Business Weekly Archive

Episodes

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20081031
20081108
20081121
20081128
20081130
20081205
20081207
20081212
20081219
20090102
20090109
20090116
20090123
20090130
20090206
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20090306
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All the week's big Business news from the BBC.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

20100723

The key interviews, reports and thoughts of the week. Everything you need to know from...

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

20101105

This episode is not available due to strike action at the BBC

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

20101210

Sexism: the glass ceiling. Corruption: business bribes. Thrift: Ikea's business culture.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Sexism: the stone age attitudes that stop women getting top jobs. Corruption: Is paying the odd business bribe a necessary evil?
Thriftiness: the business culture of the flat pack furniture giant Ikea - how far would you go to save your boss money?
Plus, the unstoppable rise of cycling - with men in lycra at the head of the pack.

20110107

The future of the world economy in 2011. And why long working hours are the norm in China.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

02/01/200920090104
05/11/201020101106
05/11/201020101107
05/12/200820081207
06/02/200920090208
06/03/200920090308
07/01/201120110108
07/01/201120110109
08/11/200820081107
08/11/200820081109
09/01/200920090111
10/12/201020101211
10/12/201020101212
12/12/200820081214
13/02/200920090215
13/03/200920090315
15/11/200820081114
15/11/200820081116
16/01/200920090118
16/05/200920090522
16/05/200920090523
16/05/200920090524

Steve Evans reports from California on the latest developments in the business world.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Steve Evans meets some of technology's biggest thinkers in California. Meet the millionaire who thinks electric cars are the future. Hear about running a business in Mexico and a novel solution to the country's drugs problem. And the African innovator who thinks he has found a simple solution to the global problem of counterfeit drugs - send a text message from the pharmacy counter. Plus two men trying to run companies in Pakistan amidst the conflict. And Lucy Kellaway on how a cleaner can save your marriage.

19/12/200820081221
19/12/200820081226
20/02/200920090222
21/11/200820081123
23/01/200920090125
23/07/201020100724
23/07/201020100725
26/12/200820081228
27/02/200920090301
28/03/200920090329
28/11/200820081130
30/01/200920090201
31/10/200820081102

All the week's big Business news from the BBC.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

A Glimpse Of The Future20100813
A Glimpse Of The Future20100814
A Glimpse Of The Future20100815

The debate over our energy future plus how the business of television is going to change.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Mark Jacobson, professor of engineering at Stanford University, says renewable energy can power the world in 40 years time. But Nathan Lewis, professor of chemistry at the California Institute of Technology, argues that more money should go in to nuclear power.

A top Malaysian businessman calls for a business jihad. Muhammad Ali Hashim, the president and chief executive of the giant Johor Corporation, wants the Muslim world to embrace Western business values without losing its own religious ones.

Plus televison analyst Anthony Rose on how we will be watching TV in the next decade. Is it going to be tailored to our individual needs and who is going to make money from this?

And Lucy Kellaway from the Financial Times on insulting big companies and why it is so easy to hate BP.

A New Oil Shock?20110318
A New Oil Shock?20110319
A New Oil Shock?20110320

Could the nuclear crisis in Japan and unrest in Arab nations lead to a global oil shock?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

We look back at a tumultuous week for Japan and hear from Tokyo-based investment banker Yuichiro Nakajima, and 'catastrophist' Gordon Woo.

As fears grow that Japan's nuclear crisis and the unrest in Arab nations could lead to a new oil shock, we speak to Dr. Jeremy Leggett, Executive Chairman of Solar Century, and Dr. Manouchehr Takin, analyst at the Centre for Global Energy Studies.

Leading hedge fund manager, Jim Chanos, warns of trouble ahead in the US municipal bond market. He tells Lesley Curwen that the question for near-bankrupt American states is: 'are you going to pay your bond-holders, or are you going to pay your teachers, firemen and sanitation workers?' And the BBC's Ed Butler reports from the city of Alameda, California on how budget shortfalls are translating into school cuts.

Plus Irish comedian and writer Colm O'Regan muses on the joys of self-employment, including going to work in your pyjamas.

A Stimulating Stimulus?20100514
A Stimulating Stimulus?20100515
A Stimulating Stimulus?20100516

Is the stimulus doing its job of creating work? We report from California.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Is the stimulus doing its job of creating work? We report from California on how the money from Washington is being spent. Steve Evans visits a massive construction project near San Francisco. He talks to workers and managers, as well as the woman charged with making sure California's stimulus money is being spent properly. Plus, computer graphics that seem as real as life itself, and the tale of the multi-millionaire searching for a cure for his paralysis.

Advice To Greece20100521
Advice To Greece20100522
Advice To Greece20100523

: get a Plan B. Advice to tech-minded girls who want to be engineers.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Afghanistan, Bankers And Planes20090821

Can Afghanistan's poppy farmers change their habits? And world bankers meet in Wyoming.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Afghanistan, Bankers And Planes20090822
Afghanistan, Bankers And Planes20090823
African Contracts And Indian Charity20091016
African Contracts And Indian Charity20091017
African Contracts And Indian Charity20091018

When is a deal not a deal? Renegotiating contracts in Africa when governments change.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly looks at the complexities of doing business in Africa. Should foreign companies worry that sometimes a contract will only last as long as the government that signs it? But is renegotiation essential, especially when the deal was flawed in the first place? The President of Liberia, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf and the former chairman of the oil giant Shell, Mark Moody Stuart, talk about their experiences. Also, don't blame the boss - he may be rich, but is he really responsible? Plus, why David Blanchflower, the economics professor who used to help set the UK's interest rates, fell out with the Bank of England. And why do Americans seem more charitable than Indians?

African Tales20100611
African Tales20100612
African Tales20100613

African tales - of human rights crimes in Zimbabwe and perceptions of hope in Benin.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Is Africa still a struggling continent fighting against abuses and corruption, made worse by its mineral riches? Or is burgeoning democracy bringing new cause for hope?

Two different visions of Africa in this week's programme, one from Zimbabwe, the other Benin.

We also hear why from the former President of Shell why BP's boss should not be resigning, despite the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

And "The Body", former Supermodel Elle Macpherson reveals all about her new life in Business.

After The Storm20101001
After The Storm20101002
After The Storm20101003

Ireland's government pledges more funds to save the banks. Was there no alternative?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

The Irish government has made another effort to rescue the country's financial sector. Saving Anglo Irish Bank could cost the country nearly $70bn but the government says it has no choice. Jonny Dymond speaks to economist and author Michael O'Sullivan who says the country has taken a wrong turn. Germany is seen as being back on the path to prosperity, but, as it marks 20 years since reunification, young people from what was East Germany wonder what the new age has offered them. And Tanzania's former president, Benjamin Mkapa, says that there can be more investment in Africa if trade barriers between countries on the continent come down.

Age Of Austerity20100625
Age Of Austerity20100626
Age Of Austerity20100627

The riches of Afghanistan and the poverty of governments.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

America's Middle Classes20101029
America's Middle Classes20101030
America's Middle Classes20101031

Are those who lost jobs and homes right to feel let down? What next for central bankers?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

They're angry and they're bitter - Business Weekly takes the temperature of America's middle classes. As the midterm elections approach are those who lost jobs and homes right to feel let down? Paul Mason reports from Georgia. And in the face of sluggish economic growth, will central bankers have to delve down into the bottom of their toolbox? Hear musician Curtis Threadneedle's take on Quantitative Easing, plus a discussion of why it matters with DeAnne Julius, chairman of Chatham House, and former Federal Reserve Governor, Larry Meyer. Plus, are you deliriously happy at work? Srikumar Rao from Columbia Business School thinks we all ought to be.

An Animal Cracker20091226
An Animal Cracker20091227

Is commercial property like the pig in a python for banks? And taking your dog to work?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Ash, Cash And Balls20100423

The cost of dodging volcanic fall-out and the truth about Spain's labour laws.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Only now are the skies starting to clear after the outpourings of the Icelandic volcano closed down air travel over North Atlantic and much of Europe. There was a tongue in cheek view in Britain that it was all a misunderstanding. Britain, in a financial dispute, had told Iceland to "send cash". Iceland misheard, and sent ash.

Business Weekly finds out how a grounded chief executive Pedro Beitra, got from Madrid to London - with a lot of good humour - and some Spanish smoked meat.

Also can Spain's unions and employers reach agreement on labour reforms, which would free up its inflexible job market?
We hear from Spanish students and economist Professor Luis Garicano from the London School of Economics.

And the rise of barter in New York. What you can get in exchange for your goods, like singing lessons.

Plus David Goldblatt reflects on the craze for golf in China and on what it costs to tee off.

Ash, Cash And Balls20100424
Ash, Cash And Balls20100425
Austere Festivities20101224
Austere Festivities20101225
Austere Festivities20101226

Can a timely intervention save Europe's economies?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Who's the festive fellow who can save Europe's indebted economies from austerity? Are business schools to blame for bankers' bonus culture? And what can a country do if it is suddenly stripped of its most valuable asset - oil? Plus: we'll be testing the emotional spell checker and finding out what's wrong with the way we all manage our information.

Austerity Measures20100910
Austerity Measures20100911
Austerity Measures20100912

Hard times in Latvia, and boom time in Germany. Plus, re-creating your career.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Two different views of Europe - hard times in Latvia, and boom time in Germany. Plus, how easy is it to re-start or repair your career? We have advice on starting again from the lawyer who was at the centre of the shredding affair at Enron. And we meet the man who keeps swapping jobs; and has gone from ballet dancer to banker.

Banks, Families And Throwing Spears20090724

Business Weekly has a bit of bank bashing - and the banks bash back.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

In this week's Business Weekly, France's Economy Minister Christine Lagarde warns bankers not to go back to their old ways. But the man who represents 375 of the world's major banks tells us his industry is busy cleaning up its act. Also, the billionaire Gerald Ronson tells us how he lost a fortune and rebuilt it and why family is important. And on the subject of families we look at how damaging feuds and rivalries can be to family-owned businesses. Plus, our top commentator in Kenya, Wycliffe Muga, gives his views on the arrival of cheap, fast broadband to East Africa. Will it, he wonders, make him stop feeling like throwing a spear at his computer?

Banks, Families And Throwing Spears20090725
Banks, Families And Throwing Spears20090726
Betting Against Wall Street20110204
Betting Against Wall Street20110205
Betting Against Wall Street20110206

When good bosses go bad... and driving an electric car.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Bonuses, Bolt-holes And Babylonians20090925

Why pay transparency can have untoward, unintended effects.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly looks at pay transparency. It now seems to have become the conventional wisdom that the more transparent everything is, the better it is. But is it true? Research has shown that more knowledge about what other companies pay can have untoward, unintended effects. It can, in fact, ratchet up everybody's earnings. Plus the programme looks at what has become of tax havens and at the world of Babylonian finance.

