters reported that the US pharmaceutical giant had known about asbestos tainting its talcum powder for decades.
The report comes as the company faces thousands of lawsuits claiming that its talc products caused cancer.
Reuters' review of documents found the company was aware of trace amounts of asbestos since at least 1971. Lisa Girion talks to the programme.
J&J lawyers said: "Johnson & Johnson's baby powder is safe and asbestos-free... The Reuters article is one-sided, false and inflammatory."

A deal at global climate talks in Poland looks more likely after a new draft was released. Frank Jordans is a reporter for the Associated Press at the talks in Katowice, and fills us in on the latest developments. And the environmental campaigner George Monbiot considers the future for environmental policy in France, after President Macron cancelled a proposed fuel tax rise in response to the 'yellow vest' protests in Paris over recent weekends. Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business headlines with Jessica Dye of the Financial Times in New York, and Dani Burger of Bloomberg in London.

(Picture: Johnson's baby powder. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

The company faces lawsuits claiming that its talc products caused cancer, which it denies

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

'Legally-Binding' Changes to Brexit Deal Agreed20190312

Theresa May and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker reveal "legally-binding" changes to the Brexit deal. Theresa May said the deal means the UK regains control of its laws and enables the UK to make an independent trade policy. She acknowledged that there was a clear concern in Parliament over the Northern Ireland backstop. We hear from George Parker, political editor of the Financial Times. British engineer Sir Tim Berners Lee, the man credited with inventing the World Wide Web 30 years ago has warned that it has become a space for 'those who spread hatred'. BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan Jones tell us more. We get an update on Sunday's Ethiopian Airlines crash, in which 157 people lost their lives en route to the Kenyan capital Nairobi; Paul Charles is a former communications director for Virgin Atlantic and airline analyst at the PC Agency. President Trump has put in a record four and three quarter trillion dollar budget request to Congress. We hear from Samira Hussain, our US business correspondent. And is technology helping us work more flexibility or making things more complicated? We hear from Heather McGregor, our regular workplace contributor. Plus, throughout the programme we'll be hearing from Lucille Liu, a financial specialist from Bloomberg in Beijing and in Houston, Tony Nash chief economist at Complete Intelligence.

Photo description: British Prime Minster Theresa May and President of European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker attend a press conference at the European Commission on March 11, 2019 in Strasbourg, France.
Photo by Thomas Niedermueller/Getty Images

Theresa May and Jean-Claude Juncker reveal "legally-binding" changes to Brexit deal

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Libyan oil disrupted by fresh violence20190409

The crisis in Libya has worsened in the last few hours with an airstrike that has closed the country's only functioning international airport in the capital, Tripoli. Libya's oil exports have ben severely disrupted, which has a global impact on the oil price, as we hear from Helima Croft, oil specialist with RBC Capital Markets in New York. With elections in India scheduled for next month, will a new film about Indian prime minister Narendra Modi swing voters to his favour? Naman Ramachandran covers south Asian cinema for Variety, and gives us his view. The New Zealand government has set a goal of eradicating all non-native predators by 2050 in order to protect the country's fragile indigenous wildlife, as we hear from the BBC's Phil Mercer. Plus, more polluting vehicles face a new charge to drive into central London. Dr Samantha Walker, director of policy and research at Asthma UK tells us that the link between asthma and pollution in London is undeniable.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Lulu Chen, technology reporter from Bloomberg in Hong Kong. And Varshini Prakash, co-founder and executive director of Sunrise, a movement of young people working to stop climate change, in Boston.

(Photo: forces loyal to the internationally recognised government at the entrance to Tripoli's old airport. Credit: Getty Images.)

Fears of the takeover of Libya's capital by a warlord impact the oil price.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Malaysia: ex-PM faces court in global financial scandal20190404

Najib Razak is on trial over charges relating to the 1MDB wealth fund. At least $4.5 billion are alleged to have been stolen from the fund. Also in the programme, are markets in the United States wise to be so upbeat about yet another round of US-China trade talks? Plus, the US government intervenes in a battle between Hollywood and Netflix. We talk about the idea of green cities and ask Elizabeth Beardsley from the US Green Building Council if small really does mean beautiful. And we're going through the garbage to find out what's recyclable, what's not - and who should pay the price of going green.

Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme by Sarah Birke, Tokyo bureau chief for The Economist and Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland, who's in Washington DC.

(Picture: Najib Razak leaving court in Kuala Lumpur. Picture credit: AFP.)

Najib Razak is on trial over charges relating to the 1MDB wealth fund

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

May Makes Fresh Push for Deal Votes20190115

UK prime minister Theresa May has made a new push to persuade MPs to back her Brexit deal. We look at the potential impact on business if the deal falls. Street protests continue across Sudan as inflation tops 130 per cent, with a drastic impact on the price of food and medicine. The US government shutdown is taking it toll in a number of different areas. Today we look at the impact on farming with Roger Johnson, President of the National Farmers Union. We also have a report from India exploring why demand for gold in the country is waning. Plus our regular workplace commentator, Pilita Clark of the Financial Times, considers whether there could be benefits to providing a workplace beer fridge. (Picture: Theresa May. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

UK prime minister Theresa May has made a new push to persuade MPs to back her Brexit deal

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

May's Brexit deal rejected again20190330

A new deadline for Brexit, but can parliament gets its act together in two weeks and will the EU be accommodating? We hear from Anna Rosenberg of Signum Global. The Danish capital, Copenhagen, wants to be the world's first net carbon neutral city by 2025. Lonely Planet have just named it the number 1 destination in the world and it's not surprising sustainability was a factor, according to LP's Destination Editor Gemma Graham.

All this and more discussed with our guest throughout the show, the ABC's Senior Business Correspondent, Peter Ryan.

(Photo: Theresa May Credit: Getty Images.)

British MPs have rejected prime minister Theresa May's Brexit deal for a third time.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Netflix Subscribers Rise to Nearly 140m20190118

Netflix finished the year with more than 139 million paid subscribers, almost tripling its membership base in just five years .But the latest results haven't played well on Wall Street as we hear from Jonathan Swartz, senior writer at Barrons financial investment in New York. Plus Oxford University has suspended new donations and sponsorships from Chinese telecoms giant Huawei. The firm is facing accusations from the US and other countries that its equipment could be used for espionage. We hear from Kieran Stacey, Washington correspondent for the Financial Times about new US actions planned against the firm.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Paddy Hirsch, contribution editor from NPR in Los Angeles. And Cathering Yeung, investment director at Fidelity International in Hong Kong.

(Picture: The logo of online streaming giant Netflix Picture credit: Alexander Pohl/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

The streaming firm gained 8.8 million customers in the three months to 21st December.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

New Zealand Attack Suspect Appears in Court20190316

The main suspect in the mosque shootings that killed 49 people in New Zealand on Friday has appeared in court on a single murder charge. Australian Brenton Tarrant, 28, appeared in the dock in a white prison shirt and handcuffs. Further charges are expected to be made against him. We get reaction from Wellington and hear how the media in New Zealand are reacting to one of the darkest days in the country's history.

There has been a major change in China's laws on foreign investment. The National People's Congress, the highest legislative body, passed the new bill addressing concerns about dealing fairly with foreign companies and joint ventures. We get the view of international lawyer Mark Schaub and ask what effect the new rules will have on trade with the US.

Also in the programme, there have been climate change protests involving school children across the world. Protester Maryam Zaringhalam tells us why she was involved.

Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by Meghan Woods, broadcaster at ABC South West in Australia and Colin Peacock from Radio New Zealand, in Wellington.

Image: Locals lay flowers in tribute to those killed and injured near the Al Noor Mosque Credit: Fiona Goodall/Getty Images

Brenton Tarrant is charged with murder in the mosque shootings.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

No majority for any Brexit options20190328

None of MPs' eight proposed Brexit options have secured clear backing in a series of votes aimed at finding a consensus over how to leave the EU. The BBC's Rob Young brings us the latest on another day of Brexit drama. It’s been two months since a mining dam disaster in Brazil killed 308 people, the country's worst industrial disaster. 50 similar dams are now being shut down, but the process is complicated. Some towns remain at risk of being completely washed away by mud. And other local economies in the region are in peril. The BBC’s Daniel Gallas reports from Minas Gerais. So-called essay mills provide work that students can pass as their own, for a fee. So it this cheating, or just another way to earn a living? We speak to one man currently being paid to write students's essays.

