Cultural Frontline, The [world Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20180310 ()

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

20170610

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Why is the house of American civil rights hero Rosa Parks now in a German suburb? Her niece, Rhea McCauley, who grew up in the house, explains its' importance and artist Ryan Mendoza describes how he saved it from demolition in Detroit and moved it, piece by piece, to his back garden in Berlin.

As Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel the Handmaid's Tale is adapted for TV, Mona Eltahawy, the author of 'Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution', argues that it depicts reality for millions of women.

The subjugation of young women is also explored by the sculptor Peju Alatise whose work is presently on show in the Nigerian pavilion at the Venice Biennale. She describes the inspiration for her art work "Flying Girls" which portrays eight life-sized sculptures of a young woman with wings.

Hay El-Matar, a thrice-weekly radio drama currently broadcast on the BBC Arabic service, has been recorded in English to be aired in the UK. Boz Temple-Morris, the series producer, and Hussam Sharwany who plays Ghaly, a character who runs the local mini-market and makes daily announcements on a megaphone, discuss why it’s important to reflect the reality of people living in Syria today.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Picture: Ryan Mendoza and Rhea McCauley in front of Rosa Parks House in Berlin. Credit: Fabia Mendoza

20170617

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Why has the new Wonder Woman superhero movie been banned from cinemas in Lebanon? We hear about the campaign to boycott the film starring Israeli actress Gal Gadot and speak to political analyst Halim Shebaya in Beirut and Hollywood screenwriter Kamran Pasha in LA, on their arguments for and against the boycott and the ban.

The Turkish author Ece Temelkuran shares her concerns on how the increased powers of President Erdogan will impact on a generation of Turkish women.

As the far right AFD or Alternative for Germany party seeks to enter the national parliament for the first time in September's German elections, we hear why a play called Fear by theater director Falk Richter provoked legal action from a member of the AFD.

With Tina Daheley

Photo: Gal Gadot in Wonder Woman Credit: 2017Warner Bros. Entertainment and Ratpac Entertainment LLC

20170708

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Caine Prize for African Writing is a powerful springboard for new writers. Tina Daheley speaks to this year's winner Bushra al-Fadil, and shortlisted finalist Magogodi oaMphela Makhene.

German-Egyptian singer Merit Ariane Stephanos talks about adapting the seminal feminist novel ‘Women at Point Zero’ by Egyptian activist Nawal El Saadai for the stage.

Close to the Arctic circle, under a shadow of full moon we meet the Icelandic artists Ragnar Helgi Olafson and Dagur Hjartarson burning their own work in an act of poetic defiance.

And from Argentina, writer Mariana Enriquez on how witnessing police brutality in her country against young people, fuels her to twist fact into fiction and horror.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Caine Prize winner 2017 Bushra al-Fadil. Credit: Caine Prize for African Writing)

20170715

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The video artist Maria Marshall frequently features her children in her work and now she’s being threatened by conspiracy theorists in the US who have branded her a paedophile and believe her work is connected to the fabricated Pizzagate scandal. She describes what it’s like to be falsely accused.

When Njambi McGrath arrived in Britain from Kenya she was shocked by how Africa as a continent was portrayed. She says it’s only seen as suffering war, famine or Ebola. Now she has channelled that frustration into a comedy routine called ‘Breaking Black’ about what it’s like to be a black woman living in the UK today.

The Standing Rock demonstrations, which aimed to shut down the Dakota Access oil pipeline, attracted the attention of the world. Now museums are opening exhibitions reacting to the growing interest in Native American culture. We hear how one artist who was there, Cannupa Hanska Luger, is responding.

Despite dodging bombs in Damascus, and death threats from ISIS, Ahmad Joudeh was determined to become a ballet dancer. Then he caught the eye of the artistic director of the Dutch National Ballet and his dream came true.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Picture of Maria Marshall. Credit: Maria Marshall.)

20170722

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Comedy often ventures where no other artistic medium dares.

Stand up comedians are used to straddling the line between funny and offensive. But as Germany upholds its ban of a comedian’s satirical poem mocking Turkish President Erdogan, and Facebook promises to hire 3,000 extra human moderators to capture offensive content, it begs the question - can we still take a joke? Navigating the line between funny and offensive, ground-breaking Indian comedian Aditi Mittal and British sensation Shazia Mirza.

Over the course of 2017, Canada is celebrating turning 150. The anniversary marks the birth of the ‘Canadian Confederation’, the coming together of the British colonies of Canada, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. But for many native Canadians, they argue it denies their very existence. Despite the backlash, Cree Indian folk icon Buffy Sainte Marie explains why she believes performing at the birthday celebrations is a chance for change.

Growing up in Beirut amidst the aftermath of civil war, female MC Malikah took to the stage when she was just 16. She is proof of the city’s rich underground hip hop movement. But as political unrest continues, there are few opportunities for Lebanon’s emerging artists beyond street level. However for Malikah, who’s now keeping company with Snoop Dogg, rapping in Arabic is one way she believes she can promote her country on the international stage.

And finally to South Korea. Koreans are huge consumers of digital media. But according to TV comedian Lee Young Joo, despite being able to boast the fastest internet on the planet, the country's high level of connectedness is yet to penetrate a culturally conservative landscape. Lee Young Joo explains how as a comedian he is attempting to challenging the status quo.

Photo : Comedian Aditi Mittal

20170729

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

As the BBC celebrates the contribution that lesbian and gay people have made to popular culture and the arts, we acknowledge the many LGBTQ artists around the world for whom coming out in their work is a dangerous thing to do.

‘Rainbow Riots’ is an album which features LGBTQ artists from countries all over the world; including Uganda where homosexuality is a crime. Musician Kowa Tigs, from Kampala, and Swedish music producer Petter Wallenberg discuss how adversity can encourage creativity.

At this year’s Pride parade in London, India’s first LGBTQ choir, Rainbow Voices Mumbai, joined forces with the UK-based Pink Singers. It was a bold statement that drew attention to the fact that India still criminalises same-sex relationships under a law introduced by the British under colonial rule. Simon Pearson and Ashish Pandya talk about the courage that comes from the gay community supporting each other worldwide.

In February the American playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney won an Oscar for co-writing Moonlight a film which explores the experiences of gay black men and which he based on his own childhood in Miami. He explains why ‘Paris is Burning’, a documentary film which captures the US underground drag scene in the 1980’s, was a source of great comfort as a young man.

Scottee is an artist who describes himself as “fat and working class, with a penchant for ladies clothes? His work addresses what it is to be an outsider; whether because of race, class, age or sexuality. His new art installation ‘You Are Not Alone’ is currently on show in Southend on Sea in England and aims to sum up the reality of being queer in Britain.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Picture: Gay man in Uganda. Copyright: Tania Marti

20170805

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Ramy Essam is an Egyptian musician who believes music can influence our view of the world. His song ‘Irhal’ became the anthem for the Arab Spring in 2011. This month he’s in Edinburgh, in Scotland, with his show ‘Ramy in the Frontline’. He explains why he believes music has the power to change minds.

There are more than one thousand comics from all over the world performing at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe this year. Many will be left leaning political comedians relishing the opportunities to take on the travails of the American President Donald Trump and the British Prime Minister Teresa May. But what about the handful of comedians who lean to the right politically? Leo Kearse, declares ‘I Can Make You Tory’ in his show, and Geoff Norcott describes himself as ‘Right-leaning But Well Meaning’, both reveal all.

Like the best comedy, Sujatro Ghosh’s photographs first make you smile and then feel uncomfortable when you realise the truth they are portraying. In a country where violence against women is growing, yet where in several states you can be sentenced to life imprisonment for slaughtering a cow, the 23-year-old photographer’s new project asks are cows in India treated better than women?

The Kenyan rapper MC Sharon, is one of only a few female hip hop artists and music producers in Africa. Her new song 'Kutupanga' , which can be loosely translated as 'lies and deceit' sends a message to corrupt politicians, and encourage people to vote wisely in the election due to be held on Tuesday.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Ramy Essam Photo credit: Val Denn

20170812

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

This week on the Cultural Frontline, guided by some of the Indian subcontinent’s finest contemporary artists we explore Partition, not as a historical event, but as an open wound.

Award winning authors, Pakistani novelist Kamila Shamsie and Indian writer Urvashi Butalia, both from families of Partition refugees, discuss how the legacy of independence continues to shape the cultural identity of both of their homelands.

Exploring the fallout of Partition across the generations, Indian graphic novelist Vishwajyoti Ghosh. His new anthology ‘This Side, That Side: Restorying Partition’ brings together comic artists, writers, and illustrators from across India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Two-time Oscar-winning filmmaker Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy takes us on a tour of her latest immersive exhibition ‘HOME1947'. Around 14 million people are thought to have been displaced with the birth of India and Pakistan. Chinoy’s exhibition brings a powerfully personal perspective to their collective story.

Author and activist Arundhati Roy discusses her new novel, ‘The Ministry of Utmost Happiness’ with BBC presenter Samira Ahmed. Arundhati explains how the characters in her new book reflect the enduring divisions of gender, caste and religion embedded within the fabric of her home country of India.

And finally, British Punjabi, DJ Swami, explores the spaces in between traditional Punjabi sounds and contemporary dance music with his latest composition, Partitions.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Wagah border post, Pakistan. Credit: Arif Ali / Stringer

20170819

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Michael Armitage is a Kenyan-British artist whose work combines materials and techniques from European and African traditions - layers of oil paint on Lubugo, a traditional bark fabric from Uganda. It explores themes from East African folklore, his own memory, and often responds to what’s going on in the news and current affairs of Kenya. We joined Michael at an opposition rally in the run-up to last week’s election in Kenya to see how it looked from a visual artist's point of view.

Ruth Behar is an anthropologist-turned-novelist who was born in Havana but grew up in New York after her family fled Cuba. Following Obama’s thawing of relations between Cuba and the US, she initiated a project for young writers from both countries to share stories with one another. As Trump talks about reversing Obama’s diplomatic efforts, what role now for Ruth’s bridge-building work?

André Naffis-Sahely is a poet with an Italian mother and Iranian father. He lives in Los Angeles now but he grew up in Abu Dhabi. His debut collection of poetry is called The Promised Land, and it offers glimpses of what life is like for different sections of society in the United Arab Emirates. They’re unflinching observations of the disparities between comfortable expat professionals and temporary migrant workers. The book also charts his own search for a place to call home.

Mamela Nyamza is a South African dancer and choreographer trained in classical ballet, modern dance, African dance, jazz, mime - even Butoh, a traditional Japanese form of dance theatre. She also happens to be a lesbian, and being gay in South Africa can be very dangerous indeed. She talks to us about the prevalence of homophobia in her country, and how she’s using her art to fight back, and change minds.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Artist Michael Armitage films supporters at the final election rally of the National Super Alliance opposition coalition in Nairobi, Kenya. Credit: Anthony Irungu

20170826

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

In the week of another tragic bomb attack in Kabul, singer Aryana Sayeed defied clerics and conservatives to stage a pop concert in the capital, celebrating Afghan Independence Day. The ‘Kim Kardashian of Kabul’ tells us why she believes in bringing music back to her home country and how her lyrics aim to give women a voice.

Does body armour make you a safer or braver artist on the streets of Kabul? Performance artist Kubra Khademi reflects on the act of provocation and protection that set out to reclaim public space for Afghan women but ultimately sent her into hiding.

An absent father, a terminal illness and a sweet tooth in Trinidad and Tobago: the ingredients for the short story The Sweet Sop, which won this year’s Commonwealth Short Story Prize. Author Ingrid Persaud tells Tina how she drew on personal experience and the legacy of the Caribbean’s colonial past in her writing.

And the Egyptian man, born a woman, whose transgender journey also transcended borders and language. Adam Kashmiry speaks to Tina from the Edinburgh Festival, where he’s currently starring in the play Adam, based on his own transformative story.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Photo: Singer Aryana Sayeed performs on stage in Kabul Credit: BBC/ Alia Rajai

20170902

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Should a divisive, traumatising sculpture have been dismantled?

‘Scaffold’, a sculpture by white American artist Sam Durant, was intended to explore America’s relationship with capital punishment. A faithful replica of seven hangman’s gallows, the work reflects the execution of 38 Dakota Indians in 1862, in what was the largest government-sanctioned mass-hanging in U.S. history. When erected by a prestigious art gallery in Minnesota, in full sight of Dakota land, protestors called the work insensitive - even, for some, an act of cultural appropriation. We hear from the artist Sam Durant as to why he’s decided to give the rights to the work over to the Dakota community, and the lessons he’s learned. And in discussion Kate Beane, historian and member of the Dakota community, is joined by Svetlana Mintcheva from the National Coalition Against Censorship to discuss who has the right to portray a traumatic past.

Also this week, 80 years on from the brutal bombing of the Basque town of Guernica, how has Picasso’s mural, painted within weeks of the bombing, created such a universal and lasting legacy?

With Tina Daheley

Photo: Protests against the artwork 'Scaffold' at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, U.S.A. Credit: Alamy

20170909

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

As residents of Texas and Louisiana begin to pick up the pieces of the destruction wrought by Hurricane Harvey, we find out the cultural cost of the storm. We speak to Dean Gladden, the Managing Director of the AlleyTheater, one of the oldest resident theaters the US, and Adam Wagner, former actor, now an arts consultant who is co-ordinating a grassroots fundraising campaign.

Is comedy a threat to authoritarian regimes? Bassem Youssef, a heart surgeon turned comedian who is often called the ‘Jon Stewart of Egypt’, launched a satirical TV show in Egypt after the fall of President Mubarak in 2011. It quickly became the most popular TV show in the nation’s history with nightly audiences of 30 million, but also made him a target of the authorities. Youssef’s story is the subject of a new documentary Tickling Giants. He talks about the power of comedy to hold autocrats to account, whoever they may be.

Toilet: A Love Story is a Bollywood blockbuster with a difference, dealing with an issue never tackled before in Bollywood- India’s problem with open defecation. How much influence can such a film have in changing attitudes?

Presenter:Tina Daheley
Producer: Shoku Amirani

Photo: Theatre district of Houston flooded. Credit: THOMAS B. SHEA, Getty Images

20170916

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Tina Daheley is joined by Lagos Comic Con founder, Ayodele Elegba, to talk comics, characters and costumes coming together for the convention billed as ‘Africa’s biggest Geek event.’ Also, what might American publisher Marvel's first Nigerian superhero mean for the home-grown Nigerian comic book scene?

We take a tour of The Angkor Panorama, a mysterious museum showcasing North Korean art in Cambodia and Tina talks to Song Byeok, a propaganda artist-turned-satirist, who defected from North to South Korea.

From Kolkata, writer Sandip Roy explores the limits of satire through the work of the Indian comedians who keep pushing their politicians to take a joke.

Also, Tina talks to Niviaq Korneliussen about her novel Homo Sapienne, which caused controversy with its candid take on Greenland’s challenging social issues.

Photo: An image from the Voyager Comic Credit: Spoof Media

20170930

Two Catalan cultural figures discuss the divisive issue of the disputed independence referendum in Catalonia. Despite being on opposite sides of the debate, Isona Passola, a film producer and president of the Catalan Academy of Cinema and the novelist Eduardo Mendoza, winner of the prestigious Cervantes Prize, remain firm friends.

Jacky-Oh Weinhaus, of the spoof political party Drag for Germany, reflects on using the art of drag to promote tolerance and democracy during the German election campaign.

Poet Naomi Shihab Nye re-visits the poem she wrote ten years ago about a chance meeting in an airport, which has resurfaced on social media in light of President Donald Trump’s travel ban.

And Maysaloun Hamoud, the Palestinian film director under fatwa for her film In Between, about the lives and loves of three young women sharing a flat in Tel Aviv.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Image: Catalan flag and ballot paper in the disputed Catalan independence referendum Credit: Pau Barrena/ AFP/ Getty Images

20171007

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

As Angola chooses a new president, João Lourenço, award-winning Angolan artist Kiluanji Kia Henda discusses how artists can interact with his country's recent violent history and politics.

Argentinian rapper Romina Bernardo, better known as Chocolate Remix, talks about taking Reggaeton music, which is known for its sexist and homophobic overtones, and remixing it for a feminist, gender-fluid audience in Buenos Aires, the gay capital of South America.

Male circumcision is the backdrop of a new feature film called The Wound, South Africa’s submission for the foreign-language Oscar. The film’s star is South African singer, songwriter and author, Nakhane. He explains why he's defying traditionalists to expose the issue of botched adult male circumcisions, the result of a traditional manhood initiation ritual practised by the Xhosa tribe.

And Bijan Khalili, owner of the Ketab bookshop in the heart of Los Angeles, which is home to a huge Iranian diaspora, talks about getting around censorship of books in Iran by publishing and selling banned Persian books since 1981.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Paul Waters

(Photo: Kiluanji Kia Henda. Credit: Muamby Wassaky)

20171014

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

A new documentary film called 'Chauka, Please tell us the time' gives an insider’s view of the treatment of inmates at Australia’s controversial Manus Island detention centre, who are mostly asylum seekers that have arrived on boats. We speak to the Iranian producer and co-director Arash Kamali Sarvestani who approached an Iranian inmate on the Island, Behrouz Boochani, to make shot the film in secret on his smartphone.

A landmark court ruling in Osaka which states that only a qualified doctor can apply tattoos, has left Japan’s tattoo industry facing an uncertain future. We hear from Hori Benny a tattoo artist in Osaka and Yoshimi Yamamoto, Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Tsuru University in Japan about the implications of the ruling for Japanese culture and the changing attitudes towards this art form in a conservative society.

This year’s PEN Pinter Prize, the renowned Irish poet Michael Longley, speaks about a poet's role in times of unrest and turmoil and the impact of conflict on children.

Presnter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Shoku Amirani

A new documentary film called 'Chauka, Please tell us the time' gives an insider’s view of the treatment of inmates at Australia’s controversial Manus Island detention centre, who are mostly asylum seekers that have arrived on boats. We speak to the Iranian producer and co-director Arash Kamali Sarvestani who approached an Iranian inmate on the Island, Behrouz Boochani, to make shot the film in secret on his smartphone.

The British Zambian poet Kayo Chingonyi settled in Britain when he was just 6 years old and started writing when he was 10. He talks about searching for his identity in the space between these two cultures, and how questions around rites of passage from boyhood to manhood have inspired his first full collection of poetry Kumukanda.

A landmark court ruling in Osaka which states that only a qualified doctor can apply tattoos, has left Japan’s tattoo industry facing an uncertain future. We hear from Hori Benny a tattoo artist in Osaka and Yoshimi Yamamoto, Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Tsuru University in Japan about the implications of the ruling for Japanese culture and the changing attitudes towards this art form in a conservative society.

This year’s PEN Pinter Prize, the renowned Irish poet Michael Longley, speaks about a poet's role in times of unrest and turmoil and the impact of conflict on children.

Presnter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Shoku Amirani

20171021

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Tina Daheley talks to digital artist Fida al-Hussan about creating empowering art in Saudi Arabia at a time of social change. Fida’s viral music video Hwages puts women in the driving seat and it is a sight that could soon become commonplace, after Saudi women won the right to drive in September 2017.

Kurdish street photographer Saman Ali, tells us why he chooses to capture the details of people’s everyday lives rather than the war and destruction. Following Liberia’s Presidential Elections, we find out why some of the nation’s biggest pop musicians are writing hit songs for presidential candidates.

Plus, two of the cast of the critically acclaimed play The Fall, tell us how they created a show inspired by their involvement in South Africa’s #RhodesMustFall student protests.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: Still image from music video Hwages Photo Credit: Fida Al Hussan)

2018031720180318 ()

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

20180421

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

20180714

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

2018072120180722 (WS)
20180723 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

20180811

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

20180825

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

2018082520180826 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

2018082520180827 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

2018092920180930 (WS)
20181001 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

20181013

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

2018101320181014 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

2018101320181015 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

2018101320181014 (WS)
20181015 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

20181103

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

2018110320181104 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

#metoo: Challenging Sexual Harrassment In Nollywood And Bollywood20171111

How are Nollywood and Bollywood responding to sexual harassment in Hollywood?

As Hollywood continues to react to the allegations of sexual harassment and assault against film mogul Harvey Weinstein and other leading stars, we speak to two leading film-makers, Nigeria’s Tope Oshin and India’s Rahul Aggarwal about the culture of harassment and exploitation within their countries’ film industries, Nollywood and Bollywood.

In the light of the United States and Israel’s withdrawal from Unesco we speak to Italian writer Marco d'Eramo and French planner Francis Engelmann about the impact the cultural organisation has in two very different parts of the world.

Plus we head to Kenya, where we take a peek behind the scenes of the hit Kenyan satirical comedy show XYZ and meet its production team, including head writer Loi Awat and producer Edward Khaemba, as they prepare its final programme in the run up to the recent Kenyan presidential elections.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: #Me too and #Balancetonporc ('expose your pig') on the hand of a protester. Credit: Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images)

#MeToo: Challenging Sexual Harrassment in Nollywood and Bollywood2017111120171112 (WS)

How are Nollywood and Bollywood responding to sexual harassment in Hollywood?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As Hollywood continues to react to the allegations of sexual harassment and assault against film mogul Harvey Weinstein and other leading stars, we speak to two leading film-makers, Nigeria’s Tope Oshin and India’s Rahul Aggarwal about the culture of harassment and exploitation within their countries’ film industries, Nollywood and Bollywood.

In the light of the United States and Israel’s withdrawal from Unesco we speak to Italian writer Marco d'Eramo and French planner Francis Engelmann about the impact the cultural organisation has in two very different parts of the world.

Plus we head to Kenya, where we take a peek behind the scenes of the hit Kenyan satirical comedy show XYZ and meet its production team, including head writer Loi Awat and producer Edward Khaemba, as they prepare its final programme in the run up to the recent Kenyan presidential elections.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: #Me too and #Balancetonporc ('expose your pig') on the hand of a protester. Credit: Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images)

#MeToo: Challenging Sexual Harrassment in Nollywood and Bollywood2017111120171113 (WS)

How are Nollywood and Bollywood responding to sexual harassment in Hollywood?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As Hollywood continues to react to the allegations of sexual harassment and assault against film mogul Harvey Weinstein and other leading stars, we speak to two leading film-makers, Nigeria’s Tope Oshin and India’s Rahul Aggarwal about the culture of harassment and exploitation within their countries’ film industries, Nollywood and Bollywood.

In the light of the United States and Israel’s withdrawal from Unesco we speak to Italian writer Marco d'Eramo and French planner Francis Engelmann about the impact the cultural organisation has in two very different parts of the world.

