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20180312 ()

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

20180319 ()

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

20141103

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about...

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

20180319

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

20180702

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

20180723

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

20180827

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

20181001

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women about their paths to success.

20181015

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women about their paths to success.

#MeToo: Two Women's Stories Beyond Hollywood20181015

Two women who have made public allegations of sexual abuse in Georgia and Japan

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women about their paths to success.

03/04/2017 Gmt20170403

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

06/02/2017 Gmt20170206

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

06/03/2017 Gmt20170306
09/01/2017 Gmt20170109
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13/02/2017 Gmt20170213
14/11/2016 Gmt20161114

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

21/11/2016 Gmt20161121
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27/02/2017 Gmt20170227

Star cricketers from New Zealand and the West Indies discuss the women's game.

30/01/2017 Gmt20170130
A Calling: Naamah Kelman and Christine Mayr-Lumetzberger20150216

From Israel and Austria, women forging their own paths in Judaism and Catholicism

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Naamah Kelman was the first woman to be ordained a rabbi in Israel in 1992. She belongs to the liberal Reform movement in Judaism and so her office isn't recognised by Orthodox Jews. She says, "women in our family were supposed to marry rabbis ... and give birth to rabbis" but her father gave her the support she needed to break the mould, study for years, and eventually become a leader. Naamah was influenced by the feminist movement to follow her religious calling despite the fears some in her own community had on her behalf about whether she was "up to it". She is now Dean of the Hebrew Union College in Jerusalem.

Former Catholic nun, Christine Mayr-Lumetzberger describes herself as a bishop, but the ordination of women in the Catholic Church is considered a grave crime - the priesthood is a male preserve. Growing up in Austria she was drawn to Biblical stories and loved sharing and explaining them, comparing her feeling of having a religious calling to having a musical gift. She spent years in a convent in the hope that reforms would enable women to become deacons. The "scandal" of her actions and subsequent ex-communication by the Vatican have not deterred her from what she feels is her path in life.

(Photo left: Naamah Kelman. Credit: Yitzhak Harari. Photo right: Christine Mayr-Lumetzberger. Credit: C M Lumetzberger)

Academics in Exile20180521

Two female academics fleeing civil war

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Explosions in classrooms and a commute threatened by bombs and bullets - academics from Yemen and Syria who found themselves working through a civil war. Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women who are passionate about educating their country's next generation, but were forced to leave them behind when they fled to safety in Europe. They discuss why they had to make that painful decision, and how they are continuing their work in exile.

Dr Fathiah Zakham is an award winning Yemeni microbiologist whose research focuses on drug-resistant tuberculosis. She was based at Hodeidah University, a port city in Yemen that came under rebel control in 2015. Despite her institution being destroyed by an air attack, Fathiah stayed in Yemen and even won a global award for female researchers. But eventually the situation became impossible and she left for Switzerland in 2017. She is now doing post-doctoral work at the University Hospital of Lausanne.

Reem Doukmak is a Syrian linguist and was working at Al Baath University in Homs, a city at the heart of the uprising against the government in 2011. Homs has been under siege for much of the time since. Reem endured two years living in a war zone before managing to leave Syria with the help of a charity. Reem is now continuing her studies at Warwick University in the UK and she also volunteers as a translator for other refugees.

(L) Image and credit: Reem Doukmak
(R) Image and credit : Fathiah Zakham

Academics In Exile20180521

Two female academics fleeing civil war

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Explosions in classrooms and a commute threatened by bombs and bullets - academics from Yemen and Syria who found themselves working through a civil war. Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women who are passionate about educating their country's next generation, but were forced to leave them behind when they fled to safety in Europe. They discuss why they had to make that painful decision, and how they are continuing their work in exile.

Dr Fathiah Zakham is an award winning Yemeni microbiologist whose research focuses on drug-resistant tuberculosis. She was based at Hodeidah University, a port city in Yemen that came under rebel control in 2015. Despite her institution being destroyed by an air attack, Fathiah stayed in Yemen and even won a global award for female researchers. But eventually the situation became impossible and she left for Switzerland in 2017. She is now doing post-doctoral work at the University Hospital of Lausanne.

Reem Doukmak is a Syrian linguist and was working at Al Baath University in Homs, a city at the heart of the uprising against the government in 2011. Homs has been under siege for much of the time since. Reem endured two years living in a war zone before managing to leave Syria with the help of a charity. Reem is now continuing her studies at Warwick University in the UK and she also volunteers as a translator for other refugees.

(L) Image and credit: Reem Doukmak
(R) Image and credit : Fathiah Zakham

Activists: Ericka Huggins and Nomboniso Gasa20141222

A former Black Panther Party leader and anti-Apartheid activist discuss fighting racism

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Ericka Huggins attended the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963 and decided then to devote herself to social action. She was 19 when she became a leader in the Los Angeles chapter of the Black Panther Party in the late 1960s. In its own words the Party wanted "the power to determine the destiny of the Black and oppressed communities." As well as the political struggle Ericka had to cope with becoming a widow and the lone parent of a 3-week-old baby when her husband, also a Black Panther Party leader, was killed. Her own imprisonment led her to the practice of meditation which is still very much part of her life. Now profressor Ericka Huggins teaches sociology at Merritt and Laney Community Colleges in Oakland California.

Nomboniso Gasa's experiences of Apartheid gave her a political consciousness from early childhood and at the age of 14 she was arrested and detained for the first of many times. As a result of living in a segregated society she says "the notion of being non-human stayed with me for a long time". She joined the ANC's underground structure in the 1980s and her work was mainly as a runner between the homelands and the ANC guerrilla fighters, including crossing into Lesotho, disguised as a boy in search of her father. Now based in Johannesburg, Nomboniso is a researcher and analyst on Gender, Politics and Cultural Issues and talks about coping with the aftermath of the violent episodes in her life through dance, gardening and yoga.

(Photo: Activists Ericka Huggins (left) and Nomboniso Gasa. Ericka Huggins Photo Credit: Peggy Moore)

Addiction: Parina Subba Limbu And Melinda Ferguson20151228

Two women from Nepal and South Africa whose drug addiction almost cost them everything

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Parina Subba Limbu first tried drugs as a teenager. Expelled from nine schools, she eventually ran away from home. After a decade of escalating addiction, and many disastrous love affairs with other addicts, Parina finally got help to get clean, and now runs Dristi Nepal, a charity she founded to care for drug-addicted women in Kathmandu, a group she says who are harshly judged by her society.

Melinda Ferguson, who grew up in Apartheid-era South Africa, started stealing her mother's brandy aged 10, and was soon experimenting with drugs. In 1993 she tried heroin, which led to a downward spiral that saw her losing her kids, and selling her body for the next hit. Melinda's journey to recovery began in 1999, and has since published two addiction memoirs, Smacked and Crashed.

[Picture: Parina Subba Limbu (Left) and Melinda Ferguson(Right)
Melinda Ferguson picture credit: Aubrey Johnson ]

Two women from Nepal and South Africa whose drug addiction almost cost them everything

Parina Subba Limbu first tried drugs as a teenager. Expelled from nine schools, she eventually ran away from home. After a decade of escalating addiction, and many disastrous love affairs with other addicts, Parina finally got help to get clean, and now runs Dristi Nepal, a charity she founded to care for drug-addicted women in Kathmandu, a group she says who are harshly judged by her society.

Melinda Ferguson, who grew up in Apartheid-era South Africa, started stealing her mother's brandy aged 10, and was soon experimenting with drugs. In 1993 she tried heroin, which led to a downward spiral that saw her losing her kids, and selling her body for the next hit. Melinda's journey to recovery began in 1999, and has since published two addiction memoirs, Smacked and Crashed.

(Picture: Parina Subba Limbu (Left) and Melinda Ferguson(Right)

Melinda Ferguson picture credit: Aubrey Johnson )

Adoption: Judith Fleming And Amy Seek2016081520160821 (WS)

The perspectives of two women at opposite ends of the adoption process in the US and UK

Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women from the US and UK, who have been at either end of the adoption process, to reflect on their choices.

Judith Fleming is an actor and writer based in the UK who decided to adopt a child, on her own, at the age of 40. We are using a different name to protect Judith's and her son's privacy. Judith looked through many profiles, but says when she saw a picture of her son she knew he was the one and she had to be his mum. Judith's open with her little boy about his identity and he knows that she didn't "grow him in her tummy".

Amy Seek is an architect from America and got pregnant at the age of 22. She made the difficult choice to give her child up in an "open adoption" and went through a painstaking process of trying to find the right family for him. Sixteen years on and Amy still lives with the pain of her decision, but she does have a relationship with her son. She reveals that they haven't had an in-depth talk about the circumstances of his adoption and hopes one day he will understand how hard it was for her to make that choice.

Photo: Judith Fleming and Amy Seek with Kim Chakanetsa in the studio, Credit: BBC

Adoption: Judith Fleming and Amy Seek2016081520160820 (WS)

The perspectives of two women at opposite ends of the adoption process in the US and UK

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women from the US and UK, who have been at either end of the adoption process, to reflect on their choices.

Judith Fleming is an actor and writer based in the UK who decided to adopt a child, on her own, at the age of 40. We are using a different name to protect Judith's and her son's privacy. Judith looked through many profiles, but says when she saw a picture of her son she knew he was the one and she had to be his mum. Judith's open with her little boy about his identity and he knows that she didn't "grow him in her tummy".

Amy Seek is an architect from America and got pregnant at the age of 22. She made the difficult choice to give her child up in an "open adoption" and went through a painstaking process of trying to find the right family for him. Sixteen years on and Amy still lives with the pain of her decision, but she does have a relationship with her son. She reveals that they haven't had an in-depth talk about the circumstances of his adoption and hopes one day he will understand how hard it was for her to make that choice.

Photo: Judith Fleming and Amy Seek with Kim Chakanetsa in the studio, Credit: BBC

Adoption: Judith Fleming and Amy Seek20160815

The perspectives of two women at opposite ends of the adoption process in the US and UK

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women from the US and UK, who have been at either end of the adoption process, to reflect on their choices.

Judith Fleming is an actor and writer based in the UK who decided to adopt a child, on her own, at the age of 40. We are using a different name to protect Judith's and her son's privacy. Judith looked through many profiles, but says when she saw a picture of her son she knew he was the one and she had to be his mum. Judith's open with her little boy about his identity and he knows that she didn't "grow him in her tummy".

Amy Seek is an architect from America and got pregnant at the age of 22. She made the difficult choice to give her child up in an "open adoption" and went through a painstaking process of trying to find the right family for him. Sixteen years on and Amy still lives with the pain of her decision, but she does have a relationship with her son. She reveals that they haven't had an in-depth talk about the circumstances of his adoption and hopes one day he will understand how hard it was for her to make that choice.

Photo: Judith Fleming and Amy Seek with Kim Chakanetsa in the studio, Credit: BBC

Advertising Execs: Nunu Ntshingila and Vasudha Narayanan20141215

South Africa's first lady of advertising answers an Indian creative director's questions

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

As the chair of one of South Africa's largest agencies, Ogilvy and Mather, Nunu Ntshingila is among the highest ranking women in world advertising. Born in Soweto in the 1960s, she learned her trade under Apartheid, when both the working environment and the marketplace were racially divided. Later she had the job of marketing the 'new South Africa' as a tourist destination and has since overseen campaigns for some of the world's biggest brands. Nunu says she moved "from the struggle between black and white to the gender struggle" and talks about her limited ability to change the way black women are portrayed in advertising.

Vasudha Narayanan is the executive creative director at the Lowe Lintas agency in India. Based in Mumbai she says advertising is not an easy job - especially for women - as the unconventional working hours and frequent parties can raise eyebrows in conservative society. Vasudha says she is conscious about the influence her adverts have on society. She says "It's men who need to change their attitudes - we try and encourage men to behave better"

(Photo: Advertising executives Nunu Ntshingila (left) and Vasudha Narayanan)

Agony Aunts: Criselda Kananda and Xinran Xue2015080320150808 (WS)

What it is like to listen to people's problems for a living in China and South Africa

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Agony aunt Criselda Kananda found out she was HIV positive 16 years ago and was given two years to live. Determined to change her fate, the South African discovered that most of the information available about the illness was full of stereotypes and judgements. So she made it her mission to help others and became a well-known radio and TV presenter, offering advice on health and well-being. But this is not an easy job. She reveals that in order to cope with other people's pain and emotions she gives herself a 'cry day', followed by 'laughter therapy'.

For almost a decade, the acclaimed Chinese author Xinran Xue hosted a call-in radio show that made her famous in her country. She offered advice to thousands of women on how to cope with traumatic experiences like domestic violence. As an agony aunt Xinran says that her callers inspired her and she learnt from their experiences. However, she became so affected by their stories that she left China in 1997 and settled in London. Since then, Xinran has published seven books, which include some of the issues she heard on her radio programme. In her latest title, Buy Me the Sky, she turns her attention to Chinese children born under the one-child policy, implemented in 1978.

(Photo: Criselda Kananda. Credit: Metrofm; Xinran Xue. Credit: Juliana Johnston)

Agony Aunts: Criselda Kananda and Xinran Xue20150803

What it is like to listen to people's problems for a living in China and South Africa

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Agony aunt Criselda Kananda found out she was HIV positive 16 years ago and was given two years to live. Determined to change her fate, the South African discovered that most of the information available about the illness was full of stereotypes and judgements. So she made it her mission to help others and became a well-known radio and TV presenter, offering advice on health and well-being. But this is not an easy job. She reveals that in order to cope with other people's pain and emotions she gives herself a 'cry day', followed by 'laughter therapy'.

For almost a decade, the acclaimed Chinese author Xinran Xue hosted a call-in radio show that made her famous in her country. She offered advice to thousands of women on how to cope with traumatic experiences like domestic violence. As an agony aunt Xinran says that her callers inspired her and she learnt from their experiences. However, she became so affected by their stories that she left China in 1997 and settled in London. Since then, Xinran has published seven books, which include some of the issues she heard on her radio programme. In her latest title, Buy Me the Sky, she turns her attention to Chinese children born under the one-child policy, implemented in 1978.

(Photo: Criselda Kananda. Credit: Metrofm; Xinran Xue. Credit: Juliana Johnston)

Alone at Sea20170102

Two women who steer boats across oceans single-handed on the challenges of being at sea

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Steering a small boat across oceans by yourself - why do it? Kim Chakanetsa meets two women who have been alone at sea for months - and they chat about encountering sharks, avoiding pirates and having to call their mums.

Roz Savage is the first woman to have rowed solo across three oceans - the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian. She had no background as an adventurer and in fact was a UK management consultant for years, but in her 30s she decided to do something completely different with her life. Roz says rowing the Atlantic was a huge struggle physically and mentally, but afterwards she wanted to put herself in even more challenging situations to see if she could do it, and to raise awareness about sustainability.

Australian Jessica Watson sailed around the world when she was just 16, battling storms and isolation, but also fierce criticism from those who thought she was too young. On her return after 210 days she was greeted by the Prime Minister and tens of thousands of people, and was later named Young Australian of the Year. Jessica says she did it partly to prove that young people, and young girls, can be serious and achieve incredible things, and they should not be dismissed.

(Photo: (L) Roz Savage sat in her row boat. Credit: Phil Uhl and (R) Jessica Watson stood on her yacht. Credit: Sam Rosewarne)

Alone At Sea20170102

Two women who steer boats across oceans single-handed on the challenges of being at sea

Steering a small boat across oceans by yourself - why do it? Kim Chakanetsa meets two women who have been alone at sea for months - and they chat about encountering sharks, avoiding pirates and having to call their mums.

Roz Savage is the first woman to have rowed solo across three oceans - the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian. She had no background as an adventurer and in fact was a UK management consultant for years, but in her 30s she decided to do something completely different with her life. Roz says rowing the Atlantic was a huge struggle physically and mentally, but afterwards she wanted to put herself in even more challenging situations to see if she could do it, and to raise awareness about sustainability.

Australian Jessica Watson sailed around the world when she was just 16, battling storms and isolation, but also fierce criticism from those who thought she was too young. On her return after 210 days she was greeted by the Prime Minister and tens of thousands of people, and was later named Young Australian of the Year. Jessica says she did it partly to prove that young people, and young girls, can be serious and achieve incredible things, and they should not be dismissed.

(Photo: (L) Roz Savage sat in her row boat. Credit: Phil Uhl and (R) Jessica Watson stood on her yacht. Credit: Sam Rosewarne)

Ambassadors: Amatalalim Alsoswa and Pirjo Suomela-Chowdhury20141229

From Finland and Yemen: two women's experiences of diplomacy at the highest level

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Amatalalim Alsoswa was Yemen's first female minister before becoming the country's first woman Ambassador. Her mission to the Netherlands began serenely in 2000 but, she tells us, she had to deal with a dramatic change of attitudes towards Yemen after the September 11 attacks the following year. Amat's recipe for success is a mixture of outspokenness and openness - a combination which helped her cope with a fatwa issued against her when she was seen on television without a headscarf (it had slipped onto her shoulders). This daughter of a religious judge says she owes her determination to her father and mother, who never worked herself, but encouraged Amat all the way to the top.

Pirjo Suomela-Chowdhury is the new Finnish Ambassador to three West African countries. "Nigeria was top of my list... I can't think of a more interesting place" she says. Ebola, the economy and the security situation dominate her concerns in the region but she welcomes the challenge alongside the opportunity to promote Finland's interests there. This is Pirjo's first posting at ambassador level but as a career diplomat she knows that one advantage of being a woman in a male-dominated field is that you are remembered, and the higher up the ladder you go, the more free you are to be yourself, even in the world of diplomacy.

An Extraordinary Meeting Between Two Former Hostages20161121

What life as a hostage in the depths of the jungle or in a darkened room can teach you

In 2002, the French Colombian politician Ingrid Betancourt became perhaps one of the best-known hostages in the world when she was kidnapped and held for over six years, deep in the Colombian jungle, by the Farc or Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia.

Watching Ingrid's emotional release on TV in 2008, was a young Canadian journalist called Amanda Lindhout. A month later she herself was taken hostage at gun-point, on a work trip to Somalia. For the 460 days of Amanda's captivity, she thought about Ingrid nearly every day, inspired by the thought that she too could one day end her ordeal.

This is the first time they have spoken to each other.

(Photo: Amanda Lindhout (L). Credit: Steve Carty. (R) Ingrid Betancourt. Credit: Barker Evans)

An Extraordinary Meeting Between Two Former Hostages20161121

What life as a hostage in the depths of the jungle or in a darkened room can teach you

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

In 2002, the French Colombian politician Ingrid Betancourt became perhaps one of the best-known hostages in the world when she was kidnapped and held for over six years, deep in the Colombian jungle, by the Farc or Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia.

Watching Ingrid's emotional release on TV in 2008, was a young Canadian journalist called Amanda Lindhout. A month later she herself was taken hostage at gun-point, on a work trip to Somalia. For the 460 days of Amanda's captivity, she thought about Ingrid nearly every day, inspired by the thought that she too could one day end her ordeal.

This is the first time they have spoken to each other.

(Photo: Amanda Lindhout (L). Credit: Steve Carty. (R) Ingrid Betancourt. Credit: Barker Evans)

Architects20171106

Two women who explore the role architecture can play in bringing communities together

A Syrian architect who watched her city destroyed around her talks to an Irish architect who helped create community spaces in a migrant camp. They emphasize the importance of authenticity, simplicity and boundaries when it comes to designing buildings and public spaces.

Marwa al-Sabouni runs an architectural practice together with her husband in the Syrian city of Homs. She has watched her city be torn apart by war, and believes communities are directly shaped by the environment they inhabit. She has now turned her mind to the question of how architecture might play a role in reversing the damage and rebuilding her country. She has written a memoir about her experiences called 'The Battle for Home'.

Grainne Hassett is a senior lecturer at the School of Architecture, University of Limerick. She also runs her own architecture practice. In August 2015 she travelled to the migrant camp in Calais, known as 'The Jungle', where she ended up building several temporary community buildings with the help of volunteers. Although the buildings were demolished, she has taken the lessons she learnt from the camp into her wider work.

Image: Marwa al-Sabouni and Grainne Hassett (R) with Kim Chakanetsa (L)
Credit: BBC

Architects20171106

Two women who explore the role architecture can play in bringing communities together

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

A Syrian architect who watched her city destroyed around her talks to an Irish architect who helped create community spaces in a migrant camp. They emphasize the importance of authenticity, simplicity and boundaries when it comes to designing buildings and public spaces.

Marwa al-Sabouni runs an architectural practice together with her husband in the Syrian city of Homs. She has watched her city be torn apart by war, and believes communities are directly shaped by the environment they inhabit. She has now turned her mind to the question of how architecture might play a role in reversing the damage and rebuilding her country. She has written a memoir about her experiences called 'The Battle for Home'.

Grainne Hassett is a senior lecturer at the School of Architecture, University of Limerick. She also runs her own architecture practice. In August 2015 she travelled to the migrant camp in Calais, known as 'The Jungle', where she ended up building several temporary community buildings with the help of volunteers. Although the buildings were demolished, she has taken the lessons she learnt from the camp into her wider work.

Image: Marwa al-Sabouni and Grainne Hassett (R) with Kim Chakanetsa (L)
Credit: BBC

Art Dealers20180625

Two female top gallery owners

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

In the art world, how much power do women hold? In 2017, of the top 100 artists whose work fetched the highest amount at auction, just 13 were women. Two female art-dealers who have pioneered Czech and Asian art on the international scene, discuss how that affects the way they value and sell art made by women.

Pearl Lam is an iconic art dealer and a pioneer in raising the profile of Chinese art. She is the founder of Pearl Lam Galleries which operate in Shanghai, Singapore and Hong Kong. She is considered a powerhouse within Asia's contemporary art scene and says that although it is all about the art, not the artist, she has become aware of issues with gender and diversity.

Katherine (Kacha) Kastner co-founded the gallery Hunt Kastner in Prague in 2005 at a time when there was no established tradition of commercial galleries in the Czech Republic. The goal was to offer a more professional representation of Czech artists both locally and internationally. She says that though she would never choose an artist based on their gender, she is trying to do more to promote female artists.

Left: Katherine Kastner (credit: Jiri Thyn)
Right: Pearl Lam (credit: William Louey)

Asian American Authors20170417

Two women who moved to the US from Asia at different stages of their lives.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two women who emigrated to the US from Asia and both became writers talk to guest presenter Lauren Schiller in San Francisco about their 'messy' relationship with language, their rejection of the American Dream, and how they're trying to break free from labels.

Barbara Jane Reyes is a poet, whose work explores language, culture and identity. She was born in Manila in the Philippines, and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area. She started writing seriously as a student - when there were very few writers who were voicing her own immigrant experience. She now teaches Philippine Studies at the University of San Francisco and is the author of four books of poetry. She is due to publish her fifth collection, Invocation to Daughters, later this year.

Yiyun Li is an award-winning writer. She grew up in Beijing, and moved to the US when she was in her early 20s to study immunology. It was after she had arrived in Iowa and adopted English as her own language that she decided to make the leap from science to creative writing. She has published four works of fiction, and numerous essays. Her latest book is called 'Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life' and it was written while she grappled with depression and was finding solace in other writers. Yiyun teaches creative writing at UC Davis.

Image: Barbara Jane Reyes (left) (credit: Oscar Bermeo) and Yiyun Li (right) (credit: Roger Turesson)

Asian American Authors20170417

Two women who moved to the US from Asia at different stages of their lives.

Two women who emigrated to the US from Asia and both became writers talk to guest presenter Lauren Schiller in San Francisco about their 'messy' relationship with language, their rejection of the American Dream, and how they're trying to break free from labels.

Barbara Jane Reyes is a poet, whose work explores language, culture and identity. She was born in Manila in the Philippines, and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area. She started writing seriously as a student - when there were very few writers who were voicing her own immigrant experience. She now teaches Philippine Studies at the University of San Francisco and is the author of four books of poetry. She is due to publish her fifth collection, Invocation to Daughters, later this year.

Yiyun Li is an award-winning writer. She grew up in Beijing, and moved to the US when she was in her early 20s to study immunology. It was after she had arrived in Iowa and adopted English as her own language that she decided to make the leap from science to creative writing. She has published four works of fiction, and numerous essays. Her latest book is called 'Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life' and it was written while she grappled with depression and was finding solace in other writers. Yiyun teaches creative writing at UC Davis.

Image: Barbara Jane Reyes (left) (credit: Oscar Bermeo) and Yiyun Li (right) (credit: Roger Turesson)

Astronauts: Sandra Magnus and Samantha Cristoforetti2016032820160402 (WS)

Women who have lived and worked in space, share their out of this world experiences

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Sandra Magnus is a US astronaut with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and is now the executive director of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Sandra always wanted to become an astronaut and has had a lifelong passion for science and exploring how the world works. On the space station she says that every day is about trouble-shooting, and sometimes it doesn't seem very organised, there is a lost and found plastic bag, "I always thought that was rather amusing because that means there were things on the station that were missing parts".

Samantha Cristoforetti made history when she became the first person to make an espresso in space. "We got to try the first freshly brewed espresso coffee in space" she says proudly. Born in Milan and raised in the province of Trentino in Itlay, Samantha speaks four languages including Russian. She has a second degree in aeronautical sciences and a masters in mechanical engineering. She is a captain in the Italian air force, a qualified jet-fighter pilot and has been an astronaut with the European Space Agency since 2009, the first Italian woman to take the role.

(Photo: Sandra Magnus: NASA, Samantha Cristoforetti: ESA-S. Corvaja)

Astronauts: Sandra Magnus and Samantha Cristoforetti20160328

Women who have lived and worked in space, share their out of this world experiences

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Sandra Magnus is a US astronaut with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and is now the executive director of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Sandra always wanted to become an astronaut and has had a lifelong passion for science and exploring how the world works. On the space station she says that every day is about trouble-shooting, and sometimes it doesn't seem very organised, there is a lost and found plastic bag, "I always thought that was rather amusing because that means there were things on the station that were missing parts".

Samantha Cristoforetti made history when she became the first person to make an espresso in space. "We got to try the first freshly brewed espresso coffee in space" she says proudly. Born in Milan and raised in the province of Trentino in Itlay, Samantha speaks four languages including Russian. She has a second degree in aeronautical sciences and a masters in mechanical engineering. She is a captain in the Italian air force, a qualified jet-fighter pilot and has been an astronaut with the European Space Agency since 2009, the first Italian woman to take the role.

(Photo: Sandra Magnus: NASA, Samantha Cristoforetti: ESA-S. Corvaja)

Astronauts: Sandra Magnus And Samantha Cristoforetti2016032820160403 (WS)

Women who have lived and worked in space, share their out of this world experiences

Sandra Magnus is a US astronaut with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and is now the executive director of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Sandra always wanted to become an astronaut and has had a lifelong passion for science and exploring how the world works. On the space station she says that every day is about trouble-shooting, and sometimes it doesn't seem very organised, there is a lost and found plastic bag, "I always thought that was rather amusing because that means there were things on the station that were missing parts".

Samantha Cristoforetti made history when she became the first person to make an espresso in space. "We got to try the first freshly brewed espresso coffee in space" she says proudly. Born in Milan and raised in the province of Trentino in Itlay, Samantha speaks four languages including Russian. She has a second degree in aeronautical sciences and a masters in mechanical engineering. She is a captain in the Italian air force, a qualified jet-fighter pilot and has been an astronaut with the European Space Agency since 2009, the first Italian woman to take the role.

(Photo: Sandra Magnus: NASA, Samantha Cristoforetti: ESA-S. Corvaja)

Bakers20180416

Two women explore the business of baking

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two women re-define what it means to be a bread-maker. While women and baking have always been closely associated with each other, the billion dollar industry is actually dominated by men. This week, two young women speak to Kim Chakanetsa about becoming the face of bread-making, taking on the family business, and the sacrifices it takes to make the perfect loaf.

Apollonia Poîlane's grandfather opened Poîlane bakery in Paris in 1932, and his son Lionel took over the business in 1970. Lionel turned it into one of France's most famous bakeries. However in 2002 he and his wife were killed in a helicopter crash, and his 18 year old daughter, Apollonia, took over the family business. She has turned Poilâne into a multi-million dollar international brand and says her father's friends and baking team helped her become the CEO she is today.

Maya Rohr is a young American baker currently doing an apprenticeship with a Swedish chocolatier. 25 years ago Maya's mother opened a bakery in their hometown of Homer, Alaska, just a few days after Maya was born. Maya is in the process of deciding whether she wants to carry on the family business, Two Sisters Bakery, or pursue her own path. The bakery is more than just a company for Maya - she says it's a vital part of her small community.

(L) Apollonia Poilâne (credit Bruno Comtesse) and (R) Maya Rohr (credit Brianna Lee)

Ballerinas: Lorena Feijoo and Kitty Phetla2015061520150620 (WS)

Ballerinas from Cuba and South Africa talk perfection, humour and breaking tradition

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Lorena Feijoo is a principal dancer with the San Francisco Ballet. Lorena was born into the world of ballet in her native Havana. Her mother was a dancer with Cuba's National Ballet and she remembers being looked after by the costume managers whilst her mum was performing. Her sister Lorna also followed in her footsteps and Lorena is now married to a dancer, she has performed with both of them. Lorena's career has taken her to Europe and America, but she is always grateful for the free ballet training she received as a child in Cuba.

Kitty Phetla grew up as a tomboy in a township in Soweto and did not know what ballet was until the age of nine. She was given the option of joining a ballet or karate group and thought she would not do the 'obvious' thing and went for ballet. Kitty danced with the Ballet Theatre Africans and is now a senior soloist and choreographer with the Joburg Ballet. Kitty is known for performing The Dying Swan, a piece made famous by legendary Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova. Kitty's version has an African twist though, instead of wearing a white tutu, pink tights and pointe shoes, she breaks with tradition to perform in an all-black costume to become The Black Dying Swan.

(Photo: Lorena Feijoo (left) Kitty Phetla (right). Credit: Erik Tomasson, Susanne Holbaek)

Ballerinas: Lorena Feijoo and Kitty Phetla20150615

Ballerinas from Cuba and South Africa talk perfection, humour and breaking tradition

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Lorena Feijoo is a principal dancer with the San Francisco Ballet. Lorena was born into the world of ballet in her native Havana. Her mother was a dancer with Cuba's National Ballet and she remembers being looked after by the costume managers whilst her mum was performing. Her sister Lorna also followed in her footsteps and Lorena is now married to a dancer, she has performed with both of them. Lorena's career has taken her to Europe and America, but she is always grateful for the free ballet training she received as a child in Cuba.

Kitty Phetla grew up as a tomboy in a township in Soweto and did not know what ballet was until the age of nine. She was given the option of joining a ballet or karate group and thought she would not do the 'obvious' thing and went for ballet. Kitty danced with the Ballet Theatre Africans and is now a senior soloist and choreographer with the Joburg Ballet. Kitty is known for performing The Dying Swan, a piece made famous by legendary Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova. Kitty's version has an African twist though, instead of wearing a white tutu, pink tights and pointe shoes, she breaks with tradition to perform in an all-black costume to become The Black Dying Swan.

(Photo: Lorena Feijoo (left) Kitty Phetla (right). Credit: Erik Tomasson, Susanne Holbaek)

Ballroom Dancers: Oti Mabuse And Alex Hixson20161107

Two female professionals take us backstage in the world of ballroom dancing

Get your dancing shoes on because this week Kim Chakanetsa brings together two supremely talented ballroom dancers who between them have a pile of trophies. We talk about the glamour, romance, athleticism and also the rivalries, injuries and tears that go on behind the scenes.

South African dancer Oti Mabuse has been Latin American dance champion in South Africa eight times and she is currently gracing UK screens as a professional dancer on the popular reality TV show Strictly Come Dancing. When she started ballroom dancing was a very divided activity, "We were the only black family doing Latin and ballroom, I was young, I was four and cute, but for my sisters it was extremely difficult." More recently, things have changed, she says "It's not about where you come from or what you look like, it's about what you do and what you deliver."

Alex Hixson is from the UK and has been a World Champion bronze medallist and an International Professional Rising Star Champion. Her favourite dance is the foxtrot. Alex started dancing aged 6, "before 'Strictly', so before ballroom dancing was cool. I saw a poster and told my mum that I want to do ballroom and Latin dancing and she said why? That's what old people do."