Bonuses, Bolt-holes And Babylonians20090926
Bonuses, Bolt-holes And Babylonians20090927
Bonuses, China And Pakistan2010012320100124 (WS)

How bonuses can make bankers more responsible.

In a week where President Obama thoroughly chastised the big Wall Street banks, can the thorny issue of bonuses be resolved? Former economist at the Bank of England, Neil Record, puts forward his ideas. And as China's economy gallops along, what's the probability that it may one day overtake that of the United States? We talk to the Hong Kong property mogul, Ronnie Chan. Plus, the uncertainty of doing business in Karachi - hear from ordinary business people how militant attacks are affecting the economy in Pakistan's business centre.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

In a week where President Obama thoroughly chastised the big Wall Street banks, can the thorny issue of bonuses be resolved? Former economist at the Bank of England, Neil Record, puts forward his ideas. And as China's economy gallops along, what's the probability that it may one day overtake that of the United States? We talk to the Hong Kong property mogul, Ronnie Chan. Plus, the uncertainty of doing business in Karachi - hear from ordinary business people how militant attacks are affecting the economy in Pakistan's business centre.

In a week where President Obama thoroughly chastised the big Wall Street banks, can the thorny issue of bonuses be resolved? Former economist at the Bank of England, Neil Record, puts forward his ideas. And as China's economy gallops along, what's the probability that it may one day overtake that of the United States? We talk to the Hong Kong property mogul, Ronnie Chan. Plus, the uncertainty of doing business in Karachi - hear from ordinary business people how militant attacks are affecting the economy in Pakistan's business centre.

How bonuses can make bankers more responsible.

Bonuses, China And Pakistan20100124
Booming Brazil And Miracles In Malawi20091121
Booming Brazil And Miracles In Malawi20091122

Brazil - land of future opportunity or stuck in the past?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Brazil seems to be steering a steadier course than many through the current financial storms. But is it, as many claim it is, on course to be one of the most vibrant economies of the 21st Century? Steve Evans is in Sao Paulo, where's he's been talking to a Lebanese immigrant who's set up his own company, as well as Henrique de Campos Meirelles, Governor of the Central Bank. And Steve investigates the air taxi business where $300 gets you to work faster by helicopter over the automobile gridlock below. Meanwhile, Lesley Curwen looks at doing business in Belarus and tackles the issue of unpaid interns - is it fair to work for nothing? And the miracle of Malawi - how that country doubled its production of corn.

Borders Without Barriers20100702
Borders Without Barriers20100703
Borders Without Barriers20100704

A brave new attempt to break down barriers to trade, at Africa's border posts.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

As a new Common Market opens for business in Africa, will its easier movement of workers deliver the goods or will bumps in the road still hold up African improvement? The BBC's Caroline Karobia reports from the border between Kenya and Uganda.

Plus Steve Evans talks to Joseph Atta-Mensah, who's the Chief of Regional Integration at the UN's Economic Commission for Africa, and asks why East Africa is going down this path?

And do you have to learn how to speak English, to succeed in the world of business? Lesley Curwen talks to students from South Korea, Turkey and China about why they have decided to learn English. Plus Lesley Curwen talks to Robert McCrum, the author of 'Globish: How the English Language became the World's Language' about whether 'Globish' will split up into many different dialects.

Also Lesley speaks to Luca di Montezemolo, the chairman of Ferrari on why the European politicians aren't doing their job.

And our regular commentator Lucy Kellaway on how a bit of insensitivity helps you becaome a big boss.

Branchless Banking And Bans On Blackberrys.2010010920100110 (WS)

Branchless banking may allow millions of poor people access to banking services for the first time. The vision is to provide microfinance services including loans and savings to very poor people. Lesley Curwen talks to Manish Khera, the chief executive of FINO - Financial Information Network and Operations - which operates through a network of local agents in India.

Can email devices distract business people from key decision-making in board meetings?

That's the belief of David Beatty who spent a decade managing one of North America's largest food companies. He's Professor of Strategic Management at the University of Toronto. He's calling for a ban on email devices in the boardroom.

And we look at the lucrative market for hair relaxers, chemicals which make curly hair straight, sleek and manageable like Michelle Obama's.

Millions of women have their hair relaxed in salons and millions of others use home-kits. But relaxers are controversial on a cultural level because they make non-white women look more European. And relaxers have sometimes caused damage to hair, or burns to the scalp.

We talk to John Corba, managing director for SoftSheen Carson Europe which is part of L'Oreal, and to the British pop star Jamelia who uses relaxers herself, but discourages her two daughters from doing so."

"Branchless banking, how email devices ruin board meetings, and the hair relaxer business.

Branchless banking, how email devices ruin board meetings, and the hair relaxer business.

Branchless banking may allow millions of poor people access to banking services for the first time. The vision is to provide microfinance services including loans and savings to very poor people. Lesley Curwen talks to Manish Khera, the chief executive of FINO - Financial Information Network and Operations - which operates through a network of local agents in India.

Can email devices distract business people from key decision-making in board meetings?

That's the belief of David Beatty who spent a decade managing one of North America's largest food companies. He's Professor of Strategic Management at the University of Toronto. He's calling for a ban on email devices in the boardroom.

And we look at the lucrative market for hair relaxers, chemicals which make curly hair straight, sleek and manageable like Michelle Obama's.

Millions of women have their hair relaxed in salons and millions of others use home-kits. But relaxers are controversial on a cultural level because they make non-white women look more European. And relaxers have sometimes caused damage to hair, or burns to the scalp.

We talk to John Corba, managing director for SoftSheen Carson Europe which is part of L'Oreal, and to the British pop star Jamelia who uses relaxers herself, but discourages her two daughters from doing so.

Branchless banking may allow millions of poor people access to banking services for the first time. The vision is to provide microfinance services including loans and savings to very poor people. Lesley Curwen talks to Manish Khera, the chief executive of FINO - Financial Information Network and Operations - which operates through a network of local agents in India.

Can email devices distract business people from key decision-making in board meetings?

That's the belief of David Beatty who spent a decade managing one of North America's largest food companies. He's Professor of Strategic Management at the University of Toronto. He's calling for a ban on email devices in the boardroom.

And we look at the lucrative market for hair relaxers, chemicals which make curly hair straight, sleek and manageable like Michelle Obama's.

Millions of women have their hair relaxed in salons and millions of others use home-kits. But relaxers are controversial on a cultural level because they make non-white women look more European. And relaxers have sometimes caused damage to hair, or burns to the scalp.

We talk to John Corba, managing director for SoftSheen Carson Europe which is part of L'Oreal, and to the British pop star Jamelia who uses relaxers herself, but discourages her two daughters from doing so.

Branchless banking, how email devices ruin board meetings, and the hair relaxer business.

Branchless Banking And Bans On Blackberrys.20100110

Branchless banking, how email devices ruin board meetings, and the hair relaxer business.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Branchless banking may allow millions of poor people access to banking services for the first time. The vision is to provide microfinance services including loans and savings to very poor people. Lesley Curwen talks to Manish Khera, the chief executive of FINO - Financial Information Network and Operations - which operates through a network of local agents in India.

Can email devices distract business people from key decision-making in board meetings?
That's the belief of David Beatty who spent a decade managing one of North America's largest food companies. He's Professor of Strategic Management at the University of Toronto. He's calling for a ban on email devices in the boardroom.

And we look at the lucrative market for hair relaxers, chemicals which make curly hair straight, sleek and manageable like Michelle Obama's.

Millions of women have their hair relaxed in salons and millions of others use home-kits. But relaxers are controversial on a cultural level because they make non-white women look more European. And relaxers have sometimes caused damage to hair, or burns to the scalp.

We talk to John Corba, managing director for SoftSheen Carson Europe which is part of L'Oreal, and to the British pop star Jamelia who uses relaxers herself, but discourages her two daughters from doing so.

Broken Climate Change Pledges And Energy Rich Brazil20091128
Broken Climate Change Pledges And Energy Rich Brazil20091129

Broken financial pledges on climate change, plus a look at the energy riches of Brazil.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

If the climate change summit in Copenhagen is going to succeed, money has got to be at the heart of any agreement. Rich nations need to pay up billions of dollars to help countries which are most vulnerable to climate change. After the Kyoto protocol was signed, richer, industrialised countries promised to pay 410 million dollars a year to help the poorest countries adapt.
But can we be sure that whatever money is promised actually gets to the people for whom it's ear-marked? An investigation by the BBC World Service discovered that the money which was pledged back then cannot be accounted for. And that's led to accusations of broken promises, and betrayal.

This week, the pledges on cutting carbon emissions have been coming thick and fast, ahead of the Copenhagen summit next month. China and the US have both put figures on how much they're willing to cut back on greenhouse gases. But if any country could afford to feel smug about all this, it's got to be - Brazil. Not only is it self-sufficient in energy, but a good chunk of it comes from renewable sources - like hydro-electric power.

Bulgaria, Ireland And The Euro20101126

What's wrong with the Euro? Hear views from Bulgaria and Ireland. And bad business speak.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

As storm clouds gather over Europe's indebted nations, we hear from Bulgaria's finance minister about how Europe has handled the crisis. And what does Ireland's bailout mean for the Eurozone? Plus the terrible human price being paid for the minerals in our mobile phones. And why do so many companies insist on speaking nonsensical business lingo?

Bulgaria, Ireland And The Euro20101127
Bulgaria, Ireland And The Euro20101128
Business Weekly20090605
Business Weekly20090606
Business Weekly20090607

Car bankruptcies to auto resurrection - an in-depth look at this week's business news.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

General Motors may be bankrupt, and eastern Europe on the verge of economic collapse, but this week Lesley Curwen looks on the bright side, hearing from Obama's economic guru, Larry Summers, and from Poland's original shock therapist, Leszek Balcerowicz - both of whom offer sound reasons to be cheerful. Plus the decline and fall of Wall Street's desk-top trophies, and why Peru's bailing out heavy industry in one of the world's most polluted cities. The best of the week's business stories in the company of Lesley Curwen.

Business Weekly20090613
Business Weekly20090614

An in-depth look at the weeks business news.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Green shoots or just more weeds? Even though GM is mired in bankruptcy and eastern Europe is tottering on the brink of crisis, some are seeing signs of recovery. Barrack Obama's economic guru, Larry Summers, and Poland's original shock therapist, Leszek Balcerowicz, are two people spotting reasons to be cheerful. Plus why Wall Street's beloved desk-top deal-trophies are a thing of the past, and why Peru's government is bailing out heavy industry in one of the world's most polluted cities. The brightest and the filthiest of the week's business news in the company of Lesley Curwen.