All this and more discussed with our 2 guests throughout the show: freelance political journalist Erin Delmore and Sushma Ramachandran, former chief business correspondent for the Hindu.

(Photo: a Brexit protester demonstrates outside the Houses of Parliament. Credit: Getty Images.)

None of MPs' eight proposed Brexit options secured a clear backing.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

President Trump Visits the US/Mexico Border20190111

Donald Trump has spent the day at the US/Mexico border in Texas to talk with officials. He reiterated his message that only by extending a wall along the border can the US remain protected from crime and illegal immigrants. We get reaction to his visit from Molly Hennessy-Fiske, a reporter for the LA Times based in Texas. Also in the programme, we hear why some big-name US and UK retailers are finding business tough after disappointing sales over the Christmas period. And we'll find out why Netflix was forced to change the Spanish subtitles on the Mexico-based film, Roma. Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by Simon Littlewood, boss of AC Growth Delivered, in Singapore, and Alison van Diggelen, host of Fresh Dialogues in Silicon Valley.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump speaks during his visit to US Border Patrol Station in McAllen, Texas. Credit: Jim Watson, Getty Images)

Donald Trump arrives at the US/Mexico border in Texas to talk with officials.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Punjab's Medical Mile20181208

In this special edition of Business Matters, Vivienne Nunis is live from the Indian state of Punjab where she takes a trip to ‘Medi street’ where there’s the highest number of medical clinics and hospitals per capita in Asia. A report from a blanket factory reveals the lack of workplace safety. Also on the programme, a special interview with Punjabi poet Jasmine Kaur, who’s making a name for herself around the world. For comment throughout the programme, Vivienne is joined by Neerja Joshi, a former nurse and assistant professor at a medical college in Jalandhar plus social worker and workplace safety campaigner Manav Singh.

PHOTO: A woman with her new born baby in Civic General Hospital, Jalandhar, India. PHOTO CREDIT: BBC

The Indian state has the highest number of hospitals and clinics per capita in south Asia

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Russian Activist Pleads Guilty in US20181214

A Russian woman accused in the US of acting as an agent for the Kremlin to infiltrate political groups has pleaded guilty in a deal with prosecutors.
Gun rights activist Maria Butina allegedly tried to infiltrate the National Rifle Association (NRA) in an effort to influence US policies in favour of Moscow.

The National Rifle Association is one of the most powerful lobby groups in the US - closely aligned to senior Republican politicians including President Trump. She said she had acted under direction of a senior Russian official. Polly Mosendz is firearms industry reporter of Bloomberg in New York gives us the background.

As the world's biggest producer of oil, Saudi Arabia has been under a lot of pressure, not least from US President Donald Trump, who does not want a cut in supplies or a rise in prices. But now, Bloomberg reports that there will be a sharp cut in exports from Saudi Arabia in January from around eight million barrels a day to seven million. Anne-Louise Hittle of Wood Mackenzie analysts in Boston gave me her view of this development.

The holy town of Pushkar in northern India has been home to the biggest camel fair in India for 150 years.
Trading camels is a valuable source of income for members of the pastoral communities in the rural state of Rajasthan. But making a living from camels is getting harder. Two years ago the central government introduced a new law that declared camels belonged to the state, to protect them from being slaughtered for meat. The government's also restricted them from being sold outside Rajasthan. Devina Gupta reports from Pushkar.

Presenter Roger Hearing is joined by Dante Disparte, founder and boss of Risk Cooperative who is in Washington, and Jodi Schneider, Senior International Editor, Bloomberg in Hong Kong.

(Photo: Mariia Butina, leader of a pro-gun organization, speaks on October 8, 2013 during a press conference in Moscow. Credit: Getty Images.)