(L) Photo: Oti Mabuse. Credit: BBC.

(R) Alex Hixson. Credit: Nick Redman, London Photos.

Ballroom Dancers: Oti Mabuse and Alex Hixson20161107

Two female professionals take us backstage in the world of ballroom dancing

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Get your dancing shoes on because this week Kim Chakanetsa brings together two supremely talented ballroom dancers who between them have a pile of trophies. We talk about the glamour, romance, athleticism and also the rivalries, injuries and tears that go on behind the scenes.

South African dancer Oti Mabuse has been Latin American dance champion in South Africa eight times and she is currently gracing UK screens as a professional dancer on the popular reality TV show Strictly Come Dancing. When she started ballroom dancing was a very divided activity, "We were the only black family doing Latin and ballroom, I was young, I was four and cute, but for my sisters it was extremely difficult." More recently, things have changed, she says "It's not about where you come from or what you look like, it's about what you do and what you deliver."

Alex Hixson is from the UK and has been a World Champion bronze medallist and an International Professional Rising Star Champion. Her favourite dance is the foxtrot. Alex started dancing aged 6, "before 'Strictly', so before ballroom dancing was cool. I saw a poster and told my mum that I want to do ballroom and Latin dancing and she said why? That's what old people do."

(L) Photo: Oti Mabuse. Credit: BBC.
(R) Alex Hixson. Credit: Nick Redman, London Photos.

Banishing Body Shame20180730

Two women using their own bodies to challenge traditional perceptions of beauty

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Body shaming is discrimination against 'non-perfect' bodies and it is usually directed at women. Kim Chakanetsa sits down with a Danish comedian and a British blogger who are challenging society's perceptions of a beautiful female body.

Chidera Eggerue - aka The Slumflower - is a British blogger whose hashtag #saggyboobsmatter started an online movement, empowering women who were considering plastic surgery and breast-feeding mothers to love their breasts. Through her public profile, she tackles the absence of positive representation of black women's bodies, bullying and insecurity.

Sofie Hagen is an award-winning Danish comedian and fat activist. As a chubby child, she was forced to go on diets, which she says led to her hating her body and was detrimental to her mental health. At university Sofie met a fat activist who changed her life. She then co-started a campaigning group in Denmark, Fedfront, and talks a lot about fatness in her comedy. She says that on a good day she will only receive 100 death threats because of her weight and gender.

Image: (L): Chidera Eggerue. Credit: Tom Oldham
Image: (R): Sofie Hagen. Credit: Karla Gowlett

Beatboxers: Bellatrix and Steff La Cheffe2015071320150718 (WS)

Learn the art of human beatboxing with two of the best in the business

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Belle Ehresman AKA Bellatrix comes from a musical household - she studied music and plays the double bass - but she became a professional beatboxer by accident. She has just returned to the UK from the 2015 World Beatboxing Championships with a 'crew' battle title to add to her solo wins. However, Belle is re-thinking her views on whether the separate male and female competition categories should be integrated, because she believes that there are gender differences in beatboxing styles which should be celebrated.

Swiss rapper and beatboxer Steff La Cheffe loves how "bossy" her stage-name sounds. In real life she is Stefanie Peter and hails from Bern in Switzerland. Her brother gave her a CD by Rahzel when she was 12 years old and her obsession with beatboxing has never gone away. Stefanie is famous for her ability to produce deep bass notes and says her mission is "to surprise and irritate people" with her performances.

Presenter: Kim Chakanetsa

[Picture: Bellatrix (Left) and Steff La Cheffe (Right)
Picture credit: Bellatrix - Rob Voodoo; Steff La Cheffe - Peter Hauser]

Beatboxers: Bellatrix and Steff La Cheffe20150713

Learn the art of human beatboxing with two of the best in the business

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Belle Ehresman AKA Bellatrix comes from a musical household - she studied music and plays the double bass - but she became a professional beatboxer by accident. She has just returned to the UK from the 2015 World Beatboxing Championships with a 'crew' battle title to add to her solo wins. However, Belle is re-thinking her views on whether the separate male and female competition categories should be integrated, because she believes that there are gender differences in beatboxing styles which should be celebrated.

Swiss rapper and beatboxer Steff La Cheffe loves how "bossy" her stage-name sounds. In real life she is Stefanie Peter and hails from Bern in Switzerland. Her brother gave her a CD by Rahzel when she was 12 years old and her obsession with beatboxing has never gone away. Stefanie is famous for her ability to produce deep bass notes and says her mission is "to surprise and irritate people" with her performances.

Presenter: Kim Chakanetsa

[Picture: Bellatrix (Left) and Steff La Cheffe (Right)
Picture credit: Bellatrix - Rob Voodoo; Steff La Cheffe - Peter Hauser]

Being Blind20171113

Two women who are visually impaired share their experiences from India and Ethiopia

Opening a bank account and praying in peace - just two things blind women cannot take for granted in Ethiopia and India. Kim Chakanetsa has a revealing conversation with two women who are taking on these challenges and more.

Yetnebersh Nigussie recently won the Right Livelihood Prize - widely referred to as the 'Alternative Nobel Prize' - for her work promoting disabled people's rights in her country. Yetnebersh is a lawyer born and raised in rural Ethiopia who lost her eye sight at the age of five. She says growing up blind had its challenges but in the end it was a kind of liberation - she was not considered suitable for early marriage due to her disability, and her mother insisted that she was educated instead.

Poonam Vaidya lives in Bangalore and lost her sight seven years ago when she was 21. After the initial shock, she says she tried not to ask, 'why me?' and slowly took hold of her independence again. She went on to further studies, and is now a content writer and blogger. She loves to travel, and is particularly interested in making transport more accessible for blind people. Poonam recently spent a year at the Colorado Center for the Blind in the US where she completed various challenges including travelling to four cities in one day.

(l) Yetnebersh Nigussie (credit: Studio Casagrande)
(r) Poonam Vaidya (credit: Raj Lalwani)

Being Blind20171113

Two women who are visually impaired share their experiences from India and Ethiopia

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Opening a bank account and praying in peace - just two things blind women cannot take for granted in Ethiopia and India. Kim Chakanetsa has a revealing conversation with two women who are taking on these challenges and more.

Yetnebersh Nigussie recently won the Right Livelihood Prize - widely referred to as the 'Alternative Nobel Prize' - for her work promoting disabled people's rights in her country. Yetnebersh is a lawyer born and raised in rural Ethiopia who lost her eye sight at the age of five. She says growing up blind had its challenges but in the end it was a kind of liberation - she was not considered suitable for early marriage due to her disability, and her mother insisted that she was educated instead.

Poonam Vaidya lives in Bangalore and lost her sight seven years ago when she was 21. After the initial shock, she says she tried not to ask, 'why me?' and slowly took hold of her independence again. She went on to further studies, and is now a content writer and blogger. She loves to travel, and is particularly interested in making transport more accessible for blind people. Poonam recently spent a year at the Colorado Center for the Blind in the US where she completed various challenges including travelling to four cities in one day.

(l) Yetnebersh Nigussie (credit: Studio Casagrande)
(r) Poonam Vaidya (credit: Raj Lalwani)

Being 'Mixed Race': Kira Lea Dargin and Annina Chirade2015051120150516 (WS)

An Australian-Aboriginal Russian woman and a Ghanaian-Austrian Londoner discuss identity

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kira Lea Dargin's parents met at church. Her mother is white from a Russian family who emigrated to Australia in the 1950s, and her father is Aboriginal Australian. Being "mixed" Kira says, means constantly having to explain how you came about or how your family manages to blend. Having come through some difficult times as a teenager Kira now happily identifies with both of her cultural backgrounds. As the director of 'Aboriginal Model Management Australia', her mission is to help broaden how Australian beauty is defined.

Annina Chirade describes herself as Ghanaian Austrian. She is the founder and editor of Rooted In magazine. When she was growing up, between London and Vienna, people would often question whether she was related to her fair, straight-haired mother. After many years obsessively straightening her own "kinky, curly, Afro-" hair as a teenager, she found her own style - inspired by the confident styles of black female singers like Erykah Badu. Annina says that when you are 'mixed-race' people make assumptions about your identity and consider it to be "up for debate", but she is clear that "whiteness is not something I'm a part of."

Picture:
Kira Lea Dargin. Credit: Claire Mahjoub, SSH
Annina Chirade. Credit: Adu Lalouschek

Being 'Mixed Race': Kira Lea Dargin and Annina Chirade20150511

An Australian-Aboriginal Russian woman and a Ghanaian-Austrian Londoner discuss identity

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kira Lea Dargin's parents met at church. Her mother is white from a Russian family who emigrated to Australia in the 1950s, and her father is Aboriginal Australian. Being "mixed" Kira says, means constantly having to explain how you came about or how your family manages to blend. Having come through some difficult times as a teenager Kira now happily identifies with both of her cultural backgrounds. As the director of 'Aboriginal Model Management Australia', her mission is to help broaden how Australian beauty is defined.

Annina Chirade describes herself as Ghanaian Austrian. She is the founder and editor of Rooted In magazine. When she was growing up, between London and Vienna, people would often question whether she was related to her fair, straight-haired mother. After many years obsessively straightening her own "kinky, curly, Afro-" hair as a teenager, she found her own style - inspired by the confident styles of black female singers like Erykah Badu. Annina says that when you are 'mixed-race' people make assumptions about your identity and consider it to be "up for debate", but she is clear that "whiteness is not something I'm a part of."

Picture:
Kira Lea Dargin. Credit: Claire Mahjoub, SSH
Annina Chirade. Credit: Adu Lalouschek

Being Open About Breast Cancer20170522

An athlete and a dancer exchange their breast cancer experiences

Being Open About Breast Cancer2017052220170528 (WS)

An athlete and a dancer exchange their breast cancer experiences

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

'I will ride cancer; cancer will not ride me'. An Indian dancer and a Jamaican athlete who were diagnosed with breast cancer at the peak of their physical condition tell Kim Chakanetsa how they got through their treatment by focussing on their passions.

Novlene Williams-Mills is an exceptional Jamaican sprinter who has competed - and won medals - in four Olympic Games. In 2012, just before the London Olympics, she found out she had breast cancer. Despite the diagnosis, she decided to compete, and helped Jamaica bring home a bronze medal in the 400 metre relay. Four surgeries later, she is cancer-free. Throughout her treatment Novlene continued to run because when she's on the track, she says all her problems disappear.

Ananda Shankar Jayant is an award-winning Indian dancer and choreographer, known for her talent in two classical dance forms Bharatanatyam and Kuchipudi. She says as soon as she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008, she made a decision that she would not succumb to the 'bogeyman' of cancer, and would keep dancing, even through chemotherapy. By focussing on her what she loves to do, she says she was able to stay positive. Now also all-clear, Ananda continues to teach and perform dance, and recently launched a dance app called Natyarambha.

L-Image: Novlene Williams-Mills. Credit: Matthew Lewis/Getty Images
R-Image: Ananda Shankar Jayant. Credit: G Muralidhar

Being Open About Breast Cancer20170522

An athlete and a dancer exchange their breast cancer experiences

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

'I will ride cancer; cancer will not ride me'. An Indian dancer and a Jamaican athlete who were diagnosed with breast cancer at the peak of their physical condition tell Kim Chakanetsa how they got through their treatment by focussing on their passions.

Novlene Williams-Mills is an exceptional Jamaican sprinter who has competed - and won medals - in four Olympic Games. In 2012, just before the London Olympics, she found out she had breast cancer. Despite the diagnosis, she decided to compete, and helped Jamaica bring home a bronze medal in the 400 metre relay. Four surgeries later, she is cancer-free. Throughout her treatment Novlene continued to run because when she's on the track, she says all her problems disappear.

Ananda Shankar Jayant is an award-winning Indian dancer and choreographer, known for her talent in two classical dance forms Bharatanatyam and Kuchipudi. She says as soon as she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008, she made a decision that she would not succumb to the 'bogeyman' of cancer, and would keep dancing, even through chemotherapy. By focussing on her what she loves to do, she says she was able to stay positive. Now also all-clear, Ananda continues to teach and perform dance, and recently launched a dance app called Natyarambha.

L-Image: Novlene Williams-Mills. Credit: Matthew Lewis/Getty Images
R-Image: Ananda Shankar Jayant. Credit: G Muralidhar

Being Transgender: Isis King and Abhina Aher2015081020150815 (WS)

Born in the wrong body? Making the transition from male to female in the US and India.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Model and fashion designer Isis King was catapulted to fame on US TV series America's Next Top Model. Her physical transition from male to female was caught on camera and got global attention in 2009. Isis says she knew she wanted to be a girl as early as four years old - "I always knew that I was different". Her mother was a strong role model and Isis remembers, "I would put on my mum's heels" when she was out and practise walking in a straight line in them. She reveals that it's been hard to find love since her genital reassignment surgery, because people have seen her on their screens at her most vulnerable, but says now she's just trying to focus on herself.

Abhina Aher is part of India's Hijra, or "third gender" community. Hijras were recognised by the country's supreme court last year, but Abhina says there's still a long way to go until people like her are accepted by families, communities and employers. Abhina, who works as a programme manager for India HIV/Aids Alliance, couldn't "connect" to herself as being a boy growing up and wanted to be a dancer like her mother. Abhina says that genital reassignment is costly in India and she had to opt for castration and hormone treatment carried out by unregulated medics.

(Picture: Isis King (Left) and Abhina Aher (Right). Credits: Isis - D Dipasupil/ Getty Images for Logo TV; Abhina - Prakash Singh/ AFP/ Getty Images)

Being Transgender: Isis King and Abhina Aher20150810

Born in the wrong body? Making the transition from male to female in the US and India.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Model and fashion designer Isis King was catapulted to fame on US TV series America's Next Top Model. Her physical transition from male to female was caught on camera and got global attention in 2009. Isis says she knew she wanted to be a girl as early as four years old - "I always knew that I was different". Her mother was a strong role model and Isis remembers, "I would put on my mum's heels" when she was out and practise walking in a straight line in them. She reveals that it's been hard to find love since her genital reassignment surgery, because people have seen her on their screens at her most vulnerable, but says now she's just trying to focus on herself.

Abhina Aher is part of India's Hijra, or "third gender" community. Hijras were recognised by the country's supreme court last year, but Abhina says there's still a long way to go until people like her are accepted by families, communities and employers. Abhina, who works as a programme manager for India HIV/Aids Alliance, couldn't "connect" to herself as being a boy growing up and wanted to be a dancer like her mother. Abhina says that genital reassignment is costly in India and she had to opt for castration and hormone treatment carried out by unregulated medics.

(Picture: Isis King (Left) and Abhina Aher (Right). Credits: Isis - D Dipasupil/ Getty Images for Logo TV; Abhina - Prakash Singh/ AFP/ Getty Images)

Being Transgender: Isis King And Abhina Aher2015081020150815 (WS)

Model and fashion designer Isis King was catapulted to fame on US TV series America's Next Top Model. Her physical transition from male to female was caught on camera and got global attention in 2009. Isis says she knew she wanted to be a girl as early as four years old - "I always knew that I was different". Her mother was a strong role model and Isis remembers, "I would put on my mum's heels" when she was out and practise walking in a straight line in them. She reveals that it's been hard to find love since her genital reassignment surgery, because people have seen her on their screens at her most vulnerable, but says now she's just trying to focus on herself.

Abhina Aher is part of India's Hijra, or "third gender" community. Hijras were recognised by the country's supreme court last year, but Abhina says there's still a long way to go until people like her are accepted by families, communities and employers. Abhina, who works as a programme manager for India HIV/Aids Alliance, couldn't "connect" to herself as being a boy growing up and wanted to be a dancer like her mother. Abhina says that genital reassignment is costly in India and she had to opt for castration and hormone treatment carried out by unregulated medics.

(Picture: Isis King (Left) and Abhina Aher (Right). Credits: Isis - D Dipasupil/ Getty Images for Logo TV; Abhina - Prakash Singh/ AFP/ Getty Images)

Bikers20170619

Two women from Poland and Kenya on their love of motorbiking

What draws women to motorbikes, whether it's weaving them through traffic or seeing the world from one? Kim Chakanetsa asks two women from Poland and Kenya who spend their lives in the saddle.

Aleksandra 'Ola' Trzaskowska's love of motorbikes is not about the machine itself - it's about the thrill of seeing new places from the best vantage point. She used to be a lawyer in Warsaw but gave it up to do what she loves. Ola now runs tours on two wheels to Asia, North Africa and both American continents. On her own trips she always aims to steer off the beaten track - preferring to explore countries like Afghanistan alone. Even breaking her leg in a road accident in Cuba hasn't put her off - as soon as it's mended she'll be straight back on her bike.

Naomi Irungu took up bikes two years ago when she met her motorcycle-mad husband. She had always wanted to try but was warned off by her family after her uncle died in a motorbike accident. Naomi says it can be exhilarating and scary riding through rush-hour traffic in Nairobi, dodging the matatus and the taxi-bikes that jostle for road space. She loves to get out of the city on longer rides and for her recent wedding she was picked up by a 15 strong motorcade of biker friends.

L-Image and credit: Ola Trzaskowska
R-Image and credit: Naomi Irungu

Bikers2017061920170625 (WS)

Two women from Poland and Kenya on their love of motorbiking

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

What draws women to motorbikes, whether it's weaving them through traffic or seeing the world from one? Kim Chakanetsa asks two women from Poland and Kenya who spend their lives in the saddle.

Aleksandra 'Ola' Trzaskowska's love of motorbikes is not about the machine itself - it's about the thrill of seeing new places from the best vantage point. She used to be a lawyer in Warsaw but gave it up to do what she loves. Ola now runs tours on two wheels to Asia, North Africa and both American continents. On her own trips she always aims to steer off the beaten track - preferring to explore countries like Afghanistan alone. Even breaking her leg in a road accident in Cuba hasn't put her off - as soon as it's mended she'll be straight back on her bike.

Naomi Irungu took up bikes two years ago when she met her motorcycle-mad husband. She had always wanted to try but was warned off by her family after her uncle died in a motorbike accident. Naomi says it can be exhilarating and scary riding through rush-hour traffic in Nairobi, dodging the matatus and the taxi-bikes that jostle for road space. She loves to get out of the city on longer rides and for her recent wedding she was picked up by a 15 strong motorcade of biker friends.

L-Image and credit: Ola Trzaskowska
R-Image and credit: Naomi Irungu

Bikers20170619

Two women from Poland and Kenya on their love of motorbiking

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

What draws women to motorbikes, whether it's weaving them through traffic or seeing the world from one? Kim Chakanetsa asks two women from Poland and Kenya who spend their lives in the saddle.

Aleksandra 'Ola' Trzaskowska's love of motorbikes is not about the machine itself - it's about the thrill of seeing new places from the best vantage point. She used to be a lawyer in Warsaw but gave it up to do what she loves. Ola now runs tours on two wheels to Asia, North Africa and both American continents. On her own trips she always aims to steer off the beaten track - preferring to explore countries like Afghanistan alone. Even breaking her leg in a road accident in Cuba hasn't put her off - as soon as it's mended she'll be straight back on her bike.

Naomi Irungu took up bikes two years ago when she met her motorcycle-mad husband. She had always wanted to try but was warned off by her family after her uncle died in a motorbike accident. Naomi says it can be exhilarating and scary riding through rush-hour traffic in Nairobi, dodging the matatus and the taxi-bikes that jostle for road space. She loves to get out of the city on longer rides and for her recent wedding she was picked up by a 15 strong motorcade of biker friends.

L-Image and credit: Ola Trzaskowska
R-Image and credit: Naomi Irungu

Bodyguards: Jacquie Davis And Denida Zinxhiria2016042520160501 (WS)

Meet the women who would take a bullet for their wealthy clients

Jacquie Davis began her career with the British police, but soon moved into security and close protection. This was in the 1970's when Jacquie says it was "very lonely" being the only woman in the industry. Today Jacquie runs the security and risk management firm Optimal Risk and her clients include the ultra-rich and famous; she's dealt with everything from hostage situations to screaming fans and celebrity tantrums.

Denida Zinxhiria grew up in Albania during a time of social upheaval where it was commonplace to hear bombs and bullets in the street. As a child she remembers her grandmother covering her to protect her from gunfire and says that incident sparked an interest in keeping people safe. Denida worked her way up through private security in Greece and now runs Athena Academy, a security company that trains female bodyguards.

Photo: Jacquiee Davis. Credit: Aaston Parrot.

Photo: Denida Zinxhiria. Credit: N/A.

Bodyguards: Jacquie Davis and Denida Zinxhiria2016042520160430 (WS)

Meet the women who would take a bullet for their wealthy clients

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Jacquie Davis began her career with the British police, but soon moved into security and close protection. This was in the 1970's when Jacquie says it was "very lonely" being the only woman in the industry. Today Jacquie runs the security and risk management firm Optimal Risk and her clients include the ultra-rich and famous; she's dealt with everything from hostage situations to screaming fans and celebrity tantrums.

Denida Zinxhiria grew up in Albania during a time of social upheaval where it was commonplace to hear bombs and bullets in the street. As a child she remembers her grandmother covering her to protect her from gunfire and says that incident sparked an interest in keeping people safe. Denida worked her way up through private security in Greece and now runs Athena Academy, a security company that trains female bodyguards.

Photo: Jacquiee Davis. Credit: Aaston Parrot.
Photo: Denida Zinxhiria. Credit: N/A.

Bodyguards: Jacquie Davis and Denida Zinxhiria20160425

Meet the women who would take a bullet for their wealthy clients

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Jacquie Davis began her career with the British police, but soon moved into security and close protection. This was in the 1970's when Jacquie says it was "very lonely" being the only woman in the industry. Today Jacquie runs the security and risk management firm Optimal Risk and her clients include the ultra-rich and famous; she's dealt with everything from hostage situations to screaming fans and celebrity tantrums.

Denida Zinxhiria grew up in Albania during a time of social upheaval where it was commonplace to hear bombs and bullets in the street. As a child she remembers her grandmother covering her to protect her from gunfire and says that incident sparked an interest in keeping people safe. Denida worked her way up through private security in Greece and now runs Athena Academy, a security company that trains female bodyguards.

Photo: Jacquiee Davis. Credit: Aaston Parrot.
Photo: Denida Zinxhiria. Credit: N/A.

Casting Directors20171016

Two women who find the perfect person for the role in films and TV

Top female casting directors in the UK and India chat to Kim Chakanetsa about fighting for the actors they want in a film, their proudest casting moments, and the painful job of telling someone they didn't get the part.

Nina Gold is the woman behind the casting of the HBO series Game of Thrones and the new Star Wars films. She has also cast Oscar-winning movies such as The King's Speech and The Theory of Everything as well as countless TV drama series in the UK and US. She says she loves to unearth and push forward new young talent. Her work has been recognised by BAFTA with a special award in 2016.

Nandini Shrikent is one of India's top casting directors. Based at the heart of Bollywood in Mumbai, she cast the lead actor for the multi-award winning film Life of Pi, as well as numerous home-grown movies including Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani and Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara. She says casting the smaller parts is actually the real test of skill - finding the perfect actor for a walk-on role can be tougher than casting a big romantic lead.

(L) Nina Gold (credit: Teri Pengilley) and (R) Nandini Shrikent (credit: Nandini Shrikent)

Casting Directors2017101620171022 (WS)

Two women who find the perfect person for the role in films and TV

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Top female casting directors in the UK and India chat to Kim Chakanetsa about fighting for the actors they want in a film, their proudest casting moments, and the painful job of telling someone they didn't get the part.

Nina Gold is the woman behind the casting of the HBO series Game of Thrones and the new Star Wars films. She has also cast Oscar-winning movies such as The King's Speech and The Theory of Everything as well as countless TV drama series in the UK and US. She says she loves to unearth and push forward new young talent. Her work has been recognised by BAFTA with a special award in 2016.

Nandini Shrikent is one of India's top casting directors. Based at the heart of Bollywood in Mumbai, she cast the lead actor for the multi-award winning film Life of Pi, as well as numerous home-grown movies including Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani and Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara. She says casting the smaller parts is actually the real test of skill - finding the perfect actor for a walk-on role can be tougher than casting a big romantic lead.

(L) Nina Gold (credit: Teri Pengilley) and (R) Nandini Shrikent (credit: Nandini Shrikent)

Casting Directors20171016

Two women who find the perfect person for the role in films and TV

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Top female casting directors in the UK and India chat to Kim Chakanetsa about fighting for the actors they want in a film, their proudest casting moments, and the painful job of telling someone they didn't get the part.

Nina Gold is the woman behind the casting of the HBO series Game of Thrones and the new Star Wars films. She has also cast Oscar-winning movies such as The King's Speech and The Theory of Everything as well as countless TV drama series in the UK and US. She says she loves to unearth and push forward new young talent. Her work has been recognised by BAFTA with a special award in 2016.

Nandini Shrikent is one of India's top casting directors. Based at the heart of Bollywood in Mumbai, she cast the lead actor for the multi-award winning film Life of Pi, as well as numerous home-grown movies including Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani and Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara. She says casting the smaller parts is actually the real test of skill - finding the perfect actor for a walk-on role can be tougher than casting a big romantic lead.

(L) Nina Gold (credit: Teri Pengilley) and (R) Nandini Shrikent (credit: Nandini Shrikent)

Caught In A Digital Storm20180129

Two women who found themselves living under a social media siege

Are women treated unfairly on social media, and is the situation worse for women of colour? Krupa Padhy meets two social activists who unexpectedly found themselves at the centre of a digital storm, and asks what happened next.

Munroe Bergdorf is a British model, DJ and social activist who came to public attention in 2017 when she was employed as the first transgender model in a L'Oreal cosmetics campaign. She was dropped by the company after a social media post in which she said all white people were guilty of racial violence, prompting a swift backlash. She says her words were taken out of context but she stands by them. Munroe received rape and death threats for weeks, but she fought back, has secured a new beauty contract and is now a public speaker on race issues.

Yassmin Abdel-Magied is a Sudanese-Australian engineer, writer and activist who was named Queensland Young Australian of the Year 2015. However just two years later she found herself facing a barrage of criticism after posting a seven word status online that was seen by many as disrespectful to fallen soldiers on Anzac Day. Although she apologised immediately, she says that didn't stop her becoming the most publicly hated Muslim in Australia, and the months of abuse only calmed down when she left the country for good.

(L) Munroe Bergdorf. Credit: Elvind Hansen
(R) Yassmin Abdel-Magied. Credit: Lucy Alcorn

Caught in a Digital Storm20180129

Two women who found themselves living under a social media siege

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Are women treated unfairly on social media, and is the situation worse for women of colour? Krupa Padhy meets two social activists who unexpectedly found themselves at the centre of a digital storm, and asks what happened next.

Munroe Bergdorf is a British model, DJ and social activist who came to public attention in 2017 when she was employed as the first transgender model in a L'Oreal cosmetics campaign. She was dropped by the company after a social media post in which she said all white people were guilty of racial violence, prompting a swift backlash. She says her words were taken out of context but she stands by them. Munroe received rape and death threats for weeks, but she fought back, has secured a new beauty contract and is now a public speaker on race issues.

Yassmin Abdel-Magied is a Sudanese-Australian engineer, writer and activist who was named Queensland Young Australian of the Year 2015. However just two years later she found herself facing a barrage of criticism after posting a seven word status online that was seen by many as disrespectful to fallen soldiers on Anzac Day. Although she apologised immediately, she says that didn't stop her becoming the most publicly hated Muslim in Australia, and the months of abuse only calmed down when she left the country for good.

(L) Munroe Bergdorf. Credit: Elvind Hansen
(R) Yassmin Abdel-Magied. Credit: Lucy Alcorn

Cave Women: Jill Heinerth And Elen Feuerriegel20160125

Two women who go deep underground in the name of science and discovery

Jill Heinerth is the world's top underwater cave explorer. More people have walked on the moon than have ventured to some of the places she has dived. Originally from Canada, and now living in Florida in the US, Jill has broken records mapping whole water courses underground, and once had a narrow escape from cave-diving in an Antarctic iceberg. She takes photographs and video whilst underground, and says that she would never attempt a dangerous dive just for the thrill of it - there has to be a new discovery to pursue.

Elen Feuerriegel is a PhD student from Australia who was catapulted into one of the most exciting scientific discoveries of our time, when her caving experience and slim build led to her joining the Rising Star Expedition. This all-women team excavated over a thousand fossils from a deep cave system in South Africa, which at its narrowest point measures just 18 cm. It was announced in September 2015 that these bones were from a previously unknown species of human ancestor, Homo Naledi.

(Photo: (L) Jill Heinerth in diving gear, Credit: Wes Skiles. (R) Elen Feuerriegel holding MH1)

Cave Women: Jill Heinerth and Elen Feuerriegel20160125

Two women who go deep underground in the name of science and discovery

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Jill Heinerth is the world's top underwater cave explorer. More people have walked on the moon than have ventured to some of the places she has dived. Originally from Canada, and now living in Florida in the US, Jill has broken records mapping whole water courses underground, and once had a narrow escape from cave-diving in an Antarctic iceberg. She takes photographs and video whilst underground, and says that she would never attempt a dangerous dive just for the thrill of it - there has to be a new discovery to pursue.

Elen Feuerriegel is a PhD student from Australia who was catapulted into one of the most exciting scientific discoveries of our time, when her caving experience and slim build led to her joining the Rising Star Expedition. This all-women team excavated over a thousand fossils from a deep cave system in South Africa, which at its narrowest point measures just 18 cm. It was announced in September 2015 that these bones were from a previously unknown species of human ancestor, Homo Naledi.

(Photo: (L) Jill Heinerth in diving gear, Credit: Wes Skiles. (R) Elen Feuerriegel holding MH1)

Chefs: Farah Quinn and Marianna Orlinkova20150112

Indonesian and Russian chefs on a male-dominated industry and getting banned ingredients

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

When celebrity chef Farah Quinn first appeared on screens in Indonesia, people were not quite sure what to make of her. Viewers were used to male chefs, so making her mark was not easy. Critics quibbled about her talents saying they lay in her looks rather than her culinary achievements, but Farah says this is unfair and she has worked hard to get to where she is, starting at the bottom and running her own restaurant.

Russian chef Marianna Orlinkova can relate to working in a tough, male-dominated industry. She says there are not many female chefs in Moscow - the kitchen culture is too tough. Marianna is a 'brand chef' and creates menus for a restaurant in the city, as well as being an award-winning food writer and deputy editor of Russia's Gastronom magazine.

(Photo: Farah Quinn (credit: Rio Photography) and Marianna Orlinkova)

Chess Grandmasters20180702

Two women who have broken records and barriers playing chess

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

What does it take for a woman to excel in the ruthlessly competitive, male-dominated world of chess? Kim Chakanetsa meets two outstanding female players from Hungary and China to find out.

Judit Polgar is the strongest female chess player of all time. As a child prodigy she broke Bobby Fischer's record to become the youngest grandmaster, aged 15. She went on to beat the World No 1 Garry Kasparov, after he had said women shouldn't play chess. Judit says she made a decision very early not to play in the Women's competition, because she wanted to play the best, and they were men. She remains the only woman ever to place in the top 10 players in the world, despite retiring 4 years ago.

Hou Yifan is widely considered to be the best woman playing chess today. She has been the Women's World Chess Champion three times, the youngest ever to win the title, as well as the youngest female player ever to qualify for the title of grandmaster. Yifan has now decided not to play in the Women's Championship anymore. She took time out of competing to study for a degree and is about to do a Masters at Oxford University, because she believes doing other things is beneficial to her and to her chess.

Image: (L) Hou Yifan. Credit: Getty Images
Image: (R) Judit Polgar. Credit: Timea Jaksa

Child Stars: Mandisa Nakana Taylor And Mara Wilson20161031

The star of the film Matilda talks to a trail-blazing South African youth TV presenter.

Can you beat the so-called 'curse' of the child performer? Maryam Maruf brings together two women who grew up on camera - the American star of the films Matilda and Mrs Doubtfire, and a South African youth TV presenter.

At six years old Mara Wilson was playing Robin Williams's daughter in Mrs Doubtfire, then she bagged the leading role in the film version of Roald Dahl's Matilda. For a few years she was the cutest little girl in Hollywood. Then as she hit puberty and did not become classically 'pretty', she discovered that the parts simply dried up. Mara chose not to re-enter the limelight as an adult, and is a writer and storyteller in New York. She's written a memoir called 'Where Am I Now?'

