The Corrections

The Corrections revisits four news stories which left the public with the wrong idea about what really happened, and investigates how and why the narrative went awry.

Episodes

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0101Olive The Poppy Seller2019092020191126 (R4)When 92-year-old Olive Cooke took her own life in 2015 the story seemed clear. A kindly and vulnerable old woman had been taken advantage of by grasping charities and had killed herself when she could give no more.

The Daily Mail ran with ‘Hounded to Death’. ‘Killed by Kindness’ was The Sun’s headline. Olive’s story was covered by tabloids, broadsheets and TV and radio news programmes. It even prompted government action. But the story was wrong.

Produced and presented by Jo Fidgen and Chloe Hadjimatheou

The Corrections re-visits four news stories which left the public with an incomplete picture of what really happened.

The Corrections is the series which looks at how journalists tell news stories.

News stories which left the public with the wrong idea about what really happened.

The Daily Mail ran with ‘Hounded to Death’. ‘Killed by Kindness’ was The Sun’s headline. Olive’s story was covered by tabloids, broadsheets and TV and radio news programmes. It even prompted government action. But the story was wrong.

Produced and presented by Jo Fidgen and Chloe Hadjimatheou

0102What Really Happened In Balcombe?2019092720191127 (R4)In 2013 the West Sussex village of Balcombe was the site of a showdown between anti-fracking protestors and the energy company Cuadrilla. Fracking – or hydraulic fracturing – involves pumping water, sand and chemicals into rock at high pressure to fracture it and release oil or gas that’s trapped there. It’s controversial. “The children of Balcombe say no to fracking!” chanted the protestors, including celebrities who turned up in support. The ‘Battle of Balcombe’ became one of the biggest stories that summer. The only problem? There was no fracking at Balcombe.

But, in fact, there was no fracking in Balcombe that summer.

So why did the "battle" there become such a significant national news story?

Produced and presented by Jo Fidgen and Chloe Hadjimatheou.
Editor: Richard Knight

The Corrections re-visits four new stories which left the public with an incomplete picture about what really happened.

In 2013 the West Sussex village of Balcombe was the site of a showdown between anti-fracking protesters and the energy company Cuadrilla. Fracking – or hydraulic fracturing – involves pumping water, sand and chemicals into rock at high pressure to fracture it and release oil or gas that’s trapped there. It’s controversial.

The Corrections is the series which looks at how journalists tell news stories.

News stories which left the public with the wrong idea about what really happened.

The Corrections re-visits four new stories which left the public with an incomplete picture about what really happened.

So why did the "battle" there become such a significant national news story?

Produced and presented by Jo Fidgen and Chloe Hadjimatheou.

0103The Brexit Murder?2019100420191128 (R4)In August 2016 Arkadiuz Joswik - known to his friends as Arek - was attacked and killed in a shopping precinct in Harlow where he’d stopped for a late night snack. Arek was Polish and the idea took hold that he had been killed by racists who were somehow empowered by the Brexit referendum earlier that summer. But was this really an anti-immigrant hate crime?

The Corrections re-visits four news stories which left the public with an incomplete picture of what really happened.

Produced and presented by Jo Fidgen and Chloe Hadjimatheou

The Corrections is the series which looks at how journalists tell news stories.

News stories which left the public with the wrong idea about what really happened.

Produced and presented by Jo Fidgen and Chloe Hadjimatheou

0104 LASTThe Carbonara Case20191011The Corrections re-visits four news stories which left the public with an incomplete picture of what really happened.

In August 2017, The Times published a piece with the headline ‘Christian child forced into Muslim foster care’. The story was front-page news the next day as well - and the next – but was it right?

Produced and presented by Jo Fidgen and Chloe Hadjimatheou

The Corrections is the series which looks at how journalists tell news stories.

News stories which left the public with the wrong idea about what really happened.

In August 2017, The Times published a piece with the headline ‘Christian child forced into Muslim foster care’. The story was front-page news the next day as well - and the next – but was it right?

Produced and presented by Jo Fidgen and Chloe Hadjimatheou

0201Trojan Horse: The Anonymous Letter20201106News stories which left the public with the wrong idea about what really happened.

News stories that left the public with the wrong idea about what really happened.

In 2014 an anonymous letter was sent to journalists detailing a 5 step plan to Islamise schools in Birmingham. The so-called Trojan Horse Affair sparked hundreds of articles and several investigations. But the letter was not all it seemed. The Corrections asks, what was going on behind the headlines?

Presenter Jo Fidgen speaks to key players, reporters and media watchers about how the coverage measured up to the reality. How did a local education story become a national security issue? And what dilemmas do journalists face when in receipt of an anonymous tip-off?

In a 3-part series, Jo explores how two incompatible narratives developed; how the controversial word ‘extremism’ entered the fray; and what the affair revealed about Britishness. Narrative consultant John Yorke is on hand to explain how storytelling techniques possibly influenced the direction the Trojan Horse story took, and why – in the end – we hear only the version that supports our tribe.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Editor: Emma Rippon

Revisiting the Birmingham Trojan Horse Affair to see what was really behind the headlines

0202Trojan Horse: The Kingpin20201113The Corrections revisits one of the most controversial news stories of recent years to see how journalists told it and how they could have told it differently.

In March 2014, The Sunday Times broke the story of the Trojan Horse Affair about an alleged plot to Islamise schools in Birmingham and beyond. It named as the ‘kingpin’ a local Ofsted inspector, Tahir Alam. He was later banned from governing schools. But is he the villain or the hero of this story?

In this episode, Jo Fidgen learns about Tahir Alam’s backstory to see how that changes our understanding of his role in this story. And a Muslim women’s rights campaigner reveals what she was hearing from teachers and parents behind the scenes, and how that challenges the narrative reported in the mainstream press.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Editor: Emma Rippon

Every story needs a villain

News stories that left the public with the wrong idea about what really happened.

0203Trojan Horse: Brit-ish?20201120The Trojan Horse Affair was one of the most divisive news stories of recent years, a supposed plot by Islamists to take over schools in Birmingham. The Corrections has been exploring how journalists told it and how they could have told it differently.

In this final episode, Jo Fidgen considers its impact. The Education Secretary Michael Gove responded by making it compulsory for schools in England and Wales to promote British values, including democracy, the rule of law and mutual respect. Undermining those values became grounds for prohibiting someone from managing a school.

The list of values generated a lot of debate and left some British Asians wondering whether they were really at home in the UK.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Editor: Emma Rippon

What the Trojan Horse Affair revealed about how to be British

News stories that left the public with the wrong idea about what really happened.