Plus we head to Kenya, where we take a peek behind the scenes of the hit Kenyan satirical comedy show XYZ and meet its production team, including head writer Loi Awat and producer Edward Khaemba, as they prepare its final programme in the run up to the recent Kenyan presidential elections.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: #Me too and #Balancetonporc ('expose your pig') on the hand of a protester. Credit: Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images)

#MeToo: Challenging Sexual Harrassment in Nollywood and Bollywood20171111

How are Nollywood and Bollywood responding to sexual harassment in Hollywood?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As Hollywood continues to react to the allegations of sexual harassment and assault against film mogul Harvey Weinstein and other leading stars, we speak to two leading film-makers, Nigeria’s Tope Oshin and India’s Rahul Aggarwal about the culture of harassment and exploitation within their countries’ film industries, Nollywood and Bollywood.

In the light of the United States and Israel’s withdrawal from Unesco we speak to Italian writer Marco d'Eramo and French planner Francis Engelmann about the impact the cultural organisation has in two very different parts of the world.

Plus we head to Kenya, where we take a peek behind the scenes of the hit Kenyan satirical comedy show XYZ and meet its production team, including head writer Loi Awat and producer Edward Khaemba, as they prepare its final programme in the run up to the recent Kenyan presidential elections.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: #Me too and #Balancetonporc ('expose your pig') on the hand of a protester. Credit: Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images)

#mlk50: America After His Dream2018033120180401 (WS)
20180402 (WS)

Remembering the cultural legacy of Dr Martin Luther King Jr

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Dr Martin Luther King Jr once had a dream that his children "would one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Fifty years on from his assassination, we speak to the artists working to keep the spirit of Dr King and his dream alive.

We head to Dr King’s home city of Atlanta, where the award-winning radio presenter Rose Holmes Scott speaks to Atlanta's citizens about his legacy.

The gospel and soul legend Mavis Staples shares her memories of Dr King.

The actor and playwright, Anna Deavere Smith discusses Notes From The Field, her one woman show, which brings to life the stories of ordinary Americans among them current and former inmates, protesters, educators and politicians.

We hear from the radical revolutionary artist Dread Scott on the power of protest art and how he creates work that speaks out against the oppression in the age of #blacklivesmatter.

Presented by Rose Scott.

(Photo: Residents march in a Martin Luther King Jr Day parade Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Dr Martin Luther King Jr once had a dream that his children “would one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Fifty years on from his assassination, we speak to the artists working to keep the spirit of Dr King and his dream alive.

We head to Dr King’s home city of Atlanta, where the award winning radio presenter Rose Holmes Scott speaks to Atlanta's citizens about his legacy.

The gospel and soul legend Mavis Staples shares her memories of Dr King.

The actor and playwright, Anna Deavere Smith discusses Notes From The Field, her one woman show, which brings to life the stories of ordinary Americans among them current and former inmates, protesters, educators and politicians.

We hear from the radical revolutionary artist Dread Scott on the power of protest art and how he creates work that speaks out against the oppression in the age of #blacklivesmatter.

Presented by Rose Scott.

(Photo: Residents march in a Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade Photo credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

#MLK50: America after his Dream2018033120180401 (WS)

Remembering the cultural legacy of Dr Martin Luther King Jr

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Dr Martin Luther King Jr once had a dream that his children "would one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Fifty years on from his assassination, we speak to the artists working to keep the spirit of Dr King and his dream alive.

We head to Dr King’s home city of Atlanta, where the award-winning radio presenter Rose Holmes Scott speaks to Atlanta's citizens about his legacy.

The gospel and soul legend Mavis Staples shares her memories of Dr King.

The actor and playwright, Anna Deavere Smith discusses Notes From The Field, her one woman show, which brings to life the stories of ordinary Americans among them current and former inmates, protesters, educators and politicians.

We hear from the radical revolutionary artist Dread Scott on the power of protest art and how he creates work that speaks out against the oppression in the age of #blacklivesmatter.

Presented by Rose Scott.

(Photo: Residents march in a Martin Luther King Jr Day parade Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

#MLK50: America After his Dream2018033120180401 (WS)

Remembering the cultural legacy of Dr Martin Luther King Jr

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Dr Martin Luther King Jr once had a dream that his children "would one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character”.

Fifty years on from his assassination, we speak to the artists working to keep the spirit of Dr King and his dream alive. We head to Dr King’s home city of Atlanta, where the award-winning radio presenter Rose Scott speaks to Atlanta's citizens about his legacy.

The gospel and soul legend Mavis Staples shares her memories of Dr King. Plus, actor and playwright, Anna Deavere Smith discusses Notes From The Field, her one woman show, which brings to life the stories of ordinary Americans among them current and former inmates, protesters, educators and politicians.

We hear from the radical revolutionary artist Dread Scott on the power of protest art and how he creates work that speaks out against oppression in the age of #blacklivesmatter.

Presenter: Rose Scott.

(Photo: Residents march in a Martin Luther King Jr Day parade Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

#MLK50: America after his Dream2018033120180402 (WS)

Remembering the cultural legacy of Dr Martin Luther King Jr

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Dr Martin Luther King Jr once had a dream that his children "would one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Fifty years on from his assassination, we speak to the artists working to keep the spirit of Dr King and his dream alive.

We head to Dr King’s home city of Atlanta, where the award-winning radio presenter Rose Holmes Scott speaks to Atlanta's citizens about his legacy.

The gospel and soul legend Mavis Staples shares her memories of Dr King.

The actor and playwright, Anna Deavere Smith discusses Notes From The Field, her one woman show, which brings to life the stories of ordinary Americans among them current and former inmates, protesters, educators and politicians.

We hear from the radical revolutionary artist Dread Scott on the power of protest art and how he creates work that speaks out against the oppression in the age of #blacklivesmatter.

Presented by Rose Scott.

(Photo: Residents march in a Martin Luther King Jr Day parade Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

#MLK50: America After his Dream2018033120180402 (WS)

Remembering the cultural legacy of Dr Martin Luther King Jr

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Dr Martin Luther King Jr once had a dream that his children "would one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character”.

Fifty years on from his assassination, we speak to the artists working to keep the spirit of Dr King and his dream alive. We head to Dr King’s home city of Atlanta, where the award-winning radio presenter Rose Scott speaks to Atlanta's citizens about his legacy.

The gospel and soul legend Mavis Staples shares her memories of Dr King. Plus, actor and playwright, Anna Deavere Smith discusses Notes From The Field, her one woman show, which brings to life the stories of ordinary Americans among them current and former inmates, protesters, educators and politicians.

We hear from the radical revolutionary artist Dread Scott on the power of protest art and how he creates work that speaks out against oppression in the age of #blacklivesmatter.

Presenter: Rose Scott.

(Photo: Residents march in a Martin Luther King Jr Day parade Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

#MLK50: America after his Dream20180331

Remembering the cultural legacy of Dr Martin Luther King Jr

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Dr Martin Luther King Jr once had a dream that his children "would one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Fifty years on from his assassination, we speak to the artists working to keep the spirit of Dr King and his dream alive.

We head to Dr King’s home city of Atlanta, where the award-winning radio presenter Rose Holmes Scott speaks to Atlanta's citizens about his legacy.

The gospel and soul legend Mavis Staples shares her memories of Dr King.

The actor and playwright, Anna Deavere Smith discusses Notes From The Field, her one woman show, which brings to life the stories of ordinary Americans among them current and former inmates, protesters, educators and politicians.

We hear from the radical revolutionary artist Dread Scott on the power of protest art and how he creates work that speaks out against the oppression in the age of #blacklivesmatter.

Presented by Rose Scott.

(Photo: Residents march in a Martin Luther King Jr Day parade Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

#MLK50: America After his Dream20180331

Remembering the cultural legacy of Dr Martin Luther King Jr

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Dr Martin Luther King Jr once had a dream that his children "would one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character”.

Fifty years on from his assassination, we speak to the artists working to keep the spirit of Dr King and his dream alive. We head to Dr King’s home city of Atlanta, where the award-winning radio presenter Rose Scott speaks to Atlanta's citizens about his legacy.

The gospel and soul legend Mavis Staples shares her memories of Dr King. Plus, actor and playwright, Anna Deavere Smith discusses Notes From The Field, her one woman show, which brings to life the stories of ordinary Americans among them current and former inmates, protesters, educators and politicians.

We hear from the radical revolutionary artist Dread Scott on the power of protest art and how he creates work that speaks out against oppression in the age of #blacklivesmatter.

Presenter: Rose Scott.

(Photo: Residents march in a Martin Luther King Jr Day parade Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

03/06/2017 Gmt20170603

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Russian Revolution was a time of great artistic creativity; from the brutality of Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago, to the horror of Solzhenitsyn’s The Gulag Archipelago. The BBC’s Alexander Kan and curator Katya Rogatchevskaia take us on a tour of the Hope, Tragedy, Myths exhibition at the British Library in London to examine its cultural legacy.

In Soviet Russia writers were seen as useful tools in the propaganda machine that supported the system, however since the breakup of the Union the demands on novelists has changed. Uzbek author and poet, Hamid Ismailov, considers the role of the writer in Uzbekistan.

What favourite food reminds you of home? Itab Azzam and Dina Mousawi are passionate cooks who set out to preserve Syria’s cuisine in their book ‘Syria – Recipes From Home’ and by doing so have captured the experiences of women in this conflict torn region.

In his exploration of what it means to be an Icelander, the author Sjon argues that his country should acknowledge the influence of the Nazi regime in the years leading up to the Second World War.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Angie Nehring

Photo: Propaganda poster Credit: The British Library

03/12/2016 Gmt2016120320161204 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

04/03/2017 Gmt2017030420170305 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

06/05/2017 Gmt20170506
07/01/2017 Gmt2017010720170108 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

10/03/201820180312 ()
20180311 ()

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

10/12/2016 Gmt2016121020161211 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

13/05/2017 Gmt20170513
15/04/2017 Gmt2017041520170416 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

17/03/201820180319 ()

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

17/12/2016 Gmt2016121720161218 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

18/03/2017 Gmt20170318

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

19/11/2016 Gmt2016111920161120 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

20/05/2017 Gmt20170520
24/12/2016 Gmt2016122420161225 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

25/02/2017 Gmt2017022520170226 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

27/05/2017 Gmt20170527
28/01/2017 Gmt2017012820170129 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

29/04/2017 Gmt20170429
A Cultural Vision for a New Zimbabwe2018081120180812 (WS)

What does the future hold for Zimbabwe, its people and its culture?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Following Zimbabwe’s historic elections The Cultural Frontline asks what the future holds for Zimbabwe, its culture and its people.

How do you make sense of a history unspoken? The writer Novuyo Rosa Tshuma discusses The House of Stone, her new novel that explores the tragedies and the conflicts of Zimbabwe’s past.

Now the vote is over, what comes next? The Chief Curator of the National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Raphael Chikukwa and the celebrated poet and singer, Albert Nyathi reflect on the elections and share their vision of how Zimbabwe can find a new purpose and identity through the power of arts and culture.

For nearly 40 years Zimbabwean life and culture was dominated by the image of one man, former President Robert Mugabe. The author Panashe Chigumadzi reflects on the omnipresence of Mugabe’s portrait and asks whether Zimbabweans can now find a new image to represent their nation.

Plus have you ever heard Chimurenga music? The musician Hope Masike explains how Zimbabwe’s music of protest has unified the country from the struggle for liberation to the new post-Mugabe era.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Nancy Bennie, Shoku Amirani and Brian Hungwe.

(Picture: People in Mbare celebrate after Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (ZEC) announced the re-election of President Emmerson Mnangagwa Picture Credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

A Cultural Vision for a New Zimbabwe2018081120180813 (WS)

What does the future hold for Zimbabwe, its people and its culture?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Following Zimbabwe’s historic elections The Cultural Frontline asks what the future holds for Zimbabwe, its culture and its people.

How do you make sense of a history unspoken? The writer Novuyo Rosa Tshuma discusses The House of Stone, her new novel that explores the tragedies and the conflicts of Zimbabwe’s past.

Now the vote is over, what comes next? The Chief Curator of the National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Raphael Chikukwa and the celebrated poet and singer, Albert Nyathi reflect on the elections and share their vision of how Zimbabwe can find a new purpose and identity through the power of arts and culture.

For nearly 40 years Zimbabwean life and culture was dominated by the image of one man, former President Robert Mugabe. The author Panashe Chigumadzi reflects on the omnipresence of Mugabe’s portrait and asks whether Zimbabweans can now find a new image to represent their nation.

Plus have you ever heard Chimurenga music? The musician Hope Masike explains how Zimbabwe’s music of protest has unified the country from the struggle for liberation to the new post-Mugabe era.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Nancy Bennie, Shoku Amirani and Brian Hungwe.

(Picture: People in Mbare celebrate after Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (ZEC) announced the re-election of President Emmerson Mnangagwa Picture Credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

A Cultural Vision for a New Zimbabwe20180811

What does the future hold for Zimbabwe, its people and its culture?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Following Zimbabwe’s historic elections The Cultural Frontline asks what the future holds for Zimbabwe, its culture and its people.

How do you make sense of a history unspoken? The writer Novuyo Rosa Tshuma discusses The House of Stone, her new novel that explores the tragedies and the conflicts of Zimbabwe’s past.

Now the vote is over, what comes next? The Chief Curator of the National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Raphael Chikukwa and the celebrated poet and singer, Albert Nyathi reflect on the elections and share their vision of how Zimbabwe can find a new purpose and identity through the power of arts and culture.

For nearly 40 years Zimbabwean life and culture was dominated by the image of one man, former President Robert Mugabe. The author Panashe Chigumadzi reflects on the omnipresence of Mugabe’s portrait and asks whether Zimbabweans can now find a new image to represent their nation.

Plus have you ever heard Chimurenga music? The musician Hope Masike explains how Zimbabwe’s music of protest has unified the country from the struggle for liberation to the new post-Mugabe era.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Nancy Bennie, Shoku Amirani and Brian Hungwe.

(Picture: People in Mbare celebrate after Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (ZEC) announced the re-election of President Emmerson Mnangagwa Picture Credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

A Tale of Defending Our Freedom Wins the Caine Prize 20172017070820170709 (WS)

Caine Prize winner Bushra al-Fadil warns of the relentless threats to our freedom

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Caine Prize for African Writing is a powerful springboard for new writers. Tina Daheley speaks to this year's winner Bushra al-Fadil, and shortlisted finalist Magogodi oaMphela Makhene.

German-Egyptian singer Merit Ariane Stephanos talks about adapting the seminal feminist novel ‘Women at Point Zero’ by Egyptian activist Nawal El Saadai for the stage.

Close to the Arctic circle, under a shadow of full moon we meet the Icelandic artists Ragnar Helgi Olafson and Dagur Hjartarson burning their own work in an act of poetic defiance.

And from Argentina, writer Mariana Enriquez on how witnessing police brutality in her country against young people, fuels her to twist fact into fiction and horror.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Caine Prize winner 2017 Bushra al-Fadil. Credit: Caine Prize for African Writing)

A Tale of Defending Our Freedom Wins the Caine Prize 201720170708

Caine Prize winner Bushra al-Fadil warns of the relentless threats to our freedom

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Caine Prize for African Writing is a powerful springboard for new writers. Tina Daheley speaks to this year's winner Bushra al-Fadil, and shortlisted finalist Magogodi oaMphela Makhene.

German-Egyptian singer Merit Ariane Stephanos talks about adapting the seminal feminist novel ‘Women at Point Zero’ by Egyptian activist Nawal El Saadai for the stage.

Close to the Arctic circle, under a shadow of full moon we meet the Icelandic artists Ragnar Helgi Olafson and Dagur Hjartarson burning their own work in an act of poetic defiance.

And from Argentina, writer Mariana Enriquez on how witnessing police brutality in her country against young people, fuels her to twist fact into fiction and horror.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Caine Prize winner 2017 Bushra al-Fadil. Credit: Caine Prize for African Writing)

All the World\u2019s a Stage2018071420180715 (WS)

What does it mean to perform, to stand before an audience and to share your art?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

What does it mean to perform, to stand before an audience and to share your story, your art, your voice? The Cultural Frontline explores the transformative power of performance.

The writer and poet Yrsa Daley-Ward reveals how writing and performing poetry has helped her come to terms with her upbringing, her sexuality and her mental-health battles, as recounted in her new memoir, The Terrible.

How do you give new meaning to an iconic feminist play? We find out why the ground breaking performer Nandar staged Myanmar’s first ever performance of The Vagina Monologues.

We head to one of Sao Paulo’s most notorious areas, Cracolandia or “land of crack” and meet the people behind an unconventional theatre company reaching out to drug addicts through drama.

Plus, the acclaimed opera star Danielle De Niese shares the story of the work of literature that inspired her to pursue a life of performance.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Performance of The Vagina Monologues in Myanmar. Credit: Rachel Briggs/BBC)

All the World\u2019s a Stage20180714

What does it mean to perform, to stand before an audience and to share your art?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

What does it mean to perform, to stand before an audience and to share your story, your art, your voice? The Cultural Frontline explores the transformative power of performance.

The writer and poet Yrsa Daley-Ward reveals how writing and performing poetry has helped her come to terms with her upbringing, her sexuality and her mental-health battles, as recounted in her new memoir, The Terrible.

How do you give new meaning to an iconic feminist play? We find out why the ground breaking performer Nandar staged Myanmar’s first ever performance of The Vagina Monologues.

We head to one of Sao Paulo’s most notorious areas, Cracolandia or “land of crack” and meet the people behind an unconventional theatre company reaching out to drug addicts through drama.

Plus, the acclaimed opera star Danielle De Niese shares the story of the work of literature that inspired her to pursue a life of performance.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Performance of The Vagina Monologues in Myanmar. Credit: Rachel Briggs/BBC)

All The World\u2019s A Stage2018071420180716 (WS)

What does it mean to perform, to stand before an audience and to share your art?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

What does it mean to perform, to stand before an audience and to share your story, your art, your voice? The Cultural Frontline explores the transformative power of performance.

The writer and poet Yrsa Daley-Ward reveals how writing and performing poetry has helped her come to terms with her upbringing, her sexuality and her mental-health battles, as recounted in her new memoir, The Terrible.

How do you give new meaning to an iconic feminist play? We find out why the ground breaking performer Nandar staged Myanmar’s first ever performance of The Vagina Monologues.

We head to one of Sao Paulo’s most notorious areas, Cracolandia or “land of crack” and meet the people behind an unconventional theatre company reaching out to drug addicts through drama.

Plus, the acclaimed opera star Danielle De Niese shares the story of the work of literature that inspired her to pursue a life of performance.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Performance of The Vagina Monologues in Myanmar. Credit: Rachel Briggs/BBC)

An Act Of Censorship Or Cultural Sensitivity?2017090220170903 (WS)

Should a divisive, traumatising sculpture have been dismantled?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Should a divisive, traumatising sculpture have been dismantled?

‘Scaffold’, a sculpture by white American artist Sam Durant, was intended to explore America’s relationship with capital punishment. A faithful replica of seven hangman’s gallows, the work reflects the execution of 38 Dakota Indians in 1862, in what was the largest government-sanctioned mass-hanging in U.S. history. When erected by a prestigious art gallery in Minnesota, in full sight of Dakota land, protestors called the work insensitive - even, for some, an act of cultural appropriation. We hear from the artist Sam Durant as to why he’s decided to give the rights to the work over to the Dakota community, and the lessons he’s learned. And in discussion Kate Beane, historian and member of the Dakota community, is joined by Svetlana Mintcheva from the National Coalition Against Censorship to discuss who has the right to portray a traumatic past.

Also this week, 80 years on from the brutal bombing of the Basque town of Guernica, how has Picasso’s mural, painted within weeks of the bombing, created such a universal and lasting legacy?

With Tina Daheley

Photo: Protests against the artwork 'Scaffold' at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, U.S.A. Credit: Alamy

An Act Of Censorship Or Cultural Sensitivity?20170902

Should a divisive, traumatising sculpture have been dismantled?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Should a divisive, traumatising sculpture have been dismantled?

‘Scaffold’, a sculpture by white American artist Sam Durant, was intended to explore America’s relationship with capital punishment. A faithful replica of seven hangman’s gallows, the work reflects the execution of 38 Dakota Indians in 1862, in what was the largest government-sanctioned mass-hanging in U.S. history. When erected by a prestigious art gallery in Minnesota, in full sight of Dakota land, protestors called the work insensitive - even, for some, an act of cultural appropriation. We hear from the artist Sam Durant as to why he’s decided to give the rights to the work over to the Dakota community, and the lessons he’s learned. And in discussion Kate Beane, historian and member of the Dakota community, is joined by Svetlana Mintcheva from the National Coalition Against Censorship to discuss who has the right to portray a traumatic past.

Also this week, 80 years on from the brutal bombing of the Basque town of Guernica, how has Picasso’s mural, painted within weeks of the bombing, created such a universal and lasting legacy?

With Tina Daheley

Photo: Protests against the artwork 'Scaffold' at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, U.S.A. Credit: Alamy

Angelina Jolie: Documenting Cambodia's History2017022520170226 (WS)

The actress and director discusses her new film First They Killed My Father

The world seen through the eyes of artists

First They Killed My Father is a new film set in Cambodia during the devastating years of violence under the Khmer Rouge regime, made by Angelina Jolie for Netflix. She explains how adopting her son Maddox from the country 15 years ago inspired her to explore Cambodia’s troubled history through film.

Writer Loung Ung who lived through the mass killings, and whose memoir the film is based on, describes how she managed to overcome her childhood trauma and how she hopes Cambodia can move on through open discussion and education.

Yalda Hakim meets a former guard at one of the Khmer Rouge torture prisons to find out about the impact of the violence on both sides.

Revered Cambodian film director Rithy Panh explains why cinema is so important for documenting this dark period of national history, and how he hopes the arts can contribute to a peaceful future for the next generation.

And Arn Chorn Pond, founder of the heritage organisation Cambodian Living Arts reflects on the need to educate young people about the traditional arts and why he thinks this can encourage understanding.

(Photo: Angelina Jolie in Cambodia promoting the film Credit: Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP/Getty Images)

Angelina Jolie: Documenting Cambodia's History20170225

The actress and director discusses her new film First They Killed My Father

The world seen through the eyes of artists

First They Killed My Father is a new film set in Cambodia during the devastating years of violence under the Khmer Rouge regime, made by Angelina Jolie for Netflix. She explains how adopting her son Maddox from the country 15 years ago inspired her to explore Cambodia’s troubled history through film.