Mandisa Nakana Taylor shot to fame in South Africa aged 10, as one of a multi-racial cast of young presenters on the kids' show YOTV. For six years children raced home after school and watched her grow up on their televisions. Mandisa says it was great fun, and there were a lot of first kisses on set, but they were also expected to maintain an adult work ethic. Now a mother and student in the UK, she still appears on screen, this time on her own YouTube channel.

(Photo: (L) Mandisa Nakana Taylor. Credit: Vanity Studios. (R) Mara Wilson. Credit: Ari Scott)

Child Stars: Mandisa Nakana Taylor and Mara Wilson20161031

The star of the film Matilda talks to a trail-blazing South African youth TV presenter.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Can you beat the so-called 'curse' of the child performer? Maryam Maruf brings together two women who grew up on camera - the American star of the films Matilda and Mrs Doubtfire, and a South African youth TV presenter.

At six years old Mara Wilson was playing Robin Williams's daughter in Mrs Doubtfire, then she bagged the leading role in the film version of Roald Dahl's Matilda. For a few years she was the cutest little girl in Hollywood. Then as she hit puberty and did not become classically 'pretty', she discovered that the parts simply dried up. Mara chose not to re-enter the limelight as an adult, and is a writer and storyteller in New York. She's written a memoir called 'Where Am I Now?'

Mandisa Nakana Taylor shot to fame in South Africa aged 10, as one of a multi-racial cast of young presenters on the kids' show YOTV. For six years children raced home after school and watched her grow up on their televisions. Mandisa says it was great fun, and there were a lot of first kisses on set, but they were also expected to maintain an adult work ethic. Now a mother and student in the UK, she still appears on screen, this time on her own YouTube channel.

(Photo: (L) Mandisa Nakana Taylor. Credit: Vanity Studios. (R) Mara Wilson. Credit: Ari Scott)

Children's Authors: Leslea Newman and Candy Gourlay2015042020150425 (WS)

Creating imaginary worlds with words for children in the US and the Philippines

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Leslea Newman has written more than sixty children's books. She says she can't remember a time when she didn't want to be a writer. As a teenager Leslea got her work published in magazines and she also worked as Alan Ginsberg's apprentice. When a friend told her she couldn't find any books for her daughter that portrayed a family like hers, with two lesbian parents, Leslea decided she needed to do something and wrote the children's picture book Heather has two Mommies. When it was published in 1989 it caused outrage "It started getting challenged and banned and I got called all kinds of terrible names". Twenty-five years later the book has been re-released, to a much kinder reception.

Candy Gourlay grew up in the Philippines and fell in love with books as a child, but says "all the stories were of these pink-skinned children with fluffy pets", and she came to the conclusion that Filipinos were not "allowed to be in books". So her first novel was set in London with English characters and an agent said "why does your book look like that?", because it had no connection to Candy's experience. Candy took this advice on board and since then has created imaginary worlds with Filipino characters for her young readers. New technology has a role in Candy's work, she says that children have so many things "clamouring for their attention", so you've got to compete and embrace "their world". She does this with her novel Shine, which combines ghosts and the internet.

Picture: Leslea Newman (Left) Credit: Mary Vazquez; Candy Gourlay (Right) Credit: Cindy Bajema/Sambat Trust

Children's Authors: Leslea Newman and Candy Gourlay20150420

Creating imaginary worlds with words for children in the US and the Philippines

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Leslea Newman has written more than sixty children's books. She says she can't remember a time when she didn't want to be a writer. As a teenager Leslea got her work published in magazines and she also worked as Alan Ginsberg's apprentice. When a friend told her she couldn't find any books for her daughter that portrayed a family like hers, with two lesbian parents, Leslea decided she needed to do something and wrote the children's picture book Heather has two Mommies. When it was published in 1989 it caused outrage "It started getting challenged and banned and I got called all kinds of terrible names". Twenty-five years later the book has been re-released, to a much kinder reception.

Candy Gourlay grew up in the Philippines and fell in love with books as a child, but says "all the stories were of these pink-skinned children with fluffy pets", and she came to the conclusion that Filipinos were not "allowed to be in books". So her first novel was set in London with English characters and an agent said "why does your book look like that?", because it had no connection to Candy's experience. Candy took this advice on board and since then has created imaginary worlds with Filipino characters for her young readers. New technology has a role in Candy's work, she says that children have so many things "clamouring for their attention", so you've got to compete and embrace "their world". She does this with her novel Shine, which combines ghosts and the internet.

Picture: Leslea Newman (Left) Credit: Mary Vazquez; Candy Gourlay (Right) Credit: Cindy Bajema/Sambat Trust

Choirs20171030

Two women who lead ambitious choirs in Israel and the UK

The joy of coming together through song - Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who have created choirs that go beyond simply making music.

Mika Danny started the Rana Choir in 2008, with a clear mission to unite Arab and Jewish women in song. Mika lives in Jaffa in Israel and says that while women from Christian, Jewish and Muslim communities find it almost impossible to discuss what they call 'the situation' there, they have been able to come together 'as a family' through singing a repertoire that reflects all their different cultural backgrounds.

Esmeralda Conde Ruiz says her life is "Music, music all day long". Originally from Spain via Germany, she now leads many different amateur and professional choirs in London, and says she always wants to push people to do things they didn't know they were capable of - whether they are a small community choir from Borough Market or a 500-strong amateur group of singers performing at the Tate Modern art gallery.

Photo: (L) Mika Danny (credit: Noa Ben Shalom) and (R) Esmeralda Conde Ruiz (credit: MIO)

Choirs20171030

Two women who lead ambitious choirs in Israel and the UK

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

The joy of coming together through song - Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who have created choirs that go beyond simply making music.

Mika Danny started the Rana Choir in 2008, with a clear mission to unite Arab and Jewish women in song. Mika lives in Jaffa in Israel and says that while women from Christian, Jewish and Muslim communities find it almost impossible to discuss what they call 'the situation' there, they have been able to come together 'as a family' through singing a repertoire that reflects all their different cultural backgrounds.

Esmeralda Conde Ruiz says her life is "Music, music all day long". Originally from Spain via Germany, she now leads many different amateur and professional choirs in London, and says she always wants to push people to do things they didn't know they were capable of - whether they are a small community choir from Borough Market or a 500-strong amateur group of singers performing at the Tate Modern art gallery.

Photo: (L) Mika Danny (credit: Noa Ben Shalom) and (R) Esmeralda Conde Ruiz (credit: MIO)

Choreographers: Aditi Mangaldas and Jasmin Vardimon20151207

Dancing and directing - the art of the choreographer

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Growing up in an Israeli kibbutz taught choreographer Jasmin Vardimon all about group dynamics, but she came to dancing relatively late, aged 14. Now artistic director of the Jasmin Vardimon Dance Company in the UK, her visually stunning and exciting performances are inspired by universal themes such as brutality and justice, filtered through the personal experience of her and her dancers. Jasmin says that leading a production is like bringing up a child - at a key point you need to be able to let go and trust the dancers to do their best.

Aditi Mangaldas was trained in the classical Indian dance form of kathak from the age of five. Her Aditi Mangaldas Dance Company, Drishtikon Dance Foundation, now performs all over the world. With its fast footwork and rhythmic complexity, kathak gives Aditi a sense of feeling timeless, of being bound to the ground. She believes that there is room for the dance form to evolve and in some of her productions fuses kathak with contemporary dance. Aditi still performs on stage, and on those days says she has to become just one of the company.

(L) Aditi Mangaldas. Credit: Dinesh Khanna
(R) Jasmin Vardimon. Credit: Ben Harries

Choreographers: Aditi Mangaldas And Jasmin Vardimon20151207

Growing up in an Israeli kibbutz taught choreographer Jasmin Vardimon all about group dynamics, but she came to dancing relatively late, aged 14. Now artistic director of the Jasmin Vardimon Dance Company in the UK, her visually stunning and exciting performances are inspired by universal themes such as brutality and justice, filtered through the personal experience of her and her dancers. Jasmin says that leading a production is like bringing up a child - at a key point you need to be able to let go and trust the dancers to do their best.

Aditi Mangaldas was trained in the classical Indian dance form of kathak from the age of five. Her Aditi Mangaldas Dance Company, Drishtikon Dance Foundation, now performs all over the world. With its fast footwork and rhythmic complexity, kathak gives Aditi a sense of feeling timeless, of being bound to the ground. She believes that there is room for the dance form to evolve and in some of her productions fuses kathak with contemporary dance. Aditi still performs on stage, and on those days says she has to become just one of the company.

(L) Aditi Mangaldas. Credit: Dinesh Khanna

(R) Jasmin Vardimon. Credit: Ben Harries

Dancing and directing - the art of the choreographer

Cities After Dark20170731

Two women known as the queens of their nightlife scenes

Cities that come alive at night, with two women who know where to go and what to do. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to a DJ from Lebanon and a singer-songwriter from China who take her on a virtual tour of their favourite nightlife scenes.

Nicole Moudaber is a Nigerian-born Lebanese DJ and music producer. Nicole began exploring Beirut's nightlife as a promoter, hosting successful club nights for years before turning her hands to the decks. She has since been described as one of the best techno DJs on the scene, sharing her distinct beats with the nightlife scenes in New York, Ibiza and beyond.

ChaCha Yehaiyahan is regarded as the queen of the underground music scene in Shanghai, a city that is a far cry from the rural mountainous village she grew up in in southwest China. She left home at 16 with her sights firmly set on the bright lights of Beijing, and wound up in Shanghai, which she says has a nightlife scene unparalleled in China.

Image: (L) ChaCha Yehaiyahan. Credit: AJ Schokora
Image: (R) Nicole Moudaber. Credit: Woolhouse Studios

Cities After Dark2017073120170806 (WS)

Two women known as the queens of their nightlife scenes

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Cities that come alive at night, with two women who know where to go and what to do. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to a DJ from Lebanon and a singer-songwriter from China who take her on a virtual tour of their favourite nightlife scenes.

Nicole Moudaber is a Nigerian-born Lebanese DJ and music producer. Nicole began exploring Beirut's nightlife as a promoter, hosting successful club nights for years before turning her hands to the decks. She has since been described as one of the best techno DJs on the scene, sharing her distinct beats with the nightlife scenes in New York, Ibiza and beyond.

ChaCha Yehaiyahan is regarded as the queen of the underground music scene in Shanghai, a city that is a far cry from the rural mountainous village she grew up in in southwest China. She left home at 16 with her sights firmly set on the bright lights of Beijing, and wound up in Shanghai, which she says has a nightlife scene unparalleled in China.

Image: (L) ChaCha Yehaiyahan. Credit: AJ Schokora
Image: (R) Nicole Moudaber. Credit: Woolhouse Studios

Cities After Dark20170731

Two women known as the queens of their nightlife scenes

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Cities that come alive at night, with two women who know where to go and what to do. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to a DJ from Lebanon and a singer-songwriter from China who take her on a virtual tour of their favourite nightlife scenes.

Nicole Moudaber is a Nigerian-born Lebanese DJ and music producer. Nicole began exploring Beirut's nightlife as a promoter, hosting successful club nights for years before turning her hands to the decks. She has since been described as one of the best techno DJs on the scene, sharing her distinct beats with the nightlife scenes in New York, Ibiza and beyond.

ChaCha Yehaiyahan is regarded as the queen of the underground music scene in Shanghai, a city that is a far cry from the rural mountainous village she grew up in in southwest China. She left home at 16 with her sights firmly set on the bright lights of Beijing, and wound up in Shanghai, which she says has a nightlife scene unparalleled in China.

Image: (L) ChaCha Yehaiyahan. Credit: AJ Schokora
Image: (R) Nicole Moudaber. Credit: Woolhouse Studios

City Traders: Louise Dispo and Lucy Shitova2016062720160702 (WS)

Profits, losses and bonuses - two female traders from Russia and the Philippines

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Women make better city traders than men according to research, but most trading floors are dominated by men. Kim Chakanetsa explores why this might be and meets two traders from Russia and the Philippines who are helping to redress the balance.

Currency trading is Louise Dispo's area of the market. Originally from the Philippines, Louise work's in London now. She says she's used to being one of the only females on the trading floor and thinks it's the high pressure, risk and unpredictable hours that put other women off choosing this as a career. Chocolate, coffee and nuts get Louise through the day and she says the office is filled with high screens, people shouting and phones ringing.

Lucy Shitova has traded base metals, such as aluminium and steel, for 10 years. She began her career in Russia and also works in London now. Lucy says she was drawn to this profession because of the buzz, the "pay-off" and the fact it's like getting paid to gamble in a casino with someone else's cash. Lucy admits that it hits hard when you lose money, but you've got to be confident in your decisions and move on.

Image: City Traders Louise Dispo (L) and Lucy Shitova (R)
Credit: Louise Dispo & Lucy Shitova

City Traders: Louise Dispo and Lucy Shitova20160627

Profits, losses and bonuses - two female traders from Russia and the Philippines

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Women make better city traders than men according to research, but most trading floors are dominated by men. Kim Chakanetsa explores why this might be and meets two traders from Russia and the Philippines who are helping to redress the balance.

Currency trading is Louise Dispo's area of the market. Originally from the Philippines, Louise work's in London now. She says she's used to being one of the only females on the trading floor and thinks it's the high pressure, risk and unpredictable hours that put other women off choosing this as a career. Chocolate, coffee and nuts get Louise through the day and she says the office is filled with high screens, people shouting and phones ringing.

Lucy Shitova has traded base metals, such as aluminium and steel, for 10 years. She began her career in Russia and also works in London now. Lucy says she was drawn to this profession because of the buzz, the "pay-off" and the fact it's like getting paid to gamble in a casino with someone else's cash. Lucy admits that it hits hard when you lose money, but you've got to be confident in your decisions and move on.

Image: City Traders Louise Dispo (L) and Lucy Shitova (R)
Credit: Louise Dispo & Lucy Shitova

City Traders: Louise Dispo And Lucy Shitova2016062720160703 (WS)

Women make better city traders than men according to research, but most trading floors are dominated by men. Kim Chakanetsa explores why this might be and meets two traders from Russia and the Philippines who are helping to redress the balance.

Currency trading is Louise Dispo's area of the market. Originally from the Philippines, Louise work's in London now. She says she's used to being one of the only females on the trading floor and thinks it's the high pressure, risk and unpredictable hours that put other women off choosing this as a career. Chocolate, coffee and nuts get Louise through the day and she says the office is filled with high screens, people shouting and phones ringing.

Lucy Shitova has traded base metals, such as aluminium and steel, for 10 years. She began her career in Russia and also works in London now. Lucy says she was drawn to this profession because of the buzz, the "pay-off" and the fact it's like getting paid to gamble in a casino with someone else's cash. Lucy admits that it hits hard when you lose money, but you've got to be confident in your decisions and move on.

Image: City Traders Louise Dispo (L) and Lucy Shitova (R)

Credit: Louise Dispo and Lucy Shitova

Profits, losses and bonuses - two female traders from Russia and the Philippines

Comics: Hatoon Kadi and Njambi McGrath20141103

Funny women - a Saudi satirist talks to a Kenyan stand-up comic

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kim Chakanetsa hosts a conversation between one of Saudi Arabia's only female comedians and a Kenyan comic who performs her stand-up routine in the UK. Both love to laugh and to make people laugh.

Hatoon Kadi took up comedy when she got bored of her office job. At the time she says the internet in Saudi Arabia was booming with comedy shows, but they were all fronted by men, so she decided to fill a gap in the market. Now Hatoon, and her comedy alter ego 'Noon al-Niswa', have attracted millions of fans across the region with sketches about everyday life for women in the Kingdom. It's not what you might think.

Njambi McGrath grew up in Kenya. When she moved to the UK she was shocked at negative depictions of Africa and set herself the mission to try and change perceptions. Africa does have 'hunger, disease and war', Njambi says, but there is fun, laughter and happiness there too.

As well as hearing each other's comedy sketches, Hatoon and Njambi talk about overturning western stereotypes of their homelands through humour, the art of developing a thick skin against critics, and how they find their material.

(Picture: Hatoon Kadi (L) and Njambi McGrath)

Conductors: Alondra de la Parra and Simone Young20150126

Two female conductors from Mexico and Australia share their passion for the podium

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Mexican conductor Alondra de la Parra has been described as a 'rock star' of the classical world. At a concert as a child her father asked her what a conductor does - "nothing" she replied. So he enlightened her and explained that the conductor does "everything". This ignited a curiosity, which soon led to an unstoppable passion and in her early 20s Alondra set up the Philharmonic Orchestra of the Americas to showcase Latin music. She is now also a guest conductor with some of the greatest orchestras in the world.

Simone Young is an award-winning conductor who is now the artistic director of the Hamburg State Opera and music director of the Hamburg Philharmonic Orchestra. She does not come from a musical family, but says that growing up in Australia, where people who challenge the status quo are championed, helped to push her along her chosen career path. Simone is now based in Germany, which is steeped in classical music history, but has guest-conducted with some of the world's leading orchestras and is famous for conducting Wagner.

(Photo: Conductors Alondra de la Parra (left) and Simone Young. Credits: Alondra de la Parra by Leonardo Manzo. Simone Young by Berthold Fabricius)

Creating Movie Worlds

Two women who shape the look of a film, from sets to props to locations - and have huge influence on our screens. But despite their success, this is still a field dominated by men.

Hannah Beachler has translated the African fantasy world of Wakanda onto the big screen in the much-anticipated new superhero movie, Black Panther. She is also the creative force behind the look of the Oscar-winning film Moonlight, and she has won awards for her work on Beyonce's visual album Lemonade. Hannah says sexism on set was so rife when she started out that she de-feminised her appearance, to avoid unwanted attention. Now she's in charge of her department however, she simply doesn't stand for any bad behaviour from anyone.

Sarah Greenwood has been nominated for two Academy Awards in 2018 for her work on the box office smash hits The Darkest Hour and Beauty and the Beast. Sarah is considered one of the UK's top production designers and she specialises in films set in the past, including Pride and Prejudice and Atonement. Having been Oscar nominated six times in her career, she says she now has the luxury of being able to make choices, and only work with people she admires.

Image: (L) Hannah Beachler. Credit: Chris Britt
Image: (R) Sarah Greenwood on set of Working Title film Anna Karenina. Credit: Laurie Sparham

Creating Movie Worlds20180226

Two women who shape the look of a film, from sets to props to locations - and have huge influence on our screens. But despite their success, this is still a field dominated by men.

Hannah Beachler has translated the African fantasy world of Wakanda onto the big screen in the much-anticipated new superhero movie, Black Panther. She is also the creative force behind the look of the Oscar-winning film Moonlight, and she has won awards for her work on Beyonce's visual album Lemonade. Hannah says sexism on set was so rife when she started out that she de-feminised her appearance, to avoid unwanted attention. Now she's in charge of her department however, she simply doesn't stand for any bad behaviour from anyone.

Sarah Greenwood has been nominated for two Academy Awards in 2018 for her work on the box office smash hits The Darkest Hour and Beauty and the Beast. Sarah is considered one of the UK's top production designers and she specialises in films set in the past, including Pride and Prejudice and Atonement. Having been Oscar nominated six times in her career, she says she now has the luxury of being able to make choices, and only work with people she admires.

Image: (L) Hannah Beachler. Credit: Chris Britt
Image: (R) Sarah Greenwood on set of Working Title film Anna Karenina. Credit: Laurie Sparham

Two women in charge of production design on major movie sets

Creating Movie Worlds20180226

Two women in charge of production design on major movie sets

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two women who shape the look of a film, from sets to props to locations - and have huge influence on our screens. But despite their success, this is still a field dominated by men.

Hannah Beachler has translated the African fantasy world of Wakanda onto the big screen in the much-anticipated new superhero movie, Black Panther. She is also the creative force behind the look of the Oscar-winning film Moonlight, and she has won awards for her work on Beyonce's visual album Lemonade. Hannah says sexism on set was so rife when she started out that she de-feminised her appearance, to avoid unwanted attention. Now she's in charge of her department however, she simply doesn't stand for any bad behaviour from anyone.

Sarah Greenwood has been nominated for two Academy Awards in 2018 for her work on the box office smash hits The Darkest Hour and Beauty and the Beast. Sarah is considered one of the UK's top production designers and she specialises in films set in the past, including Pride and Prejudice and Atonement. Having been Oscar nominated six times in her career, she says she now has the luxury of being able to make choices, and only work with people she admires.

Image: (L) Hannah Beachler. Credit: Chris Britt
Image: (R) Sarah Greenwood on set of Working Title film Anna Karenina. Credit: Laurie Sparham

Cricketers20170227

Star cricketers from New Zealand and the West Indies discuss the women's game.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Talented women cricketers from the West Indies and New Zealand chat to Kim Chakanetsa about how they've gone from playing cricket with the boys as kids to record-breaking achievements with their teams.

Merissa Aguilleira is from Trinidad and plays for the West Indies women's side. As well as a six year stint as team captain, Merissa contributed to their success in becoming Twenty20 World Champions in 2016. Her achievements seem all the more impressive when you realise that she only started playing 'real' cricket at 16, and initially her instinct was to run away from the hard ball! She talks about the importance of breaking down stereotypes by being unafraid to boast about women's achievements.

Sophie Devine is Vice Captain of the White Ferns, New Zealand's women's team. She also plays in the Australian Women's Big Bash League, and says the popularity of women's cricket there is going through the roof. As a Type 1 diabetic, Sophie says her condition has never been a barrier to sporting success, and she truly believes in the power of sport to change lives.

(L) Sophie Devine (credit: Stefan Gosatti/Getty Images) and (R) Merissa Aguilleira (WICB Media/Randy Brooks of Brooks Latouche Photography)

Cricketers20170227

Talented women cricketers from the West Indies and New Zealand chat to Kim Chakanetsa about how they've gone from playing cricket with the boys as kids to record-breaking achievements with their teams.

Merissa Aguilleira is from Trinidad and plays for the West Indies women's side. As well as a six year stint as team captain, Merissa contributed to their success in becoming Twenty20 World Champions in 2016. Her achievements seem all the more impressive when you realise that she only started playing 'real' cricket at 16, and initially her instinct was to run away from the hard ball! She talks about the importance of breaking down stereotypes by being unafraid to boast about women's achievements.

Sophie Devine is Vice Captain of the White Ferns, New Zealand's women's team. She also plays in the Australian Women's Big Bash League, and says the popularity of women's cricket there is going through the roof. As a Type 1 diabetic, Sophie says her condition has never been a barrier to sporting success, and she truly believes in the power of sport to change lives.

(L) Sophie Devine (credit: Stefan Gosatti/Getty Images) and (R) Merissa Aguilleira (WICB Media/Randy Brooks of Brooks Latouche Photography)

Crime Writers2017032720170402 (WS)

Two acclaimed female crime authors from the US and South Africa

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two women trying to get into the mind of the serial killer talk to Kim Chakanetsa about the craft of crime fiction. We hear what they're most afraid of, how writing about grim subjects has altered their outlook on life and whether women are particularly good at this genre.

Patricia Cornwell is probably the best known female crime writer in the world. Credited with creating the 'forensic thriller', Patricia has sold over 100 million books across the globe and recently published the 24th book in her hugely popular Kay Scarpetta series. Patricia has also long been fascinated by Jack the Ripper, the infamous Victorian serial killer, and has written her own account of his possible identity.

Angela Makholwa is a former South African journalist who first got into crime writing after interviewing the real-life serial killer, Moses Sithole, in prison. Her debut novel Red Ink was loosely based on those experiences. She says the role of the writer is to confront the things we all want to run away from. She has since written two more novels and says she enjoys reading crime fiction from Scandinavia, given that she writes about such a radically different part of the world. Angela lives and works in Johannesburg.

(L) Image: Patricia Cornwell. Credit: Patrick Ecclesine.
(R) Image and credit: Angela Makholwa.

Crime Writers20170327

Two acclaimed female crime authors from the US and South Africa

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two women trying to get into the mind of the serial killer talk to Kim Chakanetsa about the craft of crime fiction. We hear what they're most afraid of, how writing about grim subjects has altered their outlook on life and whether women are particularly good at this genre.

Patricia Cornwell is probably the best known female crime writer in the world. Credited with creating the 'forensic thriller', Patricia has sold over 100 million books across the globe and recently published the 24th book in her hugely popular Kay Scarpetta series. Patricia has also long been fascinated by Jack the Ripper, the infamous Victorian serial killer, and has written her own account of his possible identity.

Angela Makholwa is a former South African journalist who first got into crime writing after interviewing the real-life serial killer, Moses Sithole, in prison. Her debut novel Red Ink was loosely based on those experiences. She says the role of the writer is to confront the things we all want to run away from. She has since written two more novels and says she enjoys reading crime fiction from Scandinavia, given that she writes about such a radically different part of the world. Angela lives and works in Johannesburg.

(L) Image: Patricia Cornwell. Credit: Patrick Ecclesine.
(R) Image and credit: Angela Makholwa.

Crime Writers2017032720170402 (WS)

Two women trying to get into the mind of the serial killer talk to Kim Chakanetsa about the craft of crime fiction. We hear what they're most afraid of, how writing about grim subjects has altered their outlook on life and whether women are particularly good at this genre.

Patricia Cornwell is probably the best known female crime writer in the world. Credited with creating the 'forensic thriller', Patricia has sold over 100 million books across the globe and recently published the 24th book in her hugely popular Kay Scarpetta series. Patricia has also long been fascinated by Jack the Ripper, the infamous Victorian serial killer, and has written her own account of his possible identity.

Angela Makholwa is a former South African journalist who first got into crime writing after interviewing the real-life serial killer, Moses Sithole, in prison. Her debut novel Red Ink was loosely based on those experiences. She says the role of the writer is to confront the things we all want to run away from. She has since written two more novels and says she enjoys reading crime fiction from Scandinavia, given that she writes about such a radically different part of the world. Angela lives and works in Johannesburg.

(L) Image: Patricia Cornwell. Credit: Patrick Ecclesine.

(R) Image and credit: Angela Makholwa.

Two acclaimed female crime authors from the US and South Africa

Crowning The Queens20180813

Two women who make dramatic headpieces for very high-profile clients

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Can hats be liberating for women? Nelufar Hedayat brings together a hatmaker to the British Queen and a turban designer to Beyoncé.

Rachel Trevor-Morgan is a London based milliner who has been making hats for the Queen for over a decade. As well as royalty she also sells to top fashion retailers, and thinks it's a shame that we don’t wear hats as much as we used to. Rachel is not trying to push the boundaries of fashion with her hats - she says her mission is to make her clients look classically feminine and glamorous.

Donia Allegue Walbaum is a French luxury fashion designer whose turbans have been commissioned by Beyoncé, including for the video for her latest single. She's aiming to reinvent this age-old headpiece in a modern way, and says it's the ultimate accessory. Many of her clients also wear them to cover their heads for religious reasons, or even in the case of illness.

Image: Turban designer Donia Allegue Walbaum and milliner Rachel Trevor-Morgan donning their designs
(L) Donia Allegue Walbaum. Credit: Laurent Mauger
(R) Rachel Trevor-Morgan. Credit: Catherine Harbour

Crowning The Queens20180813

Two women who make dramatic headpieces for very high-profile clients

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Can hats be liberating for women? Nelufar Hedayat brings together a hatmaker to the British Queen and a turban designer to Beyoncé.

Rachel Trevor-Morgan is a London based milliner who has been making hats for the Queen for over a decade. As well as royalty she also sells to top fashion retailers, and thinks it's a shame that we don’t wear hats as much as we used to. Rachel is not trying to push the boundaries of fashion with her hats - she says her mission is to make her clients look classically feminine and glamorous.

Donia Allegue Walbaum is a French luxury fashion designer whose turbans have been commissioned by Beyoncé, including for the video for her latest single. She's aiming to reinvent this age-old headpiece in a modern way, and says it's the ultimate accessory. Many of her clients also wear them to cover their heads for religious reasons, or even in the case of illness.

Image: Turban designer Donia Allegue Walbaum and milliner Rachel Trevor-Morgan donning their designs
(L) Donia Allegue Walbaum. Credit: Laurent Mauger
(R) Rachel Trevor-Morgan. Credit: Catherine Harbour

Daughters Of Political Icons20170626

Two women whose fathers made an indelible mark on the political landscape in West Africa.

Growing up with a name that has resonance around the world - and a father with a towering reputation. That's been the experience of Samia Nkrumah and Noo Saro-Wiwa. We'll hear about the pride and burdens they carry with them, and how their fathers' untimely deaths have shaped their lives.

Samia Nkrumah is the daughter of Ghana's first president, Kwame Nkrumah - the man who led his country to independence in 1957, and became an international symbol of freedom as the leader of the first African country to shake off the chains of colonial rule. Samia was just 11 at the time of her father's death, and hadn't seen him for six years, after the family were separated following his overthrow. Still, Samia decided to follow her father into politics and currently chairs the Convention People's Party, a political party in Ghana founded by her father.

Noo Saro-Wiwa is the daughter of Ken Saro-Wiwa, the Nigerian writer and environmental activist who was killed in 1995 after leading peaceful protests against the oil industry in his home region of Ogoniland. Noo was a 19-year-old student at the time of his death. She went on to become a journalist and author based in the UK - she has written an account of her own journey around Nigeria called 'Looking for Transwonderland'.

Image: Samia Nkrumah (credit: Samia Nkrumah) (l) and NooSaro-Wiwa (credit: Michael Wharley) (r)

Daughters of Political Icons20170626

Two women whose fathers made an indelible mark on the political landscape in West Africa.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Growing up with a name that has resonance around the world - and a father with a towering reputation. That's been the experience of Samia Nkrumah and Noo Saro-Wiwa. We'll hear about the pride and burdens they carry with them, and how their fathers' untimely deaths have shaped their lives.

Samia Nkrumah is the daughter of Ghana's first president, Kwame Nkrumah - the man who led his country to independence in 1957, and became an international symbol of freedom as the leader of the first African country to shake off the chains of colonial rule. Samia was just 11 at the time of her father's death, and hadn't seen him for six years, after the family were separated following his overthrow. Still, Samia decided to follow her father into politics and currently chairs the Convention People's Party, a political party in Ghana founded by her father.

Noo Saro-Wiwa is the daughter of Ken Saro-Wiwa, the Nigerian writer and environmental activist who was killed in 1995 after leading peaceful protests against the oil industry in his home region of Ogoniland. Noo was a 19-year-old student at the time of his death. She went on to become a journalist and author based in the UK - she has written an account of her own journey around Nigeria called 'Looking for Transwonderland'.

Image: Samia Nkrumah (credit: Samia Nkrumah) (l) and NooSaro-Wiwa (credit: Michael Wharley) (r)

Disability: Maysoon Zayid and Gloria Williston20160222

Two successful women from America and Ghana who refuse to be defined by their disability

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Maysoon Zayid is an Arab-American actor and writer with cerebral palsy. Brought up by parents who believed that nothing was impossible, she learnt how to walk by placing her heels on her father's feet. Combating unequal treatment in her profession, Maysoon went on to become a popular stand-up comedian, co-founded the New York Arab-American Comedy Festival and has performed in clubs in the US and the Middle East.

Gloria Williston was born with micromelia – one leg shorter than the other - and uses a prosthesis to keep balance when she walks. Growing up in Ghana she faced prejudice and stigmatisation but always kept a positive attitude. She completed her degree and now works at the Orthopaedic Training Centre in Nsawam. Gloria believes that the key factor in her success was her family's 'love all the way'.

Photo: Maysoon Zayid (L) Gloria Williston (R).

Disability: Maysoon Zayid And Gloria Williston20160222

Two successful women from America and Ghana who refuse to be defined by their disability

Maysoon Zayid is an Arab-American actor and writer with cerebral palsy. Brought up by parents who believed that nothing was impossible, she learnt how to walk by placing her heels on her father's feet. Combating unequal treatment in her profession, Maysoon went on to become a popular stand-up comedian, co-founded the New York Arab-American Comedy Festival and has performed in clubs in the US and the Middle East.

Gloria Williston was born with micromelia – one leg shorter than the other - and uses a prosthesis to keep balance when she walks. Growing up in Ghana she faced prejudice and stigmatisation but always kept a positive attitude. She completed her degree and now works at the Orthopaedic Training Centre in Nsawam. Gloria believes that the key factor in her success was her family's 'love all the way'.