Maria Butina allegedly tried to infiltrate the National Rifle Association

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Special counsel Robert Mueller delivers report20190323

Special Counsel Robert Mueller has submitted his long-awaited report on alleged collusion between Russia and President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign. The report was delivered to the Department of Justice, where Attorney General William Barr will decide how much of it to share with Congress. The BBC's Nick Bryant has been looking back at a complex and politically sensitive investigation.
Also in the show, electric scooters and other new modes of transport could be allowed on Britain's roads under a wide-ranging review. A report from the government this week suggests loosening the rules on speed and power to encourage wider use. We’ll hear from James Metcalfe, Co-founder of VOLT bikes.
Thailand's five years of military government haven't helped the country's economy. We’ll hear from Korn Chatikavanij, a former finance minister and candidate for the new assembly, on what he thinks might turn the economy around.
Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business stories with Eshe Nelson, economics and markets reporter for Quartz in London, and Mike Regan of Bloomberg in New York.
All through the show we’ll be joined by Colin Peacock from Radio New Zealand.

(Picture: The Department of Justice stands in the early hours of Friday morning, March 22, 2019 in Washington, DC. Picture credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Robert Mueller handed in his report on Russia and President Trump's 2016 campaign

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Sudanese Defy Military Curfew20190412

Sudanese protesters continuing to defy a military curfew, rejecting a two-year imposition of martial law. Robots are in Walmart’s shopping aisles - but are the shiny new cleaners and stock-checkers killing off jobs for low-skilled humans? And India's massive election sequence is underway; we'll assess the success of Day One. We discuss all this with guests Sushma Ramachandran - former Business Editor at The Hindu - in Delhi and Paddy Hirsch from National Public Radio in the US.

(Image: Sudanese soldiers look on as demonstrators gather in a street in central Khartoum on April 11, 2019. Credit: AFP / Getty Images)

Sudanese protesters continuing to defy a military curfew

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Tesla to Cut About 3,000 Jobs20190119

Electric carmaker Tesla has said it will cut its workforce by 7% after the "most challenging" year in its history. In an email to staff on the firm's website, founder Elon Musk said that growth had been strong. But he added it was difficult to make Teslas with their new and developing technology as cheaply as conventional cars, and the firm's cars were still "too expensive for most people". We hear from Caroline O'Donovan, Tesla reporter for the Buzzfeed. It’s already the longest partial American government shutdown in history, and all the signs are that it’s going to get even longer. We find out what business opinion-formers have have to say on the situation. Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business stories with independent business commentator Patricia O'Connell in New York, and Max Colchester of the Wall Street Journal in London.

Throughout the programme we are joined by Robert Milliken, Australia correspondent for the Economist in Sydney.

(Picture: A Tesla Model S. Picture credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Elon Musk's Tesla to cut about 3,000 jobs as cars 'too expensive'

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

The Price of Punjab\u2019s Partition20181129

This special edition is broadcast live from the Indian state of Punjab. Known as the "Land of Five Rivers", Punjab was split down the middle between Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan over 70 years ago. The economic ramifications of that division continue to this day. In the first of three programmes from Punjab, we talk about the trade relations between India and Pakistan today and take a look at its potential. We hear about the cultural scene in both East and West Punjab and pay a visit to a city that was once a flourishing centre of creativity but is now more known for cross-border smuggling.

Vivienne Nunis is joined by Dr Aisha Ghaus Pasha member of the national assembly and former finance minister for Punjab from Lahore in Pakistan and Rajeev Bhaskar, Editor of Punjab Tribune an online news website.

(Sikh Pilgrims gather after a groundbreaking ceremony for the Kartarpur Corridor between India and Pakistan. Credit: ARIF ALI/AFP/Getty Images)

What\u2019s the economic cost of splitting the province down the middle over 70 years ago?

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

The Price Of Punjab's Partition20181129

This special edition is broadcast live from the Indian state of Punjab. Known as the "Land of Five Rivers", Punjab was split down the middle between Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan over 70 years ago. The economic ramifications of that division continue to this day. In the first of three programmes from Punjab, we talk about the trade relations between India and Pakistan today and take a look at its potential. We hear about the cultural scene in both East and West Punjab and pay a visit to a city that was once a flourishing centre of creativity but is now more known for cross-border smuggling.

Vivienne Nunis is joined by Dr Aisha Ghaus Pasha member of the national assembly and former finance minister for Punjab from Lahore in Pakistan and Rajeev Bhaskar, Editor of Punjab Tribune an online news website.