Writer Loung Ung who lived through the mass killings, and whose memoir the film is based on, describes how she managed to overcome her childhood trauma and how she hopes Cambodia can move on through open discussion and education.

Yalda Hakim meets a former guard at one of the Khmer Rouge torture prisons to find out about the impact of the violence on both sides.

Revered Cambodian film director Rithy Panh explains why cinema is so important for documenting this dark period of national history, and how he hopes the arts can contribute to a peaceful future for the next generation.

And Arn Chorn Pond, founder of the heritage organisation Cambodian Living Arts reflects on the need to educate young people about the traditional arts and why he thinks this can encourage understanding.

(Photo: Angelina Jolie in Cambodia promoting the film Credit: Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP/Getty Images)

Art Against Climate Change20181020

We hear from artists who are speaking out against environmental damage and climate change

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art Against Climate Change2018102020181021 (WS)

We hear from artists who are speaking out against environmental damage and climate change

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art Against Climate Change2018102020181022 (WS)

We hear from artists who are speaking out against environmental damage and climate change

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art And Protest At The Dakota Access Pipeline2016112620161127 (WS)

We hear from the artist behind the project to provide demonstrators with mirrored shields

The Dakota Access Pipeline has been a source of controversy with environmental and indigenous campaigners, who believe it will threaten the water source of a Sioux reservation and disturb sacred burial grounds. Artist Cannupa Hanska Luger discusses his project to distribute mirrored shields to demonstrators, in an attempt to hold a mirror to controversial police tactics at the site.

Negin Khpalwak is Afghanistan’s first female conductor and she’s still a teenager. Despite threats of violence from her family she is keen to show what women in her country are capable of. From her home in Kabul she explains how she got the musical bug and what it’s like to conduct and perform in a country where many girls are prohibited from studying music.

Members of Hong Kong’s artistic community have expressed fears that art and culture are falling victim to pressure from Beijing. President of the newly founded PEN Hong Kong writers group Jason Ng, and film journalist Vivienne Chow discuss the situation for artists in Hong Kong.

A production of a play about the French Revolution has been playing to sell-out crowds in the Iraqi Kurdistan city of Sulaymaniyah. Journalist Sarhang Hars explains why this centuries old story resonates with today’s residents.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a fist held in the air at a pipeline protest Credit: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Art and Protest at the Dakota Access Pipeline2016112620161127 (WS)

We hear from the artist behind the project to provide demonstrators with mirrored shields

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Dakota Access Pipeline has been a source of controversy with environmental and indigenous campaigners, who believe it will threaten the water source of a Sioux reservation and disturb sacred burial grounds. Artist Cannupa Hanska Luger discusses his project to distribute mirrored shields to demonstrators, in an attempt to hold a mirror to controversial police tactics at the site.

Negin Khpalwak is Afghanistan’s first female conductor and she’s still a teenager. Despite threats of violence from her family she is keen to show what women in her country are capable of. From her home in Kabul she explains how she got the musical bug and what it’s like to conduct and perform in a country where many girls are prohibited from studying music.

Members of Hong Kong’s artistic community have expressed fears that art and culture are falling victim to pressure from Beijing. President of the newly founded PEN Hong Kong writers group Jason Ng, and cultural critic Vivienne Chow discuss the situation for artists in Hong Kong.

A production of a play about the French Revolution has been playing to sell-out crowds in the Iraqi Kurdistan city of Sulaymaniyah. Journalist Sarhang Hars explains why this centuries old story resonates with today’s residents.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a fist held in the air at a pipeline protest Credit: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Art and Protest at the Dakota Access Pipeline20161126

We hear from the artist behind the project to provide demonstrators with mirrored shields

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Dakota Access Pipeline has been a source of controversy with environmental and indigenous campaigners, who believe it will threaten the water source of a Sioux reservation and disturb sacred burial grounds. Artist Cannupa Hanska Luger discusses his project to distribute mirrored shields to demonstrators, in an attempt to hold a mirror to controversial police tactics at the site.

Negin Khpalwak is Afghanistan’s first female conductor and she’s still a teenager. Despite threats of violence from her family she is keen to show what women in her country are capable of. From her home in Kabul she explains how she got the musical bug and what it’s like to conduct and perform in a country where many girls are prohibited from studying music.

Members of Hong Kong’s artistic community have expressed fears that art and culture are falling victim to pressure from Beijing. President of the newly founded PEN Hong Kong writers group Jason Ng, and cultural critic Vivienne Chow discuss the situation for artists in Hong Kong.

A production of a play about the French Revolution has been playing to sell-out crowds in the Iraqi Kurdistan city of Sulaymaniyah. Journalist Sarhang Hars explains why this centuries old story resonates with today’s residents.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a fist held in the air at a pipeline protest Credit: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Art in the Era of Fake News20170211

How should artists respond to fake news and how might it change the way we view images?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How should artists respond to the era of fake news? Photographer Alison Jackson is known for her lookalike photographs of public figures in sometimes compromising situations. She discusses why her work is particularly pertinent now.

Australian-Israeli comedian Jeremie Bracka uses humour to explore the ongoing conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. He explains what role he thinks comedy might have in improving dialogue in the region.

The Cuban graffiti artist El Sexto discusses his arrest and detention following the death of Fidel Castro in November, and what he hopes his art can do to encourage freedom of expression in the country.

How might mass immigration to Sweden influence culture? The writer Elin Unnes considers a new study which looks at the impact of increasing diversity on Swedish popular music.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a staged image of a Donald Trump lookalike by Alison Jackson Credit: Alison Jackson)

Art In The Era Of Fake News2017021120170212 (WS)

How should artists respond to fake news and how might it change the way we view images?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How should artists respond to the era of fake news? Photographer Alison Jackson is known for her lookalike photographs of public figures in sometimes compromising situations. She discusses why her work is particularly pertinent now.

Australian-Israeli comedian Jeremie Bracka uses humour to explore the ongoing conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. He explains what role he thinks comedy might have in improving dialogue in the region.

The Cuban graffiti artist El Sexto discusses his arrest and detention following the death of Fidel Castro in November, and what he hopes his art can do to encourage freedom of expression in the country.

How might mass immigration to Sweden influence culture? The writer Elin Unnes considers a new study which looks at the impact of increasing diversity on Swedish popular music.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a staged image of a Donald Trump lookalike by Alison Jackson Credit: Alison Jackson)

How should artists respond to the era of fake news? Photographer Alison Jackson is known for her lookalike photographs of public figures in sometimes compromising situations. She discusses why her work is particularly pertinent now.

Jewish Australian comedian Jeremie Bracka uses humour to explore the ongoing conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. He explains what role he thinks comedy might have in improving dialogue in the region.

The Cuban graffiti artist El Sexto discusses his arrest and detention following the death of Fidel Castro in November, and what he hopes his art can do to encourage freedom of expression in the country.

How might mass immigration to Sweden influence culture? The writer Elin Unnes considers a new study which looks at the impact of increasing diversity on Swedish popular music.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a staged image of a Donald Trump lookalike by Alison Jackson Credit: Alison Jackson)

Artist’s Response To The Turkish Referendum Result2017042220170423 (WS)

Turkish writer Kaya Genc on what the Turkish referendum means for the country’s artists.

Acclaimed Turkish writer Kaya Genc who has been covering the growing political rift in his country for the past decade, discusses what the result of the Turkish referendum means for the country’s artists and freedom of speech.

As the UK starts negotiating its exit from the European Union, historic tensions with Spain over Gibraltar have emerged again. The novelist M.G. Sanchez describes the human cost of the UK and EU’s tussle over Gibraltar.

Indian documentary filmmaker Ram Devineni tells us why he was motivated to create a comic book animation to tackle the issue of gender based violence and acid attacks on women, which are on the rise.

And as the French Presidential elections kick off this week, Lille based journalist Laurie Moniez tells us about a controversial film by Belgian director Lucas Belvaux which portrays the leadership and tactics of the Front Nacional.

With Tina Daheley

Produced by Shoku Amirani

(Photo Credit: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Gokhan Sahin, Getty Images)

Artistic Freedom in Russia and Saudi Arabia2016091020160911 (WS)

How Russian and Saudi artists tackle censorship, and art evoking sounds of the Gulf War

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Former Pussy Riot member Maria Alyokhina is starring in Burning Doors, a new stage production by Belarus Free Theatre, which examines artistic freedom in Russia. Maria and co-director Natalia Kaliada discuss what they wanted to communicate with the production.

Also, Iraqi artist Hayv Kahraman describes why the air raid siren used during the first Gulf War is at the centre of her new art installation in San Francisco, Ayelet Gundar-Goshen, whose most recent novel is Waking Lions, reflects on a hot debate concerning archaeology in Israel and sisters Noura and Bazma Bouzo explain what it is like to run Saudi Arabia's first art and culture magazine.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Maria Alyokhina, formerly of Pussy Riot Credit: Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/GettyImages)

Artistic Freedom in Russia and Saudi Arabia20160910

How Russian and Saudi artists tackle censorship, and art evoking sounds of the Gulf War

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Former Pussy Riot member Maria Alyokhina is starring in Burning Doors, a new stage production by Belarus Free Theatre, which examines artistic freedom in Russia. Maria and co-director Natalia Kaliada discuss what they wanted to communicate with the production.

Also, Iraqi artist Hayv Kahraman describes why the air raid siren used during the first Gulf War is at the centre of her new art installation in San Francisco, Ayelet Gundar-Goshen, whose most recent novel is Waking Lions, reflects on a hot debate concerning archaeology in Israel and sisters Noura and Bazma Bouzo explain what it is like to run Saudi Arabia's first art and culture magazine.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Maria Alyokhina, formerly of Pussy Riot Credit: Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/GettyImages)

Artistic Triumph through Tragedy2018072820180729 (WS)

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art? This week on The Cultural Frontline we meet four artists who have created work born out of some of life’s most painful moments.

The artist Petrit Halilaj reveals how the memory of the family home lost during the conflict in Kosovo became the inspiration behind his latest work.

The writer Laia Jufresa takes us to the mountains of Mexico’s Guerrero state, a place where violence, disappearances and murder coexist alongside a hub of artistic creativity.

Buckle up and prepare for the world’s most dangerous ride with the artist Julijonus Urbonas. We find out why he designed the concept for a “Euthanasia” rollercoaster which aims to both bring joy and to kill its passengers.

Plus has a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The poet and writer Ben Okri reflects on the transformative power of the Greek tragedy, The Oresteia.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Ash, Shoku Amirani, Nancy Bennie, Kate Bullivant and Alice Bloch.

(Photo: Family heart. Photos on the wall of teenage girl's bedroom of her missing brothers in Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico Photo Credit: Yael Martinez)

Artistic Triumph through Tragedy2018072820180729 (WS)

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art? This week on The Cultural Frontline we meet four artists who have created work born out of some of life’s most painful moments.

The artist Petrit Halilaj reveals how the memory of the family home lost during the conflict in Kosovo became the inspiration behind his latest work.

The writer Laia Jufresa takes us to the mountains of Mexico’s Guerrero state, a place where violence, disappearances and murder coexist alongside a hub of artistic creativity.

Buckle up and prepare for the world’s most dangerous ride with the artist Julijonus Urbonas. We find out why he designed the concept for a “Euthanasia” rollercoaster which aims to both bring joy and to kill its passengers.

Plus has a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The poet and writer Ben Okri reflects on the transformative power of the Greek tragedy, The Oresteia.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Ash, Shoku Amirani, Nancy Bennie, Kate Bullivant and Alice Bloch.

(Photo: Family heart. Photos on the wall of teenage girl's bedroom of her missing brothers in Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico Photo Credit: Yael Martinez)

Artistic Triumph through Tragedy2018072820180730 (WS)

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art? This week on The Cultural Frontline we meet four artists who have created work born out of some of life’s most painful moments.

The artist Petrit Halilaj reveals how the memory of the family home lost during the conflict in Kosovo became the inspiration behind his latest work.

The writer Laia Jufresa takes us to the mountains of Mexico’s Guerrero state, a place where violence, disappearances and murder coexist alongside a hub of artistic creativity.

Buckle up and prepare for the world’s most dangerous ride with the artist Julijonus Urbonas. We find out why he designed the concept for a “Euthanasia” rollercoaster which aims to both bring joy and to kill its passengers.

Plus has a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The poet and writer Ben Okri reflects on the transformative power of the Greek tragedy, The Oresteia.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Ash, Shoku Amirani, Nancy Bennie, Kate Bullivant and Alice Bloch.

(Photo: Family heart. Photos on the wall of teenage girl's bedroom of her missing brothers in Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico Photo Credit: Yael Martinez)

Artistic Triumph through Tragedy2018072820180730 (WS)

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art? This week on The Cultural Frontline we meet four artists who have created work born out of some of life’s most painful moments.

The artist Petrit Halilaj reveals how the memory of the family home lost during the conflict in Kosovo became the inspiration behind his latest work.

The writer Laia Jufresa takes us to the mountains of Mexico’s Guerrero state, a place where violence, disappearances and murder coexist alongside a hub of artistic creativity.

Buckle up and prepare for the world’s most dangerous ride with the artist Julijonus Urbonas. We find out why he designed the concept for a “Euthanasia” rollercoaster which aims to both bring joy and to kill its passengers.

Plus has a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The poet and writer Ben Okri reflects on the transformative power of the Greek tragedy, The Oresteia.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Ash, Shoku Amirani, Nancy Bennie, Kate Bullivant and Alice Bloch.

(Photo: Family heart. Photos on the wall of teenage girl's bedroom of her missing brothers in Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico Photo Credit: Yael Martinez)

Artistic Triumph through Tragedy20180728

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art? This week on The Cultural Frontline we meet four artists who have created work born out of some of life’s most painful moments.

The artist Petrit Halilaj reveals how the memory of the family home lost during the conflict in Kosovo became the inspiration behind his latest work.

The writer Laia Jufresa takes us to the mountains of Mexico’s Guerrero state, a place where violence, disappearances and murder coexist alongside a hub of artistic creativity.

Buckle up and prepare for the world’s most dangerous ride with the artist Julijonus Urbonas. We find out why he designed the concept for a “Euthanasia” rollercoaster which aims to both bring joy and to kill its passengers.

Plus has a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The poet and writer Ben Okri reflects on the transformative power of the Greek tragedy, The Oresteia.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Ash, Shoku Amirani, Nancy Bennie, Kate Bullivant and Alice Bloch.

(Photo: Family heart. Photos on the wall of teenage girl's bedroom of her missing brothers in Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico Photo Credit: Yael Martinez)

Artistic Triumph through Tragedy20180728

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art? This week on The Cultural Frontline we meet four artists who have created work born out of some of life’s most painful moments.

The artist Petrit Halilaj reveals how the memory of the family home lost during the conflict in Kosovo became the inspiration behind his latest work.

The writer Laia Jufresa takes us to the mountains of Mexico’s Guerrero state, a place where violence, disappearances and murder coexist alongside a hub of artistic creativity.

Buckle up and prepare for the world’s most dangerous ride with the artist Julijonus Urbonas. We find out why he designed the concept for a “Euthanasia” rollercoaster which aims to both bring joy and to kill its passengers.

Plus has a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The poet and writer Ben Okri reflects on the transformative power of the Greek tragedy, The Oresteia.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Ash, Shoku Amirani, Nancy Bennie, Kate Bullivant and Alice Bloch.

(Photo: Family heart. Photos on the wall of teenage girl's bedroom of her missing brothers in Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico Photo Credit: Yael Martinez)

Artists and the US Travel Ban2017020420170205 (WS)

Artists in the US and abroad discuss the likely impact of the US travel ban

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As President Trump’s immigration restrictions for refugees and migrants from certain countries continue, we hear from the Syrian artist Tammam Azzam about what the policy might mean for him.

After the December 2016 attack on a Christmas market in Berlin, the issue of how many refugees Germany has accepted is more potent than ever. Thalia Beaty reports on a theatre company which is trying to improve integration and understanding.

Ghanaian-American writer Yaa Gyasi has scored a huge hit with her debut novel Homegoing, which traces the lives of two Ghanaian sisters caught up in the transatlantic slave trade. She tells Tina how a chance visit to a castle in Ghana inspired the story.

Nigerian writer Chibundu Onuzo explains why research was so important to her while working on her latest novel, but when it came to putting herself in danger for her art, she put her foot down.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: protestors in New York Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Artists and the US Travel Ban20170204

Artists in the US and abroad discuss the likely impact of the US travel ban

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As President Trump’s immigration restrictions for refugees and migrants from certain countries continue, we hear from the Syrian artist Tammam Azzam about what the policy might mean for him.

After the December 2016 attack on a Christmas market in Berlin, the issue of how many refugees Germany has accepted is more potent than ever. Thalia Beaty reports on a theatre company which is trying to improve integration and understanding.

Ghanaian-American writer Yaa Gyasi has scored a huge hit with her debut novel Homegoing, which traces the lives of two Ghanaian sisters caught up in the transatlantic slave trade. She tells Tina how a chance visit to a castle in Ghana inspired the story.

Nigerian writer Chibundu Onuzo explains why research was so important to her while working on her latest novel, but when it came to putting herself in danger for her art, she put her foot down.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: protestors in New York Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Artists And The Us Travel Ban2017020420170205 (WS)

As President Trump’s immigration restrictions for refugees and migrants from certain countries continue, we hear from the Syrian artist Tammam Azzam about what the policy might mean for him, and former Artist in Residence at the New York Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Tania Bruguera, gives her views on the role of artists in this debate.

After the December 2016 attack on a Christmas market in Berlin, the issue of how many refugees Germany has accepted is more potent than ever. Thalia Beaty reports on a theatre company which is trying to improve integration and understanding.

Ghanaian-American writer Yaa Gyasi has scored a huge hit with her debut novel Homegoing, which traces the lives of two Ghanaian sisters caught up in the transatlantic slave trade. She tells Tina how a chance visit to a castle in Ghana inspired the story.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: protestors in New York Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Artists in the US and abroad discuss the likely impact of the US travel ban

Artists' Responses to the Turkish Referendum2017042220170423 (WS)

Turkish writer Kaya Genc on what the Turkish referendum means for the country\u2019s artists

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Acclaimed Turkish writer Kaya Genc who has been covering the growing political rift in his country for the past decade, discusses what the result of the Turkish referendum means for the country’s artists and freedom of speech.

As the UK starts negotiating its exit from the European Union, historic tensions with Spain over Gibraltar have emerged again. The novelist M.G. Sanchez describes the human cost of the UK and EU’s tussle over Gibraltar.

Indian documentary filmmaker Ram Devineni tells us why he was motivated to create a comic book animation to tackle the issue of gender based violence and acid attacks on women, which are on the rise.

And as the French Presidential elections kick off this week, Lille based journalist Laurie Moniez tells us about a controversial film by Belgian director Lucas Belvaux which portrays the leadership and tactics of the Front Nacional.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Shoku Amirani

(Photo Credit: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Gokhan Sahin, Getty Images)

Artists' Responses to the Turkish Referendum20170422

Turkish writer Kaya Genc on what the Turkish referendum means for the country\u2019s artists

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Acclaimed Turkish writer Kaya Genc who has been covering the growing political rift in his country for the past decade, discusses what the result of the Turkish referendum means for the country’s artists and freedom of speech.

As the UK starts negotiating its exit from the European Union, historic tensions with Spain over Gibraltar have emerged again. The novelist M.G. Sanchez describes the human cost of the UK and EU’s tussle over Gibraltar.

Indian documentary filmmaker Ram Devineni tells us why he was motivated to create a comic book animation to tackle the issue of gender based violence and acid attacks on women, which are on the rise.

And as the French Presidential elections kick off this week, Lille based journalist Laurie Moniez tells us about a controversial film by Belgian director Lucas Belvaux which portrays the leadership and tactics of the Front Nacional.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Shoku Amirani

(Photo Credit: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Gokhan Sahin, Getty Images)

Artists' Responses To The Turkish Referendum20170422

Turkish writer Kaya Genc on what the Turkish referendum means for the country’s artists

Australia Says Yes20171125

We hear from Australian artists after the country's historic vote for marriage equality.

Australian artists speak out in the name of love. We join comedians, cabaret singers and Priscilla Queen of the Desert star Tony Sheldon as they reflect on their country's historic vote in favour of same sex marriage.

The comedian Ronny Chieng reveals what life was like joining the hit comedy news programme, The Daily Show just as the United States was preparing for one of the most momentous elections in its history.

Plus the author JJ Bola takes us back to his childhood home and tells us why, as a refugee, he always felt like one of the bad guys from the movies.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: People in Melbourne celebrate the outcome of Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey Photo Credit: Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

Australia says Yes2017112520171126 (WS)

We hear from Australian artists after the country's historic vote for marriage equality.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Australian artists speak out in the name of love. We join comedians, cabaret singers and Priscilla Queen of the Desert star Tony Sheldon as they reflect on their country's historic vote in favour of same sex marriage.

The comedian Ronny Chieng reveals what life was like joining the hit comedy news programme, The Daily Show just as the United States was preparing for one of the most momentous elections in its history.

Plus the author JJ Bola takes us back to his childhood home and tells us why, as a refugee, he always felt like one of the bad guys from the movies.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: People in Melbourne celebrate the outcome of Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey Photo Credit: Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

Australia says Yes2017112520171127 (WS)

We hear from Australian artists after the country's historic vote for marriage equality.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Australian artists speak out in the name of love. We join comedians, cabaret singers and Priscilla Queen of the Desert star Tony Sheldon as they reflect on their country's historic vote in favour of same sex marriage.

The comedian Ronny Chieng reveals what life was like joining the hit comedy news programme, The Daily Show just as the United States was preparing for one of the most momentous elections in its history.

Plus the author JJ Bola takes us back to his childhood home and tells us why, as a refugee, he always felt like one of the bad guys from the movies.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: People in Melbourne celebrate the outcome of Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey Photo Credit: Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

Australia says Yes20171125

We hear from Australian artists after the country's historic vote for marriage equality.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Australian artists speak out in the name of love. We join comedians, cabaret singers and Priscilla Queen of the Desert star Tony Sheldon as they reflect on their country's historic vote in favour of same sex marriage.

The comedian Ronny Chieng reveals what life was like joining the hit comedy news programme, The Daily Show just as the United States was preparing for one of the most momentous elections in its history.

Plus the author JJ Bola takes us back to his childhood home and tells us why, as a refugee, he always felt like one of the bad guys from the movies.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: People in Melbourne celebrate the outcome of Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey Photo Credit: Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

Behind The Lens With Obama's Photographer2018010620180108 (WS)
20180107 (WS)

The world through the eyes of five photographers.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we focus on five photographers.