Photo: Maysoon Zayid (L) Gloria Williston (R).

Diving Into The Past20170724

Two women exploring underwater archaeological sites in Thailand and Australia

Two archaeologists take us on an underwater adventure to uncover secrets about our past. Between them they've explored wooden vessels dating back hundreds of years, discovered Roman statues in the Mediterranean and Chinese ceramics in the Gulf of Thailand, and even stumbled upon what may be an Aboriginal rubbish dump.

Pornnatcha 'Jo' Sankhaprasit is Thailand's first ever female underwater archaeologist. She grew up in the Thai mountains and didn't even see the sea until she was nine years old. She's always had a passion for history and adventure, and she was drawn to marine archaeology because sites are often far better preserved underwater than on land. However the water, and deep dives in particular, still scare her - and the breathing apparatus weighs more than she does! But it's all worth it when she gets to work on ancient wrecks like the well-preserved Chinese ship that sank in the Gulf of Thailand more than 500 years ago.

Sarah Ward is a renowned maritime archaeologist from Australia, who has a vast and varied experience in her field. She has worked on underwater archaeological sites from a Roman wreck off the coast of Turkey, to the Tudor flagship, the Mary Rose, and a warship that sank off the coast of Argentina in 1790. These days she works mainly on commercial maritime projects, carrying out detailed surveys and excavations of harbours, ports and other coastal sites.

(L) Image: Sarah Ward. Credit:Surface Supplied Diver Training
(R) Image: Pornnatcha Sankhaprasit. Credit: Ian McCann

Diving into the Past2017072420170730 (WS)

Two women exploring underwater archaeological sites in Thailand and Australia

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two archaeologists take us on an underwater adventure to uncover secrets about our past. Between them they've explored wooden vessels dating back hundreds of years, discovered Roman statues in the Mediterranean and Chinese ceramics in the Gulf of Thailand, and even stumbled upon what may be an Aboriginal rubbish dump.

Pornnatcha 'Jo' Sankhaprasit is Thailand's first ever female underwater archaeologist. She grew up in the Thai mountains and didn't even see the sea until she was nine years old. She's always had a passion for history and adventure, and she was drawn to marine archaeology because sites are often far better preserved underwater than on land. However the water, and deep dives in particular, still scare her - and the breathing apparatus weighs more than she does! But it's all worth it when she gets to work on ancient wrecks like the well-preserved Chinese ship that sank in the Gulf of Thailand more than 500 years ago.

Sarah Ward is a renowned maritime archaeologist from Australia, who has a vast and varied experience in her field. She has worked on underwater archaeological sites from a Roman wreck off the coast of Turkey, to the Tudor flagship, the Mary Rose, and a warship that sank off the coast of Argentina in 1790. These days she works mainly on commercial maritime projects, carrying out detailed surveys and excavations of harbours, ports and other coastal sites.

(L) Image: Sarah Ward. Credit:Surface Supplied Diver Training
(R) Image: Pornnatcha Sankhaprasit. Credit: Ian McCann

Diving into the Past20170724

Two women exploring underwater archaeological sites in Thailand and Australia

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two archaeologists take us on an underwater adventure to uncover secrets about our past. Between them they've explored wooden vessels dating back hundreds of years, discovered Roman statues in the Mediterranean and Chinese ceramics in the Gulf of Thailand, and even stumbled upon what may be an Aboriginal rubbish dump.

Pornnatcha 'Jo' Sankhaprasit is Thailand's first ever female underwater archaeologist. She grew up in the Thai mountains and didn't even see the sea until she was nine years old. She's always had a passion for history and adventure, and she was drawn to marine archaeology because sites are often far better preserved underwater than on land. However the water, and deep dives in particular, still scare her - and the breathing apparatus weighs more than she does! But it's all worth it when she gets to work on ancient wrecks like the well-preserved Chinese ship that sank in the Gulf of Thailand more than 500 years ago.

Sarah Ward is a renowned maritime archaeologist from Australia, who has a vast and varied experience in her field. She has worked on underwater archaeological sites from a Roman wreck off the coast of Turkey, to the Tudor flagship, the Mary Rose, and a warship that sank off the coast of Argentina in 1790. These days she works mainly on commercial maritime projects, carrying out detailed surveys and excavations of harbours, ports and other coastal sites.

(L) Image: Sarah Ward. Credit:Surface Supplied Diver Training
(R) Image: Pornnatcha Sankhaprasit. Credit: Ian McCann

Divorce Lawyers20161219

How to deal with the financial and emotional fallout when a couple split up

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Sorting out the messy business of divorce, in France and India.

Veronique Chauveau is a divorce lawyer based in Paris, where she's been practising for more than 30 years. The bulk of her work is with the rich and famous, but she also finds time for a 'reality check' through taking on international child abduction cases. And she is an undisputed expert in jam making!

Vandana Shah is a divorce lawyer in Mumbai. She learnt about divorce the hard way, when she was thrown out of the family home, and spent the next 10 years battling to get a divorce. During that time she got herself a law degree, and she is now one of the foremost lawyers at the family court in Mumbai. She regularly writes for The Huffington Post, and her memoirs are called The Ex-Files. She also started 360 Degrees Back to Life, India's first support group for people going through a divorce.

(L-Image & credit: Vandana Shah.
R-Image & credit: Veronique Chauveau.)

Divorce Lawyers20161219

Sorting out the messy business of divorce, in France and India.

Veronique Chauveau is a divorce lawyer based in Paris, where she's been practising for more than 30 years. The bulk of her work is with the rich and famous, but she also finds time for a 'reality check' through taking on international child abduction cases. And she is an undisputed expert in jam making!

Vandana Shah is a divorce lawyer in Mumbai. She learnt about divorce the hard way, when she was thrown out of the family home, and spent the next 10 years battling to get a divorce. During that time she got herself a law degree, and she is now one of the foremost lawyers at the family court in Mumbai. She regularly writes for The Huffington Post, and her memoirs are called The Ex-Files. She also started 360 Degrees Back to Life, India's first support group for people going through a divorce.

(L-Image and credit: Vandana Shah.

R-Image and credit: Veronique Chauveau.)

How to deal with the financial and emotional fallout when a couple split up

Domestic Workers: Marissa Begonia and Siphokazi Mdlankomo2016100320161008 (WS)

Life in service: the secret tales of domestic workers in the Philippines and South Africa

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Siphokazi Mdlankomo comes from South Africa and Marissa Begonia from the Philippines but they have plenty in common. They have both dedicated a great deal of their lives to taking care of other people's households and children. They are Kim Chakanetsa's guests on this programme and they are discussing life as a domestic worker.

Marissa Begonia left her three young children to work overseas. It was a tough decision for her but she couldn't bear to see them going hungry at home in the Philippines. She found work initially in Hong Kong and then Singapore and finally London. Her choice has worked out for her, after years of providing for her children back home, she was finally able to bring them to join her in London. But the separation has taken its toll on all of them, and so has the work. Melissa has seen and heard of so much mistreatment among domestic workers that she decided to set up an organisation to protect the rights and welfare of others in her profession. The organisation is called Justice for Domestic Workers.

Until very recently Siphokazi Mdlankomo was working for a family in Johannesburg, South Africa but she's had to leave her job to focus full time on her new role on television and writing cookery books. She came to fame when she was runner-up in the South African reality TV show Master Chef. Her cooking has come a long way since she started her working life. She looks back fondly at the young Siphokazi, just starting out in her career, back then, she didn't know what garlic was, or fresh herbs or how to make a piece of toast.

Siphokazi and Marissa share their intimate, moving and sometimes funny stories of running someone else's household.

(Photo: Marissa Begonia (L) and (R) Siphokazi Mdlankomo)

Domestic Workers: Marissa Begonia and Siphokazi Mdlankomo20161003

Life in service: the secret tales of domestic workers in the Philippines and South Africa

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Siphokazi Mdlankomo comes from South Africa and Marissa Begonia from the Philippines but they have plenty in common. They have both dedicated a great deal of their lives to taking care of other people's households and children. They are Kim Chakanetsa's guests on this programme and they are discussing life as a domestic worker.

Marissa Begonia left her three young children to work overseas. It was a tough decision for her but she couldn't bear to see them going hungry at home in the Philippines. She found work initially in Hong Kong and then Singapore and finally London. Her choice has worked out for her, after years of providing for her children back home, she was finally able to bring them to join her in London. But the separation has taken its toll on all of them, and so has the work. Melissa has seen and heard of so much mistreatment among domestic workers that she decided to set up an organisation to protect the rights and welfare of others in her profession. The organisation is called Justice for Domestic Workers.

Until very recently Siphokazi Mdlankomo was working for a family in Johannesburg, South Africa but she's had to leave her job to focus full time on her new role on television and writing cookery books. She came to fame when she was runner-up in the South African reality TV show Master Chef. Her cooking has come a long way since she started her working life. She looks back fondly at the young Siphokazi, just starting out in her career, back then, she didn't know what garlic was, or fresh herbs or how to make a piece of toast.

Siphokazi and Marissa share their intimate, moving and sometimes funny stories of running someone else's household.

(Photo: Marissa Begonia (L) and (R) Siphokazi Mdlankomo)

Domestic Workers: Marissa Begonia And Siphokazi Mdlankomo2016100320161009 (WS)

Siphokazi Mdlankomo comes from South Africa and Marissa Begonia from the Philippines but they have plenty in common. They have both dedicated a great deal of their lives to taking care of other people's households and children. They are Kim Chakanetsa's guests on this programme and they are discussing life as a domestic worker.

Marissa Begonia left her three young children to work overseas. It was a tough decision for her but she couldn't bear to see them going hungry at home in the Philippines. She found work initially in Hong Kong and then Singapore and finally London. Her choice has worked out for her, after years of providing for her children back home, she was finally able to bring them to join her in London. But the separation has taken its toll on all of them, and so has the work. Melissa has seen and heard of so much mistreatment among domestic workers that she decided to set up an organisation to protect the rights and welfare of others in her profession. The organisation is called Justice for Domestic Workers.

Until very recently Siphokazi Mdlankomo was working for a family in Johannesburg, South Africa but she's had to leave her job to focus full time on her new role on television and writing cookery books. She came to fame when she was runner-up in the South African reality TV show Master Chef. Her cooking has come a long way since she started her working life. She looks back fondly at the young Siphokazi, just starting out in her career, back then, she didn't know what garlic was, or fresh herbs or how to make a piece of toast.

Siphokazi and Marissa share their intimate, moving and sometimes funny stories of running someone else's household.

(Photo: Marissa Begonia (L) and (R) Siphokazi Mdlankomo)

Life in service: the secret tales of domestic workers in the Philippines and South Africa

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Editors In Chief20170828

Two women who run international news publications

Being in charge of Huffpost and The Guardian - Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women who are re-shaping their international news publications.

Lydia Polgreen is Global Editor in Chief of HuffPost. She took over from founder Ariana Huffington in 2016, after spending 15 years at the New York Times, where she had postings across Africa and Asia. The child of an Ethiopian mother and an American father, Lydia was raised in neither country, growing up mainly in Kenya and Ghana. She says moving around so much means she is now a self-made insider - precisely because she is an outsider everywhere.

Katharine Viner is Editor in Chief of Guardian News and Media, and is the first woman in the paper's almost 200-year history to hold this role. Katharine had her first article published in The Guardian newspaper when she was still at school, however she says the penny didn't drop that she was meant to be a journalist until several years later. She took charge of daily news operations across print and digital media in 2015.

Image (L): Katharine Viner. Credit: The Guardian
Image (R): Lydia Polgreen. Credit: HuffPost

Editors in Chief2017082820170903 (WS)

Two women who run international news publications

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Being in charge of Huffpost and The Guardian - Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women who are re-shaping their international news publications.

Lydia Polgreen is Global Editor in Chief of HuffPost. She took over from founder Ariana Huffington in 2016, after spending 15 years at the New York Times, where she had postings across Africa and Asia. The child of an Ethiopian mother and an American father, Lydia was raised in neither country, growing up mainly in Kenya and Ghana. She says moving around so much means she is now a self-made insider - precisely because she is an outsider everywhere.

Katharine Viner is Editor in Chief of Guardian News and Media, and is the first woman in the paper's almost 200-year history to hold this role. Katharine had her first article published in The Guardian newspaper when she was still at school, however she says the penny didn't drop that she was meant to be a journalist until several years later. She took charge of daily news operations across print and digital media in 2015.

Image (L): Katharine Viner. Credit: The Guardian
Image (R): Lydia Polgreen. Credit: HuffPost

Editors in Chief20170828

Two women who run international news publications

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Being in charge of Huffpost and The Guardian - Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women who are re-shaping their international news publications.

Lydia Polgreen is Global Editor in Chief of HuffPost. She took over from founder Ariana Huffington in 2016, after spending 15 years at the New York Times, where she had postings across Africa and Asia. The child of an Ethiopian mother and an American father, Lydia was raised in neither country, growing up mainly in Kenya and Ghana. She says moving around so much means she is now a self-made insider - precisely because she is an outsider everywhere.

Katharine Viner is Editor in Chief of Guardian News and Media, and is the first woman in the paper's almost 200-year history to hold this role. Katharine had her first article published in The Guardian newspaper when she was still at school, however she says the penny didn't drop that she was meant to be a journalist until several years later. She took charge of daily news operations across print and digital media in 2015.

Image (L): Katharine Viner. Credit: The Guardian
Image (R): Lydia Polgreen. Credit: HuffPost

Emergency workers: Maria Luisa Catrambone and 'Gardenia'2015060120150606 (WS)

What it's like to save lives on a boat in the Mediterranean and a field hospital in Syria

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

When Maria Luisa Catrambone helps to treat children who have serious burns and bloody injuries she says you need to control your facial expressions carefully and not show any sign of shock, so you don't scare them. This is something the teenager has learnt to do when going on rescue missions with the Migrant Offshore Aid Station - saving men, women and children from drowning in the Mediterranean Sea, where thousands of migrants have lost their lives trying to reach Europe in the past year. Maria feels this work is her "calling" and worked hard to convince her mum and dad, who set up MOAS, to let her join them.

Our second guest, who we've called 'Gardenia' for security reasons, works with the Syrian Civil Defence, a group of unarmed volunteers who rescue and treat victims of bomb blasts and sniper attacks. Gardenia has worked in a field hospital in Syria's southern city of Deraa for the past few years. She says if someone's lost a leg you have to reassure them "it's ok" to lose a limb, even though she knows it's not ok. Gardenia only lets herself get emotional about what she sees when she gets home "because you cannot cry in front of their eyes". Even before the conflict in Syria Gardenia knew she wanted to help save lives, so when she saw people dying in front of her she knew she had to help.

Maria Luisa (lhs) credit: Migrant Offshore Aid Station
Medic with blood stained hands credit: ANWAR AMRO / AFP / Getty Images

Emergency workers: Maria Luisa Catrambone and 'Gardenia'20150601

What it's like to save lives on a boat in the Mediterranean and a field hospital in Syria

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

When Maria Luisa Catrambone helps to treat children who have serious burns and bloody injuries she says you need to control your facial expressions carefully and not show any sign of shock, so you don't scare them. This is something the teenager has learnt to do when going on rescue missions with the Migrant Offshore Aid Station - saving men, women and children from drowning in the Mediterranean Sea, where thousands of migrants have lost their lives trying to reach Europe in the past year. Maria feels this work is her "calling" and worked hard to convince her mum and dad, who set up MOAS, to let her join them.

Our second guest, who we've called 'Gardenia' for security reasons, works with the Syrian Civil Defence, a group of unarmed volunteers who rescue and treat victims of bomb blasts and sniper attacks. Gardenia has worked in a field hospital in Syria's southern city of Deraa for the past few years. She says if someone's lost a leg you have to reassure them "it's ok" to lose a limb, even though she knows it's not ok. Gardenia only lets herself get emotional about what she sees when she gets home "because you cannot cry in front of their eyes". Even before the conflict in Syria Gardenia knew she wanted to help save lives, so when she saw people dying in front of her she knew she had to help.

Maria Luisa (lhs) credit: Migrant Offshore Aid Station
Medic with blood stained hands credit: ANWAR AMRO / AFP / Getty Images

Ending Child Marriage20180820

Two women campaigning to end child marriage in the US and in Malawi

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women about their paths to success.

Is it possible to end child marriage in a generation? Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women working to make it a thing of the past in Malawi and in the United States.

Memory Banda's sister was just 11 when she was forced to marry the man who'd made her pregnant. Determined not to have the same fate, Memory persuaded local leaders in Malawi to change their minds about this cultural practise and then - still a teenager - she successfully campaigned for the government to raise the marriage age to 18 across the country in 2015. Memory says that she faced a big backlash but she felt she had to speak out when she saw how traumatic the practice was for girls in her community.

Trevicia Williams came out of school one day and was told by her mother that she was going to be married. Trevicia was 14. Her prospective husband - whom she hardly knew - was 26. It took her three years to escape the marriage. Trevicia says education was her key to surviving the experience. Now a doctor of psychology, she empowers individuals and families to build strong healthy relationships and prevent social issues like child marriage. Trevicia's testimony was key to her state of Texas changing the law to outlaw marriage under the age of 18, in 2017.

(L) Dr Trevicia Williams (credit: Trevicia Williams)
(R ) Memory Banda (credit: Bensam)

Ending Child Marriage20180820

Two women campaigning to end child marriage in the US and in Malawi

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women about their paths to success.

Is it possible to end child marriage in a generation? Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women working to make it a thing of the past in Malawi and in the United States.

Memory Banda's sister was just 11 when she was forced to marry the man who'd made her pregnant. Determined not to have the same fate, Memory persuaded local leaders in Malawi to change their minds about this cultural practise and then - still a teenager - she successfully campaigned for the government to raise the marriage age to 18 across the country in 2015. Memory says that she faced a big backlash but she felt she had to speak out when she saw how traumatic the practice was for girls in her community.

Trevicia Williams came out of school one day and was told by her mother that she was going to be married. Trevicia was 14. Her prospective husband - whom she hardly knew - was 26. It took her three years to escape the marriage. Trevicia says education was her key to surviving the experience. Now a doctor of psychology, she empowers individuals and families to build strong healthy relationships and prevent social issues like child marriage. Trevicia's testimony was key to her state of Texas changing the law to outlaw marriage under the age of 18, in 2017.

(L) Dr Trevicia Williams (credit: Trevicia Williams)
(R ) Memory Banda (credit: Bensam)

Two women campaigning to end child marriage in the US and in Malawi

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Is it possible to end child marriage in a generation? Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women working to make it a thing of the past in Malawi and in the United States.

Memory Banda's sister was just 11 when she was forced to marry the man who'd made her pregnant. Determined not to have the same fate, Memory persuaded local leaders in Malawi to change their minds about this cultural practise and then - still a teenager - she successfully campaigned for the government to raise the marriage age to 18 across the country in 2015. Memory says that she faced a big backlash but she felt she had to speak out when she saw how traumatic the practice was for girls in her community.

Trevicia Williams came out of school one day and was told by her mother that she was going to be married. Trevicia was 14. Her prospective husband - whom she hardly knew - was 26. It took her three years to escape the marriage. Trevicia says education was her key to surviving the experience. Now a doctor of psychology, she empowers individuals and families to build strong healthy relationships and prevent social issues like child marriage. Trevicia's testimony was key to her state of Texas changing the law to outlaw marriage under the age of 18, in 2017.

(L) Dr Trevicia Williams (credit: Trevicia Williams)
(R ) Memory Banda (credit: Bensam)

Ending Child Marriage20180820

Two women campaigning to end child marriage in the US and in Malawi

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Is it possible to end child marriage in a generation? Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women working to make it a thing of the past in Malawi and in the United States.

Memory Banda's sister was just 11 when she was forced to marry the man who'd made her pregnant. Determined not to have the same fate, Memory persuaded local leaders in Malawi to change their minds about this cultural practise and then - still a teenager - she successfully campaigned for the government to raise the marriage age to 18 across the country in 2015. Memory says that she faced a big backlash but she felt she had to speak out when she saw how traumatic the practice was for girls in her community.

Trevicia Williams came out of school one day and was told by her mother that she was going to be married. Trevicia was 14. Her prospective husband - whom she hardly knew - was 26. It took her three years to escape the marriage. Trevicia says education was her key to surviving the experience. Now a doctor of psychology, she empowers individuals and families to build strong healthy relationships and prevent social issues like child marriage. Trevicia's testimony was key to her state of Texas changing the law to outlaw marriage under the age of 18, in 2017.

(L) Dr Trevicia Williams (credit: Trevicia Williams)
(R ) Memory Banda (credit: Bensam)

Endurance Sports: Megan Harrington-Johnson and Manu Vilaseca2016050920160514 (WS)

The women who are pushing their bodies to the limit by land and sea

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Megan Harrington-Johnson doesn't let worry and doubt stop her when she wants to complete a 13km open-water swim. The South African endurance swimmer has swam in shark infested waters, even though she's petrified of them and has had a close shave with a Great White. Megan says she's often the only woman on the team, but thinks it's fear rather than ability that holds other women back from doing what she does. Sweating in the water is an issue and Megan talks about the importance of staying hydrated and eating lots of calories to get through a big swim.

Manu Vilaseca started by running 5km races and now does 160km ultra-marathons. The lengthy courses are rarely on flat terrain, they're normally up and down mountains and the conditions can be unpredictable, but Manu, who's from Brazil, says even when her mind is telling her to stop she knows how to talk herself round and get through. The competitions might be punishing on Manu's body, but she says she loves the feeling of total exhaustion and almost craves the pain she will feel afterwards so she knows she's pushed herself to the limit.

Photo: (L) Megan Harrington-Johnson. Credit: Charl Rorich.
Photo: (R) Manuela Vileseca. Credit: Bernardo Rodrigues.

Endurance Sports: Megan Harrington-Johnson and Manu Vilaseca20160509

The women who are pushing their bodies to the limit by land and sea

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Megan Harrington-Johnson doesn't let worry and doubt stop her when she wants to complete a 13km open-water swim. The South African endurance swimmer has swam in shark infested waters, even though she's petrified of them and has had a close shave with a Great White. Megan says she's often the only woman on the team, but thinks it's fear rather than ability that holds other women back from doing what she does. Sweating in the water is an issue and Megan talks about the importance of staying hydrated and eating lots of calories to get through a big swim.

Manu Vilaseca started by running 5km races and now does 160km ultra-marathons. The lengthy courses are rarely on flat terrain, they're normally up and down mountains and the conditions can be unpredictable, but Manu, who's from Brazil, says even when her mind is telling her to stop she knows how to talk herself round and get through. The competitions might be punishing on Manu's body, but she says she loves the feeling of total exhaustion and almost craves the pain she will feel afterwards so she knows she's pushed herself to the limit.

Photo: (L) Megan Harrington-Johnson. Credit: Charl Rorich.
Photo: (R) Manuela Vileseca. Credit: Bernardo Rodrigues.

Endurance Sports: Megan Harrington-johnson And Manu Vilaseca2016050920160515 (WS)

The women who are pushing their bodies to the limit by land and sea

Megan Harrington-Johnson doesn't let worry and doubt stop her when she wants to complete a 13km open-water swim. The South African endurance swimmer has swam in shark infested waters, even though she's petrified of them and has had a close shave with a Great White. Megan says she's often the only woman on the team, but thinks it's fear rather than ability that holds other women back from doing what she does. Sweating in the water is an issue and Megan talks about the importance of staying hydrated and eating lots of calories to get through a big swim.

Manu Vilaseca started by running 5km races and now does 160km ultra-marathons. The lengthy courses are rarely on flat terrain, they're normally up and down mountains and the conditions can be unpredictable, but Manu, who's from Brazil, says even when her mind is telling her to stop she knows how to talk herself round and get through. The competitions might be punishing on Manu's body, but she says she loves the feeling of total exhaustion and almost craves the pain she will feel afterwards so she knows she's pushed herself to the limit.

Photo: (L) Megan Harrington-Johnson. Credit: Charl Rorich.

Photo: (R) Manuela Vileseca. Credit: Bernardo Rodrigues.

Engineers: Marita Cheng and Nisrine Chartouny2016052320160528 (WS)

Building robots and boring tunnels, female engineers from Australia and Lebanon

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

When Australian mechanical engineer Marita Cheng got to university, she was shocked to discover that only five out of 50 students on her course were female. She responded by starting Robogals - an organisation that goes into schools and teaches robotics to girls as a way of encouraging them into choosing engineering as a career. Having won multiple awards and starting her own robotics company, Marita is now an inspiring role model herself, and has developed a robot arm that can aid people with mobility issues.

Lebanese civil engineer Nisrine Chartouny oversees miles of tunnelling on London's ambitious Crossrail project. Her work requires precision, skill and very long hours. Nisrine joined her company Bechtel 10 years ago, and says she and her husband put off having babies for five years because she was enjoying her job so much. Now a mum of one, she was able to go back to work four days a week and wants the rest of the industry she is so passionate about to embrace flexible working, so that it can hold on to women like her.

(Photo: Marita Cheng (L). Credit: University of Melbourne, Australia. Nisrine Chartouny (R). Credit: Bechtel)

Engineers: Marita Cheng and Nisrine Chartouny20160523

Building robots and boring tunnels, female engineers from Australia and Lebanon

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

When Australian mechanical engineer Marita Cheng got to university, she was shocked to discover that only five out of 50 students on her course were female. She responded by starting Robogals - an organisation that goes into schools and teaches robotics to girls as a way of encouraging them into choosing engineering as a career. Having won multiple awards and starting her own robotics company, Marita is now an inspiring role model herself, and has developed a robot arm that can aid people with mobility issues.

Lebanese civil engineer Nisrine Chartouny oversees miles of tunnelling on London's ambitious Crossrail project. Her work requires precision, skill and very long hours. Nisrine joined her company Bechtel 10 years ago, and says she and her husband put off having babies for five years because she was enjoying her job so much. Now a mum of one, she was able to go back to work four days a week and wants the rest of the industry she is so passionate about to embrace flexible working, so that it can hold on to women like her.

(Photo: Marita Cheng (L). Credit: University of Melbourne, Australia. Nisrine Chartouny (R). Credit: Bechtel)

Engineers: Marita Cheng And Nisrine Chartouny2016052320160529 (WS)

When Australian mechanical engineer Marita Cheng got to university, she was shocked to discover that only five out of 50 students on her course were female. She responded by starting Robogals - an organisation that goes into schools and teaches robotics to girls as a way of encouraging them into choosing engineering as a career. Having won multiple awards and starting her own robotics company, Marita is now an inspiring role model herself, and has developed a robot arm that can aid people with mobility issues.

Lebanese civil engineer Nisrine Chartouny oversees miles of tunnelling on London's ambitious Crossrail project. Her work requires precision, skill and very long hours. Nisrine joined her company Bechtel 10 years ago, and says she and her husband put off having babies for five years because she was enjoying her job so much. Now a mum of one, she was able to go back to work four days a week and wants the rest of the industry she is so passionate about to embrace flexible working, so that it can hold on to women like her.

(Photo: Marita Cheng (L). Credit: University of Melbourne, Australia. Nisrine Chartouny (R). Credit: Bechtel)

Building robots and boring tunnels, female engineers from Australia and Lebanon

Entrepreneurs: Maureen Kamari and Serah Kanyua2015072720150801 (WS)

Being your own boss in Nairobi: two women share stories of coping with success and failure

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Maureen Kamari's cakes were always a hit in her office. They were so popular with her colleagues that they started to pay her to bake birthday cakes. Maureen realised she could turn her skills into a business and set up Amari Quickbreads, a bakery delivery service. She also passes her kitchen know-how on to other would-be cooks by giving training sessions. However, Maureen reveals that her path to success hasn't always been an easy one and she's had to learn how to recover from failure quickly.

Serah Kanyua has also learnt some tough lessons on her business journey. She was known for having an eye for style at university and people would ask her to hunt out clothes for them. She got together with some friends and turned her passion for fashion into Closet49, an online start-up, which connects women who want to buy and sell clothes. Serah says persistence, determination and courage are key to being your own boss and making it work.

Entrepreneurs: Maureen Kamari and Serah Kanyua20150727

Being your own boss in Nairobi: two women share stories of coping with success and failure

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Maureen Kamari's cakes were always a hit in her office. They were so popular with her colleagues that they started to pay her to bake birthday cakes. Maureen realised she could turn her skills into a business and set up Amari Quickbreads, a bakery delivery service. She also passes her kitchen know-how on to other would-be cooks by giving training sessions. However, Maureen reveals that her path to success hasn't always been an easy one and she's had to learn how to recover from failure quickly.

Serah Kanyua has also learnt some tough lessons on her business journey. She was known for having an eye for style at university and people would ask her to hunt out clothes for them. She got together with some friends and turned her passion for fashion into Closet49, an online start-up, which connects women who want to buy and sell clothes. Serah says persistence, determination and courage are key to being your own boss and making it work.

Explorers: Sarah Marquis and Reena Dharmshaktu20141110

A Swiss explorer and an Indian adventurer talk mountains, rucksacks and mental endurance

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kim Chakanetsa hosts a conversation between two explorers who both grew up in the mountains - Sarah Marquis in Switzerland's Jura mountains and Reena Dharmshaktu in the foothills of the Himalayas. Both women felt the pull of the outdoors from an early age and knew they couldn't be confined to an office.

Sarah Marquis recently walked 10,000 miles in three years from Siberia to the Australian outback. She is also one of this year's winners of the National Geographic Adventurer of the Year Awards.

Reena Dharmshaktu was the first Indian woman to ski to the South Pole and is also a mountaineer and outdoors instructor.

Sarah and Reena discuss their adventures, how they overcome physical and mental challenges and disconnect from the hustle and bustle of everyday life.

(Photo: Sarah Marquis and Reena Dharmshaktu, courtesy of Sarah and Reena)

Explorers: Sarah Marquis And Reena Dharmshaktu20141110

Kim Chakanetsa hosts a conversation between two explorers who both grew up in the mountains - Sarah Marquis in Switzerland's Jura mountains and Reena Dharmshaktu in the foothills of the Himalayas. Both women felt the pull of the outdoors from an early age and knew they couldn't be confined to an office.

Sarah Marquis recently walked 10,000 miles in three years from Siberia to the Australian outback. She is also one of this year's winners of the National Geographic Adventurer of the Year Awards.

Reena Dharmshaktu was the first Indian woman to ski to the South Pole and is also a mountaineer and outdoors instructor.

Sarah and Reena discuss their adventures, how they overcome physical and mental challenges and disconnect from the hustle and bustle of everyday life.

Photo: Sarah Marquis and Reena Dharmshaktu

A Swiss explorer and an Indian adventurer talk mountains, rucksacks and mental endurance

Exploring the Past: Salima Ikram and Justine Benanty20150302

An Egyptologist and a shipwreck diver on their fascination with digging up the past

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Salima Ikram was born in Pakistan and got hooked on ancient Egyptian artefacts through the pictures in a childhood book. Her fate as an Egyptologist was sealed when she came face-to-face, aged nine, with mesmerising statues in the Cairo museum; she decided then that finding out more about them would be her life's work. "Archaeologists are people who never grew up" she says. When not lecturing at the American University in Cairo, Salima will be somewhere dry, dusty, and dirty, recording ancient inscriptions or X-raying mummies - human and animal. Her role models in archaeology were women who had been working since the 1940s, but, she says sexism is still a problem and more so in the west than the east. The important thing, she says, "is to do what you want to do and do it very well."

Justine Benanty is a qualified pilot but as a maritime archaeologist her time is spent underwater rather than in the sky. At her first dig in Israel she realised that she hated wheelbarrows and got sunburnt too easily to work in the desert, so investigating shipwrecks became her focus. Her project for the last five years has been to tell the stories of the slaves, who were shipped across the Atlantic Ocean, through archaeology. It is a science which needs an image overhaul because, she says "there's nothing cooler than finding [...] a shipwreck at the bottom of the sea that no-one has seen for hundreds of years". She is a co-founder of the ArchaeoVenturers project, a collection of videos and blogs about issues in history and science, which also celebrates women's work in these fields.