Business Weekly2010011620100117 (WS)

Business Weekly reveals all about where to invest your money this year. We also hear from the disgraced scourge of Wall Street, Eliot Spitzer: about financial reforms, and the scandal that wrecked his career. Plus: should sex and the office ever be allowed to mix?"

"Investing in 2010. Eliot Spitzer on financial reforms, scandal. Sex at work: good or bad?

Investing in 2010. Eliot Spitzer on financial reforms, scandal. Sex at work: good or bad?

Business Weekly reveals all about where to invest your money this year. We also hear from the disgraced scourge of Wall Street, Eliot Spitzer: about financial reforms, and the scandal that wrecked his career. Plus: should sex and the office ever be allowed to mix?

reveals all about where to invest your money this year. We also hear from the disgraced scourge of Wall Street, Eliot Spitzer: about financial reforms, and the scandal that wrecked his career. Plus: should sex and the office ever be allowed to mix?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes"

reveals all about where to invest your money this year. We also hear from the disgraced scourge of Wall Street, Eliot Spitzer: about financial reforms, and the scandal that wrecked his career. Plus: should sex and the office ever be allowed to mix?

Investing in 2010. Eliot Spitzer on financial reforms, scandal. Sex at work: good or bad?

Business Weekly20100117

Investing in 2010. Eliot Spitzer on financial reforms, scandal. Sex at work: good or bad?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly: It's All Who You Know20100806
Business Weekly: It's All Who You Know20100807
Business Weekly: It's All Who You Know20100808

It's not what you know, it's who you know: Twenty-first century networking

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly is pressing the flesh and flashing a big smile - it's all about networking - who you know - and how to win friends and influence people -

We examine the wisdom of the legendary Dale Carnegie, more than seventy years after he wrote the book on the subject. We talk to the new Dean of Harvard Business School, plus speed networking, online networking and Lucy Kellaway's thoughts on the real recipe for business success.

Capitalism And Light Bulbs20090424
Capitalism And Light Bulbs20090425
Capitalism And Light Bulbs20090426

Business Weekly looks at capitalism from South Africa to the old Soviet empire.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly looks at capitalism in countries from South Africa to the old Soviet empire.

Is capitalism is now in retreat? A left-wing government has won power in South Africa and the countries of the old Soviet block are feeling the deep pain of recession.

The great economic earthquake is shattering the status quo everywhere. Find out how the world might look when the dust settles.

And we look at light bulbs - and some of the problems in trying to cut your carbon footprint.

Ceo's Under Pressure20100618
Ceo's Under Pressure20100619
Ceo's Under Pressure20100620

The man top CEOs turn to. Is Obama going the way of Carter? And workers pay in China.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

China Re-invents Itself20100716
China Re-invents Itself20100717
China Re-invents Itself20100718

Chinese underground music, American financial reforms and a whopping dose of envy.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

China, Zimbabwe And Economics Rap20100327

America gets tough with China over its currency. And the rapping economics professor.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

America is getting tough with China. It argues that Beijing is keeping its currency artificially low with the result that the rest of the world has higher unemployment. Will Washington label China as a currency manipulator? Some say that could lead to a trade war. Steve Evans talks to C. Fred Bergsten, the director of the Petersen Institute for International Economics. He's just testified on Capitol Hill to a House of Representatives Committee which is due to report formally on the Chinese currency. But others are much more positive about China. Lesley Curwen talks to Jim Rogers, who used to be the partner of another legendary financier, George Soros. Nowadays he runs his own investment business in Singapore and is one of the greatest enthusiasts for China's economy, but admits that its property bubble may soon burst.However, he argues that won't stop China's progress. And a new property redistribution law in Zimbabwe: Is it fair? Is it economically wise? Plus, he wears a baseball cap sideways and low slung pants, the rapping economics Professor Dan Hamermesh, tells us how he entertains his young economics students at the University of Texas with his end of term, version of a rap.

China, Zimbabwe And Economics Rap20100328
China's Hidden Bank Loans20100820
China's Hidden Bank Loans20100821
China's Hidden Bank Loans20100822

Is China's economy still overheating? Plus do food price controls really work?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Is China's economy still overheating? Beijing has been trying to force the banks to cut back on their massive lending. But now it has emerged the banks have carried on lending by disguising risky loans, and secretly shifting them off their balance sheets.

They did it by transforming loans into complex investments, in an echo of the sort of financial engineering which helped to cause the credit crisis, when banks created risky derivatives out of US subprime mortgages.

Charlene Chu is from the credit ratings agency Fitch.

Should governments try to protect their consumers against steep rises in food and fuel prices? The Kenyan parliament, for example, has passed a bill which would bring in price controls on basic foodstuffs and fuel. From Nairobi, the BBC's Kevin Mwachiro reports.

In India, the government has used various regulatory tools to keep the price of sugar down. Prices have tumbled, to the point where sugar producers are losing money on every tonne they sell. Dr GSC Rao is the chief executive of the Simbhaoli Sugar Mill.

Private equity has always been controversial. It is about buying up under-performing companies to run them better, and selling them for a hefty profit. Now the question is whether the industry has exaggerated the financial return its made for investors.

We talk to Peter Morris of the Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation, and Jon Moulton, who's worked at some of the biggest UK based private equity firms and is the chairman of Better Capital.

Plus, the British author and management consultant Peter York on why more workers have to use a pre-written script, as part of their job when dealing with customers.

Choices, Cheers And Maths20090807

Business Weekly gets philosophical and looks at personal choice versus the Nanny State.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly is full of deep thought and philosophy this week. The debate between personal choice and the Nanny State - should governments nudge us in the direction of making the right decisions or should they simply stay out of our lives? And the role of mathematics in the markets. Some blame the extensive modelling and algorithms for at least part of the mess we're in now. But can mathematics plot the course out of the recession? Plus, Lucy Kellaway on how good cheer can be good supply during these troubled economic times.

Choices, Cheers And Maths20090808
Choices, Cheers And Maths20090809
Clean Coal, Drug Companies And Kabul Property20091205

Can coal clean up its act? Will technology save the world?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Cleaning up its act - can the coal-fired power industry ever capture enough carbon?Also, the sceptical environmentalist, Professor Bjørn Lomborg, gives us his views. Plus, do drug companies always tell us the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth? Dr Martin MacKay, who's in charge of Pharmatherapeutics Research and Development at the global giant Pfizer provides some answers. And pockets of normality in the midst of chaos - Richard Scarth, who founded a property company in Kabul, gives his take on doing business in war-torn Afghanistan.

Clean Coal, Drug Companies And Kabul Property20091206
Cleaning Up Reputations20100730
Cleaning Up Reputations20100731
Cleaning Up Reputations20100801

We launch a clean-up of the Gulf of Mexico, BP's reputation and Europe's banks.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly asks whether it's time to launch a global clean-up. BP has been launching its latest efforts not just to clean up the Gulf of Mexico, following one of the world's biggest oil spills, but also to scrub clean its tarnished reputation. We hear from a leading oil-man about what lasting damage may have been done.

With the banks meanwhile, the sweeping up is done by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, which sets the rules for the world's banking industry. We hear from Professor Charles Goodhart, one of the world's top experts on banking, for an explanation on how new rules are offering to change the way the banks work - although nothing will actually change till 2018.

We also speak to two Ghanaian writers of software, and to the head of Google in Ghana, about the challenges of working on the Internet in a country where the Internet often doesn't work at all. And our regular commentator Jeremy Wagstaff considers the curse of twitter - for hoteliers.

Communist China At 60 And Digital Rwanda20091002

As China turns 60, can it still make its living from cheap labour? Plus digital Rwanda.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

As China celebrates 60 years of the People's Republic Business Weekly asks is it out-growing the economic model that's brought it global success? Is the country heading for a future of labour shortages? We speak to Cai Fang, a director of the elite Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, which advises on government policy. He's also a senior law-maker and a member of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress.
Also Rwanda's ambitious efforts to become an internet economy. The BBC's Technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones has been to Rwanda to meet some of the people driving this vision forward, including Patrick Nyirishema from the Rwanda Development Board and Richard Nyonkuru from Rwanda's ministry of education.
Plus the price of change - how coins have vanished from the tills in Zimbabwe.

Communist China At 60 And Digital Rwanda20091003
Communist China At 60 And Digital Rwanda20091004
Crisis And Opportunity20100924
Crisis And Opportunity20100925
Crisis And Opportunity20100926

We look at growth in Africa, food in Mexico, shipping in the Arctic and banks in Europe.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Digging Deep, Flying High20101015

How is the mining industry tackling safety? And the future of air travel.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

After the dramatic rescue of the trapped Chilean miners, we ask Anthony Hodges of the International Council for Mining and Metals how the industry is tackling the safety of its workers.

And, are we facing another financial crisis? Lesley Curwen talks to Lee Robinson of Trafalgar Asset Managers, a Hedge Fund manager, who has produced a book called 'The Gathering Storm'.

Tensions have been building between America and China about currency valuation, but how are other economies faring? Our Economic correspondent Andrew Walker spoke to Roberto Setubal, the Chief Executive of the bank Itaú Unibanco, about the soaring Brazilian real.

What is the future of flying? We hear from Willie Walsh, Chief Executive of British Airways, about how airlines need to change in order to survive, and Charles Champion from the European plane manufacture Airbus about the planes of the future.

And from the future to the past. In particular workplace habits of the past - when smoking, drinking and office sex scandals were the norm. Lucy Kellaway looks back with nostagia.

Digging Deep, Flying High20101016
Digging Deep, Flying High20101017
Double Dip Recession?20100903

Will a double dip recession in America happen? Plus power cuts in Iraq, and sailing.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Will a double dip recession in America really happen - or could slow growth feel just as bad as another recession? As US combat operations end in Iraq, we look at the power cuts still crippling the country seven years after the invasion. And getting bruised and battered in an extreme sailing race - all set up to make a commercial profit.

Double Dip Recession?20100904
Double Dip Recession?20100905
Dr Doom And Davos20110128
Dr Doom And Davos20110129
Dr Doom And Davos20110130

Investment advice from Dr Doom. Plus: the view from Davos.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Dreadful Debts And Damaged Reputations20100206
Dreadful Debts And Damaged Reputations20100207

The Greek debt crisis, Toyota's stained reputation and Sweden's model for bank bailouts.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Anxiety has spread through the financial markets about the yawning gaps in the public finances of members of the Eurozone. One of the worst-hit is Greece, whose deficit is more than 12 percent of its economic output. The fear is that Europe's single currency might be destabilised if Greece defaults on its debts, or even abandons the euro.