We meet the Pulitzer Prize winner, Lynsey Addario, whose work captures the people at the heart of the world’s most dangerous conflict zones.

The official photographer to President Barack Obama, Pete Souza, talks about his experience capturing the key moments of a historic US Presidency.

We explore the work of the South African photographer, Tony Gum, who has been called the coolest girl in Cape Town by Vogue Magazine.

Plus we head to the streets of New Delhi and Nairobi and discover the stories behind two photos taken by two citizens of those cities.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Former U.S. President Barack Obama looks through a photographer's camera in February 2009 Photo credit: Pete Souza/White House/Getty Images)

The world through the eyes of five photographers.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we focus on five photographers.

We meet the Pulitzer Prize winner, Lynsey Addario, whose work captures the people at the heart of the world’s most dangerous conflict zones.

The official photographer to President Barack Obama, Pete Souza, talks about his experience capturing the key moments of a historic US Presidency.

We explore the work of the South African photographer, Tony Gum, who has been called the coolest girl in Cape Town by Vogue Magazine.

Plus we head to the streets of New Delhi and Nairobi and discover the stories behind two photos taken by two citizens of those cities.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Former U.S. President Barack Obama looks through a photographer's camera in February 2009 Photo credit: Pete Souza/White House/Getty Images)

The world through the eyes of five photographers.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we focus on five photographers.

We meet the Pulitzer Prize winner, Lynsey Addario, whose work captures the people at the heart of the world’s most dangerous conflict zones.

The official photographer to President Barack Obama, Pete Souza, talks about his experience capturing the key moments of a historic US Presidency.

We explore the work of the South African photographer, Tony Gum, who has been called the coolest girl in Cape Town by Vogue Magazine.

Plus we head to the streets of New Delhi and Nairobi and discover the stories behind two photos taken by two citizens of those cities.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Former U.S. President Barack Obama looks through a photographer's camera in February 2009 Photo credit: Pete Souza/White House/Getty Images)

Beyond the Borders of Partition2017081220170813 (WS)

Independence day, 70 years on. The birth of two new nations, India and Pakistan.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on the Cultural Frontline, guided by some of the Indian subcontinent’s finest contemporary artists we explore Partition, not as a historical event, but as an open wound.

Award winning authors, Pakistani novelist Kamila Shamsie and Indian writer Urvashi Butalia, both from families of Partition refugees, discuss how the legacy of independence continues to shape the cultural identity of both of their homelands.

Exploring the fallout of Partition across the generations, Indian graphic novelist Vishwajyoti Ghosh. His new anthology ‘This Side, That Side: Restorying Partition’ brings together comic artists, writers, and illustrators from across India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Two-time Oscar-winning filmmaker Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy takes us on a tour of her latest immersive exhibition ‘HOME1947'. Around 14 million people are thought to have been displaced with the birth of India and Pakistan. Chinoy’s exhibition brings a powerfully personal perspective to their collective story.

Author and activist Arundhati Roy discusses her new novel, ‘The Ministry of Utmost Happiness’ with BBC presenter Samira Ahmed. Arundhati explains how the characters in her new book reflect the enduring divisions of gender, caste and religion embedded within the fabric of her home country of India.

And finally, British Punjabi, DJ Swami, explores the spaces in between traditional Punjabi sounds and contemporary dance music with his latest composition, Partitions.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Wagah border post, Pakistan. Credit: Arif Ali / Stringer

Beyond the Borders of Partition20170812

Independence day, 70 years on. The birth of two new nations, India and Pakistan.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on the Cultural Frontline, guided by some of the Indian subcontinent’s finest contemporary artists we explore Partition, not as a historical event, but as an open wound.

Award winning authors, Pakistani novelist Kamila Shamsie and Indian writer Urvashi Butalia, both from families of Partition refugees, discuss how the legacy of independence continues to shape the cultural identity of both of their homelands.

Exploring the fallout of Partition across the generations, Indian graphic novelist Vishwajyoti Ghosh. His new anthology ‘This Side, That Side: Restorying Partition’ brings together comic artists, writers, and illustrators from across India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Two-time Oscar-winning filmmaker Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy takes us on a tour of her latest immersive exhibition ‘HOME1947'. Around 14 million people are thought to have been displaced with the birth of India and Pakistan. Chinoy’s exhibition brings a powerfully personal perspective to their collective story.

Author and activist Arundhati Roy discusses her new novel, ‘The Ministry of Utmost Happiness’ with BBC presenter Samira Ahmed. Arundhati explains how the characters in her new book reflect the enduring divisions of gender, caste and religion embedded within the fabric of her home country of India.

And finally, British Punjabi, DJ Swami, explores the spaces in between traditional Punjabi sounds and contemporary dance music with his latest composition, Partitions.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Wagah border post, Pakistan. Credit: Arif Ali / Stringer

Bitcoin: The Culture Of Cryptocurrency20171209

The artist and gallery owner embracing Bitcoin

On The Cultural Frontline this week: borders, journeys and the power of place.

Can Bitcoin change the world of art? We hear from the crypto-artist, Valentina Picozzi and the gallery owner, Eleesa Dadiani, on the impact the borderless cryptocurrency is having on both the making and trading of art.

The writer and President of PEN Hong Kong Jason Ng discusses the challenge of navigating the fine line between censorship and freedom of expression in China and Hong Kong.

The Irish writer Gerard Brennan takes The Cultural Frontline on a visit to the Northern Irish crime literature festival, Noireland, to meet leading writers whose work is shaped by borders.

Plus, the ballet dancer Mthuthuzeli November tells the story of how dance propelled him from the poverty of rural South Africa, to the world stage.

Photo: A visual representation of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, alongside a selection of official currencies Credit: Dan Kitwood/ Getty Images

Bitcoin: The Culture of Cryptocurrency2017120920171210 (WS)

The artist and gallery owner embracing Bitcoin

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On The Cultural Frontline this week: borders, journeys and the power of place.

Can Bitcoin change the world of art? We hear from the crypto-artist, Valentina Picozzi and the gallery owner, Eleesa Dadiani, on the impact the borderless cryptocurrency is having on both the making and trading of art.

The writer and President of PEN Hong Kong Jason Ng discusses the challenge of navigating the fine line between censorship and freedom of expression in China and Hong Kong.

The Irish writer Gerard Brennan takes The Cultural Frontline on a visit to the Northern Irish crime literature festival, Noireland, to meet leading writers whose work is shaped by borders.

Plus, the ballet dancer Mthuthuzeli November tells the story of how dance propelled him from the poverty of rural South Africa, to the world stage.

Photo: A visual representation of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, alongside a selection of official currencies Credit: Dan Kitwood/ Getty Images

Bitcoin: The Culture of Cryptocurrency2017120920171211 (WS)

The artist and gallery owner embracing Bitcoin

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On The Cultural Frontline this week: borders, journeys and the power of place.

Can Bitcoin change the world of art? We hear from the crypto-artist, Valentina Picozzi and the gallery owner, Eleesa Dadiani, on the impact the borderless cryptocurrency is having on both the making and trading of art.

The writer and President of PEN Hong Kong Jason Ng discusses the challenge of navigating the fine line between censorship and freedom of expression in China and Hong Kong.

The Irish writer Gerard Brennan takes The Cultural Frontline on a visit to the Northern Irish crime literature festival, Noireland, to meet leading writers whose work is shaped by borders.

Plus, the ballet dancer Mthuthuzeli November tells the story of how dance propelled him from the poverty of rural South Africa, to the world stage.

Photo: A visual representation of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, alongside a selection of official currencies Credit: Dan Kitwood/ Getty Images

Bitcoin: The Culture of Cryptocurrency20171209

The artist and gallery owner embracing Bitcoin

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On The Cultural Frontline this week: borders, journeys and the power of place.

Can Bitcoin change the world of art? We hear from the crypto-artist, Valentina Picozzi and the gallery owner, Eleesa Dadiani, on the impact the borderless cryptocurrency is having on both the making and trading of art.

The writer and President of PEN Hong Kong Jason Ng discusses the challenge of navigating the fine line between censorship and freedom of expression in China and Hong Kong.

The Irish writer Gerard Brennan takes The Cultural Frontline on a visit to the Northern Irish crime literature festival, Noireland, to meet leading writers whose work is shaped by borders.

Plus, the ballet dancer Mthuthuzeli November tells the story of how dance propelled him from the poverty of rural South Africa, to the world stage.

Photo: A visual representation of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, alongside a selection of official currencies Credit: Dan Kitwood/ Getty Images

Budapest Night Culture2018052620180528 (WS)

A nocturnal journey into Budapest\u2019s underground music scene

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Journalist and music curator Krisztián Puskár and artist Erika Szurcsik take us on an immersive night-time adventure into the heart of Budapest’s thriving underground scene. Is the current political climate in Hungary energising or endangering arts and music?

Noisy, unpredictable, political and fun, the night begins after Erika’s rehearsal with her art punk band Gustave Tiger. We take a tram to District VIII, one of the most diverse areas in the Hungarian capital. It’s here, amongst crumbling communist-era concrete, that many underground bars and clubs are located, pushed out of the city centre by gentrification.

Krisztián and Erika introduce us to artists and musicians from the underground’s inner circle. From traditional folk band Erdőfű, to a feminist electronic music collective Rrriot Nerdz, acclaimed underground musician Balázs Pándi, and Pénz, a punk rave crew. For Erika and her friends, a DIY approach to their work is not an aesthetic choice but a reality - everything is done with little or no budget. There are also growing fears about censorship, but, by night this is a city alive with creativity, a determined sense of self-reliance, and absolute freedom to experiment.

Photo: Fogselyemfiu - DJ/Producer of the Pénz rave crew Credit: Gabor Radi

Budapest Night Culture20180526

A nocturnal journey into Budapest\u2019s underground music scene

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Journalist and music curator Krisztián Puskár and artist Erika Szurcsik take us on an immersive night-time adventure into the heart of Budapest’s thriving underground scene. Is the current political climate in Hungary energising or endangering arts and music?

Noisy, unpredictable, political and fun, the night begins after Erika’s rehearsal with her art punk band Gustave Tiger. We take a tram to District VIII, one of the most diverse areas in the Hungarian capital. It’s here, amongst crumbling communist-era concrete, that many underground bars and clubs are located, pushed out of the city centre by gentrification.

Krisztián and Erika introduce us to artists and musicians from the underground’s inner circle. From traditional folk band Erdőfű, to a feminist electronic music collective Rrriot Nerdz, acclaimed underground musician Balázs Pándi, and Pénz, a punk rave crew. For Erika and her friends, a DIY approach to their work is not an aesthetic choice but a reality - everything is done with little or no budget. There are also growing fears about censorship, but, by night this is a city alive with creativity, a determined sense of self-reliance, and absolute freedom to experiment.

Photo: Fogselyemfiu - DJ/Producer of the Pénz rave crew Credit: Gabor Radi

Budapest Night Culture2018052620180528 (WS)

A nocturnal journey into Budapest\u2019s underground music scene

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Journalist and music curator Krisztián Puskár and artist Erika Szurcsik take us on an immersive night-time adventure into the heart of Budapest’s thriving underground scene. Is the current political climate in Hungary energising or endangering arts and music?

Noisy, unpredictable, political and fun, the night begins after Erika’s rehearsal with her art punk band Gustave Tiger. We take a tram to District VIII, one of the most diverse areas in the Hungarian capital. It’s here, amongst crumbling communist-era concrete, that many underground bars and clubs are located, pushed out of the city centre by gentrification.

Krisztián and Erika introduce us to artists and musicians from the underground’s inner circle. From traditional folk band Erdőfű, to a feminist electronic music collective Rrriot Nerdz, acclaimed underground musician Balázs Pándi, and Pénz, a punk rave crew. For Erika and her friends, a DIY approach to their work is not an aesthetic choice but a reality - everything is done with little or no budget. There are also growing fears about censorship, but, by night this is a city alive with creativity, a determined sense of self-reliance, and absolute freedom to experiment.

Photo: Fogselyemfiu - DJ/Producer of the Pénz rave crew Credit: Gabor Radi

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Budapest Night Culture2018052620180527 (WS)

A nocturnal journey into Budapest\u2019s underground music scene

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Journalist and music curator Krisztián Puskár and artist Erika Szurcsik take us on an immersive night-time adventure into the heart of Budapest’s thriving underground scene. Is the current political climate in Hungary energising or endangering arts and music?

Noisy, unpredictable, political and fun, the night begins after Erika’s rehearsal with her art punk band Gustave Tiger. We take a tram to District VIII, one of the most diverse areas in the Hungarian capital. It’s here, amongst crumbling communist-era concrete, that many underground bars and clubs are located, pushed out of the city centre by gentrification.

Krisztián and Erika introduce us to artists and musicians from the underground’s inner circle. From traditional folk band Erdőfű, to a feminist electronic music collective Rrriot Nerdz, acclaimed underground musician Balázs Pándi, and Pénz, a punk rave crew. For Erika and her friends, a DIY approach to their work is not an aesthetic choice but a reality - everything is done with little or no budget. There are also growing fears about censorship, but, by night this is a city alive with creativity, a determined sense of self-reliance, and absolute freedom to experiment.

Photo: Fogselyemfiu - DJ/Producer of the Pénz rave crew Credit: Gabor Radi

Caine Prize Short Stories2016070220160703 (WS)

The 5 shortlisted authors in the running for The Caine Prize for African Writing.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Caine Prize for African Writing is awarded annually to an African writer of a short story published in English. Ahead of the announcement of this year’s winner, we’ve invited each of the 5 shortlisted authors to share their work, insights into their writing processes and their global perspectives on what it means to be an African writer in 2016.

Tope Folarin won the Caine Prize for African Writing in 2013 and has been nominated for a second time for his story, ‘Genesis.’ In a new essay for The Cultural Frontline, he addresses how his obsession with creation stories prompted him to write a creation story of his own.

Somali-born Abdul Adan grew up in Kenya and has lived in America, the setting of his entry ‘The Lifebloom Gift.’ He takes us on a journey into the world of his story, where touching, not seeing, is believing. Lesley Nneka Arimah, a Nigerian writer living in Minneapolis, USA, talks to Tina about the imaginative and intellectual leap that led her to set ‘What it Means When a Man Falls From the Sky’ in the distant, dystopian future of ‘what was now the United Countries but had once been Africa.’ Bongani Kona, author of ‘At Your Requiem’ and Lidudumalingani, author of ‘Memories We Lost’ discuss common themes, shared experiences and the significance of deciding to write in English.
Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Tope Folarin, 2016 Caine Prize shortlisted author and 2013 Caine Prize winner. Credit: Tope Folarin)

Caine Prize Short Stories20160702

The 5 shortlisted authors in the running for The Caine Prize for African Writing.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Caine Prize for African Writing is awarded annually to an African writer of a short story published in English. Ahead of the announcement of this year’s winner, we’ve invited each of the 5 shortlisted authors to share their work, insights into their writing processes and their global perspectives on what it means to be an African writer in 2016.

Tope Folarin won the Caine Prize for African Writing in 2013 and has been nominated for a second time for his story, ‘Genesis.’ In a new essay for The Cultural Frontline, he addresses how his obsession with creation stories prompted him to write a creation story of his own.

Somali-born Abdul Adan grew up in Kenya and has lived in America, the setting of his entry ‘The Lifebloom Gift.’ He takes us on a journey into the world of his story, where touching, not seeing, is believing. Lesley Nneka Arimah, a Nigerian writer living in Minneapolis, USA, talks to Tina about the imaginative and intellectual leap that led her to set ‘What it Means When a Man Falls From the Sky’ in the distant, dystopian future of ‘what was now the United Countries but had once been Africa.’ Bongani Kona, author of ‘At Your Requiem’ and Lidudumalingani, author of ‘Memories We Lost’ discuss common themes, shared experiences and the significance of deciding to write in English.
Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Tope Folarin, 2016 Caine Prize shortlisted author and 2013 Caine Prize winner. Credit: Tope Folarin)

Can Art Change the World?2016092420160925 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As this year’s Turner Prize exhibition prepares to open its doors, The Cultural Frontline considers how international artists are using their work to provoke discussion and challenge existing ideas.

Activist artists Tania Bruguera and Maria Alyokhina reflect on how actions and performance can make an impact where work in a gallery can’t.

Also in the programme, Ghanaian artist Serge Attukwei Clottey discusses his work highlighting the detrimental impact of the yellow cans used to store water all over Africa, curator Cheryl Haines explains the impact of Ai Wei Wei’s installation At Large which occupied Alcatraz last year and Palestinian artists Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme reveal how their work replaces clichéd images of their region with complex film and sound tapestries.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: works by Ai Wei Wei displayed on Alcatraz Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Can Art Change the World?20160924

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As this year’s Turner Prize exhibition prepares to open its doors, The Cultural Frontline considers how international artists are using their work to provoke discussion and challenge existing ideas.

Activist artists Tania Bruguera and Maria Alyokhina reflect on how actions and performance can make an impact where work in a gallery can’t.

Also in the programme, Ghanaian artist Serge Attukwei Clottey discusses his work highlighting the detrimental impact of the yellow cans used to store water all over Africa, curator Cheryl Haines explains the impact of Ai Wei Wei’s installation At Large which occupied Alcatraz last year and Palestinian artists Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme reveal how their work replaces clichéd images of their region with complex film and sound tapestries.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: works by Ai Wei Wei displayed on Alcatraz Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Can Music Influence our View of the World?2017080520170806 (WS)

Ramy Essam is an Egyptian musician whose song became the anthem for the Arab Spring

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Ramy Essam is an Egyptian musician who believes music can influence our view of the world. His song ‘Irhal’ became the anthem for the Arab Spring in 2011. This month he’s in Edinburgh, in Scotland, with his show ‘Ramy in the Frontline’. He explains why he believes music has the power to change minds.

There are more than one thousand comics from all over the world performing at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe this year. Many will be left leaning political comedians relishing the opportunities to take on the travails of the American President Donald Trump and the British Prime Minister Teresa May. But what about the handful of comedians who lean to the right politically? Leo Kearse, declares ‘I Can Make You Tory’ in his show, and Geoff Norcott describes himself as ‘Right-leaning But Well Meaning’, both reveal all.

Like the best comedy, Sujatro Ghosh’s photographs first make you smile and then feel uncomfortable when you realise the truth they are portraying. In a country where violence against women is growing, yet where in several states you can be sentenced to life imprisonment for slaughtering a cow, the 23-year-old photographer’s new project asks are cows in India treated better than women?

The Kenyan rapper MC Sharon, is one of only a few female hip hop artists and music producers in Africa. Her new song 'Kutupanga' , which can be loosely translated as 'lies and deceit' sends a message to corrupt politicians, and encourage people to vote wisely in the election due to be held on Tuesday.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Ramy Essam Photo credit: Val Denn

Can Music Influence our View of the World?20170805

Ramy Essam is an Egyptian musician whose song became the anthem for the Arab Spring

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Ramy Essam is an Egyptian musician who believes music can influence our view of the world. His song ‘Irhal’ became the anthem for the Arab Spring in 2011. This month he’s in Edinburgh, in Scotland, with his show ‘Ramy in the Frontline’. He explains why he believes music has the power to change minds.

There are more than one thousand comics from all over the world performing at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe this year. Many will be left leaning political comedians relishing the opportunities to take on the travails of the American President Donald Trump and the British Prime Minister Teresa May. But what about the handful of comedians who lean to the right politically? Leo Kearse, declares ‘I Can Make You Tory’ in his show, and Geoff Norcott describes himself as ‘Right-leaning But Well Meaning’, both reveal all.

Like the best comedy, Sujatro Ghosh’s photographs first make you smile and then feel uncomfortable when you realise the truth they are portraying. In a country where violence against women is growing, yet where in several states you can be sentenced to life imprisonment for slaughtering a cow, the 23-year-old photographer’s new project asks are cows in India treated better than women?

The Kenyan rapper MC Sharon, is one of only a few female hip hop artists and music producers in Africa. Her new song 'Kutupanga' , which can be loosely translated as 'lies and deceit' sends a message to corrupt politicians, and encourage people to vote wisely in the election due to be held on Tuesday.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Ramy Essam Photo credit: Val Denn

Can Protest Art Change the World?2018063020180701 (WS)

Art meets activism with Angie Thomas,Santiago Sierra,Ece Temelkuran and Fredrik \u00d6sterling

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Novelist Angie Thomas tells Tina how the Black Lives Matter movement motivated her to write the award-winning young adult novel, The Hate U Give.

Artist Santiago Sierra meets the BBC’s Guy Hedgecoe to discuss why the photography exhibition Political Prisoners in Contemporary Spain is provoking disapproval and demonstrations.

Writer Ece Temelkuran reflects on the newly re-elected President Erdogan’s rebuilding- and rebranding- of the Atatürk Cultural Centre, a focal point for the Gezi Park protests in Istanbul.

Plus, how do you deal with hate mail creatively? Swedish composer Fredrik Österling explains why the Helsingborg Symphony Orchestra turned a homophobic letter into an operatic libretto.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Image: Demonstrators from the Black Lives Matter movement staged a 'Black Resistance March' in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the Democratic Presidential Convention in July 2016. Credit: Albin Lohr-Jones/ Pacific Press/ Light Rocket via Getty Images

Can Protest Art Change the World?2018063020180702 (WS)

Art meets activism with Angie Thomas,Santiago Sierra,Ece Temelkuran and Fredrik \u00d6sterling

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Novelist Angie Thomas tells Tina how the Black Lives Matter movement motivated her to write the award-winning young adult novel, The Hate U Give.

Artist Santiago Sierra meets the BBC’s Guy Hedgecoe to discuss why the photography exhibition Political Prisoners in Contemporary Spain is provoking disapproval and demonstrations.

Writer Ece Temelkuran reflects on the newly re-elected President Erdogan’s rebuilding- and rebranding- of the Atatürk Cultural Centre, a focal point for the Gezi Park protests in Istanbul.

Plus, how do you deal with hate mail creatively? Swedish composer Fredrik Österling explains why the Helsingborg Symphony Orchestra turned a homophobic letter into an operatic libretto.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Image: Demonstrators from the Black Lives Matter movement staged a 'Black Resistance March' in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the Democratic Presidential Convention in July 2016. Credit: Albin Lohr-Jones/ Pacific Press/ Light Rocket via Getty Images

Can Protest Art Change the World?20180630

Art meets activism with Angie Thomas,Santiago Sierra,Ece Temelkuran and Fredrik \u00d6sterling

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Novelist Angie Thomas tells Tina how the Black Lives Matter movement motivated her to write the award-winning young adult novel, The Hate U Give.