(Photo: Salima Ikram and Justine Benanty. Credit: Salima Ikram - J. Rowland)

Falconers20170918

Two women who have mastered the ancient art of flying birds of prey.

The ancient art of falconry holds a magical appeal for our guests this week. They talk to Kim Chakanetsa about why they were drawn to this ancient tradition, the unique relationship they form with their birds, and the concerns of those who consider it cruel.

Helen Macdonald from the UK is the bestselling author of H is for Hawk, a moving account of the year she spent training Mabel the goshawk after her father's death. As a child Helen was obsessed by birds of prey and was determined to become a falconer - later she used her writing to bring the powerful relationship between humans, falcons and nature to a wider public. She's not currently working with a bird, but she dreams of flying merlin falcons.

Lauren McGough from Oklahoma in the US has become a world authority on the golden eagle - though growing up she didn't know falconry existed. She discovered the sport at the age of 14 and has been hooked ever since, travelling to Mongolia to learn more about eagle falconry from nomadic eagle hunters. She's currently based in South Africa, where she's working with a male crowned eagle called Dart.

Image: (L) Lauren McGough (credit Jennifer Campbell Smith) and (R) Helen Macdonald (credit: Mike Birkhead)

The ancient art of falconry holds a magical appeal for our guests this week. They talk to Kim Chakanetsa about why they were drawn to this ancient tradition, the unique relationship they form with their birds, and the concerns of those who consider it cruel.

Helen Macdonald from the UK is the bestselling author of H is for Hawk, a moving account of the year she spent training Mabel the goshawk after her father's death. As a child Helen was obsessed by birds of prey and was determined to become a falconer - later she used her writing to bring the powerful relationship between humans, falcons and nature to a wider public. She's not currently working with a bird, but she dreams of flying merlin falcons.

Lauren McGough from Oklahoma in the US has become a world authority on the golden eagle - though growing up she didn't know falconry existed. She discovered the sport at the age of 14 and has been hooked ever since, travelling to Mongolia to learn more about eagle falconry from nomadic eagle hunters. She's currently based in South Africa, where she's working with a male crowned eagle called Dart.

Image: (L) Lauren McGough (credit Jennifer Campbell Smith) and (R) Helen Macdonald (credit: Helen Macdonald)

Falconers2017091820170924 (WS)

Two women who have mastered the ancient art of flying birds of prey.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

The ancient art of falconry holds a magical appeal for our guests this week. They talk to Kim Chakanetsa about why they were drawn to this ancient tradition, the unique relationship they form with their birds, and the concerns of those who consider it cruel.

Helen Macdonald from the UK is the bestselling author of H is for Hawk, a moving account of the year she spent training Mabel the goshawk after her father's death. As a child Helen was obsessed by birds of prey and was determined to become a falconer - later she used her writing to bring the powerful relationship between humans, falcons and nature to a wider public. She's not currently working with a bird, but she dreams of flying merlin falcons.

Lauren McGough from Oklahoma in the US has become a world authority on the golden eagle - though growing up she didn't know falconry existed. She discovered the sport at the age of 14 and has been hooked ever since, travelling to Mongolia to learn more about eagle falconry from nomadic eagle hunters. She's currently based in South Africa, where she's working with a male crowned eagle called Dart.

Image: (L) Lauren McGough (credit Jennifer Campbell Smith) and (R) Helen Macdonald (credit: Mike Birkhead)

Falconers20170918

Two women who have mastered the ancient art of flying birds of prey.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

The ancient art of falconry holds a magical appeal for our guests this week. They talk to Kim Chakanetsa about why they were drawn to this ancient tradition, the unique relationship they form with their birds, and the concerns of those who consider it cruel.

Helen Macdonald from the UK is the bestselling author of H is for Hawk, a moving account of the year she spent training Mabel the goshawk after her father's death. As a child Helen was obsessed by birds of prey and was determined to become a falconer - later she used her writing to bring the powerful relationship between humans, falcons and nature to a wider public. She's not currently working with a bird, but she dreams of flying merlin falcons.

Lauren McGough from Oklahoma in the US has become a world authority on the golden eagle - though growing up she didn't know falconry existed. She discovered the sport at the age of 14 and has been hooked ever since, travelling to Mongolia to learn more about eagle falconry from nomadic eagle hunters. She's currently based in South Africa, where she's working with a male crowned eagle called Dart.

Image: (L) Lauren McGough (credit Jennifer Campbell Smith) and (R) Helen Macdonald (credit: Mike Birkhead)

Fantasy Writers: Karen Lord And Maria Turtschaninoff20160208

Two fantasy authors talk about world-building, and the importance of being bored

Karen Lord's writing feeds off the real world but knits in magic, folktales and adventure to create a unique and original universe. She is the author of three books, and her latest is called The Galaxy Game. Karen has won numerous awards including the Frank Collymore Literary award, which recognises literary talent in Barbados. She says that she loves the place where she writes from, because the melting-pot nature of the Caribbean is a constant source of stories and inspiration.

Maria Turtschaninoff started writing fairy tales aged five, and now weaves historically inspired worlds of magical realism with elements of mythology. The prizes she's won for her work include the Finlandia Junior Prize, for Maresi, her first novel published in English. Maria says her 'cricket-mind' means she's easily distracted from writing, but her best ideas often come to her when she's bored. Surprisingly, she writes in Swedish, as she comes from the tiny Swedish-speaking minority in Finland.

(Picture: Fanstasy writers Karen Lord (Right) and Maria Turtschaninoff (Left))

Fantasy Writers: Karen Lord and Maria Turtschaninoff20160208

Two fantasy authors talk about world-building, and the importance of being bored

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Karen Lord's writing feeds off the real world but knits in magic, folktales and adventure to create a unique and original universe. She is the author of three books, and her latest is called The Galaxy Game. Karen has won numerous awards including the Frank Collymore Literary award, which recognises literary talent in Barbados. She says that she loves the place where she writes from, because the melting-pot nature of the Caribbean is a constant source of stories and inspiration.

Maria Turtschaninoff started writing fairy tales aged five, and now weaves historically inspired worlds of magical realism with elements of mythology. The prizes she's won for her work include the Finlandia Junior Prize, for Maresi, her first novel published in English. Maria says her 'cricket-mind' means she's easily distracted from writing, but her best ideas often come to her when she's bored. Surprisingly, she writes in Swedish, as she comes from the tiny Swedish-speaking minority in Finland.

[Picture: Fanstasy writers Karen Lord (Right) and Maria Turtschaninoff (Left)]

Farmers: J\u00f3hanna Bergmann \u00deorvaldsd\u00f3ttir and Rashida Khan2015101220151017 (WS)

Two women from Iceland and Australia discuss farming's toughest challenges

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Jóhanna Bergmann Þorvaldsdóttir grew up on an Icelandic farm that has been in her family for three generations. She has always loved Icelandic goats - a rare and beautiful breed - and when she took over the family farm she decided to concentrate on raising them. Iceland did not have a big market for goat products but Jóhanna slowly built a customer base for her goats milk, cheese, wool and meat. After the country entered a financial crisis in 2008, Jóhanna ended up in danger of having to sell her farm. This would have been a great loss to her, but could have led to extinction for the Icelandic goat as Jóhanna's was the only commercial farm still breeding them. She saved her goats with the help of a crowdfunding website and, to her great surprise, thousands of 'Game of Thrones' fans.

Rashida Khan is a cattle producer and animal nutritionist. She runs a stud farm and a cattle station in Northern Australia. Rashida has Afghan and Aboriginal heritage and her family has worked with livestock in the Northern Territory for three generations. When the Australian government banned the export of live cattle to Indonesia following evidence of cruelty in the livestock industry there, Rashida and many like her were affected. She knew that many cattle workers live in remote, isolated places so she turned to social media to offer support to those struggling to adjust after the ban.

(Photo: Jóhanna Bergmann Þorvaldsdóttir (left). Credit: Audra Mulkern of the Female Farmer Project. (Right) Rashida Khan)

Farmers: J\u00f3hanna Bergmann \u00deorvaldsd\u00f3ttir and Rashida Khan20151012

Two women from Iceland and Australia discuss farming's toughest challenges

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Jóhanna Bergmann Þorvaldsdóttir grew up on an Icelandic farm that has been in her family for three generations. She has always loved Icelandic goats - a rare and beautiful breed - and when she took over the family farm she decided to concentrate on raising them. Iceland did not have a big market for goat products but Jóhanna slowly built a customer base for her goats milk, cheese, wool and meat. After the country entered a financial crisis in 2008, Jóhanna ended up in danger of having to sell her farm. This would have been a great loss to her, but could have led to extinction for the Icelandic goat as Jóhanna's was the only commercial farm still breeding them. She saved her goats with the help of a crowdfunding website and, to her great surprise, thousands of 'Game of Thrones' fans.

Rashida Khan is a cattle producer and animal nutritionist. She runs a stud farm and a cattle station in Northern Australia. Rashida has Afghan and Aboriginal heritage and her family has worked with livestock in the Northern Territory for three generations. When the Australian government banned the export of live cattle to Indonesia following evidence of cruelty in the livestock industry there, Rashida and many like her were affected. She knew that many cattle workers live in remote, isolated places so she turned to social media to offer support to those struggling to adjust after the ban.

(Photo: Jóhanna Bergmann Þorvaldsdóttir (left). Credit: Audra Mulkern of the Female Farmer Project. (Right) Rashida Khan)

Farmers: Jhanna Bergmann Þorvaldsdttir And Rashida Khan2015101220151017 (WS)

Two women from Iceland and Australia discuss farming's toughest challenges

Jóhanna Bergmann Þorvaldsdóttir grew up on an Icelandic farm that has been in her family for three generations. She has always loved Icelandic goats - a rare and beautiful breed - and when she took over the family farm she decided to concentrate on raising them. Iceland did not have a big market for goat products but Jóhanna slowly built a customer base for her goats milk, cheese, wool and meat. After the country entered a financial crisis in 2008, Jóhanna ended up in danger of having to sell her farm. This would have been a great loss to her, but could have led to extinction for the Icelandic goat as Jóhanna's was the only commercial farm still breeding them. She saved her goats with the help of a crowdfunding website and, to her great surprise, thousands of 'Game of Thrones' fans.

Rashida Khan is a cattle producer and animal nutritionist. She runs a stud farm and a cattle station in Northern Australia. Rashida has Afghan and Aboriginal heritage and her family has worked with livestock in the Northern Territory for three generations. When the Australian government banned the export of live cattle to Indonesia following evidence of cruelty in the livestock industry there, Rashida and many like her were affected. She knew that many cattle workers live in remote, isolated places so she turned to social media to offer support to those struggling to adjust after the ban.

(Photo: Jóhanna Bergmann Þorvaldsdóttir (left). Credit: Audra Mulkern of the Female Farmer Project. (Right) Rashida Khan)

Fashion Bosses: Rubana Huq and Kim Winser20141117

A Bangladeshi textile magnate and a British clothing retailer compare experiences

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Bangladeshi clothing manufacturer Rubana Huq, who employs over 5000 women in eight factories, talks to British retailer Kim Winser who has been responsible for some major fashion brands.

What do two women leaders in the global fashion industry have to say to each other? From how they got into the world of fashion to factory-floor culture and leadership, Bangladeshi factory boss Rubana Huq and British fashion retailer Kim Winser compare their experiences.

Kim Winser has been described as one of Europe's most successful businesswomen. She spent 20 years with the British retailer Marks and Spencer, where a conversation with her boss in the elevator led to an interview to become the first woman in the company's commercial field and then its youngest divisional director. Kim is also credited with breathing life back into major fashion brands such as Pringle of Scotland and Aquascutum. She now runs her own fashion label called Winser London.

Rubana Huq is a prize-winning poet and the "accidental" Managing Director of the Mohammadi Group. Her company owns eight factories and employs 9000 men and women making garments for export. She is among only a handful of female entrepreneurs in the clothing trade in Bangladesh and wants to see more women leading change in the industry as it recovers from the tragedy of the Rana Plaza factory collapse in 2013.

(Picture: Rubana Huq (left); Kim Winser)

Fashion Bosses: Rubana Huq And Kim Winser20141117

Bangladeshi clothing manufacturer Rubana Huq, who employs over 5000 women in eight factories, talks to British retailer Kim Winser who has been responsible for some major fashion brands.

What do two women leaders in the global fashion industry have to say to each other? From how they got into the world of fashion to factory-floor culture and leadership, Bangladeshi factory boss Rubana Huq and British fashion retailer Kim Winser compare their experiences.

Kim Winser has been described as one of Europe's most successful businesswomen. She spent 20 years with the British retailer Marks and Spencer, where a conversation with her boss in the elevator led to an interview to become the first woman in the company's commercial field and then its youngest divisional director. Kim is also credited with breathing life back into major fashion brands such as Pringle of Scotland and Aquascutum. She now runs her own fashion label called Winser London.

Rubana Huq is a prize-winning poet and the "accidental" Managing Director of the Mohammadi Group. Her company owns eight factories and employs 9000 men and women making garments for export. She is among only a handful of female entrepreneurs in the clothing trade in Bangladesh and wants to see more women leading change in the industry as it recovers from the tragedy of the Rana Plaza factory collapse in 2013.

(Picture: Rubana Huq (left); Kim Winser)

Bangladeshi clothing manufacturer Rubana Huq, who employs over 5000 women in 8 factories, talks to British retailer Kim Winser who's been responsible for some fashion major brands.

Rubana Huq is a prize-winning poet and the "accidental" Managing Director of the Mohammadi Group. Her company owns 8 factories and employs 9000 men and women making garments for export. She is among only a handful of female entrepreneurs in the clothing trade in Bangladesh and wants to see more women leading change in the industry as it recovers from the tragedy of the Rana Plaza factory collapse in 2013.

Picture: Rubana Huq (L); Kim Winser (R)

A Bangladeshi textile magnate and a British clothing retailer compare experiences

Fashion Designers: Anya Ayoung Chee And Christina Economou2016071120160717 (WS)

Successful female fashion designers from Trinidad and Greece talk shop.

Clothes designers from Trinidad and Greece get together with Kim Chakanetsa, to talk about the killer combination of creativity and business sense you need to make it in the competitive world of fashion.

Anya Ayoung Chee is from the Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago. Always interested in fashion, but too scared to study it at college, she started making her own outfits when competing to represent her country at Miss Universe. Anya later entered the US reality TV show Project Runway, and came out the surprise winner, having only learnt how to sew weeks before! She's had her own labels, but is currently leading a collective of 30 local designers with the aim of putting the Caribbean region firmly on the global fashion map.

Christina Economou is a rising star of the European fashion scene. She studied in Paris and won the 2011 International Award at London Graduate Fashion Week, then returned to her home city of Athens to fulfil her dream of launching her own luxury label. Christina has a love of bright colours and bold prints, and sources much of her production and fabric locally, for example in the historic Greek silk town of Soufli. She says fashion school did not prepare her for how to combine her design skills with running a business, so she's had to learn the hard way.

Image: Anya Ayoung Chee (l) and Christina Economou (r)

Credit: Joey Rosado (l) and Yiorgos Kaplanidis (r)

Fashion Designers: Anya Ayoung Chee and Christina Economou2016071120160716 (WS)

Successful female fashion designers from Trinidad and Greece talk shop.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Clothes designers from Trinidad and Greece get together with Kim Chakanetsa, to talk about the killer combination of creativity and business sense you need to make it in the competitive world of fashion.

Anya Ayoung Chee is from the Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago. Always interested in fashion, but too scared to study it at college, she started making her own outfits when competing to represent her country at Miss Universe. Anya later entered the US reality TV show Project Runway, and came out the surprise winner, having only learnt how to sew weeks before! She's had her own labels, but is currently leading a collective of 30 local designers with the aim of putting the Caribbean region firmly on the global fashion map.

Christina Economou is a rising star of the European fashion scene. She studied in Paris and won the 2011 International Award at London Graduate Fashion Week, then returned to her home city of Athens to fulfil her dream of launching her own luxury label. Christina has a love of bright colours and bold prints, and sources much of her production and fabric locally, for example in the historic Greek silk town of Soufli. She says fashion school did not prepare her for how to combine her design skills with running a business, so she's had to learn the hard way.

Image: Anya Ayoung Chee (l) and Christina Economou (r)
Credit: Joey Rosado (l) and Yiorgos Kaplanidis (r)

Fashion Designers: Anya Ayoung Chee and Christina Economou20160711

Successful female fashion designers from Trinidad and Greece talk shop.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Clothes designers from Trinidad and Greece get together with Kim Chakanetsa, to talk about the killer combination of creativity and business sense you need to make it in the competitive world of fashion.

Anya Ayoung Chee is from the Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago. Always interested in fashion, but too scared to study it at college, she started making her own outfits when competing to represent her country at Miss Universe. Anya later entered the US reality TV show Project Runway, and came out the surprise winner, having only learnt how to sew weeks before! She's had her own labels, but is currently leading a collective of 30 local designers with the aim of putting the Caribbean region firmly on the global fashion map.

Christina Economou is a rising star of the European fashion scene. She studied in Paris and won the 2011 International Award at London Graduate Fashion Week, then returned to her home city of Athens to fulfil her dream of launching her own luxury label. Christina has a love of bright colours and bold prints, and sources much of her production and fabric locally, for example in the historic Greek silk town of Soufli. She says fashion school did not prepare her for how to combine her design skills with running a business, so she's had to learn the hard way.

Image: Anya Ayoung Chee (l) and Christina Economou (r)
Credit: Joey Rosado (l) and Yiorgos Kaplanidis (r)

Female Computer Pioneers20180903

Two women discuss the pivotal role female programmers play in computing

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women about their paths to success.

The lost role of women in the development of the computer industry is brought into focus by an internet pioneer and a computer historian.

Radia Perlman is an American computer programmer often described as the 'Mother of the Internet' for her invention of the spanning-tree protocol, an algorithm which allowed early networks to cope with large amounts of data. She describes it as a 'simple hack' and it is still in use today.

Tilly Blyth is Head of Collections and Principal Curator at the Science Museum. She specialises in the history of computing and is particularly interested in the lost role women played within that history. She has curated an exhibition on Ada Lovelace, a 19th century trailblazer of science.

Image: (L) Tilly Blyth and (R) Radia Perlman
Credit: (L) Science Museum Group Collection and (R) Andrew Tanenbaum

Female Financiers20180716

Two women who are pushing the boundaries of global finance

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Can financial markets transform women's lives? Kim Chakanetsa unites two financiers from Nigeria and Bangladesh who are trying to increase wealth for women in very different ways.

Durreen Shahnaz was one of the first Bangladeshi women on Wall Street, and later founded Singapore-based Impact Investment Exchange (IIX) through which she set up the world's first social stock exchange. She recently launched a Women's Livelihood Bond, which will impact the lives of over 385,000 women across Southeast Asia. Durreen says she was advised along the way to change the name of the bond so it didn't include the word 'women'. She refused, poured her last savings into it, and was elated when it became over-subscribed.

When Arunma Oteh was head of Nigeria's Securities and Exchange Commission she took many powerful men to task over corruption and fraud, and faced a gendered backlash. She says people didn't like that the new Sheriff in town was a woman, but the public came to respect her results. Arunma is now Vice-President and Treasurer at the World Bank, where she convinces the private sector to invest in emerging economies. She says women are the real new emerging market, and if they earned as much as men, $160 trillion could be added to global wealth.

(L) Arunma Oteh (credit: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for RFK Human Rights)
(R) Durreen Shahnaz (credit: TED)

Feminist Publishers20180423

Two women who've carved out a space for female writers in India and Australia

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Promoting women's writing around the world - Kim Chakanetsa brings together the heads of pioneering feminist publishing houses in Australia and India, and asks how they stay relevant in an age of self-publishing and e-books?

Susan Hawthorne runs Spinifex Press in Queensland. She and her partner Renate Klein set it up in 1991 as a response to what they saw as a dearth of diversity in Australian publishing. She says that despite the proliferation of online platforms for writers to publish their work in recent years, they still find they need a real publisher to select, edit and promote them. Susan finds her books in a variety of ways, but is frustrated by the mainstream publishing sector's focus on 'star authors'. Susan is also a writer and her new novel Dark Matters is about a lesbian who is tortured.

Urvashi Butalia co-founded India's first exclusively feminist publishing house in 1984, and now runs Zubaan books based in New Delhi. Her aim is to reflect the experiences of marginalised women and she says she is also seeing a resurgence of interest from young women - and young men - in the history of the women's movement in India. Urvashi is an award-winning author herself, whose best known book is The Other Side of Silence: Voices from the Partition of India.

Image and credit: (L) Urvashi Butalia.
Image: (R) Susan Hawthorne. Credit: Naomi McKescher

Fighting Ebola: Dr Ngozi Kennedy and Fredanna M'Cormack McGough20141201

US and Sierra Leonean perspectives on the Ebola outbreak

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Dr Ngozi Kennedy works as a health specialist for UNICEF which is one of the organisations supporting the Government's response to Ebola in Sierra Leone. From her home city of Freetown she talks about its impact on women, children and adolescents and how just as her workload increased, her children have to be at home, bored and frustrated, as a result of the school closures.

Sierra Leone-born Fredanna M'Cormack-McGough is professor of Public Health at Coastal Carolina University. She was in Sierra Leone conducting research on the health system when the first Ebola case was recorded in May. On her return to America after three months, she had to allay the fears of her own community about whether she was harbouring the virus - in effect she became a case study for the course she teaches.

Kim Chakanetsa hosts a conversation between both women involved in the fight against Ebola in West Africa. From a US and Sierra Leonean perspective, these public health experts compare their experiences in dealing with the spread of the virus and discuss how it has impacted their personal lives in surprising ways.

(Picture: Dr Fredanna M'Cormack-McGough (left) and Dr Ngozi Kennedy)

Fighting Extremism: Hafsat Mohammed And Gulalai Ismail20160321

Two women fighting terrorism and violent extremism in Nigeria and Pakistan

Hafsat Mohammed is a Nigerian peace activist who survived a Boko Haram attack on a bus and works to combat violent extremism in the country by engaging young people at the grassroots level. She brings Christian and Muslim communities together to find ways to stop young people joining radical groups. Hafsat says when she was growing up this was a peaceful part of the world and it makes her sad that there is so much hate and violence there now, so she's made it her mission to stop it, despite threats made against her.

Gulalai Ismail remembers being young and seeing graffiti chalked on the walls of her home town Peshawar, in north-west Pakistan, calling for young men to join violent extremist groups. As a teenager Gulalai started campaigning for the rights of women and today has broadened her activism out to include anti-radicalisation programmes, and projects dealing with HIV/AIDS education and safe abortion. Gulalai, who has won many awards, has been threatened because of the work she does and had to flee her home after an attack a few years ago.

(Image: Hafsat Mohammed on the Left, Gulalai Ismail on the Right)

Fighting Extremism: Hafsat Mohammed and Gulalai Ismail20160321

Two women fighting terrorism and violent extremism in Nigeria and Pakistan

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Hafsat Mohammed is a Nigerian peace activist who survived a Boko Haram attack on a bus and works to combat violent extremism in the country by engaging young people at the grassroots level. She brings Christian and Muslim communities together to find ways to stop young people joining radical groups. Hafsat says when she was growing up this was a peaceful part of the world and it makes her sad that there is so much hate and violence there now, so she's made it her mission to stop it, despite threats made against her.

Gulalai Ismail remembers being young and seeing graffiti chalked on the walls of her home town Peshawar, in north-west Pakistan, calling for young men to join violent extremist groups. As a teenager Gulalai started campaigning for the rights of women and today has broadened her activism out to include anti-radicalisation programmes, and projects dealing with HIV/AIDS education and safe abortion. Gulalai, who has won many awards, has been threatened because of the work she does and had to flee her home after an attack a few years ago.

(Image: Hafsat Mohammed on the Left, Gulalai Ismail on the Right)

Fighting for Racial Justice20180319

Two women on their epic fight against racism in the UK and the US

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

At the Women of the World Festival in London, Kim Chakanetsa brings together two extraordinary women who have been instrumental in the fight against racism and police brutality.

In 2013, three women came together to form an active response to systemic racism in the US. They'd just learnt that the man who shot dead an unarmed black teenager called Trayvon Martin had been acquitted for the killing. They said simply: Black Lives Matter. One of them was Patrisse Khan-Cullors. Patrisse grew up in Los Angeles and became an activist at an early age having witnessed how her own family members had been treated at the hands of police. She has just published her memoir, 'When They Call You A Terrorist.'

Baroness Doreen Lawrence has campaigned for police reform ever since the murder of her son Stephen in London 25 years ago. He was stabbed to death at a bus stop in an unprovoked racist attack. Doreen's tireless fight for justice finally resulted in two of his killers being convicted, and in a public inquiry. This resulted in the landmark Macpherson Report, which identified institutional racism in the police service, and led to widespread police reform. Doreen Lawrence has become an important public figure in the UK and was made a life peer in the House of Lords in 2013.

Image: Doreen Lawrence, Kim Chakanetsa and Patrisse Khan-Cullors at the WOW Festival in London
Credit: BBC

Fighting For Women's Health20181001

Two doctors who are making women's health their priority

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women about their paths to success.

Fighting Revenge Porn20180212

Can women stop their intimate photos being published online without their consent? Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women fighting back against so-called 'revenge' porn

Nyika Allen is President and CEO of the New Mexico Technology Council. In 2015, Nyika's ex-boyfriend began posting compromising photographs of her on Twitter. As they were viewed by complete strangers she was overwhelmed by shock and humiliation, but decided that she would not let him win. As well as getting the images taken down, and taking her ex to court, she successfully lobbied her state's politicians. With her help, New Mexico is now one of a growing number of US states to pass a law against revenge - or non-consensual - pornography.

Talent Jumo supports survivors of revenge porn in Zimbabwe, through her organisation Katswe Sistahood. She says the trauma of the experience is often made worse by the reaction of family who can reject their daughters for bringing shame on them. She believes society stigmatises women for this whereas men are celebrated for their virility. And bullying by ex-partners is grounded in the assumption that they won't speak out. She is helping women do just that, as well as helping to draft much-needed laws that can punish this new crime.

Image: (L) Talent Jumo. Credit: DCNGO. Courtesy of The Global Fund
Image: (R) Nyika Allen. Credit: Joel Bond

Two women fighting the online sharing of non-consensual pornography

Fighting Revenge Porn20180212

Two women fighting the online sharing of non-consensual pornography

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Can women stop their intimate photos being published online without their consent? Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women fighting back against so-called 'revenge' porn

Nyika Allen is President and CEO of the New Mexico Technology Council. In 2015, Nyika's ex-boyfriend began posting compromising photographs of her on Twitter. As they were viewed by complete strangers she was overwhelmed by shock and humiliation, but decided that she would not let him win. As well as getting the images taken down, and taking her ex to court, she successfully lobbied her state's politicians. With her help, New Mexico is now one of a growing number of US states to pass a law against revenge - or non-consensual - pornography.

Talent Jumo supports survivors of revenge porn in Zimbabwe, through her organisation Katswe Sistahood. She says the trauma of the experience is often made worse by the reaction of family who can reject their daughters for bringing shame on them. She believes society stigmatises women for this whereas men are celebrated for their virility. And bullying by ex-partners is grounded in the assumption that they won't speak out. She is helping women do just that, as well as helping to draft much-needed laws that can punish this new crime.

Image: (L) Talent Jumo. Credit: DCNGO. Courtesy of The Global Fund
Image: (R) Nyika Allen. Credit: Joel Bond

Finding My Voice Through Art20170612

Two artists who encourage others to pursue their creative talents.

The power of art to change lives. Two women talk to Kim Chakanetsa about how they use art to enable refugees, asylum seekers and young women to find their creative voice.

Isha Fofana is a Gambian artist who set up an art centre in her country to encourage young women to pursue their artistic talents. Although she showed an interest in art at a young age, she was not fully able to explore it until she was much older. Her canvasses are often large and extremely colourful, capturing the joy and power she sees in the women around her.

Zeina Iaali is a Lebanese-Australian artist who volunteers at the Refugee Art Project in Sydney, which supports refugees and asylum seekers to tell their stories through art. Her own artwork revolves around her experiences as a Muslim woman in Australia. She says art has the power to bring people together, and that's where magic happens.

Photo: (L) Zeina Iaali. Credit: Refugee Art Project. (R) Isha Fofana. Credit: Mama Africa)

Finding my Voice Through Art2017061220170618 (WS)

Two artists who encourage others to pursue their creative talents

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

The power of art to change lives. Two women talk to Kim Chakanetsa about how they use art to enable refugees, asylum seekers and young women to find their creative voice.

Isha Fofana is a Gambian artist who set up an art centre in her country to encourage young women to pursue their artistic talents. Although she showed an interest in art at a young age, she was not fully able to explore it until she was much older. Her canvasses are often large and extremely colourful, capturing the joy and power she sees in the women around her.

Zeina Iaali is a Lebanese-Australian artist who volunteers at the Refugee Art Project in Sydney, which supports refugees and asylum seekers to tell their stories through art. Her own artwork revolves around her experiences as a Muslim woman in Australia. She says art has the power to bring people together, and that's where magic happens.

Photo: (L) Zeina Iaali. Credit: Refugee Art Project. (R) Isha Fofana. Credit: Mama Africa)

Finding my Voice Through Art20170612

Two artists who encourage others to pursue their creative talents

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

The power of art to change lives. Two women talk to Kim Chakanetsa about how they use art to enable refugees, asylum seekers and young women to find their creative voice.

Isha Fofana is a Gambian artist who set up an art centre in her country to encourage young women to pursue their artistic talents. Although she showed an interest in art at a young age, she was not fully able to explore it until she was much older. Her canvasses are often large and extremely colourful, capturing the joy and power she sees in the women around her.

Zeina Iaali is a Lebanese-Australian artist who volunteers at the Refugee Art Project in Sydney, which supports refugees and asylum seekers to tell their stories through art. Her own artwork revolves around her experiences as a Muslim woman in Australia. She says art has the power to bring people together, and that's where magic happens.

Photo: (L) Zeina Iaali. Credit: Refugee Art Project. (R) Isha Fofana. Credit: Mama Africa)

Finding The Funny In Feminism20161205

Stand-up comedians Aditi Mittal and Zahra Noorbakhsh seek out the funny in feminism

Feminism is not known for being funny but we're hoping to change that on The Conversation this week as two feminist stand up comedians go head to head to explore the funny in feminism. They are Aditi Mittal, one of India's top stand-up comedians today and Zahra Noorbakhsh, one half of the internationally acclaimed podcast #GoodMuslimBadMuslim. Also starring a live studio audience of young and alarmingly intelligent people.

This programme was part of the BBC's 100 Women Season.

(L) Image: Zahra Noorbakhsh, Credit: Les Talusan.

(R) Image and credit: Aditi Mittal.

Finding the Funny in Feminism20161205

Stand-up comedians Aditi Mittal and Zahra Noorbakhsh seek out the funny in feminism

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Feminism is not known for being funny but we're hoping to change that on The Conversation this week as two feminist stand up comedians go head to head to explore the funny in feminism. They are Aditi Mittal, one of India's top stand-up comedians today and Zahra Noorbakhsh, one half of the internationally acclaimed podcast #GoodMuslimBadMuslim. Also starring a live studio audience of young and alarmingly intelligent people.

This programme was part of the BBC's 100 Women Season.

(L) Image: Zahra Noorbakhsh, Credit: Les Talusan.
(R) Image and credit: Aditi Mittal.

Firefighters20180326

Two women who lead teams of firefighters into burning buildings

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Fighting fires and stereotypes at the same time - Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two senior fire women in India and the UK.

Dany Cotton joined the London Fire Brigade at 18, just a few years after it opened up to women. She has worked her way up to be the force's first ever female Commissioner, and is now spearheading a campaign for the general public to stop using the term 'fireman' because it's sexist. Dany still regularly attends fires with her force, including at Grenfell Tower, where more than 70 people died in June 2017. She says it's the worst incident she has ever experienced in 30 years of firefighting, and she has never felt such an overwhelming sense of responsibility.

Meenakshi Vijayakumar is the Deputy Director of North Western Region at the Tamil Nadu Fire and Rescue Service. She was one of the first ever female divisional fire officers in India, joining in 2003. Meenakshi has been called out to over 300 fires in her career, as well as frequent floods and the devastating 2006 tsunami in the coastal city of Chennai. All the way she has battled a widely held belief among her own colleagues that women should not be firefighters, and says she has had to work twice as hard as a man. In 2013 she was awarded the President's Fire Service Medal for Gallantry for rescuing two people from underneath a collapsed building.

