Charlotte And Lillian

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
0101The Introduction20170920

A young charity volunteer meets the old lady she has been paired with for the first time.

In the throes of splitting up from her boyfriend, 29-year-old Charlotte (Helen Monks) is determined to prove she's not as self-centred as he says she is. She signs up as a volunteer to visit the elderly, expecting to be paired with a frail and needy old lady who's full of gratitude and appreciation for such a selfless act. Instead she meets 82-year-old Lillian (Miriam Margolyes), a belligerent and feisty old bat who sees through her in an instant.

Needless to say, they don't get on - but Charlotte and Lillian's conflicting outlooks on life belie a striking similarity in their personalities. Both are profoundly selfish, self-involved and stubborn; both are quietly curious about each other (though they'd never dream of admitting it); and both are lonely.

With every visit, their arguments grow more heated, the resolutions more uneasy and the outcomes more entertaining, as Charlotte and Lillian discover eye-opening truths about themselves and each other.

This four-part, two-actress comedy, written by Holly Walsh and Kat Sommers, was recorded on location and features the fantastic combination of Miriam Margolyes and Helen Monks, working together for the first time.

As the series opens, Charlotte arrives -late - at Lillian's flat, fresh from another argument with her soon-to-be-ex. She's expecting a grateful, attentive old lady, so is pretty put out when Lillian seems more concerned with that afternoon's edition of Flog It!. Lillian, on the other hand, is irritated by the constant chirrups from Charlotte's phone and how Charlotte can't stop looking at it.

Neither of them is expecting things to develop so speedily.

A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4.

0102The Photo20170927

Charlotte wants a photo of all the good she is doing. Lillian demands editorial control.

In the throes of splitting up from her boyfriend, 29-year-old Charlotte (Helen Monks) is determined to prove she's not as self-centred as he says she is. She signs up as a volunteer to visit the elderly, expecting to be paired with a frail and needy old lady who's full of gratitude and appreciation for such a selfless act. Instead she meets 82-year-old Lillian (Miriam Margolyes), a belligerent and feisty old bat who sees through her in an instant.

Needless to say, they don't get on.

But Charlotte and Lillian's conflicting outlooks on life belie a striking similarity in their personalities. Both are profoundly selfish, self-involved and stubborn. Both are quietly curious about each other - though they'd never dream of admitting it. And both are lonely.

For Charlotte, spending time with Lillian brings certain benefits, and she's keen to maximise them for her 'personal brand'. She starts capturing moments of their time together with her phone's camera - something Lillian quickly takes exception to. She wants full editorial control, along with the final say over any photos. A battle of wills and vanities ensues, but not before each of them has picked up some unforeseen advice from across the generational divide.

This four-part, two-actress comedy, written by Holly Walsh and Kat Sommers, was recorded on location and features the fantastic combination of Miriam Margolyes and Helen Monks, working together for the first time.

A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4.

0103The Mirror20171004

Charlotte spots a priceless vintage treasure as she helps Lillian clear out her garage.

In the throes of splitting up from her boyfriend, 29-year-old Charlotte (Helen Monks) is determined to prove she's not as self-centred as he says she is. She signs up as a volunteer to visit the elderly, expecting to be paired with a frail and needy old lady who's full of gratitude and appreciation for such a selfless act. Instead she meets 82-year-old Lillian (Miriam Margolyes), a belligerent and feisty old bat who sees through her in an instant.

Needless to say, they don't get on.

Helping Lillian clear out her garage is undoubtedly a Good Turn, but it's not long before Charlotte's self-interest gets the better of her. She spots a vintage treasure in amongst Lillian's junk and, determined to get her hands on it, attempts to manipulate Lillian into giving it to her. Not only does her plan backfire spectacularly, but it also reveals how both women are just as greedy as each other.

This four-part, two-actress comedy, written by Holly Walsh and Kat Sommers, was recorded on location and features the fantastic combination of Miriam Margolyes and Helen Monks, working together for the first time.

A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4.

0104The Star Turn20171011

Lillian's tales about her life and acting career prompt Charlotte to investigate further.

In the throes of splitting up from her boyfriend, 29-year-old Charlotte (Helen Monks) is determined to prove she's not as self-centred as he says she is. She signs up as a volunteer to visit the elderly, expecting to be paired with a frail and needy old lady who's full of gratitude and appreciation for such a selfless act. Instead she meets 82-year-old Lillian (Miriam Margolyes), a belligerent and feisty old bat who sees through her in an instant.

Needless to say, they don't get on.

With the split from her boyfriend seemingly final, Charlotte has moved back in with her parents. In a desperate attempt to revamp her life, she's decided she wants to become a journalist, and announces to Lillian that she wants to jump start her new career with a poignant profile of her that will warm the hearts of everyone who reads it. Lillian is initially flattered by Charlotte's interest in her previous career as an actress - until she realises footage of her greatest ever role can be found at the touch of a button on Charlotte's mobile.

This four-part, two-actress comedy, written by Holly Walsh and Kat Sommers, was recorded on location and features the fantastic combination of Miriam Margolyes and Helen Monks, working together for the first time.

A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4.