Artist Santiago Sierra meets the BBC’s Guy Hedgecoe to discuss why the photography exhibition Political Prisoners in Contemporary Spain is provoking disapproval and demonstrations.

Writer Ece Temelkuran reflects on the newly re-elected President Erdogan’s rebuilding- and rebranding- of the Atatürk Cultural Centre, a focal point for the Gezi Park protests in Istanbul.

Plus, how do you deal with hate mail creatively? Swedish composer Fredrik Österling explains why the Helsingborg Symphony Orchestra turned a homophobic letter into an operatic libretto.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Image: Demonstrators from the Black Lives Matter movement staged a 'Black Resistance March' in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the Democratic Presidential Convention in July 2016. Credit: Albin Lohr-Jones/ Pacific Press/ Light Rocket via Getty Images

Can Protest Art Change The World?2018063020180701 (WS)
20180702 (WS)

Art meets activism with Angie Thomas,Santiago Sierra,Ece Temelkuran and Fredrik \u00d6sterling

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Novelist Angie Thomas tells Tina how the Black Lives Matter movement motivated her to write the award-winning young adult novel, The Hate U Give.

Artist Santiago Sierra meets the BBC’s Guy Hedgecoe to discuss why the photography exhibition Political Prisoners in Contemporary Spain is provoking disapproval and demonstrations.

Writer Ece Temelkuran reflects on the newly re-elected President Erdogan’s rebuilding- and rebranding- of the Atatürk Cultural Centre, a focal point for the Gezi Park protests in Istanbul.

Plus, how do you deal with hate mail creatively? Swedish composer Fredrik Österling explains why the Helsingborg Symphony Orchestra turned a homophobic letter into an operatic libretto.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Image: Demonstrators from the Black Lives Matter movement staged a 'Black Resistance March' in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the Democratic Presidential Convention in July 2016. Credit: Albin Lohr-Jones/ Pacific Press/ Light Rocket via Getty Images

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can Virtual Reality Create Empathy?2018061620180617 (WS)
20180618 (WS)

How filmmakers are using VR to create shared human experiences

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Filmmakers are using VR to create shared human experiences but can it really help us connect with others as well as literature, theatre or film?

Tina meets documentary filmmaker Nonny de la Pena to get an insight into her film After Solitary, which gives a 360 degree perspective on one former inmate's cell in solitary confinement in the United States.

Academy Award-winning film director Alejandro G. Iñárritu tells reporter Laura Hubber why he hopes his Oscar-winning installation Carne y Arena, or Flesh and Sand, could change attitudes towards migrants.

Artist and filmmaker Lynette Wallworth’s Emmy award-winning film Collisions uses cutting edge technology to tell a true story from 1950s Australia.

Plus, self-styled hologram storyteller Asad J Malik makes the case for augmented over virtual reality. He tells Datshiane Navanayagam why he chose AR to create his border-control role-play experience, Terminal 3.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Kirsty McQuire and Johny Cassidy

Image: A couple wearing headphones and virtual reality goggles experience the Rhizomat VR art piece by artist Mona El Gammal at Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin, Germany. Credit: Sean Gallup/ Getty Images

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Can You Report The News Through Song?2018041420180415 (WS)

How an innovative project is defying press censorship through music.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week's Cultural Frontline we explore the sounds of nature with Iceland’s all-female radical performance art collective, the Icelandic Love Corporation. For over two decades, their art has engaged audiences on topics such as the over-sexualisation of women and reflections around aging and the female body. Now taking inspiration from the spirit of water, they are turning their art to another pressing matter, the need to act quickly to save our environment.

The Uncensored Playlist
Can you tell the news through song? That's the aim of the Uncensored Playlist, an innovative project from Reporters without Borders. Tina speaks to the Uzbek journalist Galima Bukharbaeva and the project’s music director Lucas Mayer about how they've combined journalism, song writing and music streaming to spread the news and avoid censorship in countries without a free press.

Zimbabwe's Hit Satirical Play
A new satirical play called 'Operation Restore Legacy' has taken Zimbabwe by storm. Just six months after the fall of former President Robert Mugabe the new production which portrays the last days of his government after a military intervention, has wowed sold out audiences. The BBC's Shingai Nyoka met the writer and the director of the play, Charles Munganasa and found out what the play means for the future of the arts and freedom of expression in the country.

Singeli: The Sound of Dar es Salaam
Plus have you ever heard Singeli music? The Cultural Frontline turns up the volume on the Tanzanian music style with one of the stars of the scene, Bampa Pana from the group Sounds of Sisso. We'll find out how Singeli has taken over the airwaves and become not just the sound of Dar es Salaam but a global phenomenon.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Posters promoting the Uncensored Playlist Photo Credit: Reporters Without Borders)

Can You Report The News Through Song?2018041420180416 (WS)

How an innovative project is defying press censorship through music.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week's Cultural Frontline we explore the sounds of nature with Iceland’s all-female radical performance art collective, the Icelandic Love Corporation. For over two decades, their art has engaged audiences on topics such as the over-sexualisation of women and reflections around aging and the female body. Now taking inspiration from the spirit of water, they are turning their art to another pressing matter, the need to act quickly to save our environment.

The Uncensored Playlist
Can you tell the news through song? That's the aim of the Uncensored Playlist, an innovative project from Reporters without Borders. Tina speaks to the Uzbek journalist Galima Bukharbaeva and the project’s music director Lucas Mayer about how they've combined journalism, song writing and music streaming to spread the news and avoid censorship in countries without a free press.

Zimbabwe's Hit Satirical Play
A new satirical play called 'Operation Restore Legacy' has taken Zimbabwe by storm. Just six months after the fall of former President Robert Mugabe the new production which portrays the last days of his government after a military intervention, has wowed sold out audiences. The BBC's Shingai Nyoka met the writer and the director of the play, Charles Munganasa and found out what the play means for the future of the arts and freedom of expression in the country.

Singeli: The Sound of Dar es Salaam
Plus have you ever heard Singeli music? The Cultural Frontline turns up the volume on the Tanzanian music style with one of the stars of the scene, Bampa Pana from the group Sounds of Sisso. We'll find out how Singeli has taken over the airwaves and become not just the sound of Dar es Salaam but a global phenomenon.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Posters promoting the Uncensored Playlist Photo Credit: Reporters Without Borders)

Can You Report The News Through Song?20180414

How an innovative project is defying press censorship through music.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week's Cultural Frontline we explore the sounds of nature with Iceland’s all-female radical performance art collective, the Icelandic Love Corporation. For over two decades, their art has engaged audiences on topics such as the over-sexualisation of women and reflections around aging and the female body. Now taking inspiration from the spirit of water, they are turning their art to another pressing matter, the need to act quickly to save our environment.

The Uncensored Playlist
Can you tell the news through song? That's the aim of the Uncensored Playlist, an innovative project from Reporters without Borders. Tina speaks to the Uzbek journalist Galima Bukharbaeva and the project’s music director Lucas Mayer about how they've combined journalism, song writing and music streaming to spread the news and avoid censorship in countries without a free press.

Zimbabwe's Hit Satirical Play
A new satirical play called 'Operation Restore Legacy' has taken Zimbabwe by storm. Just six months after the fall of former President Robert Mugabe the new production which portrays the last days of his government after a military intervention, has wowed sold out audiences. The BBC's Shingai Nyoka met the writer and the director of the play, Charles Munganasa and found out what the play means for the future of the arts and freedom of expression in the country.

Singeli: The Sound of Dar es Salaam
Plus have you ever heard Singeli music? The Cultural Frontline turns up the volume on the Tanzanian music style with one of the stars of the scene, Bampa Pana from the group Sounds of Sisso. We'll find out how Singeli has taken over the airwaves and become not just the sound of Dar es Salaam but a global phenomenon.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Posters promoting the Uncensored Playlist Photo Credit: Reporters Without Borders)

Can You Report The News Through Song?2018041420180415 (WS)

How an innovative project is defying press censorship through music.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week's Cultural Frontline we explore the sounds of nature with Iceland’s all-female radical performance art collective, the Icelandic Love Corporation. For over two decades, their art has engaged audiences on topics such as the over-sexualisation of women and reflections around aging and the female body. Now taking inspiration from the spirit of water, they are turning their art to another pressing matter, the need to act quickly to save our environment.

The Uncensored Playlist
Can you tell the news through song? That's the aim of the Uncensored Playlist, an innovative project from Reporters without Borders. Tina speaks to the Uzbek journalist Galima Bukharbaeva and the project’s music director Lucas Mayer about how they've combined journalism, song writing and music streaming to spread the news and avoid censorship in countries without a free press.

Zimbabwe's Hit Satirical Play
A new satirical play called 'Operation Restore Legacy' has taken Zimbabwe by storm. Just six months after the fall of former President Robert Mugabe the new production which portrays the last days of his government after a military intervention, has wowed sold out audiences. The BBC's Shingai Nyoka met the writer and the director of the play, Charles Munganasa and found out what the play means for the future of the arts and freedom of expression in the country.

Singeli: The Sound of Dar es Salaam
Plus have you ever heard Singeli music? The Cultural Frontline turns up the volume on the Tanzanian music style with one of the stars of the scene, Bampa Pana from the group Sounds of Sisso. We'll find out how Singeli has taken over the airwaves and become not just the sound of Dar es Salaam but a global phenomenon.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Posters promoting the Uncensored Playlist Photo Credit: Reporters Without Borders)

Capturing Aleppo's Destruction on Film2016091720160918 (WS)

The film capturing the war in Aleppo; Berlin's iconic nightclub; Hong Kong's culture hub

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Syrian Armenian film-maker Avo Kaprielian discusses Houses Without Doors, his film capturing the bombardment of Aleppo from his parents' balcony in the city.

Also, Vivienne Chow reports from Hong Kong where the first venue in the $3 billion West Kowloon Cultural District has just opened, but does it live up to the hype? From Berlin, Lisa Ludwig reflects on the decision to classify iconic nightclub Berghain as 'high culture' and artist Spencer Tunick explains why he has returned to the Dead Sea, the scene of one of his most iconic mass naked photographs. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Still from Houses Without Doors Credit: Avo Kaprielian)

Capturing Aleppo's Destruction on Film20160917

The film capturing the war in Aleppo; Berlin's iconic nightclub; Hong Kong's culture hub

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Syrian Armenian film-maker Avo Kaprielian discusses Houses Without Doors, his film capturing the bombardment of Aleppo from his parents' balcony in the city.

Also, Vivienne Chow reports from Hong Kong where the first venue in the $3 billion West Kowloon Cultural District has just opened, but does it live up to the hype? From Berlin, Lisa Ludwig reflects on the decision to classify iconic nightclub Berghain as 'high culture' and artist Spencer Tunick explains why he has returned to the Dead Sea, the scene of one of his most iconic mass naked photographs. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Still from Houses Without Doors Credit: Avo Kaprielian)

Catalan Culture and the Question of Independence2017093020171001 (WS)

Two Catalan cultural figures discuss the charged issue of the independence referendum.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Two Catalan cultural figures discuss the divisive issue of the disputed independence referendum in Catalonia. Despite being on opposite sides of the debate, Isona Passola, a film producer and president of the Catalan Academy of Cinema and the novelist Eduardo Mendoza, winner of the prestigious Cervantes Prize, remain firm friends.

Jacky-Oh Weinhaus, of the spoof political party Drag for Germany, reflects on using the art of drag to promote tolerance and democracy during the German election campaign.

Poet Naomi Shihab Nye re-visits the poem she wrote ten years ago about a chance meeting in an airport, which has resurfaced on social media in light of President Donald Trump’s travel ban.

And Maysaloun Hamoud, the Palestinian film director under fatwa for her film In Between, about the lives and loves of three young women sharing a flat in Tel Aviv.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Image: Catalan flag and ballot paper in the disputed Catalan independence referendum Credit: Pau Barrena/ AFP/ Getty Images

Catalan Culture and the Question of Independence20170930

Two Catalan cultural figures discuss the charged issue of the independence referendum.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Two Catalan cultural figures discuss the divisive issue of the disputed independence referendum in Catalonia. Despite being on opposite sides of the debate, Isona Passola, a film producer and president of the Catalan Academy of Cinema and the novelist Eduardo Mendoza, winner of the prestigious Cervantes Prize, remain firm friends.

Jacky-Oh Weinhaus, of the spoof political party Drag for Germany, reflects on using the art of drag to promote tolerance and democracy during the German election campaign.

Poet Naomi Shihab Nye re-visits the poem she wrote ten years ago about a chance meeting in an airport, which has resurfaced on social media in light of President Donald Trump’s travel ban.

And Maysaloun Hamoud, the Palestinian film director under fatwa for her film In Between, about the lives and loves of three young women sharing a flat in Tel Aviv.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Image: Catalan flag and ballot paper in the disputed Catalan independence referendum Credit: Pau Barrena/ AFP/ Getty Images

Challenging Racism Through Sculpture2016081320160814 (WS)

Public art confronts racism in Berlin, plus wandering and writing in Vancouver

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Wolves are Back is a series of giant wolf-man sculptures by German artist Rainer Opolka. His bronze and cast iron creations are currently on display in Berlin, after been shown in Dresden and Potsdam. The pack of 66 creatures, each striking a threatening pose, is accompanied by the inscription ‘don’t feed the wolves.’ Tina is joined by the artist to discuss how his work intends to confront what he sees as the rise of racism and neo-Nazism in his home country.

Irish-Canadian author Anakana Schofield responds to the changing cityscape of Vancouver and considers how the current property boom is affecting both its artistic community and her own writing.

In a feature from producer Yael Even Or, artist Luciana Kaplun discusses her dramatization of an urban myth claiming Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was born in Sudan. Kaplun explains how her new film raises questions about the relationship between Africa and Israel, ahead of its screening at The Tel Aviv Museum of Art in November.

Finally, writer Elin Unnes sketches a history of the Swedish dance licence - a law prohibiting dancing in unlicensed public places in Sweden- which has recently been abolished by the Swedish Parliament.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Wolf sculptures outside Berlin central station. Credit: Rainer Opolka)

Challenging Racism Through Sculpture20160813

Public art confronts racism in Berlin, plus wandering and writing in Vancouver

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Wolves are Back is a series of giant wolf-man sculptures by German artist Rainer Opolka. His bronze and cast iron creations are currently on display in Berlin, after been shown in Dresden and Potsdam. The pack of 66 creatures, each striking a threatening pose, is accompanied by the inscription ‘don’t feed the wolves.’ Tina is joined by the artist to discuss how his work intends to confront what he sees as the rise of racism and neo-Nazism in his home country.

Irish-Canadian author Anakana Schofield responds to the changing cityscape of Vancouver and considers how the current property boom is affecting both its artistic community and her own writing.

In a feature from producer Yael Even Or, artist Luciana Kaplun discusses her dramatization of an urban myth claiming Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was born in Sudan. Kaplun explains how her new film raises questions about the relationship between Africa and Israel, ahead of its screening at The Tel Aviv Museum of Art in November.

Finally, writer Elin Unnes sketches a history of the Swedish dance licence - a law prohibiting dancing in unlicensed public places in Sweden- which has recently been abolished by the Swedish Parliament.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Wolf sculptures outside Berlin central station. Credit: Rainer Opolka)

Combat And Culture: Women On The Frontline2017092320170924 (WS)

Women in combat: They're on the real frontline, so why so rarely seen in popular culture?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Tina Daheley discusses the reality and cultural representation of women in combat with actor Avital Lvova and writer Henry Naylor from the play Angel (about Kurdish sniper Rehanna), and Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, author of Ashley's War: The Untold Story of a Team of Women Soldiers on the Special Ops Battlefield. There's room for fighting women on the real frontlines, so why not in the movies?

Also - Russian film director Alexei Uchitel talks about his forthcoming feature film Matilda, based on the love affair between Tsar Nicolas II, the last Tsar of Russia, and ballerina Matilda Kshesinskaya. What does the sometimes violent campaign to get it banned say about Russia today?

We hear from contemporary artist Rozhgar Mustafa, who is using her work to challenge discrimination against women in Iraqi Kurdistan.

And poets Yrsa Daley-Ward and Caleb Femi explain how they use innovative methods and social media to bring their work to new audiences - and the importance of their roots in Jamaica, Nigeria and England to their poetry.

Photo: A Kurdish woman fighter near Kobane, Syria. Credit: Ahmet Sik/Getty Images.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Paul Waters

Women in combat: They're on the real frontline, so why so rarely seen in popular culture?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Tina Daheley discusses the reality and cultural representation of women in combat with actor Avital Lvova and writer Henry Naylor from the play Angel (about Kurdish sniper Rehanna), and Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, author of Ashley's War: The Untold Story of a Team of Women Soldiers on the Special Ops Battlefield. There's room for fighting women on the real frontlines, so why not in the movies?

Also - Russian film director Alexei Uchitel talks about his forthcoming feature film Matilda, based on the love affair between Tsar Nicolas II, the last Tsar of Russia, and ballerina Matilda Kshesinskaya. What does the sometimes violent campaign to get it banned say about Russia today?

We hear from contemporary artist Rozhgar Mustafa, who is using her work to challenge discrimination against women in Iraqi Kurdistan.

And poets Yrsa Daley-Ward and Caleb Femi explain how they use innovative methods and social media to bring their work to new audiences - and the importance of their roots in Jamaica, Nigeria and England to their poetry.

Photo: A Kurdish woman fighter near Kobane, Syria. Credit: Ahmet Sik/Getty Images.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Paul Waters

Tina Daheley discusses the reality and cultural representation of women in combat with actor Avital Lvova and writer Henry Naylor from the play Angel (about Kurdish sniper Rehanna), and Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, author of Ashley's War: The Untold Story of a Team of Women Soldiers on the Special Ops Battlefield. There's room for fighting women on the real frontlines, so why not in the movies?

Also - Russian film director Alexei Uchitel talks about his forthcoming feature film Matilda, based on the love affair between Tsar Nicolas II, the last Tsar of Russia, and ballerina Matilda Kshesinskaya. What does the sometimes violent campaign to get it banned say about Russia today?

We hear from contemporary artist Rozhgar Mustafa, who is using her work to challenge discrimination against women in Iraqi Kurdistan.

And poets Yrsa Daley-Ward and Caleb Femi explain how they use innovative methods and social media to bring their work to new audiences - and the importance of their roots in Jamaica, Nigeria and England to their poetry.

Photo: A Kurdish woman fighter near Kobane, Syria. Credit: Ahmet Sik/Getty Images.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Paul Waters

Commemorating Taiwan's 'comfort Women'2016121720161218 (WS)

A museum has opened in Taipei to remember the women forced to work in brothels during WW2

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As President-elect Donald Trump provokes ‘serious concern’ from China over his policy towards Taiwan, we hear about a new museum in Taiwan’s capital Taipei, commemorating the so called ‘comfort women’. Two thousand Taiwanese women, and many more from elsewhere in the region were forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War II. While other countries have commemorated them already, this is Taiwan’s first museum to their experience. Cindy Sui has visited the museum and explains its significance.

World famous Ugandan musician Geoffrey Oryema has been in exile in Paris for 40 years. This weekend he returns to his homeland for the first time to perform a concert, he explains what it means to him and how his music has been inspired by life in exile.

Writer Neil Hegarty remembers his childhood growing up in the shadow of the Troubles in Northern Ireland and explains why it took so long for those experiences to make it into his fiction.

And the Sanaa Theatre Awards, Kenya’s only awards for the theatre industry are happening in Nairobi this week. But some in the theatre world are unhappy about the perceived preference shown to English language plays above vernacular works. Theatre director Lawrence Murage and awards founder George Orido discuss the situation.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: one of the surviving comfort women Credit: Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images)

As President-elect Donald Trump provokes ‘serious concern’ from China over his policy towards Taiwan, we hear about a new museum in Taiwan’s capital Taipei, commemorating the so called ‘comfort women’. Two thousand Taiwanese women, and many more from elsewhere in the region were forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War II. While other countries have commemorated them already, this is Taiwan’s first museum to their experience. Cindy Sui has visited the museum and explains its significance.

World famous Ugandan musician Geoffrey Oryema has been in exile in Paris for 40 years. This weekend he returns to his homeland for the first time to perform a concert, he explains what it means to him and how his music has been inspired by life in exile.

Writer Neil Hegarty remembers his childhood growing up in the shadow of the Troubles in Northern Ireland and explains why it took so long for those experiences to make it into his fiction.

And the Sanaa Theatre Awards, Kenya’s only awards for the theatre industry are happening in Nairobi this week. But some in the theatre world are unhappy about the perceived preference shown to English language plays above vernacular works. Theatre director Lawrence Murage and awards founder George Orido discuss the situation.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: one of the surviving comfort women Credit: Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images)

Cultural Inclusion and Exclusion2016072320160724 (WS)

Cultural Inclusion and Exclusion- institutional, virtual and symbolic.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Pokémon Go goes to the museum… With the release of the location-based smart phone game, many museums and galleries across the world have found themselves drawn into the game and attracting new visitors- players in pursuit of virtual Pokémon creatures. So could it be a game-changer for our cultural spaces? Tina is joined by Blaire Moskowitz, a New York based blogger and academic, who also works for a company that makes digital apps and audio guides for museums.

Côte d´Ivoire author Veronique Tadjo gives an insight into her rich multi-cultural influences and her determination to portray stronger female role models in children’s literature. Five years on from the earthquake and tsunami that triggered the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, a Japanese Manga artist has documented his time working inside the Fukushima nuclear plant. The artist, who works under the pen name Kazuto Tatsuta, was interviewed for The Cultural Frontline by producer Abby Leonard. Jamaican poet Kei Miller meditates on the significance of flags as symbols and the controversy that ensued when the American Embassy in Jamaica flew the rainbow flag at half mast, in the wake of the Orlando nightclub shooting in June.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Playing Pokémon Go at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany Credit: Sophia Kembowski/ AFP/ Getty Images)

Cultural Inclusion and Exclusion20160723

Cultural Inclusion and Exclusion- institutional, virtual and symbolic.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Pokémon Go goes to the museum… With the release of the location-based smart phone game, many museums and galleries across the world have found themselves drawn into the game and attracting new visitors- players in pursuit of virtual Pokémon creatures. So could it be a game-changer for our cultural spaces? Tina is joined by Blaire Moskowitz, a New York based blogger and academic, who also works for a company that makes digital apps and audio guides for museums.