(L) Meenakshi Vijayakumar. Credit: Tamil Nadu Fire and Rescue Service
(R) Dany Cotton. Credit: London Fire Brigade

First Ladies20171127

Two women whose partners became head of state in Namibia and in Iceland

What exactly is the role of the first lady? It's an unofficial position, that comes with enormous expectations, and some obvious pitfalls. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to the current First Lady of Namibia, Monica Geingos, and the former First Lady of Iceland, Jonina Leosdottir.

Monica Geingos is a lawyer and businesswoman who married Hage Geingob in 2015, shortly before he became President of Namibia. Monica has continued with many of her previous responsibilities, but she seeks to complement her husband's work by supporting socioeconomic projects in the country. She looks forward to the day when there are more female heads of state and spouses are no longer judged on what they wear or who they're married to.

Jonina Leosdottir is an Icelandic novelist and playwright, whose long-time partner, Johanna Sigurdardottir, became Prime Minister of Iceland in 2009. Jonina therefore became the world's first gay First Lady, and she had to make many personal sacrifices as her partner steered the country through economic crisis. Jonina carried on with her writing career, but says she hardly saw Johanna for five years. Now, however, she's (mostly) happy to have her back.

(L) Monica Geingos (credit: Paul Morigi/Getty Images)
(R) Jonina Leosdottir (credit: Elsa Bjorg Magnusdottir)

First Ladies20171127

Two women whose partners became head of state in Namibia and in Iceland

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

What exactly is the role of the first lady? It's an unofficial position, that comes with enormous expectations, and some obvious pitfalls. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to the current First Lady of Namibia, Monica Geingos, and the former First Lady of Iceland, Jonina Leosdottir.

Monica Geingos is a lawyer and businesswoman who married Hage Geingob in 2015, shortly before he became President of Namibia. Monica has continued with many of her previous responsibilities, but she seeks to complement her husband's work by supporting socioeconomic projects in the country. She looks forward to the day when there are more female heads of state and spouses are no longer judged on what they wear or who they're married to.

Jonina Leosdottir is an Icelandic novelist and playwright, whose long-time partner, Johanna Sigurdardottir, became Prime Minister of Iceland in 2009. Jonina therefore became the world's first gay First Lady, and she had to make many personal sacrifices as her partner steered the country through economic crisis. Jonina carried on with her writing career, but says she hardly saw Johanna for five years. Now, however, she's (mostly) happy to have her back.

(L) Monica Geingos (credit: Paul Morigi/Getty Images)
(R) Jonina Leosdottir (credit: Elsa Bjorg Magnusdottir)

Fisherwomen20180101

Two women in Alaska and Iceland who make their living from the waves

Braving rough seas to make a living - it's not easy being a fisherwoman, but for our two guests it's about much more than the catch. They talk to Kim Chakanetsa about working in the open air, forming unique bonds with their crew and about their hopes for a sustainable future of fishing.

Claire Neaton is one half of Salmon Sisters, a commercial fishing and nautical clothing company, based in Alaska. She and her sister Emma grew up in the remote Aleutian Islands in Alaska, and learnt to fish at their father's side. She says their unusual upbringing taught them to be self-sufficient and to value their family ties - and that protecting and maintaining the pristine conditions around Alaska's waters is her top priority for the future.

Steinunn Einarsdottir is a fisherwoman based in the remote north-west of Iceland. Her parents were both at sea when she was a child, and she had to fend for herself when they were away. For many years, she has fished year-round, which is rare for women in Iceland, but now she's had her second child she's working in fish farming. She hopes to get back to life on the waves when her children are a little older, despite the fact that it always makes her seasick!

(L) Claire Neaton (credit: Camrin Dengel)
(R) Steinunn Einarsdottir (credit: Steinunn Einarsdottir)

Fisherwomen20180101

Two women in Alaska and Iceland who make their living from the waves

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Braving rough seas to make a living - it's not easy being a fisherwoman, but for our two guests it's about much more than the catch. They talk to Kim Chakanetsa about working in the open air, forming unique bonds with their crew and about their hopes for a sustainable future of fishing.

Claire Neaton is one half of Salmon Sisters, a commercial fishing and nautical clothing company, based in Alaska. She and her sister Emma grew up in the remote Aleutian Islands in Alaska, and learnt to fish at their father's side. She says their unusual upbringing taught them to be self-sufficient and to value their family ties - and that protecting and maintaining the pristine conditions around Alaska's waters is her top priority for the future.

Steinunn Einarsdottir is a fisherwoman based in the remote north-west of Iceland. Her parents were both at sea when she was a child, and she had to fend for herself when they were away. For many years, she has fished year-round, which is rare for women in Iceland, but now she's had her second child she's working in fish farming. She hopes to get back to life on the waves when her children are a little older, despite the fact that it always makes her seasick!

(L) Claire Neaton (credit: Camrin Dengel)
(R) Steinunn Einarsdottir (credit: Steinunn Einarsdottir)

Football Referees: Melissa Borjas Pastrana And Sandra Serafini2016070420160710 (WS)

Women referees from Honduras and Canada on red cards and keeping emotions off the pitch

Kim Chakanetsa brings together top female football referees to discuss their passion for the game, the demands of rigorous fitness training and how they handle aggressive players.

Melissa Borjas Pastrana was inspired to follow in her uncle's footsteps to become a referee. Melissa, who lives in the Honduran capital, Tegucigalpa, referees men's games in Honduras and women's games at Fifa level. Melissa reveals how you have to be good at psychology to succeed as a referee, because you are managing 22 players on the pitch as well as the support staff and the fans in the stadium.

Sandra Serafini grew up in a football obsessed household in Canada and from a young age was a keen player. When she discovered that her talents lay more with officiating rather than playing she began to referee at men's and women's games at an amateur level, until eventually she turned professional and joined Fifa in 2006. For much of her career she has combined refereeing football matches with neurosurgery, her work as a neuroscientist helps her to understand why things can go wrong in a game and how to try and fix them. She now works with the Professional Referee Organisation where she coaches the next generation of female referees.

(Photo: Melissa Borjas Pastrana (L) Credit Omar Martinez. Sandra Serafini (R) Credit Dominic Chan)

Football Referees: Melissa Borjas Pastrana and Sandra Serafini2016070420160709 (WS)

Women referees from Honduras and Canada on red cards and keeping emotions off the pitch

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kim Chakanetsa brings together top female football referees to discuss their passion for the game, the demands of rigorous fitness training and how they handle aggressive players.

Melissa Borjas Pastrana was inspired to follow in her uncle's footsteps to become a referee. Melissa, who lives in the Honduran capital, Tegucigalpa, referees men's games in Honduras and women's games at Fifa level. Melissa reveals how you have to be good at psychology to succeed as a referee, because you are managing 22 players on the pitch as well as the support staff and the fans in the stadium.

Sandra Serafini grew up in a football obsessed household in Canada and from a young age was a keen player. When she discovered that her talents lay more with officiating rather than playing she began to referee at men's and women's games at an amateur level, until eventually she turned professional and joined Fifa in 2006. For much of her career she has combined refereeing football matches with neurosurgery, her work as a neuroscientist helps her to understand why things can go wrong in a game and how to try and fix them. She now works with the Professional Referee Organisation where she coaches the next generation of female referees.

(Photo: Melissa Borjas Pastrana (L) Credit Omar Martinez. Sandra Serafini (R) Credit Dominic Chan)

Football Referees: Melissa Borjas Pastrana and Sandra Serafini20160704

Women referees from Honduras and Canada on red cards and keeping emotions off the pitch

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kim Chakanetsa brings together top female football referees to discuss their passion for the game, the demands of rigorous fitness training and how they handle aggressive players.

Melissa Borjas Pastrana was inspired to follow in her uncle's footsteps to become a referee. Melissa, who lives in the Honduran capital, Tegucigalpa, referees men's games in Honduras and women's games at Fifa level. Melissa reveals how you have to be good at psychology to succeed as a referee, because you are managing 22 players on the pitch as well as the support staff and the fans in the stadium.

Sandra Serafini grew up in a football obsessed household in Canada and from a young age was a keen player. When she discovered that her talents lay more with officiating rather than playing she began to referee at men's and women's games at an amateur level, until eventually she turned professional and joined Fifa in 2006. For much of her career she has combined refereeing football matches with neurosurgery, her work as a neuroscientist helps her to understand why things can go wrong in a game and how to try and fix them. She now works with the Professional Referee Organisation where she coaches the next generation of female referees.

(Photo: Melissa Borjas Pastrana (L) Credit Omar Martinez. Sandra Serafini (R) Credit Dominic Chan)

Forced Marriage20170130

Two women who escaped forced marriage and set about helping others

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two women who've escaped forced marriage and now fight for the rights of other victims talk to Maryam Maruf about how they've coped after being ostracised by their families.

Most people look forward to their wedding day: not Jasvinder Sanghera. She grew up in a large Sikh family in Derby, UK and was set to marry a much older man. Instead, aged just 16, she ran away from her home. Her family disowned her - and refused her attempts at reconciliation. As a response, Jasvinder went on to found Karma Nirvana, a charity which supports victims of forced marriage and honour-based violence.

Fraidy Reiss didn't even have her own bank account when she left an abusive marriage at the age of 32. She'd been brought up in an insular Orthodox Jewish community in New York, and did not feel she had any real choice in who she married. When she left her husband she had to turn her back on her whole life. She set up a new home with her daughters, and decided to help other women from all different religious and cultural backgrounds to escape forced marriage. Her organisation is called Unchained at Last.

(L) Image: Fraidy Reiss. Credit: Julie N Samuels.
(R) Image: Jasvinder Sanghera. Credit: Karma Nirvana.

Forensic Scientists: Senem \u0160kulj and Kornelia Nehse20160104

The 'forensics' who identify bones from mass graves in Bosnia and solve murders in Berlin

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Senem Škulj is a senior forensic anthropologist for the International Commission on Missing Persons in Bosnia. Thousands of people lost their lives during the bloody conflict when Yugoslavia broke up in the early 1990s. Many bodies were thrown into mass graves and it's Senem's job to put a name to the bones that are found and to reunite the remains with relatives, so they can have a proper burial.

Kornelia Nehse is a hair and textiles expert, she began her career in the forensics department of the Berlin police 30 years ago. At first Kornelia went to the crime scene to collect evidence, but says it was difficult seeing murder victims, especially the vulnerable ones. Now her job is mainly inside the laboratory working with the tiny microscopic fibres that can help catch and convict an offender.

(Photo: Forensic scientists Senem Škulj (Left) and Kornelia Nehse (Right) at work.
Kornelia Nehse picture credit: Claudia Wendt)

Forensic Scientists: Senem Škulj And Kornelia Nehse20160104

The 'forensics' who identify bones from mass graves in Bosnia and solve murders in Berlin

Senem Škulj is a senior forensic anthropologist for the International Commission on Missing Persons in Bosnia. Thousands of people lost their lives during the bloody conflict when Yugoslavia broke up in the early 1990s. Many bodies were thrown into mass graves and it's Senem's job to put a name to the bones that are found and to reunite the remains with relatives, so they can have a proper burial.

Kornelia Nehse is a hair and textiles expert, she began her career in the forensics department of the Berlin police 30 years ago. At first Kornelia went to the crime scene to collect evidence, but says it was difficult seeing murder victims, especially the vulnerable ones. Now her job is mainly inside the laboratory working with the tiny microscopic fibres that can help catch and convict an offender.

(Photo: Forensic scientists Senem Škulj (Left) and Kornelia Nehse (Right) at work.

Kornelia Nehse picture credit: Claudia Wendt)

Funeral Directors: Nomthetho Zote and Lauren LeRoy2015092120150926 (WS)

Running funeral homes in the US and South Africa and dealing death everyday.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Lauren LeRoy is a 25-year-old funeral director from New York State. She says she knew she wanted to do this job from the age of 12. Lauren works at a funeral home established by her great uncle, and explains that you have to be good at reading a situation to know how to deal with each grieving family. The worst part of the job for Lauren is the moment just before she closes the casket for the final time and the family are saying their last goodbyes, knowing they won't see their relative again.

Nomthetho Zote runs a funeral parlour in South Africa's Eastern Cape Province. The funeral business is in her blood too, she took over the home from her parents. When Nomthetho was growing up she says death was less common, people generally died of old age, but the high prevalence of HIV/ AIDS in the country has made death an every day thing. Nomthetho even gets calls at 3am from families asking for her help, and she says whatever time of day it is you always have to be patient and kind with grieving people.

(Picture: Nomthetho Zote (Left) and Lauren LeRoy (Right). Credit: Amanda Polanski)

Funeral Directors: Nomthetho Zote and Lauren LeRoy20150921

Running funeral homes in the US and South Africa and dealing death everyday.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Lauren LeRoy is a 25-year-old funeral director from New York State. She says she knew she wanted to do this job from the age of 12. Lauren works at a funeral home established by her great uncle, and explains that you have to be good at reading a situation to know how to deal with each grieving family. The worst part of the job for Lauren is the moment just before she closes the casket for the final time and the family are saying their last goodbyes, knowing they won't see their relative again.

Nomthetho Zote runs a funeral parlour in South Africa's Eastern Cape Province. The funeral business is in her blood too, she took over the home from her parents. When Nomthetho was growing up she says death was less common, people generally died of old age, but the high prevalence of HIV/ AIDS in the country has made death an every day thing. Nomthetho even gets calls at 3am from families asking for her help, and she says whatever time of day it is you always have to be patient and kind with grieving people.

(Picture: Nomthetho Zote (Left) and Lauren LeRoy (Right). Credit: Amanda Polanski)

Funeral Directors: Nomthetho Zote And Lauren Leroy2015092120150926 (WS)

Running funeral homes in the US and South Africa and dealing death everyday.

Lauren LeRoy is a 25-year-old funeral director from New York State. She says she knew she wanted to do this job from the age of 12. Lauren works at a funeral home established by her great uncle, and explains that you have to be good at reading a situation to know how to deal with each grieving family. The worst part of the job for Lauren is the moment just before she closes the casket for the final time and the family are saying their last goodbyes, knowing they won't see their relative again.

Nomthetho Zote runs a funeral parlour in South Africa's Eastern Cape Province. The funeral business is in her blood too, she took over the home from her parents. When Nomthetho was growing up she says death was less common, people generally died of old age, but the high prevalence of HIV/ AIDS in the country has made death an every day thing. Nomthetho even gets calls at 3am from families asking for her help, and she says whatever time of day it is you always have to be patient and kind with grieving people.

(Picture: Nomthetho Zote (Left) and Lauren LeRoy (Right). Credit: Amanda Polanski)

Gamers and Geeks: Jenny Brusk and Angelica Lim2015091420150919 (WS)

A roboticist and a games developer on how and why they are making technology more human

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Jenny Brusk didn't know what she was letting herself in for when she enrolled in a university Masters course in computing in 1990. She went on to become Sweden's first female games developer but she was often mistaken for the company receptionist. The experience made her stronger. She says, "rather than go hide somewhere in the office I would fill my space". Jenny is now researching how game characters can be made more psychologically realistic by using natural speech, gossip and lies. She is also the founder of DONNA, an organisation which aims to attract more women into the games industry.

Roboticist Angelica Lim is a self-professed 'geek' who programmes robots to have more 'human' traits, like compassion and empathy. She has lived, baked biscuits and made music with a robot, all in the name of research. The goal is creating the perfect companion robot which might provide help and therapy to the elderly or provide assistance at home to anyone. At some points when she was sharing her home with the robot, Angelica found herself questioning the relationship asking, "is it my servant or is it my kid?"

(Photo (L): Jenny Brusk, credit: Torbjörn Svensson. (R): Angelica Lim, credit: Andy Heather)

Gamers and Geeks: Jenny Brusk and Angelica Lim20150914

A roboticist and a games developer on how and why they are making technology more human

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Jenny Brusk didn't know what she was letting herself in for when she enrolled in a university Masters course in computing in 1990. She went on to become Sweden's first female games developer but she was often mistaken for the company receptionist. The experience made her stronger. She says, "rather than go hide somewhere in the office I would fill my space". Jenny is now researching how game characters can be made more psychologically realistic by using natural speech, gossip and lies. She is also the founder of DONNA, an organisation which aims to attract more women into the games industry.

Roboticist Angelica Lim is a self-professed 'geek' who programmes robots to have more 'human' traits, like compassion and empathy. She has lived, baked biscuits and made music with a robot, all in the name of research. The goal is creating the perfect companion robot which might provide help and therapy to the elderly or provide assistance at home to anyone. At some points when she was sharing her home with the robot, Angelica found herself questioning the relationship asking, "is it my servant or is it my kid?"

(Photo (L): Jenny Brusk, credit: Torbjörn Svensson. (R): Angelica Lim, credit: Andy Heather)

Gamers And Geeks: Jenny Brusk And Angelica Lim2015091420150919 (WS)

Jenny Brusk didn't know what she was letting herself in for when she enrolled in a university Masters course in computing in 1990. She went on to become Sweden's first female games developer but she was often mistaken for the company receptionist. The experience made her stronger. She says, "rather than go hide somewhere in the office I would fill my space". Jenny is now researching how game characters can be made more psychologically realistic by using natural speech, gossip and lies. She is also the founder of DONNA, an organisation which aims to attract more women into the games industry.

Roboticist Angelica Lim is a self-professed 'geek' who programmes robots to have more 'human' traits, like compassion and empathy. She has lived, baked biscuits and made music with a robot, all in the name of research. The goal is creating the perfect companion robot which might provide help and therapy to the elderly or provide assistance at home to anyone. At some points when she was sharing her home with the robot, Angelica found herself questioning the relationship asking, "is it my servant or is it my kid?"

(Photo (L): Jenny Brusk, credit: Torbjörn Svensson. (R): Angelica Lim, credit: Andy Heather)

A roboticist and a games developer on how and why they are making technology more human

Glossy Magazines20170206

Two successful editors reveal the challenges and triumphs of running a glossy magazine.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

What does it take to run a glossy magazine? Two editors speak to Kim Chakanetsa about celebrities, gossip and the power of true life stories.

Betty Irabor launched her magazine, Genevieve, in Lagos 13 years ago, with the aim of inspiring other women to believe in themselves. Her publication is described as Nigeria's leading inspirational and lifestyle magazine. She's even got her daughter involved, first as a teen columnist, now as Assistant Editor. She says that in recent years the website has become more important than the printed edition. But it's still the Lagos elite that set the trends in her fashion pages.

Mamen Sanchez Perez is editor of Hola Mexico and deputy editor of Hola Spain, both part of the Hello Magazine family. She shares her memories of her grandparents, who first launched Hola Magazine in Barcelona in the 1940s, with the aim of bringing more respect and integrity to the gossip pages. That family ethos carries through to the present day - and Mamen's grandmother still plays an active role in the business.

Image: (L) Betty Irabor and (R) Mamen Sanchez Perez
Credit: (L) Genevieve Magazine and (R) no credit

Graffiti Artists: Lady Pink And Olga Alexopoulou2016102420161030 (WS)

Subway tunnels of 1970s New York and giant murals in Greece - Graffiti artists talk shop

How do you feel about graffiti and street art? Is it a democratic form of creative expression, or an eyesore, a public nuisance, that gets your blood boiling? These are questions that Kim Chakanetsa puts to her two guests today.

Olga Alexopoulou lives in Turkey but is originally from Greece. She has a master's degree in Fine Art from Oxford University but she likes to paint on walls, big walls. She is responsible for the biggest mural in Greece, all 350 square metres of it. Street art has been very visible during the recent crises in both Turkey and Greece and while Olga's work promotes peace she has also had to face down her critics.

Lady Pink has been described as "the first lady of graffiti". She was born in Ecuador but made a name for herself across New York by literally spray painting her name on the city's subway trains. She was one of very few women on the scene in the late '70s. She used to dress as a boy to avoid unwanted attention. Three decades on, she is now one of the leading figures in the street art scene.

(Photo: Olga Alexopoulou (L). Credit: Yannis Bournias. (R) Lady Pink. Credit: Lauren Thomas)

Graffiti Artists: Lady Pink and Olga Alexopoulou2016102420161029 (WS)

Subway tunnels of 1970s New York and giant murals in Greece - Graffiti artists talk shop

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

How do you feel about graffiti and street art? Is it a democratic form of creative expression, or an eyesore, a public nuisance, that gets your blood boiling? These are questions that Kim Chakanetsa puts to her two guests today.

Olga Alexopoulou lives in Turkey but is originally from Greece. She has a master's degree in Fine Art from Oxford University but she likes to paint on walls, big walls. She is responsible for the biggest mural in Greece, all 350 square metres of it. Street art has been very visible during the recent crises in both Turkey and Greece and while Olga's work promotes peace she has also had to face down her critics.

Lady Pink has been described as "the first lady of graffiti". She was born in Ecuador but made a name for herself across New York by literally spray painting her name on the city's subway trains. She was one of very few women on the scene in the late '70s. She used to dress as a boy to avoid unwanted attention. Three decades on, she is now one of the leading figures in the street art scene.

(Photo: Olga Alexopoulou (L). Credit: Yannis Bournias. (R) Lady Pink. Credit: Lauren Thomas)

Graffiti Artists: Lady Pink and Olga Alexopoulou20161024

Subway tunnels of 1970s New York and giant murals in Greece - Graffiti artists talk shop

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

How do you feel about graffiti and street art? Is it a democratic form of creative expression, or an eyesore, a public nuisance, that gets your blood boiling? These are questions that Kim Chakanetsa puts to her two guests today.

Olga Alexopoulou lives in Turkey but is originally from Greece. She has a master's degree in Fine Art from Oxford University but she likes to paint on walls, big walls. She is responsible for the biggest mural in Greece, all 350 square metres of it. Street art has been very visible during the recent crises in both Turkey and Greece and while Olga's work promotes peace she has also had to face down her critics.

Lady Pink has been described as "the first lady of graffiti". She was born in Ecuador but made a name for herself across New York by literally spray painting her name on the city's subway trains. She was one of very few women on the scene in the late '70s. She used to dress as a boy to avoid unwanted attention. Three decades on, she is now one of the leading figures in the street art scene.

(Photo: Olga Alexopoulou (L). Credit: Yannis Bournias. (R) Lady Pink. Credit: Lauren Thomas)

Gymnasts: Simone Biles & Nadia Comaneci20170911

Two women who re-defined what's possible in gymnastics

Legendary gymnasts Simone Biles and Nadia Comaneci get together with Kim Chakanetsa for a frank discussion of the highs and lows of their sport.

At the Montreal Olympics in 1976, aged just 14, Nadia Comaneci became the first gymnast in history to be awarded a perfect 10 for her routine on the uneven bars. Nadia went on to win 25 medals during her gymnastic career, including five Olympic gold medals. Originally from Romania, Nadia defected to the US in 1989 and now runs a gymnastics school in Oklahoma.

Simone Biles burst onto the Olympic gymnastics scene at the 2016 Rio Games, with her jaw-dropping trademark move The Biles, and took home four gold medals. Not bad for a 19 year old, who only got into the sport by accident when a coach at a local gym spotted her perfectly copying the older girls' moves, aged six. Simone is now the most decorated American gymnast of all time, holding 19 Olympic and World Championship medals.

(Photo: (L) Nadia Comaneci. Credit: Dennis Grombkowski/Getty Images. (R) Simone Biles. Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images)

Gymnasts: Simone Biles and Nadia Comaneci2017091120170917 (WS)

Two women who redefined what's possible in gymnastics on the highs and lows of their sport

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Legendary gymnasts Simone Biles and Nadia Comaneci get together with Kim Chakanetsa for a frank discussion of the highs and lows of their sport.

At the Montreal Olympics in 1976, aged just 14, Nadia Comaneci became the first gymnast in history to be awarded a perfect 10 for her routine on the uneven bars. Nadia went on to win 25 medals during her gymnastic career, including five Olympic gold medals. Originally from Romania, Nadia defected to the US in 1989 and now runs a gymnastics school in Oklahoma.

Simone Biles burst onto the Olympic gymnastics scene at the 2016 Rio Games, with her jaw-dropping trademark move The Biles, and took home four gold medals. Not bad for a 19 year old, who only got into the sport by accident when a coach at a local gym spotted her perfectly copying the older girls' moves, aged six. Simone is now the most decorated American gymnast of all time, holding 19 Olympic and World Championship medals.

(Photo: (L) Nadia Comaneci. Credit: Dennis Grombkowski/Getty Images. (R) Simone Biles. Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images)

Gymnasts: Simone Biles and Nadia Comaneci20170911

Two women who redefined what's possible in gymnastics on the highs and lows of their sport

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Legendary gymnasts Simone Biles and Nadia Comaneci get together with Kim Chakanetsa for a frank discussion of the highs and lows of their sport.

At the Montreal Olympics in 1976, aged just 14, Nadia Comaneci became the first gymnast in history to be awarded a perfect 10 for her routine on the uneven bars. Nadia went on to win 25 medals during her gymnastic career, including five Olympic gold medals. Originally from Romania, Nadia defected to the US in 1989 and now runs a gymnastics school in Oklahoma.

Simone Biles burst onto the Olympic gymnastics scene at the 2016 Rio Games, with her jaw-dropping trademark move The Biles, and took home four gold medals. Not bad for a 19 year old, who only got into the sport by accident when a coach at a local gym spotted her perfectly copying the older girls' moves, aged six. Simone is now the most decorated American gymnast of all time, holding 19 Olympic and World Championship medals.

(Photo: (L) Nadia Comaneci. Credit: Dennis Grombkowski/Getty Images. (R) Simone Biles. Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images)

Hair Stylists: Sapna Bhavnani and Charlotte Mensah2016091220160917 (WS)

An Indian hair stylist to the stars speaks to an award winning British afro hairdresser

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Sapna Bhavnani is one of India's most celebrated hair stylists and is known for her own cropped hair and tattoos. Her Mumbai based salon, Mad-O-Wat, is the go-to place for Bollywood's A-list when their hair needs some attention. Clients include actors, politicians and sports stars like Indian cricket captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni. Sapna says her hair appointments can often turn into therapy sessions as her clients want to get their problems off their chest when they're sitting in her chair.

Charlotte Mensah developed a passion for hair styling while she looked after her little sister's hair after their mother died. Charlotte, who has twice been named British Afro Hairdresser of the Year, (by the British Hairdressing Awards) grew up in Ghana and moved to London when she was 11 years old. She goes back and forth to Accra and says it gives her a lot of inspiration for the styles she creates in the Hair Lounge, her Portobello Road salon, which specialises in afro hair. Charlotte promotes natural hair and says women are embracing this look.

Photo: (L)-Sapna Bhavnani. Credit: Sheetal Sherekar.
(R) Charlotte Mensah. Credit: John Rawson.

Hair Stylists: Sapna Bhavnani and Charlotte Mensah20160912

An Indian hair stylist to the stars speaks to an award winning British afro hairdresser

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Sapna Bhavnani is one of India's most celebrated hair stylists and is known for her own cropped hair and tattoos. Her Mumbai based salon, Mad-O-Wat, is the go-to place for Bollywood's A-list when their hair needs some attention. Clients include actors, politicians and sports stars like Indian cricket captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni. Sapna says her hair appointments can often turn into therapy sessions as her clients want to get their problems off their chest when they're sitting in her chair.

Charlotte Mensah developed a passion for hair styling while she looked after her little sister's hair after their mother died. Charlotte, who has twice been named British Afro Hairdresser of the Year, (by the British Hairdressing Awards) grew up in Ghana and moved to London when she was 11 years old. She goes back and forth to Accra and says it gives her a lot of inspiration for the styles she creates in the Hair Lounge, her Portobello Road salon, which specialises in afro hair. Charlotte promotes natural hair and says women are embracing this look.

Photo: (L)-Sapna Bhavnani. Credit: Sheetal Sherekar.
(R) Charlotte Mensah. Credit: John Rawson.

Hair Stylists: Sapna Bhavnani And Charlotte Mensah2016091220160918 (WS)

Sapna Bhavnani is one of India's most celebrated hair stylists and is known for her own cropped hair and tattoos. Her Mumbai based salon, Mad-O-Wat, is the go-to place for Bollywood's A-list when their hair needs some attention. Clients include actors, politicians and sports stars like Indian cricket captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni. Sapna says her hair appointments can often turn into therapy sessions as her clients want to get their problems off their chest when they're sitting in her chair.

Charlotte Mensah developed a passion for hair styling while she looked after her little sister's hair after their mother died. Charlotte, who has twice been named British Afro Hairdresser of the Year, (by the British Hairdressing Awards) grew up in Ghana and moved to London when she was 11 years old. She goes back and forth to Accra and says it gives her a lot of inspiration for the styles she creates in the Hair Lounge, her Portobello Road salon, which specialises in afro hair. Charlotte promotes natural hair and says women are embracing this look.

Photo: (L)-Sapna Bhavnani. Credit: Sheetal Sherekar.

(R) Charlotte Mensah. Credit: John Rawson.

An Indian hair stylist to the stars speaks to an award winning British afro hairdresser

Head Gardeners20180604

Two women in charge of popular botanical gardens

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Planting, pruning and giving the orders - Kim Chakanetsa meets two female head gardeners who are challenging the idea that gardening is a hobby for women but a career for men.

Sharon Cooke runs Andromeda Botanic Gardens in Barbados, the only Royal Horticulture Society Partner Garden in the West Indies. The garden was created in the 1950s by award-winning horticulturist Iris Bannochie. After Iris died, the garden fell into decline, but Sharon is now restoring it to its former glory. Sharon says that when people ask to meet the Head Gardener, they usually expect a man, and are surprised to see that she is in charge.

Sandra Pella has been the Head Gardener at the public Toronto Botanical Garden in Canada since 2008. Sandra is self-taught, but came from a family of green-fingered farmers. She quit her job at a bank and made the change from gardening as a hobby, to gardening as a profession. She says that because of her gender, people sometimes don't believe she is strong enough to use a wheelbarrow or climb a ladder.

(L) Image: Sandra Pella. Credit: Paul Zammit
(R) Image and credit: Sharon Cooke

Heavy Metal: Doris Yeh and Sasha Zagorc2016053020160604 (WS)

Female heavy metal musicians from Taiwan and Slovenia.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kim Chakanetsa quizzes two heavy metal bass guitarists about their roles in their bands, how they learnt to head-bang, and juggling the music with their day jobs.

Doris Yeh tours all over the world with best-selling Taiwanese metal band Chthonic. She says she only got into heavy metal by accident, but now loves it. Being the only woman in the band can have its down-sides - at performances her male colleagues used to expect her to get changed in the toilet while they occupied the one dressing room! However, Doris learnt to assert herself, and says when she gets on stage and starts playing, she is just excited to be able to treasure that moment with the audience.

Slovenian Sasha Zagorc formed the heavy metal/hard rock band Hellcats with her sister ten years ago. She's always been a metal-head so just wears her own black leather clothes in their videos and on stage. Initially the band had to deal with quite a lot of criticism as the first all-female band on the Slovenian metal scene, but they just kept going and now have fans all over the world. For Sasha having a band provides much needed relaxation, and she loves going on tour with her best friends.

(L) Photo: Doris Yeh. Credit: CHTHONIC.
(R) Photo: Sasha Zagorc. Credit: Simon Podgorsek.

Heavy Metal: Doris Yeh and Sasha Zagorc20160530

Female heavy metal musicians from Taiwan and Slovenia.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Kim Chakanetsa quizzes two heavy metal bass guitarists about their roles in their bands, how they learnt to head-bang, and juggling the music with their day jobs.

Doris Yeh tours all over the world with best-selling Taiwanese metal band Chthonic. She says she only got into heavy metal by accident, but now loves it. Being the only woman in the band can have its down-sides - at performances her male colleagues used to expect her to get changed in the toilet while they occupied the one dressing room! However, Doris learnt to assert herself, and says when she gets on stage and starts playing, she is just excited to be able to treasure that moment with the audience.