(Sikh Pilgrims gather after a groundbreaking ceremony for the Kartarpur Corridor between India and Pakistan. Credit: ARIF ALI/AFP/Getty Images)

What\u2019s the economic cost of splitting the province down the middle over 70 years ago?

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Theresa May's Brexit Deal Heavily Defeated20190116

Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal has been rejected by 230 votes - the largest defeat for a sitting government in history. MPs voted by 432 votes to 202 to reject the deal, which sets out the terms of Britain's exit from the EU on 29 March. We get reaction from Allie Renison, Head of Europe and Trade Policy at the Institute of Directors. Justin Urquhart-Stewart of Seven Investment Management, Liam Murphy of the professional services firm Wachsman, headquartered in Dublin and the US perspective from Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago.

We also ask how badly relations between Canada and China have soured as a result of the death penalty passed against a Canadian citizen convicted of drugs charges. And why are efforts to find a solution to the US government shutdown going nowhere? A question for Jasmine Farrier of the Department of Political Science at the University of Louisville in Kentucky.

All this and more discussed with our 2 guests throughout the show:

Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network, in Toronto. And Lulu Chen, technology reporter for Bloomberg,in Hong Kong.

Photo: A demonstration outside the Houses of Parliament featuring a paper mâché Theresa May head sailing towards an iceberg. Credit: Getty Images.)

It was the largest defeat for a sitting government in history.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Top Huawei Executive Arrested20181206

Canadian authorities have arrested the daughter of the founder of Chinese telecoms giant Huawei at the request of US law enforcement. Robert Fife, who broke the story for the Globe and Mail, explains the implications. Also in the programme, a meeting of the world’s biggest oil exporters will discuss output cuts to help shore up prices. Amrita Sen at Energy Aspects is at the meeting in Vienna. Then, Tumblr will ban all adult content from the social networking site later this month in a move that will alter how it is used. Buzzfeed reporter Cates Holderness explains why Tumblr is doing this now. We have a report from the Spanish port city of Barcelona about efforts to bring illegal immigrants out of the shadows. Plus, London based chef Shrimoyee Chakraborty tells us the extraordinary story of the centenarian Indian grandmother Mastanamma who became an unlikely star on YouTube for her cooking.

Presenter Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by Freshdialogue.com's Alison van Diggelen in Silicon Valley and Madhavan Narayanan, journalist and former senior editor at the Hindustan Times, in Delhi.

Picture: An oil rig worker (Credit: Getty Images).

Canadian authorities have arrested the daughter of the Chinese telecoms giant's founder.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Trade Talks Continue in Beijing20190108

US-China trade talks have restarted in Beijing, but what's driving the American delegation? We're joined by Eva Hampl, Senior Director at the United States Council for International Business. We’ll also have a report from Serbia on the impact of Chinese investment in the country.

Also in the show, World Bank President Jim Yong Kim has made the surprise announcement that he is stepping down after six years in the post. We speak with Scott Morris, senior fellow at the Center for Global Development and director of the US Development Policy Initiative, on Dr. Kim's legacy and the future of the World Bank.

And our regular workplace commentator Alison Green mulls over whether passive aggression is a sensible strategy for dealing with problems at the office.

All through the show we’ll be joined by Dr. Cathy O’Neil, a mathematician focussing on artificial intelligence and algorithms, and Asit Biswas, Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Lee Kuan Yew School in Singapore.

(Picture: US and Chinese flags at the US Department of State May 23, 2018 in Washington, DC. Picture credit:BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

US-China trade talks continue in Beijing

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Trump Asked To Delay State of the Union Speech20190117

Democrats have asked President Donald Trump to postpone a speech to Congress, arguing security cannot be guaranteed due to the government shutdown. Mr Trump is due to address Congress for the annual State of the Union speech on 29 January. Is there any chance of a end to the deadlock? After a defeat over its Brexit deal, the UK government has won a confidence vote 325 to 306. We hear how British businesses are handling the uncertainty and Lianna Brianded of Yahoo Finance gives us reaction to the latest vote from outside Parliament. Also in the programme, YouTube bans uploads of dangerous pranks and challenges. Julia Alexander, Tech and internet culture reporter at The Verge tells us why. Plus, with Soho House now in Mumbai and opening in Hong Kong later this year, Sharnjit Leyl is exploring private members clubs in Singapore to see why the trend is taking off across Asia.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate in Washington. And Nisid Hajari, Asia Editor for Bloomberg's editorial board in Bangkok.