Côte d´Ivoire author Veronique Tadjo gives an insight into her rich multi-cultural influences and her determination to portray stronger female role models in children’s literature. Five years on from the earthquake and tsunami that triggered the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, a Japanese Manga artist has documented his time working inside the Fukushima nuclear plant. The artist, who works under the pen name Kazuto Tatsuta, was interviewed for The Cultural Frontline by producer Abby Leonard. Jamaican poet Kei Miller meditates on the significance of flags as symbols and the controversy that ensued when the American Embassy in Jamaica flew the rainbow flag at half mast, in the wake of the Orlando nightclub shooting in June.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Playing Pokémon Go at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany Credit: Sophia Kembowski/ AFP/ Getty Images)

Cultural Revolution and Gardening as Art2016052820160529 (WS)

Looking back fifty years to China's Cultural Revolution, visiting Angola's newest museum.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

It’s fifty years since the beginning of the Cultural Revolution in China, but how is this dark period of national history remembered through art and culture? Journalist Vivienne Chow reports from Hong Kong.

Also in the programme, Tina heads to the Chelsea Flower Show in London to meet Juliet Sargeant, the first black landscape designer to exhibit in the show. She discusses her gold medal winning garden, based on the theme of modern slavery. We’ll also hear from Angola, where a new currency museum has opened – just as the Kwanza plummets in value. Writer Claudio Silva visits the museum and reports back, plus how one Cameroonian singer is raising awareness about his country’s problem with terrorism through music.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Mao souvenirs on sale in Beijing Credit: FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Cultural Revolution and Gardening as Art20160528

Looking back fifty years to China's Cultural Revolution, visiting Angola's newest museum.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

It’s fifty years since the beginning of the Cultural Revolution in China, but how is this dark period of national history remembered through art and culture? Journalist Vivienne Chow reports from Hong Kong.

Also in the programme, Tina heads to the Chelsea Flower Show in London to meet Juliet Sargeant, the first black landscape designer to exhibit in the show. She discusses her gold medal winning garden, based on the theme of modern slavery. We’ll also hear from Angola, where a new currency museum has opened – just as the Kwanza plummets in value. Writer Claudio Silva visits the museum and reports back, plus how one Cameroonian singer is raising awareness about his country’s problem with terrorism through music.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Mao souvenirs on sale in Beijing Credit: FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Culture and Holland's Political Climate2017031820170319 (WS)

Dutch/Moroccan novelist Abdelkader Benali discusses how culture has responded to populism

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The so called ‘Moroccan issue’ featured heavily in the Dutch election campaign. Although populist leader Geert Wilders was beaten into second place, the rhetoric he used in the campaign clearly struck a chord with Dutch voters. Tina speaks to the Dutch Moroccan writer Abdelkader Benali about how the political climate has impacted the cultural sphere.

As firms start bidding for the contract to build President Trump’s Mexican wall, activist and musician Glenn Weyant in Arizona and the artist Enrique Chiu in Tijuana speak to Tina about how they’re using the existing border fence in their art.

A new romantic comedy about a single woman in search of a sperm donor has shocked Egyptian society. Our reporter Nirvana El Saied speaks to the creative team behind the film about the challenges of making this kind of film in a conservative society.

As Hindu groups demand an apology over a new American TV show that they say promotes Hinduphobia, writer Sandip Roy considers the potential perils when TV and film attempt to sensationalise the religion of a billion plus people.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: election posters on display in Holland Credit:EMMANUEL DUNAND / Getty Images)

Culture and Holland's Political Climate20170318

Dutch/Moroccan novelist Abdelkader Benali discusses how culture has responded to populism

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The so called ‘Moroccan issue’ featured heavily in the Dutch election campaign. Although populist leader Geert Wilders was beaten into second place, the rhetoric he used in the campaign clearly struck a chord with Dutch voters. Tina speaks to the Dutch Moroccan writer Abdelkader Benali about how the political climate has impacted the cultural sphere.

As firms start bidding for the contract to build President Trump’s Mexican wall, activist and musician Glenn Weyant in Arizona and the artist Enrique Chiu in Tijuana speak to Tina about how they’re using the existing border fence in their art.

A new romantic comedy about a single woman in search of a sperm donor has shocked Egyptian society. Our reporter Nirvana El Saied speaks to the creative team behind the film about the challenges of making this kind of film in a conservative society.

As Hindu groups demand an apology over a new American TV show that they say promotes Hinduphobia, writer Sandip Roy considers the potential perils when TV and film attempt to sensationalise the religion of a billion plus people.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: election posters on display in Holland Credit:EMMANUEL DUNAND / Getty Images)

Culture And Holland's Political Climate2017031820170319 (WS)

The so called ‘Moroccan issue’ featured heavily in the Dutch election campaign. Although populist leader Geert Wilders was beaten into second place, the rhetoric he used in the campaign clearly struck a chord with Dutch voters. Tina speaks to the Dutch Moroccan writer Abdelkader Benali about how the political climate has impacted the cultural sphere.

As firms start bidding for the contract to build President Trump’s Mexican wall, activist and musician Glenn Weyant in Arizona and the artist Enrique Chiu in Tijuana speak to Tina about how they’re using the existing border fence in their art.

A new romantic comedy about a single woman in search of a sperm donor has shocked Egyptian society. Our reporter Nirvana El Saied speaks to the creative team behind the film about the challenges of making this kind of film in a conservative society.

As Hindu groups demand an apology over a new American TV show that they say promotes Hinduphobia, writer Sandip Roy considers the potential perils when TV and film attempt to sensationalise the religion of a billion plus people.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: election posters on display in Holland Credit:EMMANUEL DUNAND / Getty Images)

Culture And The Conflict In The Former Yugoslavia20171216

Reflections on how the conflict in the former Yugoslavia shaped a generation of writers.

In this week’s The Cultural Frontline stories of history, legacy and tradition.

Following the final cases in the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the Macedonian writer Lidija Dimkovska reflects on how the conflict shaped a generation of writers.

The BBC's Paula Adamo Idoeta takes us on a whistle stop tour of Sao Paulo following the history of the city’s love/hate relationship with street art.

The writer Inua Ellams explores tradition, family, politics and race in his drama Barber Shop Chronicles set in six hairdressers across two continents.

Plus ahead of the release of The Last Jedi we’ll hear from a super fan and a superstar of Star Wars on the blockbuster’s continuing global appeal.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: A woman looks at pictures of victims inside the memorial of victims, in front of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague Photo credit: JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images)

Culture and the Conflict in the Former Yugoslavia2017121620171217 (WS)

Reflections on how the conflict in the former Yugoslavia shaped a generation of writers.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In this week’s The Cultural Frontline stories of history, legacy and tradition.

Following the final cases in the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the Macedonian writer Lidija Dimkovska reflects on how the conflict shaped a generation of writers.

The BBC's Paula Adamo Idoeta takes us on a whistle stop tour of Sao Paulo following the history of the city’s love/hate relationship with street art.

The writer Inua Ellams explores tradition, family, politics and race in his drama Barber Shop Chronicles set in six hairdressers across two continents.

Plus ahead of the release of The Last Jedi we’ll hear from a super fan and a superstar of Star Wars on the blockbuster’s continuing global appeal.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: A woman looks at pictures of victims inside the memorial of victims, in front of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague Photo credit: JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images)

Culture and the Conflict in the Former Yugoslavia2017121620171218 (WS)

Reflections on how the conflict in the former Yugoslavia shaped a generation of writers.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In this week’s The Cultural Frontline stories of history, legacy and tradition.

Following the final cases in the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the Macedonian writer Lidija Dimkovska reflects on how the conflict shaped a generation of writers.

The BBC's Paula Adamo Idoeta takes us on a whistle stop tour of Sao Paulo following the history of the city’s love/hate relationship with street art.

The writer Inua Ellams explores tradition, family, politics and race in his drama Barber Shop Chronicles set in six hairdressers across two continents.

Plus ahead of the release of The Last Jedi we’ll hear from a super fan and a superstar of Star Wars on the blockbuster’s continuing global appeal.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: A woman looks at pictures of victims inside the memorial of victims, in front of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague Photo credit: JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images)

Culture and the Conflict in the Former Yugoslavia20171216

Reflections on how the conflict in the former Yugoslavia shaped a generation of writers.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In this week’s The Cultural Frontline stories of history, legacy and tradition.

Following the final cases in the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the Macedonian writer Lidija Dimkovska reflects on how the conflict shaped a generation of writers.

The BBC's Paula Adamo Idoeta takes us on a whistle stop tour of Sao Paulo following the history of the city’s love/hate relationship with street art.

The writer Inua Ellams explores tradition, family, politics and race in his drama Barber Shop Chronicles set in six hairdressers across two continents.

Plus ahead of the release of The Last Jedi we’ll hear from a super fan and a superstar of Star Wars on the blockbuster’s continuing global appeal.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: A woman looks at pictures of victims inside the memorial of victims, in front of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague Photo credit: JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images)

Culture And The French Elections2017040820170409 (WS)

How artists, writers and musicians are reflecting the election campaign in their work

As France prepares for one of the most unpredictable Presidential elections in recent memory, Tina Daheley speaks to artists, writers and musicians about how they’re reflecting on the debates raised by the campaign through their work.

Architect Dietmar Feichtinger discusses his designs for security barriers which will surround the Eiffel Tower, and architect and commentator Dan Dorrell considers how security concerns might impact the geography of the city.

Marie Beschon of the Marseille based theatre company Manifeste Rien explains why their latest show is tackling the waves of immigration that have characterised the city for decades.

Writer and journalist Laurent Dandrieu discusses the challenges of being publicly right-wing for cultural figures in France today.

Thierry Danet, of the Ososphere Festival in Strasbourg explains why his city has such a unique relationship with Europe and how his festival plans to engage with the debates ignited by the election.

Rapper and novelist Gael Faye tells Tina how growing up in Burundi and then moving to France as a teenager gave him the drive to write music about unity and acceptance.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a man looks at the Eiffel Tower Credit: PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Culture and the French Elections2017040820170409 (WS)

How artists, writers and musicians are reflecting the election campaign in their work

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As France prepares for one of the most unpredictable Presidential elections in recent memory, Tina Daheley speaks to artists, writers and musicians about how they’re reflecting on the debates raised by the campaign through their work.

Architect Dietmar Feichtinger discusses his designs for security barriers which will surround the Eiffel Tower, and architect and commentator Dan Dorrell considers how security concerns might impact the geography of the city.

Marie Beschon of the Marseille based theatre company Manifeste Rien explains why their latest show is tackling the waves of immigration that have characterised the city for decades.

Writer and journalist Laurent Dandrieu discusses the challenges of being publicly right-wing for cultural figures in France today.

Thierry Danet, of the Ososphere Festival in Strasbourg explains why his city has such a unique relationship with Europe and how his festival plans to engage with the debates ignited by the election.

Rapper and novelist Gael Faye tells Tina how growing up in Burundi and then moving to France as a teenager gave him the drive to write music about unity and acceptance.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a man looks at the Eiffel Tower Credit: PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Culture and the French Elections20170408

How artists, writers and musicians are reflecting the election campaign in their work

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As France prepares for one of the most unpredictable Presidential elections in recent memory, Tina Daheley speaks to artists, writers and musicians about how they’re reflecting on the debates raised by the campaign through their work.

Architect Dietmar Feichtinger discusses his designs for security barriers which will surround the Eiffel Tower, and architect and commentator Dan Dorrell considers how security concerns might impact the geography of the city.

Marie Beschon of the Marseille based theatre company Manifeste Rien explains why their latest show is tackling the waves of immigration that have characterised the city for decades.

Writer and journalist Laurent Dandrieu discusses the challenges of being publicly right-wing for cultural figures in France today.

Thierry Danet, of the Ososphere Festival in Strasbourg explains why his city has such a unique relationship with Europe and how his festival plans to engage with the debates ignited by the election.

Rapper and novelist Gael Faye tells Tina how growing up in Burundi and then moving to France as a teenager gave him the drive to write music about unity and acceptance.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a man looks at the Eiffel Tower Credit: PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Culture And The Trump Presidency2017011420170115 (WS)

How artists are reacting to and reflecting the approaching Presidency of Donald Trump

Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States on January 20th. The Cultural Frontline looks ahead to the Trump Presidency and examines how artists, writers and musicians are marking this historic moment.

Booker Prize-winning novelist Paul Beatty looks back at Obama's cultural legacy and looks ahead to how the Trump cultural aesthetic might be expressed.

As inauguration day looms, who will be performing and who has refused? Mark Coles examines what we know so far.

And we hear from visual artists on both sides of the political spectrum about how they have chosen to express their feelings about the election.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Donald Trump at the Capitol Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Culture and the Trump Presidency2017011420170115 (WS)

How artists are reacting to and reflecting the approaching Presidency of Donald Trump

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States on January 20th. The Cultural Frontline looks ahead to the Trump Presidency and examines how artists, writers and musicians are marking this historic moment.

Booker Prize-winning novelist Paul Beatty looks back at Obama's cultural legacy and looks ahead to how the Trump cultural aesthetic might be expressed.

As inauguration day looms, who will be performing and who has refused? Mark Coles examines what we know so far.

And we hear from visual artists on both sides of the political spectrum about how they have chosen to express their feelings about the election.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Donald Trump at the Capitol Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Culture and the Trump Presidency20170114

How artists are reacting to and reflecting the approaching Presidency of Donald Trump

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States on January 20th. The Cultural Frontline looks ahead to the Trump Presidency and examines how artists, writers and musicians are marking this historic moment.

Booker Prize-winning novelist Paul Beatty looks back at Obama's cultural legacy and looks ahead to how the Trump cultural aesthetic might be expressed.

As inauguration day looms, who will be performing and who has refused? Mark Coles examines what we know so far.

And we hear from visual artists on both sides of the political spectrum about how they have chosen to express their feelings about the election.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Donald Trump at the Capitol Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Culture as Catharsis2016071620160717 (WS)

How music and literature can provide catharsis in America, South Africa, Spain and the UK

The world seen through the eyes of artists

American singer Jayanthi Kyle discusses the song Hand in Hand, a protest song she co-wrote with Wes Burdine about the high profile killings of African American men by police in America. The song has become an anthem sung at Black Lives Matter rallies in Minneapolis. Jayanthi reflects on what artists can do to advance racial equality and justice.

Also in the programme; London based Greek novelist Panos Karnezis considers whether Britain's decision to leave the EU should have been anticipated by artists, writer Yewande Omotoso asks how literature is engaging the with legacy of Truth and Reconciliation in South Africa 20 years on, and 80 years after the Spanish Civil War began, flamenco artist Paco Peña discusses how music and art can help a country wrestle with its past.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Jayathi Kyle: Credit: Tony Webster)

Culture as Catharsis20160716

How music and literature can provide catharsis in America, South Africa, Spain and the UK

The world seen through the eyes of artists

American singer Jayanthi Kyle discusses the song Hand in Hand, a protest song she co-wrote with Wes Burdine about the high profile killings of African American men by police in America. The song has become an anthem sung at Black Lives Matter rallies in Minneapolis. Jayanthi reflects on what artists can do to advance racial equality and justice.

Also in the programme; London based Greek novelist Panos Karnezis considers whether Britain's decision to leave the EU should have been anticipated by artists, writer Yewande Omotoso asks how literature is engaging the with legacy of Truth and Reconciliation in South Africa 20 years on, and 80 years after the Spanish Civil War began, flamenco artist Paco Peña discusses how music and art can help a country wrestle with its past.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Jayathi Kyle: Credit: Tony Webster)

Dancing with Pride2018072120180722 (WS)

We explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture around the world.

The Bassiani nightclub in Tbilisi has been a rare safe place for Georgia’s LGBTQ+ community to dance freely and express themselves but in May 2018 it was raided by armed police. Many Georgians saw the police raids as an attack on their freedom. Thousands took to the streets and started a protest rave, dancing for freedom. The BBC's Rayhan Demytrie met with one of the artists at the centre of the protests, the author, poet and musician, Erekle Deisadze.

We meet Dope Saint Jude, the South African musician and former drag king turning her life into lyrics and exploring queer culture and race through hip hop.

The BBC’s Saskia Edwards takes us into the world of voguing and meets two aspiring dancers striking poses and finding meaning on the dancefloors of New York and Bratislava, Slovakia.

Plus have you heard of bucking? We hear from the choreographer Jamal Sims on how the high-energy dance craze has taken Atlanta’s gay nightclubs by storm and even inspired Beyoncé.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Image: Bucking contest in Atlanta, USA. Credit: John Orphan)

Dancing with Pride2018072120180723 (WS)

We explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture around the world.

The Bassiani nightclub in Tbilisi has been a rare safe place for Georgia’s LGBTQ+ community to dance freely and express themselves but in May 2018 it was raided by armed police. Many Georgians saw the police raids as an attack on their freedom. Thousands took to the streets and started a protest rave, dancing for freedom. The BBC's Rayhan Demytrie met with one of the artists at the centre of the protests, the author, poet and musician, Erekle Deisadze.

We meet Dope Saint Jude, the South African musician and former drag king turning her life into lyrics and exploring queer culture and race through hip hop.

The BBC’s Saskia Edwards takes us into the world of voguing and meets two aspiring dancers striking poses and finding meaning on the dancefloors of New York and Bratislava, Slovakia.

Plus have you heard of bucking? We hear from the choreographer Jamal Sims on how the high-energy dance craze has taken Atlanta’s gay nightclubs by storm and even inspired Beyoncé.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Image: Bucking contest in Atlanta, USA. Credit: John Orphan)

Dancing with Pride20180721

We explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture around the world.

The Bassiani nightclub in Tbilisi has been a rare safe place for Georgia’s LGBTQ+ community to dance freely and express themselves but in May 2018 it was raided by armed police. Many Georgians saw the police raids as an attack on their freedom. Thousands took to the streets and started a protest rave, dancing for freedom. The BBC's Rayhan Demytrie met with one of the artists at the centre of the protests, the author, poet and musician, Erekle Deisadze.

We meet Dope Saint Jude, the South African musician and former drag king turning her life into lyrics and exploring queer culture and race through hip hop.

The BBC’s Saskia Edwards takes us into the world of voguing and meets two aspiring dancers striking poses and finding meaning on the dancefloors of New York and Bratislava, Slovakia.

Plus have you heard of bucking? We hear from the choreographer Jamal Sims on how the high-energy dance craze has taken Atlanta’s gay nightclubs by storm and even inspired Beyoncé.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Image: Bucking contest in Atlanta, USA. Credit: John Orphan)

Dancing with Pride2018072120180723 (WS)
20180722 (WS)

We explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture around the world.

The Bassiani nightclub in Tbilisi has been a rare safe place for Georgia’s LGBTQ+ community to dance freely and express themselves but in May 2018 it was raided by armed police. Many Georgians saw the police raids as an attack on their freedom. Thousands took to the streets and started a protest rave, dancing for freedom. The BBC's Rayhan Demytrie met with one of the artists at the centre of the protests, the author, poet and musician, Erekle Deisadze.

We meet Dope Saint Jude, the South African musician and former drag king turning her life into lyrics and exploring queer culture and race through hip hop.

The BBC’s Saskia Edwards takes us into the world of voguing and meets two aspiring dancers striking poses and finding meaning on the dancefloors of New York and Bratislava, Slovakia.

Plus have you heard of bucking? We hear from the choreographer Jamal Sims on how the high-energy dance craze has taken Atlanta’s gay nightclubs by storm and even inspired Beyoncé.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Image: Bucking contest in Atlanta, USA. Credit: John Orphan)

We explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture around the world.

The Bassiani nightclub in Tbilisi has been a rare safe place for Georgia’s LGBTQ+ community to dance freely and express themselves but in May 2018 it was raided by armed police. Many Georgians saw the police raids as an attack on their freedom. Thousands took to the streets and started a protest rave, dancing for freedom. The BBC's Rayhan Demytrie met with one of the artists at the centre of the protests, the author, poet and musician, Erekle Deisadze.

We meet Dope Saint Jude, the South African musician and former drag king turning her life into lyrics and exploring queer culture and race through hip hop.

The BBC’s Saskia Edwards takes us into the world of voguing and meets two aspiring dancers striking poses and finding meaning on the dancefloors of New York and Bratislava, Slovakia.

Plus have you heard of bucking? We hear from the choreographer Jamal Sims on how the high-energy dance craze has taken Atlanta’s gay nightclubs by storm and even inspired Beyoncé.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Image: Bucking contest in Atlanta, USA. Credit: John Orphan)

We explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture around the world.

The Bassiani nightclub in Tbilisi has been a rare safe place for Georgia’s LGBTQ+ community to dance freely and express themselves but in May 2018 it was raided by armed police. Many Georgians saw the police raids as an attack on their freedom. Thousands took to the streets and started a protest rave, dancing for freedom. The BBC's Rayhan Demytrie met with one of the artists at the centre of the protests, the author, poet and musician, Erekle Deisadze.

We meet Dope Saint Jude, the South African musician and former drag king turning her life into lyrics and exploring queer culture and race through hip hop.

The BBC’s Saskia Edwards takes us into the world of voguing and meets two aspiring dancers striking poses and finding meaning on the dancefloors of New York and Bratislava, Slovakia.

Plus have you heard of bucking? We hear from the choreographer Jamal Sims on how the high-energy dance craze has taken Atlanta’s gay nightclubs by storm and even inspired Beyoncé.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Image: Bucking contest in Atlanta, USA. Credit: John Orphan)

Daring Disabled Artists2018092220180923 (WS)

What does it mean to be an artist with a disability?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

What does it mean to be an artist with a disability?

This week on The Cultural Frontline we look at how disabled artists are challenging perceptions and asking questions of their audiences.

Nicholas Ouma Odhiambo found dance at the age of 31 through an inclusive company called Dance Into Space based in Nairobi, Kenya. After contracting polio at the age of 3 and living his life with reduced mobility he reveals how he found happiness in dance.

Why are disabled characters in films being repeatedly played by non-disabled actors? Adam Pearson and Virali Modi, actors based in the UK and India re-count the prejudice they’ve faced in securing acting work, and discuss why it’s so important that the industry changes.

Khairani Barokka takes us inside her latest work using installations and performance to ask important questions of what someone’s disability can mean for their place in the world.

And Tina Daheley is joined in the studio with Kat Hawkins, a dancer and double leg amputee who came back to dance three years ago. Together they discuss art and disability and ask whether things are changing for disabled artists around the world.

Presented by Tina Daheley and Kat Hawkins.

