The Charity Business

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Fundraising2018030920180814 (R4)

What do we think about when we think about charities? Is the reality different?

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor begins a new series examining how charities work, and asking what they are for.

In this first episode, Matthew asks what we think about when we think about charities, and examines whether the reality is different. He looks at the differences between large and small charities, examines some of the recent scandals surrounding the charity sector, and speaks to the Minister for Civil Society, who has just launched a consultation on the future of the charity sector.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits a small volunteer-led horse sanctuary, an evening for volunteers who want to work with refugees and asylum seekers, and a church hosting a children's centre as he delves into questions around charity fundraising. How efficient are charities' fundraising operations? Has the big increase in money spent on fundraising recently resulted in more money coming into the sector? And how does what we imagine charities do to raise money differ from the reality?

Producer: Giles Edwards.

01Fundraising2018030920180815 (R4)

What do we think about when we think about charities? Is the reality different?

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor begins a new series examining how charities work, and asking what they are for.

In this first episode, Matthew asks what we think about when we think about charities, and examines whether the reality is different. He looks at the differences between large and small charities, examines some of the recent scandals surrounding the charity sector, and speaks to the Minister for Civil Society, who has just launched a consultation on the future of the charity sector.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits a small volunteer-led horse sanctuary, an evening for volunteers who want to work with refugees and asylum seekers, and a church hosting a children's centre as he delves into questions around charity fundraising. How efficient are charities' fundraising operations? Has the big increase in money spent on fundraising recently resulted in more money coming into the sector? And how does what we imagine charities do to raise money differ from the reality?

Producer: Giles Edwards.

01Fundraising20180309

What do we think about when we think about charities? Is the reality different?

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor begins a new series examining how charities work, and asking what they are for.

In this first episode, Matthew asks what we think about when we think about charities, and examines whether the reality is different. He looks at the differences between large and small charities, examines some of the recent scandals surrounding the charity sector, and speaks to the Minister for Civil Society, who has just launched a consultation on the future of the charity sector.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits a small volunteer-led horse sanctuary, an evening for volunteers who want to work with refugees and asylum seekers, and a church hosting a children's centre as he delves into questions around charity fundraising. How efficient are charities' fundraising operations? Has the big increase in money spent on fundraising recently resulted in more money coming into the sector? And how does what we imagine charities do to raise money differ from the reality?

Producer: Giles Edwards.

01Fundraising2018030920180815 (R4)
20180814 (R4)

What do we think about when we think about charities? Is the reality different?

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor begins a new series examining how charities work, and asking what they are for.

In this first episode, Matthew asks what we think about when we think about charities, and examines whether the reality is different. He looks at the differences between large and small charities, examines some of the recent scandals surrounding the charity sector, and speaks to the Minister for Civil Society, who has just launched a consultation on the future of the charity sector.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits a small volunteer-led horse sanctuary, an evening for volunteers who want to work with refugees and asylum seekers, and a church hosting a children's centre as he delves into questions around charity fundraising. How efficient are charities' fundraising operations? Has the big increase in money spent on fundraising recently resulted in more money coming into the sector? And how does what we imagine charities do to raise money differ from the reality?

Producer: Giles Edwards.

What do we think about when we think about charities? Is the reality different?

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor begins a new series examining how charities work, and asking what they are for.

In this first episode, Matthew asks what we think about when we think about charities, and examines whether the reality is different. He looks at the differences between large and small charities, examines some of the recent scandals surrounding the charity sector, and speaks to the Minister for Civil Society, who has just launched a consultation on the future of the charity sector.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits a small volunteer-led horse sanctuary, an evening for volunteers who want to work with refugees and asylum seekers, and a church hosting a children's centre as he delves into questions around charity fundraising. How efficient are charities' fundraising operations? Has the big increase in money spent on fundraising recently resulted in more money coming into the sector? And how does what we imagine charities do to raise money differ from the reality?

Producer: Giles Edwards.

01Impact2018032320180828 (R4)

Matthew Taylor finishes his look at the charity sector, focusing on charities' impact.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor concludes his look at the charity sector with a look at the impact charities have, and how they measure it.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits charities with very different approaches to measuring and assessing what they do and the impact they have. Some ask whether it's really possible to measure love; others say a relentless focus on measuring impact allows the charity both to explain itself to funders and to improve its effectiveness. And he hears from one leading businessman who says that charities are often part of the problem - and only business, with its hugely greater scale, can really solve many of the most pressing social problems.