Slovenian Sasha Zagorc formed the heavy metal/hard rock band Hellcats with her sister ten years ago. She's always been a metal-head so just wears her own black leather clothes in their videos and on stage. Initially the band had to deal with quite a lot of criticism as the first all-female band on the Slovenian metal scene, but they just kept going and now have fans all over the world. For Sasha having a band provides much needed relaxation, and she loves going on tour with her best friends.

(L) Photo: Doris Yeh. Credit: CHTHONIC.
(R) Photo: Sasha Zagorc. Credit: Simon Podgorsek.

Heavy Metal: Doris Yeh And Sasha Zagorc2016053020160605 (WS)

Kim Chakanetsa quizzes two heavy metal bass guitarists about their roles in their bands, how they learnt to head-bang, and juggling the music with their day jobs.

Doris Yeh tours all over the world with best-selling Taiwanese metal band Chthonic. She says she only got into heavy metal by accident, but now loves it. Being the only woman in the band can have its down-sides - at performances her male colleagues used to expect her to get changed in the toilet while they occupied the one dressing room! However, Doris learnt to assert herself, and says when she gets on stage and starts playing, she is just excited to be able to treasure that moment with the audience.

Slovenian Sasha Zagorc formed the heavy metal/hard rock band Hellcats with her sister ten years ago. She's always been a metal-head so just wears her own black leather clothes in their videos and on stage. Initially the band had to deal with quite a lot of criticism as the first all-female band on the Slovenian metal scene, but they just kept going and now have fans all over the world. For Sasha having a band provides much needed relaxation, and she loves going on tour with her best friends.

(L) Photo: Doris Yeh. Credit: CHTHONIC.

(R) Photo: Sasha Zagorc. Credit: Simon Podgorsek.

Female heavy metal musicians from Taiwan and Slovenia.

'Hijabistas': Hidaya Mohamad and Naballah Chi2015052520150530 (WS)

Young muslims in Trinidad and Tokyo on 'modest' fashion and what not to ask them

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Naballah Chi is a 25-year-old fashion blogger, model and hijab stylist from Trinidad and Tobago. Her blog celebrates colourful clothes inspired by her Caribbean island home, but it also addresses the concerns and questions of her followers. Naballah has worn the hijab since kindergarten, but as an aspiring model she acknowledges that keeping the commitment can be a struggle and describes the guilt she felt when she removed it to take part in a beauty pageant.

Hidaya Mohamad is a Javanese-Malaysian graduate student in Japan and feels she looks "like an alien" being the only hijabi on campus. Her philosophy is that if you're going to get noticed, you should wear good clothes and have fun. She is a student of foreign affairs and a fashionista with her own style blog, who says the hijab enables her to control who sees her body, "it liberates me .... but it does not define me."

(Photo: Hidaya Mohamed and Naballah Chi. Credits: Ryuuzaki Julio and Luis Young)

Presenter: Kim Chakanetsa

'Hijabistas': Hidaya Mohamad and Naballah Chi20150525

Young muslims in Trinidad and Tokyo on 'modest' fashion and what not to ask them

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Naballah Chi is a 25-year-old fashion blogger, model and hijab stylist from Trinidad and Tobago. Her blog celebrates colourful clothes inspired by her Caribbean island home, but it also addresses the concerns and questions of her followers. Naballah has worn the hijab since kindergarten, but as an aspiring model she acknowledges that keeping the commitment can be a struggle and describes the guilt she felt when she removed it to take part in a beauty pageant.

Hidaya Mohamad is a Javanese-Malaysian graduate student in Japan and feels she looks "like an alien" being the only hijabi on campus. Her philosophy is that if you're going to get noticed, you should wear good clothes and have fun. She is a student of foreign affairs and a fashionista with her own style blog, who says the hijab enables her to control who sees her body, "it liberates me .... but it does not define me."

(Photo: Hidaya Mohamed and Naballah Chi. Credits: Ryuuzaki Julio and Luis Young)

Presenter: Kim Chakanetsa

Hiv-aids Doctors20170807

Two women at the forefront of global efforts to combat HIV-AIDS.

Two doctors at the epicentre of the AIDS crisis - Glenda Gray and Wafaa El-Sadr - have worked tirelessly to care for those affected by the virus, to combat its spread, and to get the drugs to those who need it.

Glenda Gray is a South African paediatrician and world-renowned scientist who currently directs the HIV Vaccine Trials study, which is the largest of its kind ever conducted in South Africa. Thanks in part to her work on mother-to-child transmission, the number of babies born with HIV has dropped dramatically from 600,000 a year to 150,000. Glenda herself grew up under Apartheid in a family of activists, and carried on her fight for social justice into medical school and beyond.

Wafaa El-Sadr is director of ICAP based at Columbia University in New York. Born in Egypt to a family of physicians, Wafaa was working as a young doctor in Harlem, when the first AIDS cases began to appear in the 1980s. She didn't know she was witnessing the start of an epidemic that was to sweep across the globe. Wafaa helped develop a treatment programme that is now used as a model around the world.

Image: (L) Glenda Gray (credit: JP Crouch Photography) and (R) Wafaa El-Sadr (credit: Michael Dames)

HIV-AIDS Doctors2017080720170813 (WS)

Two women at the forefront of global efforts to combat HIV-AIDS.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two doctors at the epicentre of the AIDS crisis - Glenda Gray and Wafaa El-Sadr - have worked tirelessly to care for those affected by the virus, to combat its spread, and to get the drugs to those who need it.

Glenda Gray is a South African paediatrician and world-renowned scientist who currently directs the HIV Vaccine Trials study, which is the largest of its kind ever conducted in South Africa. Thanks in part to her work on mother-to-child transmission, the number of babies born with HIV has dropped dramatically from 600,000 a year to 150,000. Glenda herself grew up under Apartheid in a family of activists, and carried on her fight for social justice into medical school and beyond.

Wafaa El-Sadr is director of ICAP based at Columbia University in New York. Born in Egypt to a family of physicians, Wafaa was working as a young doctor in Harlem, when the first AIDS cases began to appear in the 1980s. She didn't know she was witnessing the start of an epidemic that was to sweep across the globe. Wafaa helped develop a treatment programme that is now used as a model around the world.

Image: (L) Glenda Gray (credit: JP Crouch Photography) and (R) Wafaa El-Sadr (credit: Michael Dames)

HIV-AIDS Doctors20170807

Two women at the forefront of global efforts to combat HIV-AIDS.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two doctors at the epicentre of the AIDS crisis - Glenda Gray and Wafaa El-Sadr - have worked tirelessly to care for those affected by the virus, to combat its spread, and to get the drugs to those who need it.

Glenda Gray is a South African paediatrician and world-renowned scientist who currently directs the HIV Vaccine Trials study, which is the largest of its kind ever conducted in South Africa. Thanks in part to her work on mother-to-child transmission, the number of babies born with HIV has dropped dramatically from 600,000 a year to 150,000. Glenda herself grew up under Apartheid in a family of activists, and carried on her fight for social justice into medical school and beyond.

Wafaa El-Sadr is director of ICAP based at Columbia University in New York. Born in Egypt to a family of physicians, Wafaa was working as a young doctor in Harlem, when the first AIDS cases began to appear in the 1980s. She didn't know she was witnessing the start of an epidemic that was to sweep across the globe. Wafaa helped develop a treatment programme that is now used as a model around the world.

Image: (L) Glenda Gray (credit: JP Crouch Photography) and (R) Wafaa El-Sadr (credit: Michael Dames)

Inside Soap Operas: Simone Singh and Sarah Mayberry2015082420150829 (WS)

What it's like to work on soap operas in India and Australia, on and off set.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Simone Singh is an award winning Indian television and film actress. She became a household name for playing the title role in the popular serial drama Heena. The audience was sympathetic to the heroine of this show, but Simone says even when she played a "baddie" she doesn't lose fans because "they remember your past work, they love you anyway".

Sarah Mayberry works on Australia's longest running soap opera, Neighbours, as a script writer and story liner. She describes the storyline meetings as intense, where the team "absolutely bare their souls" when using personal experience to brainstorm ideas. Sarah has worked on Neighbours for 16 years and says they "spread the villainy across the sexes".

(Picture: Simone Singh - Left and Sarah Mayberry - Right)

Inside Soap Operas: Simone Singh and Sarah Mayberry20150824

What it's like to work on soap operas in India and Australia, on and off set.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Simone Singh is an award winning Indian television and film actress. She became a household name for playing the title role in the popular serial drama Heena. The audience was sympathetic to the heroine of this show, but Simone says even when she played a "baddie" she doesn't lose fans because "they remember your past work, they love you anyway".

Sarah Mayberry works on Australia's longest running soap opera, Neighbours, as a script writer and story liner. She describes the storyline meetings as intense, where the team "absolutely bare their souls" when using personal experience to brainstorm ideas. Sarah has worked on Neighbours for 16 years and says they "spread the villainy across the sexes".

(Picture: Simone Singh - Left and Sarah Mayberry - Right)

Inside Soap Operas: Simone Singh And Sarah Mayberry2015082420150829 (WS)

What it's like to work on soap operas in India and Australia, on and off set.

Simone Singh is an award winning Indian television and film actress. She became a household name for playing the title role in the popular serial drama Heena. The audience was sympathetic to the heroine of this show, but Simone says even when she played a "baddie" she doesn't lose fans because "they remember your past work, they love you anyway".

Sarah Mayberry works on Australia's longest running soap opera, Neighbours, as a script writer and story liner. She describes the storyline meetings as intense, where the team "absolutely bare their souls" when using personal experience to brainstorm ideas. Sarah has worked on Neighbours for 16 years and says they "spread the villainy across the sexes".

(Picture: Simone Singh - Left and Sarah Mayberry - Right)

Interpreters20170515

Two female interpreters on the challenges of being someone else's voice.

Interpreters2017051520170521 (WS)

Two female interpreters on the challenges of being someone else's voice.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Female interpreters discuss being voices for vulnerable people. Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women, one who interprets for medical patients, and one who helps refugees apply for asylum. They talk about the pressures and the joys of what they say is an under-valued job.

Teodora Manea Hauskeller is a Romanian who works as a medical interpreter in the UK, easing understanding between doctors and patients who don't speak English. She is present in the room when potentially scary diagnoses are being given, and says the responsibility and emotion of this kind of work can be quite tough, but it can also be very rewarding.

Mariam Massarat is an Iranian-American interpreter, who specialises in translating for Farsi-speaking asylum seekers and refugees in the US. She gets to know her clients and puts them at their ease before they go into the asylum interview, and then she acts as their voice for up to six hours. If the interview is successful, and they are granted asylum, she loves to hear what they go on to do in their new lives.

Image: Mariam Massarat (L) and Teodora Manea Hauskeller (R)

Interpreters20170515

Two female interpreters on the challenges of being someone else's voice.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Female interpreters discuss being voices for vulnerable people. Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women, one who interprets for medical patients, and one who helps refugees apply for asylum. They talk about the pressures and the joys of what they say is an under-valued job.

Teodora Manea Hauskeller is a Romanian who works as a medical interpreter in the UK, easing understanding between doctors and patients who don't speak English. She is present in the room when potentially scary diagnoses are being given, and says the responsibility and emotion of this kind of work can be quite tough, but it can also be very rewarding.

Mariam Massarat is an Iranian-American interpreter, who specialises in translating for Farsi-speaking asylum seekers and refugees in the US. She gets to know her clients and puts them at their ease before they go into the asylum interview, and then she acts as their voice for up to six hours. If the interview is successful, and they are granted asylum, she loves to hear what they go on to do in their new lives.

Image: Mariam Massarat (L) and Teodora Manea Hauskeller (R)

Investigative Reporters: Khadija Ismayilova And Sacha Pfeiffer20161114

Female journalists determined to publish the truth whatever the price

Azeri journalist Khadija Ismayilova became the subject of an international release campaign last year when she was arrested and detained by her government, and her cause was taken up by human rights lawyer Amal Clooney. Khadija had been delving into the President's family businesses, and published allegations of extensive embezzlement of oil funds. She spent 18 months in prison before being given early release in May 2016, but says she is determined to continue her investigations.

Sacha Pfeiffer is an American newspaper journalist and was a member of the now world-renowned 'Spotlight' team on the Boston Globe. She and her colleagues spent years building up evidence and personal testimony of sexual abuse at the hands of Catholic priests, and the systematic cover-up of this by the Church. The resulting story caused shock-waves when it was published and the investigation was dramatised in the film Spotlight, which won the Best Film Oscar in 2016. Sacha was played by Rachel McAdams.

(L) Photo: Khadija Ismayilova. Credit: Aziz Karimov.

(R) Photo and credit: Sacha Pfeiffer.

Investigative Reporters: Khadija Ismayilova and Sacha Pfeiffer20161114

Female journalists determined to publish the truth whatever the price

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Azeri journalist Khadija Ismayilova became the subject of an international release campaign last year when she was arrested and detained by her government, and her cause was taken up by human rights lawyer Amal Clooney. Khadija had been delving into the President's family businesses, and published allegations of extensive embezzlement of oil funds. She spent 18 months in prison before being given early release in May 2016, but says she is determined to continue her investigations.

Sacha Pfeiffer is an American newspaper journalist and was a member of the now world-renowned 'Spotlight' team on the Boston Globe. She and her colleagues spent years building up evidence and personal testimony of sexual abuse at the hands of Catholic priests, and the systematic cover-up of this by the Church. The resulting story caused shock-waves when it was published and the investigation was dramatised in the film Spotlight, which won the Best Film Oscar in 2016. Sacha was played by Rachel McAdams.

(L) Photo: Khadija Ismayilova. Credit: Aziz Karimov.
(R) Photo and credit: Sacha Pfeiffer.

Jazz Musicians: Melissa Aldana and Nomfundo Xaluva2016092620161001 (WS)

Award-winning female jazz musicians from Chile and South Africa chat

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Growing up in Santiago Melissa Aldana learnt to play the tenor saxophone or 'horn' at her father's knee, though he took some convincing that she would stick with it. She did, and went on to become the first ever female instrumentalist to win the prestigious Thelonious Monk Jazz Award in 2013. Melissa is now the leader of a successful jazz trio based in New York, and loves her work, but is concerned that a musician's life on the road will be hard to square with starting a family when the time comes.

South African musician Nomfundo Xaluva is winning awards for putting a new twist on her country's very strong jazz tradition. As well as singing and composing, Nomfundo says she is one of very few female black pianists in South Africa, and so feels responsible for being a role model to young girls. Being Xhosa, from the Eastern Cape, music forms a huge part of her culture, and she tries to incorporate this into her work, often singing in her mother tongue. Nomfundo reckons jazz is slowly becoming hip again, and she is excited to be a part of that.

L-Photo: Melissa Aldana.
R-Photo: Nomfundo Xaluva.

Jazz Musicians: Melissa Aldana and Nomfundo Xaluva20160926

Award-winning female jazz musicians from Chile and South Africa chat

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Growing up in Santiago Melissa Aldana learnt to play the tenor saxophone or 'horn' at her father's knee, though he took some convincing that she would stick with it. She did, and went on to become the first ever female instrumentalist to win the prestigious Thelonious Monk Jazz Award in 2013. Melissa is now the leader of a successful jazz trio based in New York, and loves her work, but is concerned that a musician's life on the road will be hard to square with starting a family when the time comes.

South African musician Nomfundo Xaluva is winning awards for putting a new twist on her country's very strong jazz tradition. As well as singing and composing, Nomfundo says she is one of very few female black pianists in South Africa, and so feels responsible for being a role model to young girls. Being Xhosa, from the Eastern Cape, music forms a huge part of her culture, and she tries to incorporate this into her work, often singing in her mother tongue. Nomfundo reckons jazz is slowly becoming hip again, and she is excited to be a part of that.

L-Photo: Melissa Aldana.
R-Photo: Nomfundo Xaluva.

Jazz Musicians: Melissa Aldana And Nomfundo Xaluva2016092620161002 (WS)

Growing up in Santiago Melissa Aldana learnt to play the tenor saxophone or 'horn' at her father's knee, though he took some convincing that she would stick with it. She did, and went on to become the first ever female instrumentalist to win the prestigious Thelonious Monk Jazz Award in 2013. Melissa is now the leader of a successful jazz trio based in New York, and loves her work, but is concerned that a musician's life on the road will be hard to square with starting a family when the time comes.

South African musician Nomfundo Xaluva is winning awards for putting a new twist on her country's very strong jazz tradition. As well as singing and composing, Nomfundo says she is one of very few female black pianists in South Africa, and so feels responsible for being a role model to young girls. Being Xhosa, from the Eastern Cape, music forms a huge part of her culture, and she tries to incorporate this into her work, often singing in her mother tongue. Nomfundo reckons jazz is slowly becoming hip again, and she is excited to be a part of that.

L-Photo: Melissa Aldana.

R-Photo: Nomfundo Xaluva.

Award-winning female jazz musicians from Chile and South Africa chat

Jockeys: Michelle Payne and Jadey Pietrasiewicz2016041120160416 (WS)

Female jockeys who have made an impact on the male dominated world of horse racing

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Michelle Payne is the first ever female jockey to win the Melbourne Cup­ and is the youngest of ten children of Paddy and Mary Payne who grew up in central Victoria, Australia. Mary died in a motor vehicle accident when Michelle was only six months old, leaving Paddy to raise the children as a single father. Michelle entered racing aged 15, the eighth of the Payne children to do so. She won in her first race at Ballarat, riding 'Reigning' a horse trained by her father. Michelle’s book “Life as I know it” is published by Melbourne University Press.

Jadey Pietrasiewicz grew up in a small town in The Netherlands and started horse racing by accident at 14. Jadey started off as an amateur and turned professional in 2013. She won the HH Sheikha Fatima Ladies World Championship in Abu Dhabi in November 2014 and has ridden worldwide on both Thoroughbreds and Arabians (100+ wins). She is currently riding in Australia, based with Ellerton Zahra Racing.

(L) Michelle Payne. Credit: Racing Victoria.
(R) Jadey Pietrasiewicz. Credit: Wouter Tijtgat.

Jockeys: Michelle Payne and Jadey Pietrasiewicz20160411

Female jockeys who have made an impact on the male dominated world of horse racing

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Michelle Payne is the first ever female jockey to win the Melbourne Cup­ and is the youngest of ten children of Paddy and Mary Payne who grew up in central Victoria, Australia. Mary died in a motor vehicle accident when Michelle was only six months old, leaving Paddy to raise the children as a single father. Michelle entered racing aged 15, the eighth of the Payne children to do so. She won in her first race at Ballarat, riding 'Reigning' a horse trained by her father. Michelle’s book “Life as I know it” is published by Melbourne University Press.

Jadey Pietrasiewicz grew up in a small town in The Netherlands and started horse racing by accident at 14. Jadey started off as an amateur and turned professional in 2013. She won the HH Sheikha Fatima Ladies World Championship in Abu Dhabi in November 2014 and has ridden worldwide on both Thoroughbreds and Arabians (100+ wins). She is currently riding in Australia, based with Ellerton Zahra Racing.

(L) Michelle Payne. Credit: Racing Victoria.
(R) Jadey Pietrasiewicz. Credit: Wouter Tijtgat.

Jockeys: Michelle Payne And Jadey Pietrasiewicz2016041120160417 (WS)

Michelle Payne is the first ever female jockey to win the Melbourne Cup­ and is the youngest of ten children of Paddy and Mary Payne who grew up in central Victoria, Australia. Mary died in a motor vehicle accident when Michelle was only six months old, leaving Paddy to raise the children as a single father. Michelle entered racing aged 15, the eighth of the Payne children to do so. She won in her first race at Ballarat, riding 'Reigning' a horse trained by her father. Michelle’s book “Life as I know it? is published by Melbourne University Press.

Jadey Pietrasiewicz grew up in a small town in The Netherlands and started horse racing by accident at 14. Jadey started off as an amateur and turned professional in 2013. She won the HH Sheikha Fatima Ladies World Championship in Abu Dhabi in November 2014 and has ridden worldwide on both Thoroughbreds and Arabians (100+ wins). She is currently riding in Australia, based with Ellerton Zahra Racing.

(L) Michelle Payne. Credit: Racing Victoria.

(R) Jadey Pietrasiewicz. Credit: Wouter Tijtgat.

Female jockeys who have made an impact on the male dominated world of horse racing

Journalists: Ameera Ahmad Harouda And Alina Gracheva20151130

Gaza's first female news fixer and a camera woman from Moldova

As a child, Ameera Ahmad Harouda wanted to be the first female Palestinian fighter pilot, but as an adult she became a pioneer in the news field instead; starting work as Gaza's first female news fixer in 2005. Ameera's work begins when the violence escalates, and she's now the 'go to' person for many international journalists who need to hire a fixer to help them get into Gaza and gain access to stories and people.

Al Jazeera camera woman Alina Gracheva grew up in the former Soviet state of Moldova. She's covered some of the biggest news stories in recent history - the war in Chechnya, the fall of the Taliban in Afghanistan and the invasion of Iraq, but it was the Beslan school siege in 2004, that had the biggest effect on her. Alina says that instead of focussing on the bombs and bullets, camera women can give a different perspective, "they are more likely to notice a mother in the corner, or a child with dirty fingers".

(Picture: Ameera Ahmad Harouda (Left) and Alina Gracheva (Right))

Journalists: Ameera Ahmad Harouda and Alina Gracheva20151130

Gaza's first female news fixer and a camera woman from Moldova

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

As a child, Ameera Ahmad Harouda wanted to be the first female Palestinian fighter pilot, but as an adult she became a pioneer in the news field instead; starting work as Gaza's first female news fixer in 2005. Ameera's work begins when the violence escalates, and she's now the 'go to' person for many international journalists who need to hire a fixer to help them get into Gaza and gain access to stories and people.

Al Jazeera camera woman Alina Gracheva grew up in the former Soviet state of Moldova. She's covered some of the biggest news stories in recent history - the war in Chechnya, the fall of the Taliban in Afghanistan and the invasion of Iraq, but it was the Beslan school siege in 2004, that had the biggest effect on her. Alina says that instead of focussing on the bombs and bullets, camera women can give a different perspective, "they are more likely to notice a mother in the corner, or a child with dirty fingers".

[Picture: Ameera Ahmad Harouda (Left) and Alina Gracheva (Right)]

Lawyers: Jane Serwanga and Niranjali Amerasinghe2015070620150711 (WS)

Lawyers from Kenya and Sri Lanka talk about using the law to change lives

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Jane Serwanga started her career with ambitions of being a high-earning commercial lawyer, but a revelation that the law can discriminate against women inspired her to enter women's rights law . Now she works with Equality Now, an international women's rights advocacy organisation. She might be working on a case defending the rights of one woman to inherit property or be safe from violence, but she and her colleagues will be thinking strategically about how to use that case to bring about changes in the law that benefit all women.

Niranjali Amerasinghe grew up in Sri Lanka during the country's civil war. She was inspired to become a lawyer after watching the role that the law played in attempts to resolve disputes and prevent further conflict. As the director of the Climate Change Program at the Centre for International Environmental Law in Washington DC, Niranjali travels the world attending conferences and negotiations trying to convince governments and big companies to make promises that will protect the environment. She also advises communities affected by environmental damage on how to use the law to defend their rights.

(Photo: Jane Serwanga (left) and Niranjali Amerasinghe)

Lawyers: Jane Serwanga and Niranjali Amerasinghe20150706

Lawyers from Kenya and Sri Lanka talk about using the law to change lives

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Jane Serwanga started her career with ambitions of being a high-earning commercial lawyer, but a revelation that the law can discriminate against women inspired her to enter women's rights law . Now she works with Equality Now, an international women's rights advocacy organisation. She might be working on a case defending the rights of one woman to inherit property or be safe from violence, but she and her colleagues will be thinking strategically about how to use that case to bring about changes in the law that benefit all women.

Niranjali Amerasinghe grew up in Sri Lanka during the country's civil war. She was inspired to become a lawyer after watching the role that the law played in attempts to resolve disputes and prevent further conflict. As the director of the Climate Change Program at the Centre for International Environmental Law in Washington DC, Niranjali travels the world attending conferences and negotiations trying to convince governments and big companies to make promises that will protect the environment. She also advises communities affected by environmental damage on how to use the law to defend their rights.

(Photo: Jane Serwanga (left) and Niranjali Amerasinghe)

Life In Extreme Conditions20171023

Two women who have lived and worked in some of the most extreme climates on earth

Pushing the limits in the name of science: Two women who have lived and worked in some of the most extreme conditions on earth talk to Kim Chakanetsa about the challenges of cold and dry conditions, the bonds they form on base, and what draws them back to these remote places.

Carolyn Graves is a Canadian meteorologist currently working for the British Antarctic Survey. In 2016 she travelled to the Halley Research Station in Antarctica. She was planning to spend a whole year there, carrying out meteorological observations and monitoring all the technical equipment. But after just six months the entire team were forced to abandon base, over fears of a growing crack in the ice shelf.

Violette Impellizzeri is an Italian astronomer who currently works at the ALMA observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert. She travels to base camp, which is 3,000m above sea level, about once every six weeks. The conditions are extreme - dry and remote - but the clear skies are ideal for the telescope, which provides unique research opportunities for scientists around the world.

L-Image and credit: Violette Impellizeri at the ALMA observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile. Credit: Cristian Pontoni.
R-Image: Carolyn Graves launching a balloon at the Halley Research Station in Antarctica. Credit: Kevin Hallam.

Pushing the limits in the name of science: Two women who have lived and worked in some of the most extreme conditions on earth talk to Kim Chakanetsa about the challenges of cold and dry conditions, the bonds they form on base, and what draws them back to these remote places.

Carolyn Graves is a Canadian meteorologist currently working for the British Antarctic Survey. In 2016 she travelled to the Halley Research Station in Antarctica. She was planning to spend a whole year there, carrying out meteorological observations and monitoring all the technical equipment. But after just six months the entire team were forced to abandon base, over fears of a growing crack in the ice shelf.

Violette Impellizzeri is an Italian astronomer who currently works at the ALMA observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert. She travels to base camp, which is 3,000m above sea level, about once every six weeks. The conditions are extreme - dry and remote - but the clear skies are ideal for the telescope, which provides unique research opportunities for scientists around the world.

L-Image and credit: Violette Impellizeri at the ALMA observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile.
R-Image: Carolyn Graves launching a balloon at the Halley Research Station in Antarctica. Credit: Kevin Hallam

Life in Extreme Conditions2017102320171029 (WS)

Two women who have lived and worked in some of the most extreme climates on earth

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Pushing the limits in the name of science: Two women who have lived and worked in some of the most extreme conditions on earth talk to Kim Chakanetsa about the challenges of cold and dry conditions, the bonds they form on base, and what draws them back to these remote places.

Carolyn Graves is a Canadian meteorologist currently working for the British Antarctic Survey. In 2016 she travelled to the Halley Research Station in Antarctica. She was planning to spend a whole year there, carrying out meteorological observations and monitoring all the technical equipment. But after just six months the entire team were forced to abandon base, over fears of a growing crack in the ice shelf.

Violette Impellizzeri is an Italian astronomer who currently works at the ALMA observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert. She travels to base camp, which is 3,000m above sea level, about once every six weeks. The conditions are extreme - dry and remote - but the clear skies are ideal for the telescope, which provides unique research opportunities for scientists around the world.

L-Image and credit: Violette Impellizeri at the ALMA observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile. Credit: Cristian Pontoni.
R-Image: Carolyn Graves launching a balloon at the Halley Research Station in Antarctica. Credit: Kevin Hallam.

Life in Extreme Conditions20171023

Two women who have lived and worked in some of the most extreme climates on earth

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Pushing the limits in the name of science: Two women who have lived and worked in some of the most extreme conditions on earth talk to Kim Chakanetsa about the challenges of cold and dry conditions, the bonds they form on base, and what draws them back to these remote places.

Carolyn Graves is a Canadian meteorologist currently working for the British Antarctic Survey. In 2016 she travelled to the Halley Research Station in Antarctica. She was planning to spend a whole year there, carrying out meteorological observations and monitoring all the technical equipment. But after just six months the entire team were forced to abandon base, over fears of a growing crack in the ice shelf.

Violette Impellizzeri is an Italian astronomer who currently works at the ALMA observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert. She travels to base camp, which is 3,000m above sea level, about once every six weeks. The conditions are extreme - dry and remote - but the clear skies are ideal for the telescope, which provides unique research opportunities for scientists around the world.

L-Image and credit: Violette Impellizeri at the ALMA observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile. Credit: Cristian Pontoni.
R-Image: Carolyn Graves launching a balloon at the Halley Research Station in Antarctica. Credit: Kevin Hallam.

Life In The Circus: Anastasia Iv And Sarah Schwarz2015083120150905 (WS)

Running away to the circus: a Polish hair-hanger and German wire walker discuss their act

Anastasia IV from Poland joined the circus at eighteen. She performs one of the most risky and unusual acts in the circus: hair-hanging. Anastasia endures pain in her scalp and neck as she swings around the auditorium suspended by a metal ring which is plaited into her hair. She says it's 'the closest you can get to actually flying like a bird'

Sarah Swarz grew up in a circus family in Germany and started performing at the age of ten. She trained as a wire walker, contortionist and acrobat. She and her husband live in a trailer and travel with their Piglet Circus where her pig Max, is the 'boss of the show' - he can use a microphone and is trained to undo her clothes for a striptease routine.

Anastasia IV (r) (credit: Circus of Horrors)

Sarah Schwarz (l) (credit: Jessica Ford)

Life in the Circus: Anastasia IV and Sarah Schwarz2015083120150905 (WS)

Running away to the circus: a Polish hair-hanger and German wire walker discuss their act

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Anastasia IV from Poland joined the circus at eighteen. She performs one of the most risky and unusual acts in the circus: hair-hanging. Anastasia endures pain in her scalp and neck as she swings around the auditorium suspended by a metal ring which is plaited into her hair. She says it's 'the closest you can get to actually flying like a bird'

Sarah Swarz grew up in a circus family in Germany and started performing at the age of ten. She trained as a wire walker, contortionist and acrobat. She and her husband live in a trailer and travel with their Piglet Circus where her pig Max, is the 'boss of the show' - he can use a microphone and is trained to undo her clothes for a striptease routine.

Anastasia IV (r) (credit: Circus of Horrors)
Sarah Schwarz (l) (credit: Jessica Ford)

Life in the Circus: Anastasia IV and Sarah Schwarz20150831

Running away to the circus: a Polish hair-hanger and German wire walker discuss their act

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Anastasia IV from Poland joined the circus at eighteen. She performs one of the most risky and unusual acts in the circus: hair-hanging. Anastasia endures pain in her scalp and neck as she swings around the auditorium suspended by a metal ring which is plaited into her hair. She says it's 'the closest you can get to actually flying like a bird'

Sarah Swarz grew up in a circus family in Germany and started performing at the age of ten. She trained as a wire walker, contortionist and acrobat. She and her husband live in a trailer and travel with their Piglet Circus where her pig Max, is the 'boss of the show' - he can use a microphone and is trained to undo her clothes for a striptease routine.

Anastasia IV (r) (credit: Circus of Horrors)
Sarah Schwarz (l) (credit: Jessica Ford)

Living with Apes in the Wild: Emily Otali and Lone Nielsen2015042720150502 (WS)

City women who moved to the wilds of Uganda and Borneo to rescue and research great apes

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Emily Otali is a primatologist from Uganda. She's been told that she's the first black African woman to earn a PhD in the subject. On an early field trip she broke the rules and made direct eye-contact with a female chimpanzee, but that was the moment she 'fell in love' and found her vocation. Emily's job now is to observe a community of chimpanzees in Uganda's Kibale National Park and study their behaviour from dawn to sunset, and from birth until death. She says there's a deeper purpose to the work:- "we also study them to understand ourselves: where we have come from and where we're going in the future." Emily gave up her social life in Kampala for a comparatively lonely, but beautiful, forest life. She's also living apart from one of her children who is at school in the city. Despite some initial misgivings her parents and family now support her career choice and she tells others to be sure to choose a job they love because "if you don't like it, you'll never be happy."