Image: Kat Hawkins and Anne Gaelle Thiriot perform on stage as part of AnnieVickySarah. Choreography: Victoria Malin. Credit: Matt Grayson.

Daring Disabled Artists2018092220180924 (WS)

What does it mean to be an artist with a disability?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

What does it mean to be an artist with a disability?

This week on The Cultural Frontline we look at how disabled artists are challenging perceptions and asking questions of their audiences.

Nicholas Ouma Odhiambo found dance at the age of 31 through an inclusive company called Dance Into Space based in Nairobi, Kenya. After contracting polio at the age of 3 and living his life with reduced mobility he reveals how he found happiness in dance.

Why are disabled characters in films being repeatedly played by non-disabled actors? Adam Pearson and Virali Modi, actors based in the UK and India re-count the prejudice they’ve faced in securing acting work, and discuss why it’s so important that the industry changes.

Khairani Barokka takes us inside her latest work using installations and performance to ask important questions of what someone’s disability can mean for their place in the world.

And Tina Daheley is joined in the studio with Kat Hawkins, a dancer and double leg amputee who came back to dance three years ago. Together they discuss art and disability and ask whether things are changing for disabled artists around the world.

Presented by Tina Daheley and Kat Hawkins.

Image: Kat Hawkins and Anne Gaelle Thiriot perform on stage as part of AnnieVickySarah. Choreography: Victoria Malin. Credit: Matt Grayson.

Daring Disabled Artists20180922

What does it mean to be an artist with a disability?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

What does it mean to be an artist with a disability?

This week on The Cultural Frontline we look at how disabled artists are challenging perceptions and asking questions of their audiences.

Nicholas Ouma Odhiambo found dance at the age of 31 through an inclusive company called Dance Into Space based in Nairobi, Kenya. After contracting polio at the age of 3 and living his life with reduced mobility he reveals how he found happiness in dance.

Why are disabled characters in films being repeatedly played by non-disabled actors? Adam Pearson and Virali Modi, actors based in the UK and India re-count the prejudice they’ve faced in securing acting work, and discuss why it’s so important that the industry changes.

Khairani Barokka takes us inside her latest work using installations and performance to ask important questions of what someone’s disability can mean for their place in the world.

And Tina Daheley is joined in the studio with Kat Hawkins, a dancer and double leg amputee who came back to dance three years ago. Together they discuss art and disability and ask whether things are changing for disabled artists around the world.

Presented by Tina Daheley and Kat Hawkins.

Image: Kat Hawkins and Anne Gaelle Thiriot perform on stage as part of AnnieVickySarah. Choreography: Victoria Malin. Credit: Matt Grayson.

Daring Disabled Artists2018092220180923 (WS)
20180924 (WS)

What does it mean to be an artist with a disability?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

What does it mean to be an artist with a disability?

This week on The Cultural Frontline we look at how disabled artists are challenging perceptions and asking questions of their audiences.

Nicholas Ouma Odhiambo found dance at the age of 31 through an inclusive company called Dance Into Space based in Nairobi, Kenya. After contracting polio at the age of 3 and living his life with reduced mobility he reveals how he found happiness in dance.

Why are disabled characters in films being repeatedly played by non-disabled actors? Adam Pearson and Virali Modi, actors based in the UK and India re-count the prejudice they’ve faced in securing acting work, and discuss why it’s so important that the industry changes.

Khairani Barokka takes us inside her latest work using installations and performance to ask important questions of what someone’s disability can mean for their place in the world.

And Tina Daheley is joined in the studio with Kat Hawkins, a dancer and double leg amputee who came back to dance three years ago. Together they discuss art and disability and ask whether things are changing for disabled artists around the world.

Presented by Tina Daheley and Kat Hawkins.

Image: Kat Hawkins and Anne Gaelle Thiriot perform on stage as part of AnnieVickySarah. Choreography: Victoria Malin. Credit: Matt Grayson.

Dramatising the Refugee Crisis, Broken Fingaz Street Art2016110520161106 (WS)

Berkun Oya on dramatising the refugee crisis; the Broken Fingaz street art collective

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Turkish playwright Berkun Oya tells presenter Tina Daheley how he tackled the refugee crisis in his latest play Closed, and why he chose to set it in Copenhagen, Denmark. Closed is part of Theatre Uncut, which commissions plays as rapid responses to current events and enables them to be performed by anyone, anywhere in the world for free.

Reporter Sahar Zand meets a member of the Broken Fingaz street art collective from Israel. Against the colourful backdrop of his latest mural in Hackney, east London, they discuss the controversial group’s international presence and deep roots in their native Haifa, Israel.

Tina is also joined by Austrian-American film-maker duo, Richard Ladkani and Kief Davidson, who have co-directed The Ivory Game, a new Netflix documentary, executive produced by Hollywood actor Leonardo DiCaprio. The film blends undercover reporting in China and Africa with the suspense of a thriller, to expose the international ivory trade.

Chinese-American author Yiyun Li explains how lessons from her childhood have coloured her approach to the issues of immigration, racial tension and gender inequality in her writing, amid the divisive atmosphere of the US presidential election campaign.

(Photo: A Broken Fingaz mural in Bremen, Germany. Credit: Broken Fingaz)

Dramatising the Refugee Crisis, Broken Fingaz Street Art20161105

Berkun Oya on dramatising the refugee crisis; the Broken Fingaz street art collective

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Turkish playwright Berkun Oya tells presenter Tina Daheley how he tackled the refugee crisis in his latest play Closed, and why he chose to set it in Copenhagen, Denmark. Closed is part of Theatre Uncut, which commissions plays as rapid responses to current events and enables them to be performed by anyone, anywhere in the world for free.

Reporter Sahar Zand meets a member of the Broken Fingaz street art collective from Israel. Against the colourful backdrop of his latest mural in Hackney, east London, they discuss the controversial group’s international presence and deep roots in their native Haifa, Israel.

Tina is also joined by Austrian-American film-maker duo, Richard Ladkani and Kief Davidson, who have co-directed The Ivory Game, a new Netflix documentary, executive produced by Hollywood actor Leonardo DiCaprio. The film blends undercover reporting in China and Africa with the suspense of a thriller, to expose the international ivory trade.

Chinese-American author Yiyun Li explains how lessons from her childhood have coloured her approach to the issues of immigration, racial tension and gender inequality in her writing, amid the divisive atmosphere of the US presidential election campaign.

(Photo: A Broken Fingaz mural in Bremen, Germany. Credit: Broken Fingaz)

Emel: The Voice of the Tunisian Revolution2017031120170312 (WS)

The singer explains how she feels about her permanent association with the Arab Spring

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Tunisian singer Emel has been called ‘the voice of the Tunisian Revolution’. As she releases her new album she talks to Tina about what this tag has meant to her and why she wants to use her new music to move beyond the clichés associated with her region.

Nigerian novelist Ayobami Adebayo has just been nominated for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction. She explores the way women’s hair communicates meaning in Yoruba culture.

As new Wolverine film Logan is cut by 14 minutes for release in China, culture critic Vivienne Chow describes how the country's censorship laws are impacting creativity.

We get a tour of Jamaica’s capital Kingston to find out how the political graffiti that has decorated the walls since the 1970s is being replaced by a more positive image of the city’s cultural heritage.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Tunisian singer Emel Credit: AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/GettyImages)

Emel: The Voice of the Tunisian Revolution20170311

The singer explains how she feels about her permanent association with the Arab Spring

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Tunisian singer Emel has been called ‘the voice of the Tunisian Revolution’. As she releases her new album she talks to Tina about what this tag has meant to her and why she wants to use her new music to move beyond the clichés associated with her region.

Nigerian novelist Ayobami Adebayo has just been nominated for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction. She explores the way women’s hair communicates meaning in Yoruba culture.

As new Wolverine film Logan is cut by 14 minutes for release in China, culture critic Vivienne Chow describes how the country's censorship laws are impacting creativity.

We get a tour of Jamaica’s capital Kingston to find out how the political graffiti that has decorated the walls since the 1970s is being replaced by a more positive image of the city’s cultural heritage.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Tunisian singer Emel Credit: AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/GettyImages)

Emel: The Voice Of The Tunisian Revolution2017031120170312 (WS)

Tunisian singer Emel has been called ‘the voice of the Tunisian Revolution’. As she releases her new album she talks to Tina about what this tag has meant to her and why she wants to use her new music to move beyond the clichés associated with her region.

Nigerian novelist Ayobami Adebayo has just been nominated for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction. She explores the way women’s hair communicates meaning in Yoruba culture.

As new Wolverine film Logan is cut by 14 minutes for release in China, culture critic Vivienne Chow describes how the country's censorship laws are impacting creativity.

We get a tour of Jamaica’s capital Kingston to find out how the political graffiti that has decorated the walls since the 1970s is being replaced by a more positive image of the city’s cultural heritage.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Tunisian singer Emel Credit: AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/GettyImages)

The singer explains how she feels about her permanent association with the Arab Spring

Empathising Across Cultural Divides2016082020160821 (WS)

Connecting through art and design in Lebanon, Nigeria, the Middle East and San Francisco.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Tina interviews the Lebanese author, Nada Awar Jarrar, author of An Unsafe Haven, a new novel exploring the experience and impact of Syrian refugees in Lebanon. Also in the programme: an essay from the Nigerian author Leye Adenle, on making the genre of crime fiction his own. Plus, the founder and members of the Heartbeat music project, which brings young Israeli and Palestinian musicians together, talk to Tina and perform in the studio. Finally, The Atlas of Emotions is a new online tool that visualises and describes feelings, inspired by the teachings of the Dalai Lama. Producer Tania Ketenjian spoke to the San Francisco psychologist and designer behind the project, about how they realised the Dalai Lama’s ambition to map the mind.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: A Syrian refugee hangs washing in Lebanon Credit: Anwar Amro/ AFP/ Getty Images)

Empathising Across Cultural Divides20160820

Connecting through art and design in Lebanon, Nigeria, the Middle East and San Francisco.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Tina interviews the Lebanese author, Nada Awar Jarrar, author of An Unsafe Haven, a new novel exploring the experience and impact of Syrian refugees in Lebanon. Also in the programme: an essay from the Nigerian author Leye Adenle, on making the genre of crime fiction his own. Plus, the founder and members of the Heartbeat music project, which brings young Israeli and Palestinian musicians together, talk to Tina and perform in the studio. Finally, The Atlas of Emotions is a new online tool that visualises and describes feelings, inspired by the teachings of the Dalai Lama. Producer Tania Ketenjian spoke to the San Francisco psychologist and designer behind the project, about how they realised the Dalai Lama’s ambition to map the mind.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: A Syrian refugee hangs washing in Lebanon Credit: Anwar Amro/ AFP/ Getty Images)

Fiction From The Arab World20170429

What kinds of subjects have preoccupuied writers in the region for the last decade?

Fiction from the Arab World2017042920170430 (WS)

What kinds of subjects have preoccupuied writers in the region for the last decade?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Saudi writer Mohammed Hasan Alwan has been announced as the winner of the International Prize for Arabic Fiction. Now in its 10th year, the prize aims to bring the region’s rich and varied literary output to a wider audience. Alwan and commentator Anwar Hamed discuss how the upheavals of the past 10 years have been reflected in novels and poetry.

As France prepares to choose between Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen in next month’s Presidential election, writer Agnes Poirier considers how Macron the outsider may represent more cultural continuity than it appears.

A literary exercise called The Black Obituary Project is encouraging black men and women in the US to write their own obituaries. It aims to highlight the psychological impact of police shootings on the wider black community. Founder Ja’han Jones explains what has surprised him most about the response.

Israeli singer David Broza discusses a career that spans more than 40 years and in the week that Radiohead have been criticised for planning to perform in Israel, reflects on why he doesn’t think cultural boycotts are productive.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a woman reads in a bookshop Credit:SAFIN HAMED/AFP/Getty Images)

Fiction from the Arab World20170429

What kinds of subjects have preoccupuied writers in the region for the last decade?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Saudi writer Mohammed Hasan Alwan has been announced as the winner of the International Prize for Arabic Fiction. Now in its 10th year, the prize aims to bring the region’s rich and varied literary output to a wider audience. Alwan and commentator Anwar Hamed discuss how the upheavals of the past 10 years have been reflected in novels and poetry.

As France prepares to choose between Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen in next month’s Presidential election, writer Agnes Poirier considers how Macron the outsider may represent more cultural continuity than it appears.

A literary exercise called The Black Obituary Project is encouraging black men and women in the US to write their own obituaries. It aims to highlight the psychological impact of police shootings on the wider black community. Founder Ja’han Jones explains what has surprised him most about the response.

Israeli singer David Broza discusses a career that spans more than 40 years and in the week that Radiohead have been criticised for planning to perform in Israel, reflects on why he doesn’t think cultural boycotts are productive.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a woman reads in a bookshop Credit:SAFIN HAMED/AFP/Getty Images)

Fidel Castro's Cultural Legacy2016120320161204 (WS)

As Cuba mourns the death of Fidel Castro, artist Geandy Pavón and blogger Harold Cárdenas Lema discuss his cultural legacy, and how artists have responded to news of his death.

The young residents of Mitrovica in Kosovo are used to growing up in a city divided along ethnic lines but playing rock music together is breaking down barriers, we hear the story of Mitrovica Rock School.

This week was meant to mark the opening of a landmark exhibition of Iranian owned contemporary art in Berlin but it was cancelled at the last minute. Journalist Saeed Kamali Dehghan and German diplomat Andreas Gorgen discuss what happened.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a painting of Fidel Castro in a Havana Street Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Fidel Castro's Cultural Legacy2016120320161204 (WS)

How arts and culture fared under his rule, and how artists have reacted to his death.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As Cuba mourns the death of Fidel Castro, artist Geandy Pavón and blogger Harold Cárdenas Lema discuss his cultural legacy, and how artists have responded to news of his death.

The young residents of Mitrovica in Kosovo are used to growing up in a city divided along ethnic lines but playing rock music together is breaking down barriers, we hear the story of Mitrovica Rock School.

This week was meant to mark the opening of a landmark exhibition of Iranian owned contemporary art in Berlin but it was cancelled at the last minute. Journalist Saeed Kamali Dehghan and German diplomat Andreas Gorgen discuss what happened.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a painting of Fidel Castro in a Havana Street Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Fidel Castro's Cultural Legacy20161203

How arts and culture fared under his rule, and how artists have reacted to his death.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As Cuba mourns the death of Fidel Castro, artist Geandy Pavón and blogger Harold Cárdenas Lema discuss his cultural legacy, and how artists have responded to news of his death.

The young residents of Mitrovica in Kosovo are used to growing up in a city divided along ethnic lines but playing rock music together is breaking down barriers, we hear the story of Mitrovica Rock School.

This week was meant to mark the opening of a landmark exhibition of Iranian owned contemporary art in Berlin but it was cancelled at the last minute. Journalist Saeed Kamali Dehghan and German diplomat Andreas Gorgen discuss what happened.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a painting of Fidel Castro in a Havana Street Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Fighting Cultural Destruction2016082720160828 (WS)

Protecting Syria's antiquities, street art with a message, Pashtun fashion

The world seen through the eyes of artists

With Sahar Zand.

Maamoun Abdulkarim, the man in charge of trying to protect Syria’s precious artefacts from being destroyed by ISIS, explains why his job is crucial for Syria’s future.

Also in the programme, we visit the street artist based in Manchester, England who’s using her art to challenge our ideas of how men and women should behave, Afghan designer Nawed Elias discusses his work combining Pashtun traditional costume with high fashion, and from Kuwait, writer Mai Al-Nakib relates a curious case of life imitating art.

(Photo: artefacts from Tell Halaf in Northern Syria on display in Germany Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Fighting Cultural Destruction20160827

Protecting Syria's antiquities, street art with a message, Pashtun fashion

The world seen through the eyes of artists

With Sahar Zand.

Maamoun Abdulkarim, the man in charge of trying to protect Syria’s precious artefacts from being destroyed by ISIS, explains why his job is crucial for Syria’s future.

Also in the programme, we visit the street artist based in Manchester, England who’s using her art to challenge our ideas of how men and women should behave, Afghan designer Nawed Elias discusses his work combining Pashtun traditional costume with high fashion, and from Kuwait, writer Mai Al-Nakib relates a curious case of life imitating art.

(Photo: artefacts from Tell Halaf in Northern Syria on display in Germany Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Film, Feminism And Frankenstein2018062320180624 (WS)
20180625 (WS)

How artists are stitching stories together from other cultures,places and times for today

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How artists are stitching stories together from other cultures, places and times to speak to audiences today about gender equality and conflict in the Middle East.

At a time of radical change in Saudi Arabia, the BBC’s Nawal al-Maghafi asks Saudi's first female filmmaker Haifaa al-Mansour why she wanted to tell the story of English science fiction pioneer, Mary Shelley.

The award-winning Iraqi novelist Ahmed Saadawi tells the BBC’s Mona Deeley why he chose to transplant Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to Baghdad.

Iranian artist Morehshin Allahyari tells a story that re-writes mythology to interrogate misogyny in the Middle East and beyond.

Plus, the award-winning poet and artist Imtiaz Dharker on the film that showed her that art can be a rich tapestry.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Kirsty McQuire

Image: Prop of Bride of Frankenstein and Son of Frankenstein Credit: Albert L. Ortega/ Getty Images

How artists are stitching stories together from other cultures,places and times for today

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How artists are stitching stories together from other cultures, places and times to speak to audiences today about gender equality and conflict in the Middle East.

At a time of radical change in Saudi Arabia, the BBC’s Nawal al-Maghafi asks Saudi's first female filmmaker Haifaa al-Mansour why she wanted to tell the story of English science fiction pioneer, Mary Shelley.

The award-winning Iraqi novelist Ahmed Saadawi tells the BBC’s Mona Deeley why he chose to transplant Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to Baghdad.

Iranian artist Morehshin Allahyari tells a story that re-writes mythology to interrogate misogyny in the Middle East and beyond.

Plus, the award-winning poet and artist Imtiaz Dharker on the film that showed her that art can be a rich tapestry.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Kirsty McQuire

Image: Prop of Bride of Frankenstein and Son of Frankenstein Credit: Albert L. Ortega/ Getty Images

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Finding Calm in Public Spaces2016062520160626 (WS)

Why public space matters for culture in London, Istanbul and Nairobi

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Wolfgang Buttress is the artist behind a giant interactive beehive which has landed at London’s Kew Gardens. He explains why he is using his work to highlight the situation of the world’s bees.

Also, Turkish writer Burhan Sonmez considers the ways that his home city of Istanbul has changed and British poet Dean Atta presents a brand new poem, written after the massacre at Orlando’s gay nightclub, Pulse. Finally, we hear from musical therapist and singer Wanny Angerer about how art can change lives on a local level, at a Nairobi cancer centre. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: The Hive in London's Kew Gardens Credit: Jeff Eden)

Finding Calm in Public Spaces20160625

Why public space matters for culture in London, Istanbul and Nairobi

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Wolfgang Buttress is the artist behind a giant interactive beehive which has landed at London’s Kew Gardens. He explains why he is using his work to highlight the situation of the world’s bees.

Also, Turkish writer Burhan Sonmez considers the ways that his home city of Istanbul has changed and British poet Dean Atta presents a brand new poem, written after the massacre at Orlando’s gay nightclub, Pulse. Finally, we hear from musical therapist and singer Wanny Angerer about how art can change lives on a local level, at a Nairobi cancer centre. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: The Hive in London's Kew Gardens Credit: Jeff Eden)

Finding Freedom Through Art2018102720181028 (WS)

We meet the artists expressing what it means to be free.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

From Gangsta Rap to Religious Redemption2018042120180422 (WS)

The musician who gave up gangsta rap for a new life as an Orthodox Jew.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline, stories of place and identity from a musician, a writer and a curator.

We meet the rapper who took an unorthodox route to embracing Orthodox Judaism, after turning his back on gangsta rap. Nissim Black talks about his spiritual and lyrical journey with The Cultural Frontline’s Datshiane Navanayagam.

The Roma are one of the most marginalised groups in Europe and for many years their cultural identity has been portrayed negatively with few Roma artists having the platform to tell their own stories. Delaine Le Bas is trying to change that narrative. She tells Tina how she came to launch a ground breaking new arts event, the Roma Biennale.

Failaka Island is a peaceful place found off the coast of Kuwait which belies a chequered past. It was occupied by an invading Iraqi army during the Gulf War and was a former outpost of Alexander the Great thousands of years before. But could its unique history be threatened by vast urban development in the region? The writer Mai Al-Nakib takes us on journey to an island frozen in time.

Has a book, a song, a film or a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The critically acclaimed Danish film director and screenwriter Lone Scherfig reveals how the work of Austrian director Michael Haneke shaped her vision as a film maker.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Nissim Black Picture Credit: Nissim Official)

From Gangsta Rap to Religious Redemption2018042120180423 (WS)

The musician who gave up gangsta rap for a new life as an Orthodox Jew.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline, stories of place and identity from a musician, a writer and a curator.

We meet the rapper who took an unorthodox route to embracing Orthodox Judaism, after turning his back on gangsta rap. Nissim Black talks about his spiritual and lyrical journey with The Cultural Frontline’s Datshiane Navanayagam.

The Roma are one of the most marginalised groups in Europe and for many years their cultural identity has been portrayed negatively with few Roma artists having the platform to tell their own stories. Delaine Le Bas is trying to change that narrative. She tells Tina how she came to launch a ground breaking new arts event, the Roma Biennale.

Failaka Island is a peaceful place found off the coast of Kuwait which belies a chequered past. It was occupied by an invading Iraqi army during the Gulf War and was a former outpost of Alexander the Great thousands of years before. But could its unique history be threatened by vast urban development in the region? The writer Mai Al-Nakib takes us on journey to an island frozen in time.

Has a book, a song, a film or a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The critically acclaimed Danish film director and screenwriter Lone Scherfig reveals how the work of Austrian director Michael Haneke shaped her vision as a film maker.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Nissim Black Picture Credit: Nissim Official)

From Gangsta Rap to Religious Redemption20180421

The musician who gave up gangsta rap for a new life as an Orthodox Jew.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline, stories of place and identity from a musician, a writer and a curator.

We meet the rapper who took an unorthodox route to embracing Orthodox Judaism, after turning his back on gangsta rap. Nissim Black talks about his spiritual and lyrical journey with The Cultural Frontline’s Datshiane Navanayagam.

The Roma are one of the most marginalised groups in Europe and for many years their cultural identity has been portrayed negatively with few Roma artists having the platform to tell their own stories. Delaine Le Bas is trying to change that narrative. She tells Tina how she came to launch a ground breaking new arts event, the Roma Biennale.