The BBC's Ed Butler reports from Athens.

And Lesley Curwen talks to Dr. Otmar Issing, one of the chief architects of the Euro, who warns against any financial rescue for Greece.

Plus Sweden's finance minister Anders Borg talks about the stability fee imposed on banks to pay for future bailouts.

And Paul Eisenstein of the DetroitBureau.com reports on Toyota's safety problems and record recalls.

Steve Evans reports from Australia on the town which was devastated by bush-fires a year ago, destroying lives and businesses.

Dreams And Nightmares20100528
Dreams And Nightmares20100529
Dreams And Nightmares20100530

Tasting chocolate and saving the Euro. Plus Apple's iPad and Puffin Books.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Egyptian Economics20110218
Egyptian Economics20110219
Egyptian Economics20110220

Unemployment in Egypt: Mubarak is gone, but economic problems remain.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

We hear from an unemployed Cairo resident about how difficult it is to find work and pay for food and medical treatment for his family. And Dr Hassan Hakimian, the Director of the London Middle East Institute, tells us how the low average age in many Middle Eastern countries is contributing to economic problems in the region.
On the other side of the world in California, the film business is struggling to make a profit. We hear from Mike Goodrich, the editor of Screen International, and from the man who discovered Martin Scorcese, Jonathan Taplin.
Food Security is becoming an increasingly important issue for governements. Lesley Curwen talks Johann Tergesen, president of Canadian company Burcon NutraScience about how plant proteins could save the day.

Plus, Chris Hogg reports on the dilemma facing politicians in China as they try to deal with rising prices.

Entrepreneurs And Ethical Gifts20101231
Entrepreneurs And Ethical Gifts20110101
Entrepreneurs And Ethical Gifts20110102

Can entrepreneurs boost the world economy in 2011?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Can entrepreneurs bring badly-needed growth to the world economy in 2011? We speak to Brent Hoberman, who founded lastminute.com, and Sigrun Lilja Gudjonsdottir, an Icelandic designer and businesswoman.

We hear from Charlotte Ashton in Malawi about how farmers are trying new methods to grow food without government subsidies.

Plus, how investing in what you love can bring big financial rewards. British investor Robert Didier tells Lesley Curwen about his unusual pension fund.

And one man's search for the goat he bought as a Christmas gift. Justin Rowlatt talks to Christopher Richardson about the film he made, in which he went to Zambia to find the goats that he gave to friends as 'ethical presents'.

And Chris Hogg discovers that China's gift-giving culture has become very complicated, with people turning into 'festival slaves' as they try to keep up with all the presents they are required to give.

Europe On The Ropes?20100213
Europe On The Ropes?20100214

Europe vows to support Greece through its financial woes. But does that mean a bailout?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

It's been a long and hectic week for those involved in Europe's economies. Greece made a pledge to drastically reduce it's deficit, and it's fellow eurozone members made noises of support, but were short on specifics. Meanwhile, investors placed huge bets against the European single currency, the Euro, as worries grew about the indebtedness of countries like Greece, Portugal, Ireland and Spain.

Business Weekly talks to Portugal's finance minister, Fernando Teixeira dos Santos, who says he would turn down any bailout package from Europe because it would be "like anaesthesia".

And Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, who is advising the Greek government, argues that Portugal and others are the subject of unfair speculation.

Also it's a month since the devastating earthquake in Haiti. People are desperate to earn cash through temporary clearing-up work, but is there enough work to satisfy all the people who need it? And microfinance organisations are trying to get loans to people who need them. The BBC's Mike Wooldridge reports from Port au Prince.

Plus, it was one of the biggest scandals to rock the business world in recent years - a powerful mixture of sex, power and lies. Three years ago, the chief executive of the oil giant BP, Lord Browne resigned because of a lie relating to a gay relationship. Now, in a candid interview with Business Weekly he breaks his silence for the first time and tells his side of the story.

Flash Trading, Solar Power And Exams20090904

Business Weekly looks at how billions can made trading shares in fractions of seconds.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly delves into the lightening fast world of flash trading, where shares are bought and sold in the blink of an eye. And all in the split second before big deals are done. Does it give those who can afford the expensive software an unfair advantage? And no ray of sunshine for solar power - with everyone looking for new ways to generate power, why is that industry in such trouble? Plus, school and college exams - why the skills needed to succeed in them are precisely the opposite skills required in the workplace.

Flash Trading, Solar Power And Exams20090905
Flash Trading, Solar Power And Exams20090906
From China And Japan To The Frozen South20100416
From China And Japan To The Frozen South20100417
From China And Japan To The Frozen South20100418

Will the Chinese revalue their currency? And will the Japanese ever beat deflation?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

How close is China to a revaluation of its currency? The United States says its holding the rate with the dollar too low so China is exporting unemployment, but is Beijing's policy likely to change any time soon? The BBC's Chris Hogg met movers and shakers at a big conference on Hainan island south of Hong Kong. And why are prices are falling in the Land of the Rising Sun? Falling prices hit company profits in Japan, and by increasing the real burden of debt, they deter new investment too. But why is there seemingly little urgency to really tackle deflation? Ken Cukier, the Japan business and finance correspondent for The Economist, explains why. And Stephanie Flanders reports from Ireland on the pain and recovery of the Celtic Tiger. Plus, meteorologist Tamsin Gray describes her working life in Antarctica. On the lighter side, she outlines the joy of washing hair in temperatures of minus 50C, and holding it upside down so it freezes in a shock of long icicles.

G20 And Free Trade20090403
G20 And Free Trade20090404
G20 And Free Trade20090405

As the G20 summit ends, Business Weekly looks at whether free trade really works

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

The G20 summit in London may have ended in amity and smiles for the cameras from the world's leaders, but is that the real story?

Behind the scenes Business Weekly takes a sceptical look at whether free trade really works in the cut-and-thrust world of business, outside the economics theory classroom.

Plus, people in poorer countries are facing a double whammy. As they struggle with higher food prices, many are seeing their incomes fall as jobs are cut because of the impact of the global recession on the developing world.

G20 Seoul20101112
G20 Seoul20101113
G20 Seoul20101114

Could the currency spat lead to a full blown trade war? Hear the views from the G20.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Andrew Walker is in Seoul for the G20 meeting, where he has been investigating the danger of the currency spat leading to a full blown trade war. And he's been talking to businesses from Japan, Argentina and Denmark. Lesley Curwen is in London looking at the heady price of gold: can it rise much further? Plus, the view from China on currencies.

Ge, Communism And The Recession20090731

Business Weekly talks to Jeff Immelt of GE, and looks at two former Communist countries.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly talks to Jeff Immelt of GE on the challenge of leading one of the world's biggest firms during the recession.

Plus how are the old communist countries faring during this meltdown?

Vladimir Ilyich Lenin got much wrong but one thing right. He wondered what good communists should do in a storm on a mountain as they struggled for the summit. His advice: "descend, seek another path, longer, perhaps, but one that will enable them to reach the summit".

Clearly, the chief executive of GE, on one measure the world's biggest company, has been reading his Lenin. Jeff Immelt took the top job, following Jack Welch who was widely thought to be the world's most impressive business leader at the time. If ever there were a tough act to follow it was that.

And then came the great skid which affected GE in lots of ways because of its sheer size and diversity - it owns television channels, not least NBC, but also a big finance company. It manufactures everything from medical machines to locomotives to aero-engines.

But big picture first, Jeff Immelt gave the BBC's Business Editor, Robert Peston, his broad impression of what had gone wrong.

Twenty years ago, the Berlin Wall came down and soon after the German Democratic Republic, the old East Germany, was dead and largely un-mourned.

But now its capitalist successor, the eastern part of the unified Germany, undergoes the ructions of recession.

In the long-standing capitalist countries, crises come and crises go. They bring pain, sometimes more sometimes less, but they don't bring widespread questioning about the whole system,or they haven't since the 1930s.

But what about the old Communist world where memories remain of communism, perhaps sepia tinged memories as time alters realities.

Lesley Curwen has been to one small town in East Germany that's a microcosm of the old German Democratic Republic.

Russia, at the heart of the old system, is expected to see its economy shrink this year by an astounding 8%.

Steve Evans asked Gabriel Stein, the chief international economist for Lombard Street Research in London, what he thought the current diminishing economy would mean for ordinary Russians.

Finally, does microlending really work? Every year billions of dollars are ploughed into this sort of lending, and part of that is supplied through aid money, from donor governments. But is it money well spent?

Dean Karlan, professor of economics at Yale University, has studied how it works - and made the study rigorous by comparing groups with a control group in the Philippines.

A control group is a group identical to the one being observed except that it doesn't have what is being tested for.

As Professor Karlan told Lesley Curwen, the results raised serious questions about the effectiveness of microcredit in reducing poverty.

Ge, Communism And The Recession20090801
Ge, Communism And The Recession20090802
Getting Cash Into Cuba20090417
Getting Cash Into Cuba20090418
Getting Cash Into Cuba20090419

Looks at breaking through the barrier of the Straits of Florida to get cash into Cuba.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly looks at breaking down the barrier that is the Straits of Florida to get cash into Cuba.

The rules governing how much money Cuban-Americans can send back to their families are to be relaxed. But, perhaps more potent in the long run, American telecoms companies will be allowed to do business with Cuba, and that could well open the way for much more internet and phone use there.

At the moment, there are only about 11 fixed-line phones for every 100 Cubans, and even fewer mobile phones, not that Cubans can afford to use them so high are the rates compared to their incomes. Only 12 out of every 100 Cubans are connected to the internet, compared with 21 in Mexico and 73 in the US.

The internet, too, is very expensive to use because it is all via satellite, in the absence of the cable from mainland America that Cuba needs.

Business Weekly talked to economist, Professor Luis Rene Fernandez, of the University of Havana.

Also the programme discusses whether we are defined by our work? It's a self-indulgent question, of course. For the great mass of the people on this planet, work is what you do despite its unpleasantness in order to get payment and, therefore, food and a roof and then, with a bit of luck and elbow-grease, the luxuries of life.

But for some happy few, work is pleasure, and our jobs give us status and self-worth. In the last recession, there were people who were made redundant but who continued to leave home each morning dressed for work, even if they only went to the library or the local park.

We asked one of the world's most popular authors, Alain de Botton, the author of The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work, to reflect on the pleasures and sorrows of work.