(Photo: Theresa May. Credit: Getty Images .)

Democrats have asked President Donald Trump to postpone the speech to Congress

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Trump claims US economy would 'rocket' with lower interest rates20190406

President Trump has stepped up his attacks on the US Federal Reserve. We ask Harvard professor Ken Rogoff if he's right. Also in the programme, we examine what happens to cities around the world when developers move in. Plus, Britain's Prince Harry has called for addictive video games like Fortnite to be banned. And, we ask why online retail giant Asos is cracking down on "returnaholics".

Presenter Nigel Cassidy is joined throughout the programme by independent political reporter Erin Delmore in New York. And from Perth in Western Australia, radio host and academic Glynn Greensmith.

Photo: President Trump stands behind Fed chairman Jerome Powell as he delivers a speech (Credit: Getty).

President Trump has stepped up his attacks on the US Federal Reserve.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

UK Prime Minister May Survives Leadership Challenge20181213

Theresa May has survived a vote of no confidence in her leadership of her governing Conservative Party. The BBC's UK Political Correspondent Rob Watson has been following developments at Westminster. The Indian rupee has lost more than 10% of its value against the dollar in 2018 - making it the worst performing Asian currency this year. While it has shown signs of a rebound in the last two weeks – the weak rupee is creating challenges for the Indian economy, as Sameer Hashmi reports. France's President Macron has come under fire recently for being seen as disconnected from voters. We ask leadership coach Christine Comerford from the SmartTribes Institute for her assessment of leaders including Mr Macron and UK Prime Minister Theresa May. Evelyn Berezin, the woman who created and sold what many recognise as the world's first word processor has died aged 93. Matthew Kirschenbaum, Professor of English and Digital Studies at the University of Maryland, tells us about her influence on modern computing.

Presenter Roger Hearing is joined by Peter Morici, Professor of International Business at the University of Maryland and Jyoti Malhotra, Editor of National & Strategic Affairs at The Print website in Delihi.

(Picture: British Prime Minister Theresa May makes a statement outside Number 10 Downing Street. Credit: Getty Images.)

But will her Brexit plan come to fruition?

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Uk Prime Minister May Survives Leadership Challenge20181213

Theresa May has survived a vote of no confidence in her leadership of her governing Conservative Party. The BBC's UK Political Correspondent Rob Watson has been following developments at Westminster. The Indian rupee has lost more than 10% of its value against the dollar in 2018 - making it the worst performing Asian currency this year. While it has shown signs of a rebound in the last two weeks – the weak rupee is creating challenges for the Indian economy, as Sameer Hashmi reports. France's President Macron has come under fire recently for being seen as disconnected from voters. We ask leadership coach Christine Comerford from the SmartTribes Institute for her assessment of leaders including Mr Macron and UK Prime Minister Theresa May. Evelyn Berezin, the woman who created and sold what many recognise as the world's first word processor has died aged 93. Matthew Kirschenbaum, Professor of English and Digital Studies at the University of Maryland, tells us about her influence on modern computing.

Presenter Roger Hearing is joined by Peter Morici, Professor of International Business at the University of Maryland and Jyoti Malhotra, Editor of National & Strategic Affairs at The Print website in Delihi.

(Picture: British Prime Minister Theresa May makes a statement outside Number 10 Downing Street. Credit: Getty Images.)

But will her Brexit plan come to fruition?

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

UK Prime Minister suffers double defeat on Brexit deal20181205

British Prime Minister Theresa May has suffered two major defeats - just before opening five days of debate on the Government's deal for the UK's withdrawal from the European Union. With widespread expectation that the deal will not pass a vote in the House of Commons, the BBC's Rob Watson explains what's next. Also in the programme, we get an update on the thousands of migrants who have arrived at the US-Mexico border after travelling thousands of miles from Central America. Then, we're used to the stars of the world of business being glamorous innovators - but are we missing something? Jamie Waller explains why we should pay more attention to the entrepreneurs running "unsexy businesses". And, should you pay more for larger shoes? Our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clarke thinks so.