Lone Nielsen left behind a 10-year career as an air hostess and turned her habit of volunteering at a research project for orangutans in Borneo into her life's work. Lone is the founder of Nyaru Menteng Rescue Centre which now looks after around 600 orangutans who've been orphaned, displaced or mistreated. The aim of the Centre is to 'educate' the apes so they can return to the wild and start a new population. She describes how, for eight years, her own house on the Indonesian island was home to between 6 and 36 orphaned baby orangutans who needed through-the-night care either needing milk, their diapers changed, or comfort if their nightmares woke them. She says: "I became the substitute mother and I didn't get a lot of sleep at the time." In her time working with orangutans Lone says she's observed gender traits in their behaviour which are so similar to humans, "it's scary." She says male apes often "take the easy way out" and are less industrious than the females. Lone also talks about "the kindest soul I've ever met" - an orangutan called Alma whose death she describes as the hardest thing that ever happened to her.

Presenter: Kim Chakanetsa
Picture: Emily Otali with a chimpanzee (Left) Credit: Pamela Otali; and Lone Nielsen with an orangutan ((Right). BPI Björn Vaugn / Save the Orangutan

Living with Apes in the Wild: Emily Otali and Lone Nielsen20150427

City women who moved to the wilds of Uganda and Borneo to rescue and research great apes

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Emily Otali is a primatologist from Uganda. She's been told that she's the first black African woman to earn a PhD in the subject. On an early field trip she broke the rules and made direct eye-contact with a female chimpanzee, but that was the moment she 'fell in love' and found her vocation. Emily's job now is to observe a community of chimpanzees in Uganda's Kibale National Park and study their behaviour from dawn to sunset, and from birth until death. She says there's a deeper purpose to the work:- "we also study them to understand ourselves: where we have come from and where we're going in the future." Emily gave up her social life in Kampala for a comparatively lonely, but beautiful, forest life. She's also living apart from one of her children who is at school in the city. Despite some initial misgivings her parents and family now support her career choice and she tells others to be sure to choose a job they love because "if you don't like it, you'll never be happy."

Lone Nielsen left behind a 10-year career as an air hostess and turned her habit of volunteering at a research project for orangutans in Borneo into her life's work. Lone is the founder of Nyaru Menteng Rescue Centre which now looks after around 600 orangutans who've been orphaned, displaced or mistreated. The aim of the Centre is to 'educate' the apes so they can return to the wild and start a new population. She describes how, for eight years, her own house on the Indonesian island was home to between 6 and 36 orphaned baby orangutans who needed through-the-night care either needing milk, their diapers changed, or comfort if their nightmares woke them. She says: "I became the substitute mother and I didn't get a lot of sleep at the time." In her time working with orangutans Lone says she's observed gender traits in their behaviour which are so similar to humans, "it's scary." She says male apes often "take the easy way out" and are less industrious than the females. Lone also talks about "the kindest soul I've ever met" - an orangutan called Alma whose death she describes as the hardest thing that ever happened to her.

Presenter: Kim Chakanetsa
Picture: Emily Otali with a chimpanzee (Left) Credit: Pamela Otali; and Lone Nielsen with an orangutan ((Right). BPI Björn Vaugn / Save the Orangutan

Living With Elephants: Saba Douglas-Hamilton and Sangduen 'Lek' Chailert2015092820151003 (WS)

Two elephant conservationists share tales of their intelligence, empathy and tempers

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Sangduen 'Lek' Chailert comes from the small hill tribe village of Baan Lao in northern Thailand. At a young age she heard the screams of an elephant that was being forced to work in terrible conditions for the logging industry. Lek felt compelled to help it. Although she had no training she bought some medicine and soon she was being called upon to treat other local elephants. She later formed the Save Elephant Foundation to advocate for the rights of these animals in Thailand and the Elephant Nature Park, a protected area where rescued elephants receive protection and form new herds. Lek says that rebuilding an elephant's trust in humans can be a challenge - 'they never forget' - but she's found a novel technique: singing them lullabies.

Saba Douglas-Hamilton was born in Kenya where her father worked as a prominent elephant conservationist. In fact she says she was 'baptised in elephant's breath' as her mother introduced her to wild elephants when she was a baby. Today she works for the charity her family started, Save the Elephants, which researches their behaviour and works with local people to promote human-elephant co-existence. She once feared for her life when she woke in the night to find a wild bull elephant towering over her mattress. Unperturbed by this, she says 'I find elephants endlessly fascinating…We recognise in them, and they recognise in us, a parallel intelligence'.

(L) Saba Douglas-Hamilton. Credit: Sam Gracey
(R) Sangduen 'Lek' Chailert. Credit: Save Elephant Foundation

Living With Elephants: Saba Douglas-Hamilton and Sangduen 'Lek' Chailert20150928

Two elephant conservationists share tales of their intelligence, empathy and tempers

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Sangduen 'Lek' Chailert comes from the small hill tribe village of Baan Lao in northern Thailand. At a young age she heard the screams of an elephant that was being forced to work in terrible conditions for the logging industry. Lek felt compelled to help it. Although she had no training she bought some medicine and soon she was being called upon to treat other local elephants. She later formed the Save Elephant Foundation to advocate for the rights of these animals in Thailand and the Elephant Nature Park, a protected area where rescued elephants receive protection and form new herds. Lek says that rebuilding an elephant's trust in humans can be a challenge - 'they never forget' - but she's found a novel technique: singing them lullabies.

Saba Douglas-Hamilton was born in Kenya where her father worked as a prominent elephant conservationist. In fact she says she was 'baptised in elephant's breath' as her mother introduced her to wild elephants when she was a baby. Today she works for the charity her family started, Save the Elephants, which researches their behaviour and works with local people to promote human-elephant co-existence. She once feared for her life when she woke in the night to find a wild bull elephant towering over her mattress. Unperturbed by this, she says 'I find elephants endlessly fascinating…We recognise in them, and they recognise in us, a parallel intelligence'.

(L) Saba Douglas-Hamilton. Credit: Sam Gracey
(R) Sangduen 'Lek' Chailert. Credit: Save Elephant Foundation

Living With Elephants: Saba Douglas-hamilton And Sangduen 'lek' Chailert2015092820151003 (WS)

Two elephant conservationists share tales of their intelligence, empathy and tempers

Sangduen 'Lek' Chailert comes from the small hill tribe village of Baan Lao in northern Thailand. At a young age she heard the screams of an elephant that was being forced to work in terrible conditions for the logging industry. Lek felt compelled to help it. Although she had no training she bought some medicine and soon she was being called upon to treat other local elephants. She later formed the Save Elephant Foundation to advocate for the rights of these animals in Thailand and the Elephant Nature Park, a protected area where rescued elephants receive protection and form new herds. Lek says that rebuilding an elephant's trust in humans can be a challenge - 'they never forget' - but she's found a novel technique: singing them lullabies.

Saba Douglas-Hamilton was born in Kenya where her father worked as a prominent elephant conservationist. In fact she says she was 'baptised in elephant's breath' as her mother introduced her to wild elephants when she was a baby. Today she works for the charity her family started, Save the Elephants, which researches their behaviour and works with local people to promote human-elephant co-existence. She once feared for her life when she woke in the night to find a wild bull elephant towering over her mattress. Unperturbed by this, she says 'I find elephants endlessly fascinating…We recognise in them, and they recognise in us, a parallel intelligence'.

(L) Saba Douglas-Hamilton. Credit: Sam Gracey

(R) Sangduen 'Lek' Chailert. Credit: Save Elephant Foundation

Make-up Artists20170306

Two female make-up artists on how paint, powder and oil can create characters.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two leading female make-up artists speak to Kim Chakanetsa on the power of powder to create looks, moods and characters.

Alex Box is a British internationally-renowned fashion make-up artist. Her work is artistic, colourful and unique. Alex's background is in fine art, and she uses that as an inspiration to constantly push the boundaries of her work.

Charu Khurana is the first official female make-up artist in Bollywood. She spent years fighting against an informal ban on women working in the film industry across India. Charu is now one of the few professionals in her field to be trained in handling prosthetics.

Image: (L) Charu Khurana (credit: N/A) and (R) Alex Box (credit: Elizabeth Hoff)

Making Movies: Chika Anadu and Shonali Bose20150323

The blood, sweat and tears of being an independent film-maker, in India and Nigeria

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Chika Anadu is a self-taught film-maker who wrote, produced and directed her first feature film, the acclaimed B for Boy, in 2013. After studying law in the UK she went back to her home country Nigeria to shoot her film - a contemporary drama which reflects the tension between modern and traditional values in middle-class family life in Lagos. Its central character is a female TV producer who is under pressure to have a baby boy. Chika says, "you tell the stories that you know... I'm Nigerian, I'm Igbo...but I feel that what affects me most is the fact that I'm a woman." Chika also talks about her choice not to go to film school and how she dealt with major financial and technical problems on her set.

Shonali Bose is an independent film-maker from India who sees her art as a form of social activism. She has most recently directed Margarita, With a Straw - a coming-of-age movie about a young woman with cerebral palsy. Shonali says finding funding is always a challenge, "the discrimination is such that if it is a woman-led film, it is very hard to find money and I think that is not just the case in India". Her advice to aspiring directors is to get experience on film-sets and to work extremely hard. She talks about combining motherhood with movie-making and sees her two feature films as her 'non-human' children!

(Photo: Chika Anadu (left), Credit: Restless Talent ; Shonali Bose (right), Credit: Shonali Bose)

Making Sex Work Safer: Daisy Nakato and Catherine Healy2016090520160910 (WS)

Sex workers turned campaigners from Uganda and New Zealand

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two women whose aim is to make sex work safer in Uganda and New Zealand join Kim Chakanetsa to exchange experiences.

Daisy Nakato is the founder of WONETHA, a sex workers' rights and support organisation in Kampala, Uganda. She says she chose to go into sex work at 17, but did face many challenges including violence from clients and running from the police. She is now building a better relationship with the police, which she hopes will lead to a reduction in violence against sex workers, but for her decriminalisation is the ultimate goal. Daisy is also HIV positive, and her project encourages sex workers to get tested and then supports them in controlling the spread of the disease.

New Zealander Catherine Healy went from teaching in a school to sex work in a massage parlour in her thirties. She says this was an empowering choice for her, but she was appalled at the lack of any protections for her profession, which was then illegal. So she formed the New Zealand Prostitutes Collective and led a long campaign to decriminalise all forms of sex work. This law was passed in 2003 and gives full employment rights to sex workers, and Catherine says the police are now partners in keeping sex workers safe.

Making Sex Work Safer: Daisy Nakato and Catherine Healy20160905

Sex workers turned campaigners from Uganda and New Zealand

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Two women whose aim is to make sex work safer in Uganda and New Zealand join Kim Chakanetsa to exchange experiences.

Daisy Nakato is the founder of WONETHA, a sex workers' rights and support organisation in Kampala, Uganda. She says she chose to go into sex work at 17, but did face many challenges including violence from clients and running from the police. She is now building a better relationship with the police, which she hopes will lead to a reduction in violence against sex workers, but for her decriminalisation is the ultimate goal. Daisy is also HIV positive, and her project encourages sex workers to get tested and then supports them in controlling the spread of the disease.

New Zealander Catherine Healy went from teaching in a school to sex work in a massage parlour in her thirties. She says this was an empowering choice for her, but she was appalled at the lack of any protections for her profession, which was then illegal. So she formed the New Zealand Prostitutes Collective and led a long campaign to decriminalise all forms of sex work. This law was passed in 2003 and gives full employment rights to sex workers, and Catherine says the police are now partners in keeping sex workers safe.

Making Sex Work Safer: Daisy Nakato And Catherine Healy2016090520160911 (WS)

Two women whose aim is to make sex work safer in Uganda and New Zealand join Kim Chakanetsa to exchange experiences.

Daisy Nakato is the founder of WONETHA, a sex workers' rights and support organisation in Kampala, Uganda. She says she chose to go into sex work at 17, but did face many challenges including violence from clients and running from the police. She is now building a better relationship with the police, which she hopes will lead to a reduction in violence against sex workers, but for her decriminalisation is the ultimate goal. Daisy is also HIV positive, and her project encourages sex workers to get tested and then supports them in controlling the spread of the disease.

New Zealander Catherine Healy went from teaching in a school to sex work in a massage parlour in her thirties. She says this was an empowering choice for her, but she was appalled at the lack of any protections for her profession, which was then illegal. So she formed the New Zealand Prostitutes Collective and led a long campaign to decriminalise all forms of sex work. This law was passed in 2003 and gives full employment rights to sex workers, and Catherine says the police are now partners in keeping sex workers safe.

Sex workers turned campaigners from Uganda and New Zealand

Martial Artists: Norma Foster and Nat\u00e1lia Falavigna20151102

A Scottish karate referee and a Brazilian taekwondo champion share their experiences

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Norma Foster from Scotland discovered karate in her teens when her male friends began taking classes and using Japanese words that were strange to her. She decided to start learning herself but when it came to competitions she found herself the only woman in the room. She wasn't deterred and after spending eight years in Tokyo studying karate she now has a sixth degree black belt. Norma became the first female referee at the World Karate Federation, but her career was not without obstacles: on one occasion a competition was shut down because a member of the referee committee claimed that women were not allowed to judge male athletes. Now she wants to increase the number of women referees at all levels of the sport.

Natália Falavigna from Brazil knew she wanted to be an Olympic athlete from the age of four. She tried several sports before finding taekwondo. When her teacher told her he could make her a world champion she realised she'd found what she wanted to do for the rest of her life. She enjoys the 'explosive' nature of taekwondo which involves high-energy kicking and spinning, and the challenge of mastering her emotions during a fight. In 2004 she achieved her dream of competing in the Olympics, coming fourth place. Then in 2008 she won bronze at the Summer Olympics, becoming the first Brazilian to win an Olympic medal in taekwondo.

Picture: Norma Foster (Right) and Natália Falavigna (Left)
Picture credits: Peter Stoddart (Right) /Fausto Roim (Left)

Martial Artists: Norma Foster And Natlia Falavigna20151102

Norma Foster from Scotland discovered karate in her teens when her male friends began taking classes and using Japanese words that were strange to her. She decided to start learning herself but when it came to competitions she found herself the only woman in the room. She wasn't deterred and after spending eight years in Tokyo studying karate she now has a sixth degree black belt. Norma became the first female referee at the World Karate Federation, but her career was not without obstacles: on one occasion a competition was shut down because a member of the referee committee claimed that women were not allowed to judge male athletes. Now she wants to increase the number of women referees at all levels of the sport.

Natália Falavigna from Brazil knew she wanted to be an Olympic athlete from the age of four. She tried several sports before finding taekwondo. When her teacher told her he could make her a world champion she realised she'd found what she wanted to do for the rest of her life. She enjoys the 'explosive' nature of taekwondo which involves high-energy kicking and spinning, and the challenge of mastering her emotions during a fight. In 2004 she achieved her dream of competing in the Olympics, coming fourth place. Then in 2008 she won bronze at the Summer Olympics, becoming the first Brazilian to win an Olympic medal in taekwondo.

Picture: Norma Foster (Right) and Natália Falavigna (Left)

Picture credits: Peter Stoddart (Right) /Fausto Roim (Left)

A Scottish karate referee and a Brazilian taekwondo champion share their experiences

Matchmakers

Is there a secret formula for finding love and marriage? Two modern-day matchmakers working within the Jewish community and the Hindu community share their unique insights into dating and relationships.

Aleeza Ben Shalom is a Jewish-American matchmaker based in Philadelphia, USA, who describes herself as a love coach for marriage-minded singles. Her approach is not necessarily to find someone a match herself, but to give them the tools they might need to find a potential partner, mainly through a series of coaching sessions. She works within the Jewish community, and enjoys matching older singles through her business Marriage Minded Mentor.

Geeta Khanna is an Indian matchmaker based in Delhi who tries to bridge the divide between the expectations of traditional parents and the modern desires of her clients. While many Indians are now using dating apps like Tinder and Shaadi, Geeta thinks there is still room for her personal services. Her agency Cocktail Matches serves an affluent Hindu community. She says she works with people of all ages, but in India it can be hard to find a match if you've been divorced.

(L) Aleeza Ben Shalom (credit: Yehudis Goldfarb)
(R) Geeta Khanna (credit: Vijay Kumar Gupta)

Matchmakers20180305

Is there a secret formula for finding love and marriage? Two modern-day matchmakers working within the Jewish community and the Hindu community share their unique insights into dating and relationships.

Aleeza Ben Shalom is a Jewish-American matchmaker based in Philadelphia, USA, who describes herself as a love coach for marriage-minded singles. Her approach is not necessarily to find someone a match herself, but to give them the tools they might need to find a potential partner, mainly through a series of coaching sessions. She works within the Jewish community, and enjoys matching older singles through her business Marriage Minded Mentor.

Geeta Khanna is an Indian matchmaker based in Delhi who tries to bridge the divide between the expectations of traditional parents and the modern desires of her clients. While many Indians are now using dating apps like Tinder and Shaadi, Geeta thinks there is still room for her personal services. Her agency Cocktail Matches serves an affluent Hindu community. She says she works with people of all ages, but in India it can be hard to find a match if you've been divorced.

(L) Aleeza Ben Shalom (credit: Yehudis Goldfarb)
(R) Geeta Khanna (credit: Vijay Kumar Gupta)

Matchmakers20180305

Two women who've dedicated their lives to helping people find love and marriage

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Matchmakers20180305

Two women who've dedicated their lives to helping people find love and marriage

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Is there a secret formula for finding love and marriage? Two modern-day matchmakers working within the Jewish community and the Hindu community share their unique insights into dating and relationships.

Aleeza Ben Shalom is a Jewish-American matchmaker based in Philadelphia, USA, who describes herself as a love coach for marriage-minded singles. Her approach is not necessarily to find someone a match herself, but to give them the tools they might need to find a potential partner, mainly through a series of coaching sessions. She works within the Jewish community, and enjoys matching older singles through her business Marriage Minded Mentor.

Geeta Khanna is an Indian matchmaker based in Delhi who tries to bridge the divide between the expectations of traditional parents and the modern desires of her clients. While many Indians are now using dating apps like Tinder and Shaadi, Geeta thinks there is still room for her personal services. Her agency Cocktail Matches serves an affluent Hindu community. She says she works with people of all ages, but in India it can be hard to find a match if you've been divorced.

(L) Aleeza Ben Shalom (credit: Yehudis Goldfarb)
(R) Geeta Khanna (credit: Vijay Kumar Gupta)

Maths Is Fun20170703

Two women who transmit their love of maths to others

Calculator tricks and baking cakes - how two female mathematicians help people have fun with maths.

Eugenia Cheng's aim is to rid the world of 'math phobia' and she uses baking to explain complex mathematical ideas to the general public, via her books and YouTube channel. For instance, she makes puff pastry to reveal how exponential growth works. Eugenia has taught Pure Mathematics at universities in the UK, France and US and is currently Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her most recent book is called Beyond Infinity: An Expedition to the Outer Limits of the Mathematical Universe.

Sara Santos engages the unsuspecting public in maths through a kind of street performance. Originally from Portugal, Sara now runs a company called Maths Busking in the UK, and tours festivals, schools and corporate events wearing a yellow top hat and doing maths for people's amusement. Her 'tricks' include tying people up with ropes and guessing their birthdays. Sara says the idea that only very clever people are good at maths is rubbish; anyone can do it.

(L) Image and credit: Eugenia Cheng
(R) Image: Sara Santos. Credit: Paul Clarke

Maths is Fun2017070320170709 (WS)

Two women who transmit their love of maths to others

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Calculator tricks and baking cakes - how two female mathematicians help people have fun with maths.

Eugenia Cheng's aim is to rid the world of 'math phobia' and she uses baking to explain complex mathematical ideas to the general public, via her books and YouTube channel. For instance, she makes puff pastry to reveal how exponential growth works. Eugenia has taught Pure Mathematics at universities in the UK, France and US and is currently Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her most recent book is called Beyond Infinity: An Expedition to the Outer Limits of the Mathematical Universe.

Sara Santos engages the unsuspecting public in maths through a kind of street performance. Originally from Portugal, Sara now runs a company called Maths Busking in the UK, and tours festivals, schools and corporate events wearing a yellow top hat and doing maths for people's amusement. Her 'tricks' include tying people up with ropes and guessing their birthdays. Sara says the idea that only very clever people are good at maths is rubbish; anyone can do it.

(L) Image and credit: Eugenia Cheng
(R) Image: Sara Santos. Credit: Paul Clarke

Maths is Fun20170703

Two women who transmit their love of maths to others

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Calculator tricks and baking cakes - how two female mathematicians help people have fun with maths.

Eugenia Cheng's aim is to rid the world of 'math phobia' and she uses baking to explain complex mathematical ideas to the general public, via her books and YouTube channel. For instance, she makes puff pastry to reveal how exponential growth works. Eugenia has taught Pure Mathematics at universities in the UK, France and US and is currently Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her most recent book is called Beyond Infinity: An Expedition to the Outer Limits of the Mathematical Universe.

Sara Santos engages the unsuspecting public in maths through a kind of street performance. Originally from Portugal, Sara now runs a company called Maths Busking in the UK, and tours festivals, schools and corporate events wearing a yellow top hat and doing maths for people's amusement. Her 'tricks' include tying people up with ropes and guessing their birthdays. Sara says the idea that only very clever people are good at maths is rubbish; anyone can do it.

(L) Image and credit: Eugenia Cheng
(R) Image: Sara Santos. Credit: Paul Clarke

Mayors: Annise Parker and Chhavi Rajawat20150223

From India and the USA, women who gave up corporate careers to change their communities

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Annise Parker is the mayor of Houston, Texas, the oil and gas capital of America. She once worked in this industry, but says her day job was supporting her "volunteer habit" and eventually gave it up to serve her community full-time. Annise climbed the rungs of local government to become the first openly gay mayor of a major US city in 2010. Her election caused an international media frenzy because of her sexuality. "The perception was Houston was a very conservative, sort of backwards place that wouldn't allow that to happen", but Annise says she used the coverage as an opportunity to talk about her city in a new way. Annise describes being a mayor as the best political job you can have, she was recently voted the seventh best in the world, but is sad about the lack of women wanting to take up this position.

Chhavi Rajawat also gave up a high-flying corporate career in India to run for elected office. She has an MBA and worked in the telecoms industry, until she was asked by villagers from her ancestral home, Soda in Rajasthan, to run for the position of sarpanch, or local mayor. Chhavi has used her business savvy to attract funds from the private sector to help provide clean water, electricity and build toilets. She says, "if I were just to depend on government funding I don't think I'd be able to do what I've been able to do in these five years." She's been credited with changing the face of rural India because of her achievements. Chhavi says for her "every day is a Monday", people queue up at her front door early morning and late at night to discuss their issues.

(Photo: Mayor Annise Parker and Sarpanch Chhavi Rajawat)

Mechanics: Patrice Banks and Sandra Aguebor2016061320160618 (WS)

Nigeria's first 'lady mechanic' with an 'auto airhead' turned car mechanic from the US

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Patrice Banks says she was an 'auto airhead' before she fell in love with fixing vehicles. She was an engineer for a big chemicals company, but despite her passion for problem solving she avoided her own car maintenance and preferred to pay a man to do it. The Philadelphia born mechanic discovered that many other women felt the same way and decided to do something about it. Patrice started work in a garage, went back to school and set up Girls Auto Clinic to help women feel more connected with their cars.

Nigerian Sandra Aguebor got her first job in a car repair shop aged 13 and has never looked back. Sandra did not let the jokes and jeers about being a girl doing this job get to her. Now Sandra is famous for being Nigeria's first female mechanic and has run her own garage, Sandex Car Care, for 20 years. She also leads the Lady Mechanic Initiative, which trains women to work with cars.

(Photo: (L) Patrice Banks. Credit: Girls Auto Clinic. (R) Sandra Aquebor. Credit: Lady Mechanic Initiative)

Mechanics: Patrice Banks and Sandra Aguebor20160613

Nigeria's first 'lady mechanic' with an 'auto airhead' turned car mechanic from the US

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Patrice Banks says she was an 'auto airhead' before she fell in love with fixing vehicles. She was an engineer for a big chemicals company, but despite her passion for problem solving she avoided her own car maintenance and preferred to pay a man to do it. The Philadelphia born mechanic discovered that many other women felt the same way and decided to do something about it. Patrice started work in a garage, went back to school and set up Girls Auto Clinic to help women feel more connected with their cars.

Nigerian Sandra Aguebor got her first job in a car repair shop aged 13 and has never looked back. Sandra did not let the jokes and jeers about being a girl doing this job get to her. Now Sandra is famous for being Nigeria's first female mechanic and has run her own garage, Sandex Car Care, for 20 years. She also leads the Lady Mechanic Initiative, which trains women to work with cars.

(Photo: (L) Patrice Banks. Credit: Girls Auto Clinic. (R) Sandra Aquebor. Credit: Lady Mechanic Initiative)

Mechanics: Patrice Banks And Sandra Aguebor2016061320160619 (WS)

Patrice Banks says she was an 'auto airhead' before she fell in love with fixing vehicles. She was an engineer for a big chemicals company, but despite her passion for problem solving she avoided her own car maintenance and preferred to pay a man to do it. The Philadelphia born mechanic discovered that many other women felt the same way and decided to do something about it. Patrice started work in a garage, went back to school and set up Girls Auto Clinic to help women feel more connected with their cars.

Nigerian Sandra Aguebor got her first job in a car repair shop aged 13 and has never looked back. Sandra did not let the jokes and jeers about being a girl doing this job get to her. Now Sandra is famous for being Nigeria's first female mechanic and has run her own garage, Sandex Car Care, for 20 years. She also leads the Lady Mechanic Initiative, which trains women to work with cars.

(Photo: (L) Patrice Banks. Credit: Girls Auto Clinic. (R) Sandra Aquebor. Credit: Lady Mechanic Initiative)

Nigeria's first 'lady mechanic' with an 'auto airhead' turned car mechanic from the US

Midwives: Esther Madudu and Eija Pessinen20150413

Guiding pregnant women and delivering babies in Uganda and Finland

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Esther Madudu is a midwife working in rural Uganda. She was six years old when she witnessed her first birth - watching her grandmother assist labouring mothers inspired Esther to follow in her footsteps. Electricity and running water can be in short supply in the communities she works in and when the lights go out Esther has had to improvise by holding a mobile phone torch in her mouth "to see where the baby was coming out from, or where the bleeding was coming from". She says there are many challenges to overcome in this job, but her passion for it keeps her going and Esther has become the face of a global campaign calling for more midwives in Africa.

Eija Pessinen has had a very different experience to Esther, she works as a midwife in Finland, which is routinely ranked as one of the best places in the world to give birth. The standard of facilities and care are very high, but Eija says the salaries need to improve - "we earn less than a butcher". Eija is proud to have delivered 4000 babies, "the ones that I've delivered are kind of mine, although they are not mine" and says she feels "empowered" to have provided maternity care to 20,000 mothers. Eija won the European Union Prize for Women Innovators in 2009, for inventing Relaxbirth - a system aimed at making labour easier both for women and midwives.

Migrants: Cynthia Masiyiwa and Mahboba Rawi2015081720150822 (WS)

Leaving Zimbabwe and Afghanistan, two migrants discuss belonging to two cultures.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Mahboba Rawi was a teenager when the Soviet-Afghan War broke out. She led protests against Soviet control in her high school. After she was nearly arrested, she decided to flee the country. Along with millions of others, Mahboba made the ten day walk to the border with Pakistan, not knowing whether she would ever see the relatives she was leaving behind again. Eventually, she married an Afghan-Australian man and settled with him in Australia. Life took another tragic turn when her son drowned in an accident. His death moved her to set up her own charity, Mahboba's Promise which supports impoverished children and widows in Afghanistan.

Cynthia Masiyiwa left Zimbabwe ten years ago when the country was in political and economic crisis. Worried for her future, her parents sent her to live with her sister in the UK. Cynthia thought the UK would be a "land of opportunities", but she quickly experienced several setbacks. She disliked the cold climate, the "frosty" behaviour of Londoners - and then her mother died. As the only black student in her class, Cynthia was shocked to experience racism; in fact she jokes that running from bullies helped her become a 'champion sprinter'. Later she gained the confidence to challenge the prejudices of her peers and eventually her classmates became her allies. Now she works for Citizens UK helping other young migrants to navigate the immigration system and even persuading the government to improve it.

(Photo: Cynthia Masiyiwa. Credit: Cynthia Masiyiwa)
(Photo: Mahboba Rawi. Credit: Rob Tuckwell Photography)

Migrants: Cynthia Masiyiwa and Mahboba Rawi20150817

Leaving Zimbabwe and Afghanistan, two migrants discuss belonging to two cultures.

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Mahboba Rawi was a teenager when the Soviet-Afghan War broke out. She led protests against Soviet control in her high school. After she was nearly arrested, she decided to flee the country. Along with millions of others, Mahboba made the ten day walk to the border with Pakistan, not knowing whether she would ever see the relatives she was leaving behind again. Eventually, she married an Afghan-Australian man and settled with him in Australia. Life took another tragic turn when her son drowned in an accident. His death moved her to set up her own charity, Mahboba's Promise which supports impoverished children and widows in Afghanistan.

Cynthia Masiyiwa left Zimbabwe ten years ago when the country was in political and economic crisis. Worried for her future, her parents sent her to live with her sister in the UK. Cynthia thought the UK would be a "land of opportunities", but she quickly experienced several setbacks. She disliked the cold climate, the "frosty" behaviour of Londoners - and then her mother died. As the only black student in her class, Cynthia was shocked to experience racism; in fact she jokes that running from bullies helped her become a 'champion sprinter'. Later she gained the confidence to challenge the prejudices of her peers and eventually her classmates became her allies. Now she works for Citizens UK helping other young migrants to navigate the immigration system and even persuading the government to improve it.

(Photo: Cynthia Masiyiwa. Credit: Cynthia Masiyiwa)
(Photo: Mahboba Rawi. Credit: Rob Tuckwell Photography)

Migrants: Cynthia Masiyiwa And Mahboba Rawi2015081720150822 (WS)

Mahboba Rawi was a teenager when the Soviet-Afghan War broke out. She led protests against Soviet control in her high school. After she was nearly arrested, she decided to flee the country. Along with millions of others, Mahboba made the ten day walk to the border with Pakistan, not knowing whether she would ever see the relatives she was leaving behind again. Eventually, she married an Afghan-Australian man and settled with him in Australia. Life took another tragic turn when her son drowned in an accident. His death moved her to set up her own charity, Mahboba's Promise which supports impoverished children and widows in Afghanistan.

Cynthia Masiyiwa left Zimbabwe ten years ago when the country was in political and economic crisis. Worried for her future, her parents sent her to live with her sister in the UK. Cynthia thought the UK would be a "land of opportunities", but she quickly experienced several setbacks. She disliked the cold climate, the "frosty" behaviour of Londoners - and then her mother died. As the only black student in her class, Cynthia was shocked to experience racism; in fact she jokes that running from bullies helped her become a 'champion sprinter'. Later she gained the confidence to challenge the prejudices of her peers and eventually her classmates became her allies. Now she works for Citizens UK helping other young migrants to navigate the immigration system and even persuading the government to improve it.

(Photo: Cynthia Masiyiwa. Credit: Cynthia Masiyiwa)

(Photo: Mahboba Rawi. Credit: Rob Tuckwell Photography)

Leaving Zimbabwe and Afghanistan, two migrants discuss belonging to two cultures.

Missing Relatives: Luz Villamil And Visaka Dharmadasa2015100520151010 (WS)

A sister and a mother explain why grief is constant when a relative goes missing

Kim Chakanetsa presents a conversation between two women from different cultures about their paths to success.

Visaka Dharmadasa is a celebrated Sri Lankan peace activist whose son went missing in action in 1998, while fighting for the Sri Lankan army against Tamil Tiger rebels. She won a landmark case against the government to get DNA checks done to trace missing soldiers and she works with mothers from both sides of the conflict, Tamils and Sinhalese, for a peaceful future. Visaka's work and her belief that her son is still alive keep her sane; she still keeps the chocolates in the freezer, that she bought for him 15 years ago, waiting for his return.

Luz Villamil is Colombian Palestinian. Her father was kidnapped by Farc left wing guerrillas in 1998, but released after 81 days. Luz's family's joy was short lived as two years later her brother went missing from a Colombian seaside resort. His disappearance has remained a mystery and they have no clues, only rumour and speculation. Luz hopes her brother is hearing the messages her family sends out on a Colombian radio show that features relatives of kidnapped and missing people.

Left: Luz Villam