Global Aftershocks20090911
Global Aftershocks20090912
Global Aftershocks20090913

Meet the men who told the Masters of the Universe they weren't in charge any more.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly reports from America, Europe and China on the after effects of a weekend of financial convulsion a year ago. Merill Lynch was bought by Bank of America, AIG was bailed out by the US Government and, most reverberating of all, Lehman Brothers collapsed.
Steve Evans meets Tony Lomas and Steven Pearson - the administrators of Lehman Brothers Europe. These two men from accountants PriceWaterhouseCoopers give an extraordinary insight into what it was like to tell highly educated and highly paid men and women that their company didn't exist anymore.
And the effects of that collapse and the problems other big banks discovered a year year ago have rippled out around the world. Lesley Curwen discovers that Chinese migrant workers have been losing their jobs as a result. But are there now signs that they are returning to their old workplaces as the world economy starts to show signs of recovery? Lesley joins the workers as they gather at train stations and hiring points across China.

Going Against The Grain2010013020100131 (WS)

Informal traders and black market profiteers: do they represent the seamy side of business or capitalsim in its purest form? Toby Sheta, a Zimbabwean mobile phone trader, talks about how he had to apply

""situational morality"" to make money during the Mugabe regime.

Jim Chanos is a legendary New York investor from Kynikos Associates who built his fortune by anticipating the collapse of Enron and other flawed corporations. He now foresees a crash in China's sizzling property market.

Expectations have been high over President Obama's bank reforms. But will they work?

Lesley Curwen asked Professor Martin Feldstein, a current member of Mr Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board, and Professor Tim Congdon former economic advisor to the British government."

"The black market, China's property bubble and will Obama's banking reforms work?

The black market, China's property bubble and will Obama's banking reforms work?

Informal traders and black market profiteers: do they represent the seamy side of business or capitalsim in its purest form? Toby Sheta, a Zimbabwean mobile phone trader, talks about how he had to apply

""situational morality"" to make money during the Mugabe regime.

Jim Chanos is a legendary New York investor from Kynikos Associates who built his fortune by anticipating the collapse of Enron and other flawed corporations. He now foresees a crash in China's sizzling property market.

Expectations have been high over President Obama's bank reforms. But will they work?

Lesley Curwen asked Professor Martin Feldstein, a current member of Mr Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board, and Professor Tim Congdon former economic advisor to the British government.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Informal traders and black market profiteers: do they represent the seamy side of business or capitalsim in its purest form? Toby Sheta, a Zimbabwean mobile phone trader, talks about how he had to apply
"situational morality" to make money during the Mugabe regime.
Jim Chanos is a legendary New York investor from Kynikos Associates who built his fortune by anticipating the collapse of Enron and other flawed corporations. He now foresees a crash in China's sizzling property market.
Expectations have been high over President Obama's bank reforms. But will they work?
Lesley Curwen asked Professor Martin Feldstein, a current member of Mr Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board, and Professor Tim Congdon former economic advisor to the British government.

Going Against The Grain20100131

The black market, China's property bubble and will Obama's banking reforms work?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Informal traders and black market profiteers: do they represent the seamy side of business or capitalsim in its purest form? Toby Sheta, a Zimbabwean mobile phone trader, talks about how he had to apply
"situational morality" to make money during the Mugabe regime.
Jim Chanos is a legendary New York investor from Kynikos Associates who built his fortune by anticipating the collapse of Enron and other flawed corporations. He now foresees a crash in China's sizzling property market.
Expectations have been high over President Obama's bank reforms. But will they work?
Lesley Curwen asked Professor Martin Feldstein, a current member of Mr Obama's Economic Recovery Advisory Board, and Professor Tim Congdon former economic advisor to the British government.

Good Derivatives?20091023
Good Derivatives?20091024
Good Derivatives?20091025

Derivatives, sanctions, praise and family firms - complete weekend mental stimulation.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

A different view of those much abused financial gizmos, derivatives. The energy business National Grid tells Lesley Curwen that they use them everyday and contrary to popular belief, they make their business safer. But US academic Doug Elliott says the pain of regulation is worth it.

Plus one man's tips on how to evade sanctions on Iran and Lucy Kellaway reveals her secret addiction - to praise.

There's also a look at the world's most common type of business - the family firm. We examine the eternal drama of family owned companies - where love, loyalty and commercial life collide. Ernest Antoine Seilliere talks about his personal experience of running his family's firm and INSEAD Professor Randal Carlock tells us why training as a counsellor is useful when visiting family owned companies.

Greece And Africa20100227
Greece And Africa20100228

The man accused of fiddling the figures in Greece. The cost of Africa's financial crisis.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

The former head of the Greek statistical service, Dr Emanuel Kontopirakis, defends himself against accusations that the figures were fiddled for years.

The Managing Director of the World Bank, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, tells of the damaging impact on Africa of the global downturn. But Nigerian investment banker, Kato Mukuru, has a more positive view.

What's the best way for global companies to deal with China and its unique and baffling business culture? Professor Nandani Lynton, from the China Europe International Business School in Shanghai shares her view.

Plus, our regular commentator James Srodes looks at the impact on consumers when companies like Toyota grow too big and too fast.

Greek And Icelandic Debts2010030620100307

Iceland's debt has led to anger. \nGreek finances see speculators bet against the euro.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Iceland's huge debts have ignited public anger there. Business Daily's Steve Evans reports from Reykjavik on the level of resentment.

Meanwhile, there's a tide of red ink in Greece's government finances. Speculators, such as hedge funds, have been making giant financial bets against Greek government debt, and against the Euro. British hedge fund manager Hugh Hendry from Eclectica Asset Management explains the situation.

It's not only Greece whose public finances are coming under scrutiny. The biggest bond investor in the world is looking critically at the sprawling government debt of some of our most powerful economies, including the UK. Mohamed El-Erian is its boss - the chief executive of PIMCO, the Pacific Investment Management Company, a global group based in the US, which manages investments worth more than a trillion dollars.

You might call it the Tumbleweed moment - when dead weeds roll across the dusty deserted streets of the city which has just finished hosting a global sports tournament. But what exactly is left to benefit the city that provided all that fun? Going on previous form, not much, argues our Business of Sport commentator David Goldblatt.

Green China?20110311
Green China?20110312
Green China?20110313

Can China achieve green growth? Plus, how your boss could be spying on you at work.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Impact investment promises to reduce poverty by supporting bigger businesses. But will it face the same problems as its predecessor, microfinance? We talk to Harold Rosen, who is at the forefront of the new movement.

In China, the latest government five-year-plan has set out tough targets to limit carbon emissions. But wealthy Chinese people are just at the beginning of their love affair with cars. Justin Rowlatt meets boy-racer Jason Yi and his father, Jimmy.

Piracy is on the rise. More than 700 people are now being held for ransom on ships along the Somali coast. Lesley Curwen speaks to Dr Philip Belcher from the Bahamas Maritime Authority about a recent hijack attempt on a ship, and asks Efthimios Mitropoulos of the International Maritime Organisation what is being done to stop these attacks.

And look closely at that innocent tissue box on the corner of your desk - it could be secretly recording your every word. We visit the Spymaster shop in London and talk to its director, Julia Wing about industrial espionage.

Hard Times And Emigration20101008
Hard Times And Emigration20101009
Hard Times And Emigration20101010

Time to go home or seek a new life abroad?How recession is affecting migration patterns.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

The global economic crisis has led to rapid job losses across the developed economies. Countries like Ireland, that had attracted hundreds of thousands of immigrants in the boom years, are seeing many of them leave again. Our Dublin reporter Julie Kirby speaks to people preparing to seek work elsewhere.

As stock markets languish and interest rates rumble around record lows, investment funds are buying up farmland and making good money out it. Jonny Dymond speaks to Jeff Conrad who grew up on a farm but is now the chief executive of Hancock Agricultural Investment Group, based in Boston in the US. But not everyone thinks land should be bought and sold like any other commodity - Professor John Peck of the group Family Farm Defenders puts the case for small farmers.

How young should children learn about business? The British government has said it wants the nation's young people to be more entrepreneurial. Simon Atkinson went to Rotherham in the north of England, where children are being exposed to business skills in the classroom as soon as they start school.

And it's not just children who are being encouraged to think like entrepreneurs - the British Prime Minister has made a passionate plea to the nation to start up companies to help return the economy to growth. David Blanchflower is an economist who used to advise Britain's central bank. He tells Tanya Beckett that building a start up is very definitely not for everyone.

Pawnbrokers operate on a simple principle - they'll loan you money using your possessions as security. And when the loan is repayed with interest, you get your stuff back. The system runs up against a big problem in much of the Islamic world because Islam prohibits the charging of interest. So how come pawn shops are thriving in majority Muslim Malaysia - our correspondent Jennifer Pak investigates.

In Search Of The New Austerity20090918
In Search Of The New Austerity20090919
In Search Of The New Austerity20090920

Includes John Thane, ex head of Merrill Lynch, and report on how to get China spending.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly this week has a truly global reach. In New York we talk to John Thane, the bricklayer's son who became head of Merrill Lynch - and then fell back to earth.
And we hear from Adam Levinson; the hedge fund manager whose reward last year was a cool $300 million. We'll have a report, too, from China, from the port of Dalian, about how the to turn a nation of savers into a nation of spenders. Economist Stephen Roach features. And in Las Vegas the President of MGM Miragehead, Jim Murren, tells us how to raise money in a downturn. Plus how John McAfee lost a fortune and gained a new perspective about wealth.

Inflation In China20110121
Inflation In China20110122
Inflation In China20110123

How worried should we be about inflation?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

How worried should we be about inflation? We hear from economist Andy Xie who says it's a problem in China, and from the former British central banker David Blanchflower who says unemployment is a much greater threat.
Plus Jim Rogers, former investment partner of George Soros, on why he's so optimistic about China.
Are match-fixing scandals tarnishing the allure of Indian cricket for investors?
And following Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier's return to Haiti, we hear from journalist and author Riccardo Orizio about how the world's most notorious dictators have managed their money.
Plus we speak to the United Nations Special Representative for business and human rights, John Ruggie, on new guidelines to protect workers and the environment from abuses by big companies.

Is California Broke?20110225
Is California Broke?20110226
Is California Broke?20110227

Will California go bankrupt? Plus an interview with US Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Daily is in sunny California, where the fabled golden State has turned grey with gloom... Twenty-five billion dollars worth of budget deficit has forced the lay-off of thousands of police officers, fire officers and teachers, and without more controversial tax hikes, some say California could go bust. Ed Butler meets voters and workers to get their views, and speaks to Phil Bachelor, City Manager of Vallejo, one of the worst-hit cities in the state, and Mark Baldassare, President of the Public Policy Institute of California.

US Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner speaks to the BBC's Evan Davis about China's currency and the global banking system.

Indra Nooyi, the Chairman and Chief Executive of PepsiCo, talks to Lesley Curwen about how the rising oil price is affecting her business, and about how her grandfather influenced her.

And it's fashion season in Europe, with London Fashion Week ending and the Milan shows beginning. The BBC's Vincent Dowd meets designers Christopher Raeburn and Yang Du, and Caroline Rush of the British Fashion Council.

Madness And Brain Dysfunction20090508
Madness And Brain Dysfunction20090509
Madness And Brain Dysfunction20090510

Business Weekly is about madness and brain dysfunction, in banks, bankers and bloggers.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly is about madness, collective and personal - and brain dysfunction, in banks, bankers and bloggers.

The big question this past week is whether we are now - just - starting to get past the madness which has possessed the global financial system. Is there some sort of order emerging? The authorities in America stress-tested the big banks to see how they would fare if the recession got much, much worse.

The bad news is that ten of America's largest banks need between them another 75 billion dollars to weather the hypothetical ultra-bad-case scenario in which they were assessed.

The good news? This might signal the end of the initial phase of the global economic shock - which was all about the incredible shrinking banking system, the collapse of individual banks and the seizing up of financial markets.

But how rigorous were the tests? Some experts are worried that they didn't go far enough. We asked Irwin Collier, economics professor at Berlin's Free University, were the tests too easy?

One of the amazing things about this great global crisis, it seems to me, is the human dimension. What exactly was motivating those bankers and traders as they spun out of control in the hysteria before the crash?

There was hubris among the masters of the financial universe whose nemesis then brought their world crashing down around them and us. There's a bit of Shakespeare here, or Greek tragedy or even Wagner.

To get an idea of the heightened atmosphere when it really did seem as if markets could only go up, I turned to Tetsuya Ishikawa, a trader at the time with Morgan Stanley in London and now out of a job. He's written a memoir called "How I Caused the Credit Crunch" - hyperbole, of course, but we asked him first what he meant by it.

So let's have a look at how that individual tale of collective irrationality might have a bearing on broad economics. The common perception - indeed the general assumption made in economics - is man - by which we mean man and woman - is economic man, economically rational man.

Not so, according to a very bright economist from MIT and now Duke University in North Carolina who's done a raft of experiments involving real people to see how they actually behave in particular circumstances.

Dan Ariely discovered, for example, that some people will do things for no payment that they refuse to do when there's a small payment on offer - not the way the economic text-books tell you it's meant to be.

Dan's discipline is called "behavioural economics" and it's the bright new thing. He calls it all "predictable irrationality" and 2008 was a bumper year for the theory.

Twitter, twitter, twitter. Aren't you sick of it? The social networking site is the bright new thing and if you're not at it all the time, you're clearly some sort of dinosaur.

Basically, you sign up and keep your friends - or followers as they're called in the jargon - informed of your every movement, should you so desire and should they so desire, which we suspect is more of an issue.

Anyway, is it over-hyped? I like to think, the true mark of a good techie is in knowing when a new technology is not as good as the old one. And on Twitter, our regular technology commentator, Jeremy Wagstaff, is beginning to have his doubts.

Money And Happiness20100409

Can money bring you happiness? We contrast two different jobs - and salaries.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Does money make you happy? We present you with two cases. First, a man with a lowish paid job that he loved. Donald Sewell has just retired after 48 years as a train driver.

Second, contrast him with Tiger Woods who gets perhaps a hundred million dollars a year for playing a game, and is far from happy. Hear the personal views of Dave Zirin, the author of a People's History of Sports in the United States.

Is happiness important at work? We brought together two experts on work to discuss happiness there. Jessica Pryce-Jones wrote "Happiness at Work", and Gurcharan Das is now a writer but used to be a CEO of Proctor & Gamble in India.

China has put billions into mines and dams in Africa, but what are its motives there? We hear from Lui Guijin, China's top official in Africa.

And in Britain the general election is now underway. Hard times may well be around the corner. But how do you pitch austerity to voters? Tim Harford from the Financial Times newspaper explains.

Money And Happiness20100410
Money And Happiness20100411

Can money bring you happiness? We contrast two different jobs - and salaries.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Does money make you happy? We present you with two cases. First, a man with a lowish paid job that he loved. Donald Sewell has just retired after 48 years as a train driver.

Second, contrast him with Tiger Woods who gets perhaps a hundred million dollars a year for playing a game, and is far from happy. Hear the personal views of Dave Zirin, the author of a People's History of Sports in the United States.

Is happiness important at work? We brought together two experts on work to discuss happiness there. Jessica Pryce-Jones wrote "Happiness at Work", and Gurcharan Das is now a writer but used to be a CEO of Proctor & Gamble in India.

China has put billions into mines and dams in Africa, but what are its motives there? We hear from Lui Guijin, China's top official in Africa.

And in Britain the general election is now underway. Hard times may well be around the corner. But how do you pitch austerity to voters? Tim Harford from the Financial Times newspaper explains.

Monster Banks20090612

Monster banks are under the microscope - as 10 US banks pledge to repay bail-out money.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

What's that coming over the hill? "Monster" banks under the microscope this week.

As 10 of America's biggest pledge to pay back their bail-out money, we look at the implications for the future of global finance.

Plus success stories from one of the US's biggest pizza retailers and American Indians, and why bailing out green technologies is a jolly good idea for the economy as well as the planet.

Muslim Brands And Talking Cars20100827
Muslim Brands And Talking Cars20100828
Muslim Brands And Talking Cars20100829

Businessman Rafi-uddin Shikoh on why there are few Muslim global brands. And talking cars.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Steve Evans talks to Muslim businessman, Rafi-uddin Shikoh, who is worried that so few firms from Muslim countries make it as top global brands.

Professor Cliff Nass runs a laboratory in California working out how cars can get more driver-friendly - by starting to think for themselves.

Are we too fearful of the new world of cyberspace and its viruses, worms and trojans waiting to insinuate themselves into our computers for purposes of vandalism or theft? Our regular commentator, Jeremy Wagstaff, thinks we might be over-reacting.

Plus, should you breast feed in the office?

New Realities20091114
New Realities20091115

Business Weekly is all about adjusting to new realities.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly is all about adjusting to new realities. We look at Iceland where they're trying to repair a damaged economy and Brazil, where they want to pay farmers to battle climate change and at all of us as we try to guess where the global economy goes next.

Many Icelanders are angry about the mess they're in. They blame the small and close-knit community of bankers and rich business people, at the pinnacle of Icelandic society. Some want revenge, especially those who believe there was more to the collapse than a torrent of unwise lending, made worse by the global credit crisis. We speak to the man who has the task of investigating these concerns, Olafur Thor Hauksson, the government special prosecutor looking into suspicions about loan fraud and illegal attempts to ramp up bank share prices.

And as the world spins ever closer to the start of the Copenhagen climate change meeting we hear from Brazil where the argument is about who will pay its farmers for not cutting down trees. Trees of course, are vital because they soak up carbon dioxide and so mitigate climate change. The question is, should Brazilian tax-payers pay the price or should it be those in richer countries? Listen to what Brazil's finance minister Guido Mantega thinks.

And as we all wonder if the world economy is really recovering we hear from Michael Blastland who specialises in looking at what lies behind commonly accepted statistics.

Of Puzzles And Solutions20100313
Of Puzzles And Solutions20100314

Brazil on-line, Iceland's money-troubles and Iranian sanctions. And a wooden game.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

In Brazil the internet is widely used and relied upon in all walks of life. In fact so much so, that its probably the most internet addicted country on the planet, as our technology correspondent, Mark Gregory, discovered in Rio.

The tension in the Iranian stand-off with the West, with America in the vanguard, builds relentlessly. We've aired the pro-sanction argument extensively on this programme so let's hear the anti-sanctions view from Abbas Edalat, Professor of Computer Science at Imperial College in London.

The case for paying your taxes if you're Icelandic. There's a lot anger in Iceland that tax-payers are paying much for the mistakes of Icelandic bankers. Gunnar Orn Olafsson is the head of investigations at the Icelandic tax-collection authority. How has Iceland changed since the good times stopped rolling?

Jenga is the popular game involving 54 blocks of wood, with which you build a tower. The inventor of game is Leslie Scott. She tells how she thought of it when she lived in Africa: "jenga" means "build" in Swahili.

Papers, Poetry And Politics20100402

Google on newspapers survival; poetry and capitalism; US corporate political ambitions.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Words feature heavily in Business Weekly today.

Hear Google's views on how the wordsmiths in newspapers can survive, from chief economist, Hal Varian.

How do we read in the online world? Dr Jakob Nielsen, who's been called the guru of web usability, explains.

What do poets make of capitalism? There are contrasting views from poets Daljit Nagra, Victoria Chang and Dmitry Bykhov.

Lucy Kellaway's has opinions about forgetfulness.

And should a company ever be president of the United States? Why not, says William Klein from PR company Murray Hill Incorporated.

Papers, Poetry And Politics20100403
Papers, Poetry And Politics20100404
Product Placement20100709
Product Placement20100710
Product Placement20100711

Does product placement work? Plus Mick Jagger on the era of making money from music.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Protectionism, Trade Deals...and Greed20090626

A star-studded cast talks about world trade and greed. And getting around Internet blocks.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

This week's programme rolls out the stars - some of the world's economic heavyweights. The US Trade representative Ron Kirk tells us about the growth in protectionism and his hopes for the Doha round of trade talks. Lesley Curwen gets an insight into Germany's economy from that country's Finance Minister, Peer Steinbrück. London's former mayor, the Enron whistle-blower and a hedge fund manager all talk about greed. And getting round the blocks on Internet sites in places like Iran, China and Burma. We talk to a man who's set up a company to beat the censors - can he find a way round the walls?

Protectionism, Trade Deals...and Greed20090627
Protectionism, Trade Deals...and Greed20090628
Rationality And Money20101119
Rationality And Money20101120
Rationality And Money20101121

Rationality, money and the finacial crisis. And Ireland's commedy and economics festival.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Why are humans willing to lose money in order to win revenge? Has that instinct had a role in the economic crisis? Hear the insights of behavioural guru Dan Ariely. Robert Peston reports on the millions of Chinese homes which are lying empty. Nessa Tierney reports on Ireland's commedy and economics festival. And Professor Yanis Varoufakis, from the University of Athens, talks about the impact of Greece's austerity cuts.