But as he reaches the end of the series Matthew is prompted to ask a more profound question: where do our responsibilities lie? Some influential advocates argue that failing to adopt a utilitarian perspective in at least some of our giving is irrational, even immoral; while for many volunteers, donors and trustees of charities the act of giving itself is what makes charity worthwhile.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

01Impact2018032320180829 (R4)

Matthew Taylor finishes his look at the charity sector, focusing on charities' impact.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor concludes his look at the charity sector with a look at the impact charities have, and how they measure it.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits charities with very different approaches to measuring and assessing what they do and the impact they have. Some ask whether it's really possible to measure love; others say a relentless focus on measuring impact allows the charity both to explain itself to funders and to improve its effectiveness. And he hears from one leading businessman who says that charities are often part of the problem - and only business, with its hugely greater scale, can really solve many of the most pressing social problems.

But as he reaches the end of the series Matthew is prompted to ask a more profound question: where do our responsibilities lie? Some influential advocates argue that failing to adopt a utilitarian perspective in at least some of our giving is irrational, even immoral; while for many volunteers, donors and trustees of charities the act of giving itself is what makes charity worthwhile.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

01Impact2018032320180829 (R4)
20180828 (R4)

Matthew Taylor finishes his look at the charity sector, focusing on charities' impact.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor concludes his look at the charity sector with a look at the impact charities have, and how they measure it.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits charities with very different approaches to measuring and assessing what they do and the impact they have. Some ask whether it's really possible to measure love; others say a relentless focus on measuring impact allows the charity both to explain itself to funders and to improve its effectiveness. And he hears from one leading businessman who says that charities are often part of the problem - and only business, with its hugely greater scale, can really solve many of the most pressing social problems.

But as he reaches the end of the series Matthew is prompted to ask a more profound question: where do our responsibilities lie? Some influential advocates argue that failing to adopt a utilitarian perspective in at least some of our giving is irrational, even immoral; while for many volunteers, donors and trustees of charities the act of giving itself is what makes charity worthwhile.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

Matthew Taylor finishes his look at the charity sector, focusing on charities' impact.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor concludes his look at the charity sector with a look at the impact charities have, and how they measure it.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits charities with very different approaches to measuring and assessing what they do and the impact they have. Some ask whether it's really possible to measure love; others say a relentless focus on measuring impact allows the charity both to explain itself to funders and to improve its effectiveness. And he hears from one leading businessman who says that charities are often part of the problem - and only business, with its hugely greater scale, can really solve many of the most pressing social problems.

But as he reaches the end of the series Matthew is prompted to ask a more profound question: where do our responsibilities lie? Some influential advocates argue that failing to adopt a utilitarian perspective in at least some of our giving is irrational, even immoral; while for many volunteers, donors and trustees of charities the act of giving itself is what makes charity worthwhile.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

01Service Delivery2018031620180821 (R4)

Matthew Taylor continues his series on what charities are for, examining service delivery.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor continues his series asking what charities are for, in this episode examining service delivery and charities' relationships with government.

In recent years, governments of all political stripes have looked to charities to deliver many of their services, including to some of the hardest-to-reach individuals and communities in the UK and around the world. But what happens when charities get almost all their money from government? How free are they to speak out on behalf of the people they are supposed to help? And what else happens when charities start behaving like contractors, competing with each other for business?

Visiting Bradford and Leeds, Matthew speaks to charities, to service users, and to commissioners about the relationship with government. He hears some real concerns about where it is going wrong, and how it can be improved.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

01Service Delivery2018031620180822 (R4)

Matthew Taylor continues his series on what charities are for, examining service delivery.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor continues his series asking what charities are for, in this episode examining service delivery and charities' relationships with government.

In recent years, governments of all political stripes have looked to charities to deliver many of their services, including to some of the hardest-to-reach individuals and communities in the UK and around the world. But what happens when charities get almost all their money from government? How free are they to speak out on behalf of the people they are supposed to help? And what else happens when charities start behaving like contractors, competing with each other for business?

Visiting Bradford and Leeds, Matthew speaks to charities, to service users, and to commissioners about the relationship with government. He hears some real concerns about where it is going wrong, and how it can be improved.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

01Service Delivery20180316

Matthew Taylor continues his series on what charities are for, examining service delivery.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor continues his series asking what charities are for, in this episode examining service delivery and charities' relationships with government.

In recent years, governments of all political stripes have looked to charities to deliver many of their services, including to some of the hardest-to-reach individuals and communities in the UK and around the world. But what happens when charities get almost all their money from government? How free are they to speak out on behalf of the people they are supposed to help? And what else happens when charities start behaving like contractors, competing with each other for business?