Presenter Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by Maya K. van Rossum, executive director of the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, in Philadelphia, and Simon Littlewood, President of AC Growth Delivered, in London.

(Picture: Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in London. Credit: Getty Images).

Theresa May begins a five day debate to sell her Brexit deal.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

UK seeks Brexit delay20190315

British politicians have voted overwhelmingly to delay the UK's departure from the EU. But with no clear strategy, what's next? Also in the programme, are customer service standards slipping? Author and expert Martin Newman thinks so. And the BBC's Steffan Powell walks us through the titles vying for best video game at the Bafta awards.

Presenter Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by Jyoti Malhotra, editor, national and strategic affairs at the Print website in Delhi. And NPR writer and contributing editor Paddy Hirsch in Los Angeles.

Photo: Pro-Brexit and anti-Brexit protesters hold flags as they demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament in London (Credit: Getty Images)

British politicians have voted overwhelmingly to delay the UK's departure from the EU.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

US Banks Profits Positive20190413

Ten years since the US financial crisis, are the banks reporting more of the bad loans which brought the system down last time? There are also gains for Jumia, Africa's answer to Amazon, which has made a sparkling stockmarket debut. We talk to the man who co founded it seven years ago in Nigeria. Plus the delights of Metallica and Megadeth - we enter the profitable world of heavy metal music. We discuss all this with Colin Peacock from Radio New Zealand and activist and financial reform advocate in Washington, Alexis Goldstein

(Image: Wells Fargo app. Credit: Anadolu Agency / Getty Images)

Ten years since the US financial crisis, we look at bank profits season

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

US Businesses Urge Trump to End China Tariff War20181128

Thousands of American businesses are calling on President Trump to reach a deal with President Xi to end tariffs. Craig Allen from the US-China Business Council tells us the US president has been poorly advised on trade with China. Also in the programme, French President Emmanuel Macron has said he will not abandon a controversial fuel tax. The BBC's Rob Young has been in Paris, finding out more about the wave of anger towards Mr Macron. Our workplace commentator Stephanie Hare argues that many large technology companies remain woefully ignorant about the need to promote inspirational women as role models. Also, major clothing retailers have faced scrutiny from a British parliamentary committee over the environmental impact of ‘fast fashion’. We hear from Mary Creagh, chair of the Environmental Audit Committee who held the hearing, and Mike Barry, director of sustainable business at clothing retailer Marks and Spencer, who gave evidence on behalf of the chain.

Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the show by Alexis Goldstein, an activist and financial reform advocate in Washington DC, and by David Kuo of the Motley Fool, in Singapore.

(Picture: President Trump meeting Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2017. Picture credit: AFP/Getty Images.)

Thousands of American businesses are calling on Donald Trump to make a deal with China

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

US Shutdown Leaves 800,000 Workers Without Pay20190112

Thousands of federal workers are without their January pay as the federal budget is still unagreed. We hear from Trish Gilbert, the head of the National Air Traffic Controllers' Association, how her colleagues are being affected. Chinese telecommunications company Huawei is once again under scrutiny as an employee is arrested in Poland on suspicion of spying. And as Washington considers banning Chinese telecoms equipment, we hear what implications this could have for rural America. And will a new standard for wetwipes mean the end for fatbergs? Susannah Streeter is joined throughout the programme by Clive Hunton from ABC NewsRadio in Canberra.

(Picture: Statue of George Washington outside the closed Federal Hall Memorial National Historic Site in Wall Street. Credit: Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

Thousands of federal workers miss their January pay as the budget is still unagreed.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