Rebranding Africa20090710
Rebranding Africa20090711
Rebranding Africa20090712

How do you attract business when your country's a by-word for repression or Genocide?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

How do you attract business when your country's a by-word for repression or Genocide? In Business Weekly, Steve Evans hears perspectives from Zimbabwe and Rwanda, who are struggling to rebrand themselves just as the rest of the world is most focussed on its own economic woes. He also queries the green agenda with the OECD chief who thinks we can solve climate change and make a profit. And how do you get junior to eat her peas? An Australian academic applies macro-economic theory to the diet of his two-year-old.

Recession, Poverty, Terrorism And Corruption20090717

Big Questions are asked in Business Weekly. Recession, terrorism and corruption.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

It's time to answer some of the big questions on Business Weekly. What's the best way to tackle the global recession? A leading economist says do exactly the opposite of what the Obama White House is doing - cut spending and slash taxes. Does the increase in the poverty that comes with slumping economic growth create the fertile conditions for extremism and terrorism? Egypt's finance minister tells us it's by no means as simple as that. And how to deal with corruption. The former head of the anti-corruption commission in Nigeria tells a tale of bullets and bribes - a situation which forced him to flee his own country.

Recession, Poverty, Terrorism And Corruption20090718
Recession, Poverty, Terrorism And Corruption20090719
Recession, Power Shifts - And Trousers20090410

The changes wrought by recession, power shifts across the Pacific, and bankers' trousers.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly reflects on big changes wrought by recession: the movement of economic power across the Pacific - or not, depending in your confidence in America. The movement of money from newspapers to the internet. And the movement of redundant bankers' trousers from up to down, or so it is alleged.

When the history books get written, there's no doubt that this recession will be one of those turning points.

The Depression in the 1930s transformed attitudes and led to painful turmoil, not to mention war and a belief in the state as saviour. Even if this one is nowhere near as bad, it's clear that all kinds of beliefs are now being questioned.

There is now, for example, a widespread assertion that America has let everyone else down by borrowing beyond its means and that its economic power is now shifting away. On this scenario, the Asian manufacturing countries will be relatively unhurt by recession, and poised to gain when we all emerge.

Kishore Mahbubani is a professor at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore. He thinks a time of Western smugness is over.

The recession isn't helping a lot of daily newspapers. London's Evening Standard has just been sold to a Russian oligarch for less than two dollars - the whole thing not just an eiditon you might buy on the way home. American papers from San Francisco to Boston are in difficulty. The Sydney Morning Herald and the Age in Melbourne have merged parts of their coverage.

Advertising always suffers in a recession but this time, it's only crystallised a change that was happening anyway - i.e. the internet and the explosion of alternative places to advertise.

To discuss all this, Business Weekly turned to Roger Parry who's on the board of a string of big media companies in Britain and before that was chief executive of Clear Channel International, then the world's largest operator of radio stations, concert promotions and outdoor advertising.

Finally, we dwell on the plight of the former Masters of the Universe - the bankers whose ingenuity helped get us into the current mess, and some of whom now find themselves out of jobs. And out of their trousers too, if you believe our regular commentator Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times

Recession, Power Shifts - And Trousers20090411
Recession, Power Shifts - And Trousers20090412
Recovery In Japan And Lessons From Iceland20090828
Recovery In Japan And Lessons From Iceland20090829
Recovery In Japan And Lessons From Iceland20090830

Business Weekly looks at economic recovery in Japan. Will unemployment dampen optimism?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly goes on a global tour. First stop is Japan, to take the pulse of that country's economy. Are there signs of recovery or does the shadow of unemployment loom large? Then on to Jackson Hole in the American West where the world's central bankers held their annual meeting. Have they spotted any green shoots of recovery? And to Iceland, where a leading banker tells the lessons and dangers of being a small fish in a big financial pond.

Reining In The Banks20100917
Reining In The Banks20100918
Reining In The Banks20100919

After the Great Recession, banks get new rules for responsible lending. Will they work?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Irresponsible lending by banks has been fingered as being one of the main causes behind the Great Recession. This week central bankers, at the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), agreed on new rules aimed at reining in commercial lenders, but some economists have said they will not prevent another crisis. Lesley Curwen puts the criticism to Stephen Cecchetti, the Head of the Monetary and Economic Department at the BIS.

As the world's economy struggles to recover, there is concern over whether the price of oil is hampering growth. With the oil producers' group Opec marking its 50th birthday, Jonny Dymond speaks to its secretary general, Abdullah al-Badri, about whether it has been a force for good for consumers as well as producers.

And if you are over the age of 30 you may remember the day when people were just 'people', rather than 'consumers' or 'customers'. Our trend spotter, Peter York, says the rise of marketing, and more particularly the language of marketing, has changed the way we speak about the world around us.

Sewage, Bankruptcy And Strikes20110304

An American county is facing bankruptcy because Wall St helped finance its sewers.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

We look at one American county that's staring bankruptcy in the face - all because Wall Street banks helped it arrange financing for a sewer system.

Plus: why has Calcutta become India's city of strikes?

And we talk to the anti-capitalist rebel who became a business guru by selling handbags which creak.

Sewage, Bankruptcy And Strikes20110305
Sewage, Bankruptcy And Strikes20110306
Sex, Trucks And Love20090814

How should women bosses behave in a very male business?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Sex, Trucks And Love20090815
Sex, Trucks And Love20090816
South Africa20090320
South Africa20090322
South Africa20090327

The issues facing voters in South Africa. Plus, do women make better managers than men?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Supermarkets, Microsoft And Middle Management20091009

Business Weekly looks at the psychology of supermarkets and middle management.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly looks at the power of the mind. What's the psychology behind the layout of a supermarket? What are the pressures and mental stresses of middle management? And what are the best mind games to play in job interviews? Plus, the head of Microsoft, Steve Ballmer, tells us how the software giant is faring in these uncertain times. And fathering a genius - William Gates Snr recalls his memories of the adolescent Bill Gates Jnr.

Supermarkets, Microsoft And Middle Management20091010
Supermarkets, Microsoft And Middle Management20091011
Swine Flu And Investing In Iraq20090501
Swine Flu And Investing In Iraq20090502
Swine Flu And Investing In Iraq20090503

Looks at whether there is a risk the world might overreact to swine flu.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Looks at whether there is a risk the world might overreact to swine flu, asks if now is the time to invest in Iraq, or get divorced if you are the wealthy partner.

Every day, there is a new tally of the number of people infected by the swine flu that started in Mexico and which has spread across the globe as fast as an aeroplane will take it. Assessments are raidly being cobbled together about how economic disruption the flu might cause, and how much money should be spent trying to contain the spread of the virus. But could the authorities over-react, and cause more financial damage that the illness deserves?

Different governments make different calculations. Britain, for example, has already stock-piled enough of the relevant medicine to cover half the population. Brazil, on the other hand, has only stock-piled enough to cover five per cent. No rights and wrongs here. It's a question of how you weigh possibilities against current alternative needs, like schools.

To explain the calculation of risk, Business Weekly turned to Peter Sandman who advises US government agencies.

Investing in Iraq - has got to be some sort of risk, particularly given more than a 100 people dead in recent weeks through bombs. All the same, to be in London at the moment is to hear the mantra: "Iraq is open for business".

So what is the reality? To learn more, we talked to two people who ought to know something. Michael Wareing is the chief executive of the global accountancy company, KPMG, and also the British Prime Minister's economic envoy to Iraq. And, first, Dr Sami al-Araji is the chairman of Iraq's National Investment Commission. He makes much of Investment Law Number 13, as it's known - a new law passed to make the legal framework clear.

It seems some rich people are deciding that now is the time to risk making a big financial gamble - to get divorced, while their wealth is at its lowest ebb.

Of course there are always emotional reasons behind the end of a marriage. But some of it is about canny financial planning. England is the centre of the wealthy divorce universe, and a court case has been heard here in London this past week, which could make it even more attractive.

It's all about a German heiress who wants to enforce a 'pre-nup' - a financial agreement made before she got married, which would leave her husband with nothing. When we spoke to divorce lawyer Julian Lipson from international law firm Withers, we asked how important these pre-nuptial agreements are.

Taming The Banks20091219
Taming The Banks20091220

If banks leave London because of tough regulation, is it a ""price worth paying""?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Andy Haldane, the Bank of England director for financial stability, says that if banks leave London because of tough regulation it might be a "price worth paying". He offers a tough analysis of what's gone wrong and how to put it right. Plus can we learn about financial markets from animals and plants?
Also, a big global company decides there's money in wind. We interview the chief executive of GE Power on why he's investing big in wind farms.
Plus how Icelandic citizens use knitting to keep their spirits up in the economic dark.

Tax Havens20090515
Tax Havens20090516
Tax Havens20090517

Should the authorities get really tough on tax havens?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

There are a lot of hard sums being done in Washington at the moment - the math as they put it there. With banks using up tax-payers' money like it's about to go out of fashion, and a recession biting by the day, the deficit in the public finances widens into an ocean of red ink in the coming years.

Mr Obama has just spotted where some of that money could come from. Echoing the G20 leaders, he identified tax-havens as culprits that need to be clobbered, though he and they don't quite put it that way.

It might be hard to do, though, or so thinks David Cay Johnston who won a string of awards and even one change in the law when he reported on tax for the New York Times. Now, he teaches law at Syracuse University in New York State. He told Lesley Curwen that tax havens should now be nervous.

The Age Of Austerity - But Will There Be Riots?20100430
The Age Of Austerity - But Will There Be Riots?20100501
The Age Of Austerity - But Will There Be Riots?20100502

When does anger turn to riot? As governments tighten belts, lessons from 200 years ago.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

When does anger turn to riot? As governments tighten belts from Iceland to Greece, lessons from 200 years ago about when poverty erupts into violence. It's not when people are at their worst off.
And who owns the picture on your tee-shirt? Copyright and the rights of photographers in the age of the web.

The American Dream20090529
The American Dream20090530
The American Dream20090531

As the recession bites, is the American dream now turning into a nightmare for some?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Steve Evans goes in search of the American dream in Peachtree City, Georgia. A tale of despair, resilience and hope in the suburban South. Lesley Curwen talks to the father of the Internet about his now 30-year old offspring. Plus, the man who's been in charge of some of the biggest fraud cases of the past quarter of a century. New York's District Attorney, Robert Morgenthau, tells us why more frauds come to light in a downturn. And how the shipping industry and the Suez Canal are suffering under the dual burdens of recession and piracy.