Visiting Bradford and Leeds, Matthew speaks to charities, to service users, and to commissioners about the relationship with government. He hears some real concerns about where it is going wrong, and how it can be improved.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

01Service Delivery2018031620180822 (R4)
20180821 (R4)

Matthew Taylor continues his series on what charities are for, examining service delivery.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor continues his series asking what charities are for, in this episode examining service delivery and charities' relationships with government.

In recent years, governments of all political stripes have looked to charities to deliver many of their services, including to some of the hardest-to-reach individuals and communities in the UK and around the world. But what happens when charities get almost all their money from government? How free are they to speak out on behalf of the people they are supposed to help? And what else happens when charities start behaving like contractors, competing with each other for business?

Visiting Bradford and Leeds, Matthew speaks to charities, to service users, and to commissioners about the relationship with government. He hears some real concerns about where it is going wrong, and how it can be improved.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

Matthew Taylor continues his series on what charities are for, examining service delivery.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor continues his series asking what charities are for, in this episode examining service delivery and charities' relationships with government.

In recent years, governments of all political stripes have looked to charities to deliver many of their services, including to some of the hardest-to-reach individuals and communities in the UK and around the world. But what happens when charities get almost all their money from government? How free are they to speak out on behalf of the people they are supposed to help? And what else happens when charities start behaving like contractors, competing with each other for business?

Visiting Bradford and Leeds, Matthew speaks to charities, to service users, and to commissioners about the relationship with government. He hears some real concerns about where it is going wrong, and how it can be improved.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

0101Fundraising20180309

Matthew Taylor begins a new series examining how charities work, and asking what they are for.

In this first episode, Matthew asks what we think about when we think about charities, and examines whether the reality is different. He looks at the differences between large and small charities, examines some of the recent scandals surrounding the charity sector, and speaks to the Minister for Civil Society, who has just launched a consultation on the future of the charity sector.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits a small volunteer-led horse sanctuary, an evening for volunteers who want to work with refugees and asylum seekers, and a church hosting a children's centre as he delves into questions around charity fundraising. How efficient are charities' fundraising operations? Has the big increase in money spent on fundraising recently resulted in more money coming into the sector? And how does what we imagine charities do to raise money differ from the reality?

Producer: Giles Edwards.

Matthew Taylor begins a new series examining how charities work, and asking what they are for.

In this first episode, Matthew asks what we think about when we think about charities, and examines whether the reality is different. He looks at the differences between large and small charities, examines some of the recent scandals surrounding the charity sector, and hears from a man who thinks business, rather than charity, is the best way to solve social problems.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits a small volunteer-led horse sanctuary, a charity music gig, and a church hosting a children's centre as he delves into questions around charity fundraising. How efficient are charities' fundraising operations? Has the big increase in money spent on fundraising recently resulted in more money coming into the sector? And how does what we imagine charities do to raise money differ from the reality?

Producer: Giles Edwards.

What do we think about when we think about charities? Is the reality different?

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

0102Service Delivery20180316

Matthew Taylor continues his series asking what charities are for, in this episode examining service delivery and charities' relationships with government.

In recent years, governments of all political stripes have looked to charities to deliver many of their services, including to some of the hardest-to-reach individuals and communities in the UK and around the world. But what happens when charities get almost all their money from government? How free are they to speak out on behalf of the people they are supposed to help? And what else happens when charities start behaving like contractors, competing with each other for business?

Visiting Bradford and Leeds, Matthew speaks to charities, to service users, and to commissioners about the relationship with government. He hears some real concerns about where it is going wrong, and how it can be improved.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

Matthew Taylor continues his series on what charities are for, examining service delivery.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

0103Impact20180323

Matthew Taylor finishes his look at the charity sector, focusing on charities' impact.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor finishes his look at the charity sector, focusing on charities' impact.

Matthew Taylor presents a series asking what charities are for.

Matthew Taylor concludes his look at the charity sector with a look at the impact charities have, and how they measure it.

In Leeds and Bradford, Matthew visits charities with very different approaches to measuring and assessing what they do and the impact they have. Some ask whether it's really possible to measure love; others say a relentless focus on measuring impact allows the charity both to explain itself to funders and to improve its effectiveness. And he hears from one leading businessman who says that charities are often part of the problem - and only business, with its hugely greater scale, can really solve many of the most pressing social problems.

But as he reaches the end of the series Matthew is prompted to ask a more profound question: where do our responsibilities lie? Some influential advocates argue that failing to adopt a utilitarian perspective in at least some of our giving is irrational, even immoral; while for many volunteers, donors and trustees of charities the act of giving itself is what makes charity worthwhile.

Producer: Giles Edwards.