US Stocks Stabilise After Sell Off20181207

US markets stabilised on Thursday after steep falls earlier in the day spurred by fears about US-China trade tensions and global growth. The rebound followed sharp falls in Europe and extended the sharp market swings seen in recent weeks. We get analysis first from Susan Schmidt, Head of US equities at Aviva Investors in Chicago. The Gulf Cooperation Council is holding a summit in Riyadh on Sunday, against the backdrop of a Saudi-led economic blockade against Qatar and Qatar's decision this week to leave the oil-producing cartel, OPEC. So how much cooperation can there be at the Summit? A question for Wadah Khanfar of the al-Sharq Foundation.The Oresund Bridge, which links the Danish capital, Copenhagen, and the Swedish city of Malmö, is a handy shorthand for smooth European cross-border cooperation. But what sort of success has it had in real economic terms? The bridge recently turned 18 - so our reporter Maddy Savage headed to southern Sweden.Have you been a voluntourist? A noun of the social media age used to describe a foreigner who goes to a poorer country to do well-meaning voluntary work. But are they actually doing more harm than good? The BBC's Manuela Saragosa has been investigating.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show.Diane Brady, Bloomberg BusinessWeek and Wall Street Journal writer turned media entrepreneur, with us from New York. And Andrew Peaple, Deputy Asia Finance editor for the Wall Street Journal, with us from Hong Kong.

Markets spooked by fears over US-China trade tensions and global growth.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Venezuela's Guaido banned from public office for 15 years20190329

Venezuela's long-running crisis seems to be moving into an even more critical phase. The government of President Nicolas Maduro has just banned from public office Juan Guaido, the opposition leader who has declared himself president. They say the ban is because of financial and legal irregularities. Mr Guaido said it was an attempt by the government to confuse public opinion. We get the latest from the BBC's Will Grant, in Caracas. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has a tough job with local elections on Sunday, with the Turkish lira suffering fresh falls in value today. As we hear from our Turkey correspondent, Mark Lowen. The US government is concerned that the personal data collected by the Chinese-owned Grindr dating app could be exploited by Beijing to blackmail individuals with security clearances. Officials have now forced Grindr to be put up for sale. The Wall Street Journal's Georgia Wells, who broke the story, explains. Plus, one of the newer trends in stress reduction that involves the noise of a gong. It's called having a gong bath - as one gong-bath practitioner, Leo Cosendai, demonstrates.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Paddy Hirsch, contributing editor at NPR, in Los Angeles. And Jodi Schneider, Senior International Editor at Bloomberg in Hong Kong .

Venezuela's long-running crisis seems to be moving into an even more critical phase.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Wall Street Soars On Powell Comments20190105

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has told a conference that he will not resign from his post if President Donald Trump asks him to. The comments boosted Wall Street, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average closing up 3.29% at 23,433. The BBC's Michelle Fleury sums up the day from New York.

With a partial government shutdown in the US now entering its third week, we talk to one federal employee about the mood amongst her colleagues.

Hundreds of German politicians have had personal details stolen and published online. Sven Herpig, project director of the Transatlantic Cyber Forum at the Berlin-based think-tank Stiftung Neue Verantwortung, tells us how much personal data was leaked after the breach.

You may well have heard of the dark web by now. It’s the hard-to-reach cousin of the regular web. Not many of us know how to get there, but Kai Ryssdal, who hosts the Marketplace show on American Public Media, called up some technical help to see for himself what the dark web looks like.

And finally, the BBC’s Manuela Saragosa has been looking into the arguments around whether businesses should be doing more to tackle the problem of loneliness.

Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business stories with Nina Trentmann of the Wall Street Journal in London, and Melody Hahn, senior writer at Yahoo Finance in New York.

All through the show we’ll be joined by Peter Ryan, the ABC's senior business correspondent.

(Picture: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House on January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. Picture credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Federal Reserve Chairman Powell said he will not resign if asked by President Trump.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

What's Poisoning Punjab's Food?20181204

Punjab is known as India's agricultural heartland. In a special edition of the programme we hear about the push towards more sustainable farming in the state and the early rumblings of an organic food revolution.

We meet the Punjabi film star and singer Babbu Maan, looking to challenge Bollywood. We visit one of India's most sacred sites, the Golden Temple and meet the team which provides some of the biggest names in cricket with their most prized possession - their bats.

Vivienne Nunis presents the programme live from Jalandhar. She's joined throughout by Himanshu Pathak, the founder of NGO Change This India and spokesperson for the Congress party of Punjab; and Lahore journalist Mehmal Sarfraz from Neo TV.

(Picture: Two farmers on a tractor in Punjab. Credit BBC).

We head to India's "food bowl" state for a special edition of the programme.

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.