The Berlin Wall20091107
The Berlin Wall20091108

and the Box - revolutions in politics and trade.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

The Best Of All Possible Worlds20101217
The Best Of All Possible Worlds20101218
The Best Of All Possible Worlds20101219

Does Ireland's downturn have an upside? And why East Africa still backs a single currency.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

The Euro And Consumer Choices20110114
The Euro And Consumer Choices20110115
The Euro And Consumer Choices20110116

A leading economist says several countries will abandon the euro in the next few years.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

The Euro In Crisis20101203
The Euro In Crisis20101204
The Euro In Crisis20101205

Crisis in the Eurozone. And is microfinance failing Asia's poor?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

We look at the loss of confidence in the Eurozone and speak to Graham Bishop, who was involved in designing the single currency, about the possibility of more bailouts, and we ask what would happen if Germany decided to leave the Euro.

The online encyclopedia Wikipedia claims to be the fifth most popular website in the world, used by millions of students and fact-seekers every day. We talk to Sue Gardner, its Executive Director, about why women don't contribute much to its content, and how the site is trying to stop online vandals planting rude words in articles.

Microfinance, or microcredit, is supposed to be a lifeline for the poor, allowing people to borrow small amounts of money to start businesses. But following accusations of profiteering by commercial lenders, authorities in India and Bangladesh have introduced new restrictions on how the industry operates. We hear from borrowers and microfinance experts in Bangladesh.

The release of Burma's pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi has re-ignited debate about international sanctions and trade across the country's borders. But what's it like actually trying to do business under the gaze of a repressive regime? We have a report from inside Burma.

The Financial Cost Of Conflict20110325
The Financial Cost Of Conflict20110326
The Financial Cost Of Conflict20110327

As western forces bomb Libya, we explore the financial cost of war.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

As western forces bomb Libya, we explore the financial cost of war. How much is the coalition spending and can the countries involved afford it?

Plus the BBC's Duncan Bartlett reports from Tokyo on how the business community coped in the aftermath of the earthquake.

Plus presenter Justin Rowlatt also visits Beijing to find out how owning a property helps men find a wife. He hears how spiralling property prices could fuel social tensions.

And our regular commentator Lucy Kellaway tells us why we should stop promoting people on merit.

The Pay Czar, The Investment Gurus And The Tweeting Boss20091212

Can America's pay czar enforce the ceiling on top executive salary and bonuses?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Kenneth Feinberg, America's regulator of top pay in big companies that took tax-payers' billions, on his struggle to enforce the limit.

Plus, Anthony Bolton is a legend in the City of London. He is known to be a stickler for detail and someone who bucks the trend, by seeking out unrecognised gems of companies. For 28 years, until 2007, he managed the Fidelity Special Situations Fund. In that time, his fund out-performed the wider London stockmarket. He then moved into a job overseeing Fidelity's wider investments and was getting ready for retirement. But now Mr. Bolton has surprised everyone by deciding to move to Hong Kong to manage a fund investing in China. He admits it was a difficult personal decision to make. But he explains his optimism about China's growth and his hopes of finding Chinese companies which will exploit domestic demand.

And returning to the source. 300 years ago Abraham Darby used coal instead of wood to make iron, so starting an important part of the Industrial Revolution. We report from Coalbrookdale in Britain where it happened. And we ask Oxford University professor, Dieter Helm, about the cost of a new industrial revolution if we move from a coal economy to a low carbon one.

Barack Obama tweets, Britney Spears tweets, and all the climate change crowd at Copenhagen are tweeting madly too. Twitter, the micro-blogging website is all the rage. In the last year it has become a cultural phenomenon, with millions of individuals and more and more governments and companies using it. All this comes, free of charge to the users. Despite its huge success and high profile, Twitter is a business which has yet to make a profit. It has now made financial deals with the search companies Google and Bing. Twitter co-founder Biz Stone talks about its search for earnings. And will Google use material from Twitter to target users with behavioural advertising?

The Pay Czar, The Investment Gurus And The Tweeting Boss20091213
The Real Warren Buffett20091031
The Real Warren Buffett20091101

Warren Buffett on his investing philosophy - and why he buys cheap cars.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Warren Buffett on investing - and why he buys cheap cars. In a rare and frank interview, he explains why he's an investor not a speculator. But is it really more complicated than that? Mr Buffett will answer.
Plus the first man to log on to the internet. Professor Leonard Kleinrock of the University of California, Los Angeles remembers October 29, 1969 when he logged on to connect a computer with one in Stanford - and the internet was born.
Plus songs for our economic times. Comic Harry Shearer has written about Wall Street. Hear the results.

Throw Out The New, Keep Hold Of The Old?2010010220100103 (WS)

Are traditional books better than eBooks? And why are some young people ambitious while others drift? Is it the school system?

Plus, why buses are the way forward and highspeed trains may be bad for the environment.

Are traditional books better than eBooks? And why some kids have drive and others don't.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Throw Out The New, Keep Hold Of The Old?20100103
Trouble And Strife20100320
Trouble And Strife20100321

Trouble in Spain. Trouble in Africa. But is there a silver lining in the Middle east?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

The higher they fly the harder they fall. Just before the great crash, Spain could do no wrong. Money was flowing in and in the five years to 2005, more than half the new jobs in the whole of the European Union were in Spain as construction boomed. Then the boom went bust big time. Property prices collapsed. Unemployment is now a staggering twenty per cent of the workforce. Lesley Curwen has been to Spain's Costa Blanca to find out what went wrong.

If you think Spain's economy has problems, imagine those of the Palestinians, both on the Gaza Strip along the Mediterranean, and on the West Bank of the Jordan. They are in a state of perpetual conflict with Israel so you might imagine the opportunities to make money there are slim. But a stock market does exist, in Nablus. Hear Samir Hulilehm, chief executive of the Palestine Development and Investment Company tell us how you can make money.

And one of the big African problems is remoteness from markets - and the internet shrinks those distances. To get a flavour of its growing use, our East Africa correspondent, Will Ross, went to meet Zack Matere who grows crops and keeps cattle in Kenya's Rift Valley.

Uk Spending Cuts, Swearing At Work20101022

Will radical cuts in UK public services halt economic growth? And should we swear at work?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

We count the pennies, as a curtain of austerity falls over Britain. Will radical cuts in public services smash the tender flower of economic growth? Can you put a price on a rainforest in Kenya, and does swearing at work upset your colleagues? Plus, the big idea from one of the world's great thinkers, Hernando de Soto.

It's been a week of angry protests about austerity cuts in Europe; in Britain in reaction to swingeing spending cuts, in France to campaign against the rise in pension age.

Around half a million jobs will be lost in British government and councils, as parts of cuts worth $130bn in the next four years. Britain's finance minister said the measures were needed to avoid a Greek-style crisis.

Bronwyn Curtis, head of global research at HSBC, Nick Jones, from PriceWaterhouseCoopers, who wrote a report on the job losses, and Hugh Morgan Williams of the Canford Group which supplies broadcast equipment debated whether the cuts would damage confidence and growth so much that the country would sink back into recession.

A thriving economy is one where people own houses and goods and can prove it legally. But this is not the case in many poor nations. So the battle is to give land rights to millions who are invisible to their governments. They can then borrow against property assets to build businesses. That is the big idea of economist Hernando de Soto, of the Instituto Libertad y Democracia think-tank in Peru. He explained how he persuades governments his approach works.

The conservation of living species sounds like it's a million miles away from the world of business. It's not. Environment ministers and scientists have been meeting in Nagoya in Japan, to discuss targets for slowing down the galloping rate of extinctions, which has severe economic consequences. Kenya's largest forest is estimated to be worth nearly $1.3bn annually, for example. But as the BBC's David Shukman reports, the forest is under threat.

In many workplaces, one common complaint is about co-workers' bad language. But some argue swearing can be a positive force, that it can make workers bond together. Jim O'Connor, author of Cuss Control, and Yehuda Baruch, professor of management at the University of East Anglia discussed whether or not bad language at work could be justified.

Uk Spending Cuts, Swearing At Work20101023
Uk Spending Cuts, Swearing At Work20101024
Ukraine And Germany: A Tale Of Two Countries20110211
Ukraine And Germany: A Tale Of Two Countries20110212
Ukraine And Germany: A Tale Of Two Countries20110213

Can Ukraine fully stamp out corruption? And why does Germany have so few women CEO's?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly speaks to the President of Ukraine, and asks if corruption reaches the government. Plus: Germany may be a successful economy, but why does it have so few women chief executives? And, should a highflying woman marry - not another highflyer - but a supportive and unambitious husband instead?

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Uncertainty20100508
Uncertainty20100509

in the markets and uncertainty in Britain from the general election.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

West African Journey20100604
West African Journey20100605
West African Journey20100606

We travel through Africa studying the power of money. Is it a force for good or bad?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Work, Death And Football20100220

The not-for-profit US companies which supply human bodies to academics and scientists.

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

There is a demand for human bodies, organs and tissues, for use by medical schools and by scientific companies.

In America, there is a semi-commercial element to the supply of this demand. Not-for-profit companies offer financial support to families of the dead, arranging for the processing and transport of bodies or tissues, as well as final cremation. But is this a deeply sensitive area where business should not go?

Lesley Curwen speaks to Michel Anteby, a Professor at Harvard University, who has done research into the companies offering these services, and to Brent Bardsley, executive vice president of Anatomy Gifts Registry, part of the not-for-profit Anatomic Gift Foundation.

And are trade unions on the rise again? Steve Evans talks to the heads of a South African union for call-centre workers and the European unions about the future. Why did they declined and can they really stage a comeback? And, indeed, should they come back?

Also, soccer is a multi-billion dollar business, fuelled by the passion and the money of fans. But concern about insolvencies has been growing. The English Premier League is one of the richest sporting series in the world. Yet English football is riddled with clubs which seem to be permanently on the brink of bankruptcy. The BBC's Theo Leggett reports on where all the riches go - on transfer fees and players' wages.

Plus, the cost of disgrace. What is the Tiger Woods brand now worth? Our regular business of sports commentator, David Goldblatt takes a look at the economics of the world's richest sportsman.

Work, Death And Football20100221
Working Out Of The Recession20090703
Working Out Of The Recession20090704
Working Out Of The Recession20090705

With unemployment up, should governments concentrate on savings jobs or creating new ones?

Business Weekly brings you the best of the week's Business Daily programmes

Business Weekly lines up for the unemployment office - but how much should governments everywhere be spending? And should they be concentrating on saving existing jobs or creating new ones?

In Germany they pay a million people to work shorter hours or to stay at home. They call it Kurzarbeit, literally "short work". But is it worth the money?

And where there is no such safety net - half a world away in Indonesia, where the search for work is desperate and a major issue in the country's election this week.