Failaka Island is a peaceful place found off the coast of Kuwait which belies a chequered past. It was occupied by an invading Iraqi army during the Gulf War and was a former outpost of Alexander the Great thousands of years before. But could its unique history be threatened by vast urban development in the region? The writer Mai Al-Nakib takes us on journey to an island frozen in time.

Has a book, a song, a film or a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The critically acclaimed Danish film director and screenwriter Lone Scherfig reveals how the work of Austrian director Michael Haneke shaped her vision as a film maker.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Nissim Black Picture Credit: Nissim Official)

From Gangsta Rap To Religious Redemption2018042120180422 (WS)

The musician who gave up gangsta rap for a new life as an Orthodox Jew.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline, stories of place and identity from a musician, a writer and a curator.

We meet the rapper who took an unorthodox route to embracing Orthodox Judaism, after turning his back on gangsta rap. Nissim Black talks about his spiritual and lyrical journey with The Cultural Frontline’s Datshiane Navanayagam.

The Roma are one of the most marginalised groups in Europe and for many years their cultural identity has been portrayed negatively with few Roma artists having the platform to tell their own stories. Delaine Le Bas is trying to change that narrative. She tells Tina how she came to launch a ground breaking new arts event, the Roma Biennale.

Failaka Island is a peaceful place found off the coast of Kuwait which belies a chequered past. It was occupied by an invading Iraqi army during the Gulf War and was a former outpost of Alexander the Great thousands of years before. But could its unique history be threatened by vast urban development in the region? The writer Mai Al-Nakib takes us on journey to an island frozen in time.

Has a book, a song, a film or a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The critically acclaimed Danish film director and screenwriter Lone Scherfig reveals how the work of Austrian director Michael Haneke shaped her vision as a film maker.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Nissim Black Picture Credit: Nissim Official)

From Gangsta Rap To Religious Redemption2018042120180423 (WS)

The musician who gave up gangsta rap for a new life as an Orthodox Jew.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline, stories of place and identity from a musician, a writer and a curator.

We meet the rapper who took an unorthodox route to embracing Orthodox Judaism, after turning his back on gangsta rap. Nissim Black talks about his spiritual and lyrical journey with The Cultural Frontline’s Datshiane Navanayagam.

The Roma are one of the most marginalised groups in Europe and for many years their cultural identity has been portrayed negatively with few Roma artists having the platform to tell their own stories. Delaine Le Bas is trying to change that narrative. She tells Tina how she came to launch a ground breaking new arts event, the Roma Biennale.

Failaka Island is a peaceful place found off the coast of Kuwait which belies a chequered past. It was occupied by an invading Iraqi army during the Gulf War and was a former outpost of Alexander the Great thousands of years before. But could its unique history be threatened by vast urban development in the region? The writer Mai Al-Nakib takes us on journey to an island frozen in time.

Has a book, a song, a film or a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The critically acclaimed Danish film director and screenwriter Lone Scherfig reveals how the work of Austrian director Michael Haneke shaped her vision as a film maker.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Nissim Black Picture Credit: Nissim Official)

Future Art of Africa20181006

What does the future hold for art and artists across the African continent?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Future Art of Africa2018100620181007 (WS)

What does the future hold for art and artists across the African continent?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Future Art of Africa2018100620181008 (WS)

What does the future hold for art and artists across the African continent?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Future Art Of Africa2018100620181008 (WS)
20181007 (WS)

What does the future hold for art and artists across the African continent?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

What does the future hold for art and artists across the African continent?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

What does the future hold for art and artists across the African continent?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Giving Banned Music a New Voice2017012820170129 (WS)

Norweigan singer Moddi tells why he chose to record 12 banned songs from around the world

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Norwegian singer Moddi explains what drove him to make an album of banned music, and why one of the songs got him in hot water with the Russian government.

From the Mexican border city of Juarez, once known as the murder capital of the world, we hear about a new electronic music movement which is helping the city’s youth come to terms with the violence they grew up with.

Comedian Bilal Zafar shares the story of how a Twitter prank led to him becoming the target of far right hatred online, and why he made it into a comedy show.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: crowds at a concert Credit: KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)

Giving Banned Music a New Voice20170128

Norweigan singer Moddi tells why he chose to record 12 banned songs from around the world

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Norwegian singer Moddi explains what drove him to make an album of banned music, and why one of the songs got him in hot water with the Russian government.

From the Mexican border city of Juarez, once known as the murder capital of the world, we hear about a new electronic music movement which is helping the city’s youth come to terms with the violence they grew up with.

Comedian Bilal Zafar shares the story of how a Twitter prank led to him becoming the target of far right hatred online, and why he made it into a comedy show.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: crowds at a concert Credit: KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)

House of Kenzo, Art Collective2018091520180916 (WS)

The underground dance collective revolutionising nightlife in Texas

The world seen through the eyes of artists

House of Kenzo are the underground dance collective revolutionising Texan nightlife. We join Breezy, Roxy, Flo, Gemel and Toni over a weekend, as they perform at the opening of a queer film festival in Austin and in their hometown of San Antonio.

Each performance is a conceptual piece of artwork with built in messages of radical self-expression, body positivity, ecology and community. Constructing a DIY stage on the dancefloor, House of Kenzo blend jaw-dropping dance moves - voguing, krumping, break dancing in ten inch heels - with avant garde club music, shouting explicit mantras at the audience, inviting them to join in a communal, often cathartic, dance battle.

For local artist Ben Aqua, they represent the future of queer culture. Their volatile energy, flamboyant fashion, and total freedom of expression are inspiring a movement in Texas - a traditionally conservative state. Their events are often a springboard for other LGBT artists of colour in the underground nightlife scene.

Local journalist and DJ, Dan Gentile, believes House of Kenzo have a real future not in just music but in performance art, the type of higher end culture that would traditionally be difficult for an underground art collective to break into.

To date, they’ve performed showcases at Austin’s SXSW, Day For Night Festival in Houston, and are beginning to tour all over the US, and will be travelling to Europe for the first time this October.

A Just Radio Production for BBC World Service. Produced by Victoria Ferran.

Image: Roxy and Breezy from underground arts collective House of Kenzo (Credit: Ben Aqua)

House of Kenzo, Art Collective2018091520180917 (WS)

The underground dance collective revolutionising nightlife in Texas

The world seen through the eyes of artists

House of Kenzo are the underground dance collective revolutionising Texan nightlife. We join Breezy, Roxy, Flo, Gemel and Toni over a weekend, as they perform at the opening of a queer film festival in Austin and in their hometown of San Antonio.

Each performance is a conceptual piece of artwork with built in messages of radical self-expression, body positivity, ecology and community. Constructing a DIY stage on the dancefloor, House of Kenzo blend jaw-dropping dance moves - voguing, krumping, break dancing in ten inch heels - with avant garde club music, shouting explicit mantras at the audience, inviting them to join in a communal, often cathartic, dance battle.

For local artist Ben Aqua, they represent the future of queer culture. Their volatile energy, flamboyant fashion, and total freedom of expression are inspiring a movement in Texas - a traditionally conservative state. Their events are often a springboard for other LGBT artists of colour in the underground nightlife scene.

Local journalist and DJ, Dan Gentile, believes House of Kenzo have a real future not in just music but in performance art, the type of higher end culture that would traditionally be difficult for an underground art collective to break into.

To date, they’ve performed showcases at Austin’s SXSW, Day For Night Festival in Houston, and are beginning to tour all over the US, and will be travelling to Europe for the first time this October.

A Just Radio Production for BBC World Service. Produced by Victoria Ferran.

Image: Roxy and Breezy from underground arts collective House of Kenzo (Credit: Ben Aqua)

House of Kenzo, Art Collective20180915

The underground dance collective revolutionising nightlife in Texas

The world seen through the eyes of artists

House of Kenzo are the underground dance collective revolutionising Texan nightlife. We join Breezy, Roxy, Flo, Gemel and Toni over a weekend, as they perform at the opening of a queer film festival in Austin and in their hometown of San Antonio.

Each performance is a conceptual piece of artwork with built in messages of radical self-expression, body positivity, ecology and community. Constructing a DIY stage on the dancefloor, House of Kenzo blend jaw-dropping dance moves - voguing, krumping, break dancing in ten inch heels - with avant garde club music, shouting explicit mantras at the audience, inviting them to join in a communal, often cathartic, dance battle.

For local artist Ben Aqua, they represent the future of queer culture. Their volatile energy, flamboyant fashion, and total freedom of expression are inspiring a movement in Texas - a traditionally conservative state. Their events are often a springboard for other LGBT artists of colour in the underground nightlife scene.

Local journalist and DJ, Dan Gentile, believes House of Kenzo have a real future not in just music but in performance art, the type of higher end culture that would traditionally be difficult for an underground art collective to break into.

To date, they’ve performed showcases at Austin’s SXSW, Day For Night Festival in Houston, and are beginning to tour all over the US, and will be travelling to Europe for the first time this October.

A Just Radio Production for BBC World Service. Produced by Victoria Ferran.

Image: Roxy and Breezy from underground arts collective House of Kenzo (Credit: Ben Aqua)

How Can We Design a Better World?2018090820180909 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline presents a panel discussion on the social impact of design.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In partnership with the London Design Biennale, The Cultural Frontline presents a panel discussion on the social impact of design.

In front of a live audience in London’s historic Somerset House, a panel of leading designers and creative minds discuss how design can transform people and society.

From the reimagining of a Guatemalan town through the craft and creativity of local artisans to the forging of an architectural vision of a future Mogadishu, we explore how architects and urban designers are working to reinvent areas afflicted by poverty or conflict. Plus we will take a step into the future and hear how the Norwegian government plan to make the nation “inclusively” designed, from classroom to hospital, by 2025.

Our presenter Tina Daheley is joined by Paola Antonelli of New York’s Museum of Modern Art, Onny Eikhaug of the Norwegian Design and Architecture Centre, Madina Scacchi of the Somali Architecture Project and from the Guatemalan Design Pavilion, social entrepreneur and industrial designer, Diego Olivero.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Shoku Amirani, Laura Hyde and Nancy Bennie.

(Photo: Guatemalan Design Pavilion at the London Design Biennale Photo Credit Tricia Yourkevich/BBC)

How Can We Design a Better World?2018090820180910 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline presents a panel discussion on the social impact of design.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In partnership with the London Design Biennale, The Cultural Frontline presents a panel discussion on the social impact of design.

In front of a live audience in London’s historic Somerset House, a panel of leading designers and creative minds discuss how design can transform people and society.

From the reimagining of a Guatemalan town through the craft and creativity of local artisans to the forging of an architectural vision of a future Mogadishu, we explore how architects and urban designers are working to reinvent areas afflicted by poverty or conflict. Plus we will take a step into the future and hear how the Norwegian government plan to make the nation “inclusively” designed, from classroom to hospital, by 2025.

Our presenter Tina Daheley is joined by Paola Antonelli of New York’s Museum of Modern Art, Onny Eikhaug of the Norwegian Design and Architecture Centre, Madina Scacchi of the Somali Architecture Project and from the Guatemalan Design Pavilion, social entrepreneur and industrial designer, Diego Olivero.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Shoku Amirani, Laura Hyde and Nancy Bennie.

(Photo: Guatemalan Design Pavilion at the London Design Biennale Photo Credit Tricia Yourkevich/BBC)

How Can We Design a Better World?20180908

The Cultural Frontline presents a panel discussion on the social impact of design.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In partnership with the London Design Biennale, The Cultural Frontline presents a panel discussion on the social impact of design.

In front of a live audience in London’s historic Somerset House, a panel of leading designers and creative minds discuss how design can transform people and society.

From the reimagining of a Guatemalan town through the craft and creativity of local artisans to the forging of an architectural vision of a future Mogadishu, we explore how architects and urban designers are working to reinvent areas afflicted by poverty or conflict. Plus we will take a step into the future and hear how the Norwegian government plan to make the nation “inclusively” designed, from classroom to hospital, by 2025.

Our presenter Tina Daheley is joined by Paola Antonelli of New York’s Museum of Modern Art, Onny Eikhaug of the Norwegian Design and Architecture Centre, Madina Scacchi of the Somali Architecture Project and from the Guatemalan Design Pavilion, social entrepreneur and industrial designer, Diego Olivero.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Shoku Amirani, Laura Hyde and Nancy Bennie.

(Photo: Guatemalan Design Pavilion at the London Design Biennale Photo Credit Tricia Yourkevich/BBC)

How does the Experience of Emigration Affect a Writer\u2019s Work?2017052020170521 (WS)

Lila Azam Zanganeh on the creativity that comes from having multiple identities

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Lila Azam Zanganeh was born in Paris to Iranian parents who fled the country during the Revolution. She talks about the creativity that comes from having ‘multiple identities’, and why she writes in English; a language she describes as elastic and flexible, and which allows her to explore her many selves.

The EU wants to stop the migrants and asylum seekers who gather in Libya and pay huge sums to traffickers to cross in leaky boats to Europe. Now photo journalist Narciso Contreras has discovered that the real horror is how many are being enslaved and used almost as currency by the militias who run the country. Libya: A Human Marketplace tells their story.

The Canadian writer, Paul E. Hardisty, writes thrillers, but he’s also an engineer, hydrologist and environmental scientist. His work often takes him to countries that are experiencing conflict and he frequently draws on these experiences for his novels. He argues that fiction allows him to tell the truth about the devastating effects of civil war.

When 19-year-old US photographer Myles Loftin typed the words “four black teenagers” into a search engine he was concerned that the majority of the pictures he saw were of grim faced boys wearing sweatshirts with the hood up. So he started his project Hooded, which shows young black people in brightly coloured hoodies, smiling broadly at the camera.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Lila Azam Zanganeh. Credit: Marcelo Correa 2017)

This content has been re-edited for accuracy (22.05.17)

How does the Experience of Emigration Affect a Writer\u2019s Work?20170520

Lila Azam Zanganeh on the creativity that comes from having multiple identities

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Lila Azam Zanganeh was born in Paris to Iranian parents who fled the country during the Revolution. She talks about the creativity that comes from having ‘multiple identities’, and why she writes in English; a language she describes as elastic and flexible, and which allows her to explore her many selves.

The EU wants to stop the migrants and asylum seekers who gather in Libya and pay huge sums to traffickers to cross in leaky boats to Europe. Now photo journalist Narciso Contreras has discovered that the real horror is how many are being enslaved and used almost as currency by the militias who run the country. Libya: A Human Marketplace tells their story.

The Canadian writer, Paul E. Hardisty, writes thrillers, but he’s also an engineer, hydrologist and environmental scientist. His work often takes him to countries that are experiencing conflict and he frequently draws on these experiences for his novels. He argues that fiction allows him to tell the truth about the devastating effects of civil war.

When 19-year-old US photographer Myles Loftin typed the words “four black teenagers” into a search engine he was concerned that the majority of the pictures he saw were of grim faced boys wearing sweatshirts with the hood up. So he started his project Hooded, which shows young black people in brightly coloured hoodies, smiling broadly at the camera.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Lila Azam Zanganeh. Credit: Marcelo Correa 2017)

This content has been re-edited for accuracy (22.05.17)

How I Made My Own Emoji20171104

Meet the high school student who set out to make the first hijabi emoji.

We meet the high school student, Rayouf Alhumedhi, who is trying to change the world of emojis. Rayouf tells the Cultural Frontline about how, with the help of Unicode's Jenny Lee, she set out on a campaign to create an emoji for women who wear hijabs.

Tina Daheley goes on a tour of the futuristic exhibition, 'Zhongguo 2185' and speaks to its curator Victor Wang about its artistic vision of China in the year 2185.

The British-Zambian poet, Kayo Chingonyi talks about how he bridges cultures through his life and his work and we hear from the Swedish photographers responding to President Trump’s criticisms of their country through their book “Last Night in Sweden.”

(Picture: Hijabi Emoji: Picture Credit: Aphee Messer)

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

How I Made My Own Emoji2017110420171105 (WS)

Meet the high school student who set out to make the first hijabi emoji.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

We meet the high school student, Rayouf Alhumedhi, who is trying to change the world of emojis. Rayouf tells the Cultural Frontline about how, with the help of Unicode's Jenny Lee, she set out on a campaign to create an emoji for women who wear hijabs.

Tina Daheley goes on a tour of the futuristic exhibition, 'Zhongguo 2185' and speaks to its curator Victor Wang about its artistic vision of China in the year 2185.

The British-Zambian poet, Kayo Chingonyi talks about how he bridges cultures through his life and his work and we hear from the Swedish photographers responding to President Trump’s criticisms of their country through their book “Last Night in Sweden.”

(Picture: Hijabi Emoji: Picture Credit: Aphee Messer)

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

How I Made My Own Emoji2017110420171106 (WS)

Meet the high school student who set out to make the first hijabi emoji.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

We meet the high school student, Rayouf Alhumedhi, who is trying to change the world of emojis. Rayouf tells the Cultural Frontline about how, with the help of Unicode's Jenny Lee, she set out on a campaign to create an emoji for women who wear hijabs.

Tina Daheley goes on a tour of the futuristic exhibition, 'Zhongguo 2185' and speaks to its curator Victor Wang about its artistic vision of China in the year 2185.

The British-Zambian poet, Kayo Chingonyi talks about how he bridges cultures through his life and his work and we hear from the Swedish photographers responding to President Trump’s criticisms of their country through their book “Last Night in Sweden.”

(Picture: Hijabi Emoji: Picture Credit: Aphee Messer)

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

How I Made My Own Emoji20171104

Meet the high school student who set out to make the first hijabi emoji.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

We meet the high school student, Rayouf Alhumedhi, who is trying to change the world of emojis. Rayouf tells the Cultural Frontline about how, with the help of Unicode's Jenny Lee, she set out on a campaign to create an emoji for women who wear hijabs.

Tina Daheley goes on a tour of the futuristic exhibition, 'Zhongguo 2185' and speaks to its curator Victor Wang about its artistic vision of China in the year 2185.

The British-Zambian poet, Kayo Chingonyi talks about how he bridges cultures through his life and his work and we hear from the Swedish photographers responding to President Trump’s criticisms of their country through their book “Last Night in Sweden.”

(Picture: Hijabi Emoji: Picture Credit: Aphee Messer)

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

How the Arab Spring Has Impacted Cinema2017032520170326 (WS)

Film-makers from Egypt and Syria discuss how recent upheavals have impacted film

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Film-makers from Syria and Egypt join Tina to discuss how the upheavals in the Arab world over the last six years have impacted the region’s cinema scene.

Artist Ai Weiwei explains why so much of his recent work has focused on Europe’s migrant crisis and reflects on how he thinks art can influence public opinion.

As President Trump signals his desire to cut federal funding for the arts via the National Endowment for the Arts, we find out what that might mean in practice for US arts organisations.

A mobile literary festival is travelling through Africa, taking books and performance to towns and cities that aren’t usually seen as cultural hubs. We hear from some of the participants in the Kenyan city of Nakuru.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a man walks past a cinema in Damascus Credit: LOUAI BESHARA/AFP/Getty Images)

How the Arab Spring Has Impacted Cinema20170325

Film-makers from Egypt and Syria discuss how recent upheavals have impacted film

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Film-makers from Syria and Egypt join Tina to discuss how the upheavals in the Arab world over the last six years have impacted the region’s cinema scene.

Artist Ai Weiwei explains why so much of his recent work has focused on Europe’s migrant crisis and reflects on how he thinks art can influence public opinion.

As President Trump signals his desire to cut federal funding for the arts via the National Endowment for the Arts, we find out what that might mean in practice for US arts organisations.

A mobile literary festival is travelling through Africa, taking books and performance to towns and cities that aren’t usually seen as cultural hubs. We hear from some of the participants in the Kenyan city of Nakuru.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a man walks past a cinema in Damascus Credit: LOUAI BESHARA/AFP/Getty Images)

How The Arab Spring Has Impacted Cinema2017032520170326 (WS)

Film-makers from Syria and Egypt join Tina to discuss how the upheavals in the Arab world over the last six years have impacted the region’s cinema scene.

Artist Ai Weiwei explains why so much of his recent work has focused on Europe’s migrant crisis and reflects on how he thinks art can influence public opinion.

As President Trump signals his desire to cut federal funding for the arts via the National Endowment for the Arts, we find out what that might mean in practice for US arts organisations.

A mobile literary festival is travelling through Africa, taking books and performance to towns and cities that aren’t usually seen as cultural hubs. We hear from some of the participants in the Kenyan city of Nakuru.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a man walks past a cinema in Damascus Credit: LOUAI BESHARA/AFP/Getty Images)

Film-makers from Egypt and Syria discuss how recent upheavals have impacted film

Identity and Adversity2016041620160417 (WS)

How identity and adversity are inspiring literature, theatre, comic books and street art

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Lead characters in most mainstream comic books were created decades ago in the heyday of racism and sexism; the heroes are mostly straight, white men. South African graphic novelist Nas Hoosen has decided it is time to make a change for superheroes.

Yemen’s civil war has led to great social disruption in the country, but even in difficult circumstances artists still feel the need to practise their art. We talk to street artist Murad Subay about why he continues to make controversial art in the capital Sana’a.

Skid Row in Los Angeles is a street and a name synonymous with poverty and vagrancy. But within the community a vibrant arts scene has emerged and begun to flourish. Carren Jao reports on artists and activists who have been making the voices of Skid Row heard for the last three decades.

Author Walter Mosley writes the Easy Rawlins novels. He is also a playwright, screenwriter and visual artist. He writes essays, poetry, articles and most recently, a memoir called The Graphomaniac's Primer. Tania Ketenjian has been finding out about his compulsion to write and write and write.

(Photo: Sector comic book. Credit: Ben Rausch)

Identity and Adversity20160416

How identity and adversity are inspiring literature, theatre, comic books and street art

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Lead characters in most mainstream comic books were created decades ago in the heyday of racism and sexism; the heroes are mostly straight, white men. South African graphic novelist Nas Hoosen has decided it is time to make a change for superheroes.

Yemen’s civil war has led to great social disruption in the country, but even in difficult circumstances artists still feel the need to practise their art. We talk to street artist Murad Subay about why he continues to make controversial art in the capital Sana’a.

Skid Row in Los Angeles is a street and a name synonymous with poverty and vagrancy. But within the community a vibrant arts scene has emerged and begun to flourish. Carren Jao reports on artists and activists who have been making the voices of Skid Row heard for the last three decades.

Author Walter Mosley writes the Easy Rawlins novels. He is also a playwright, screenwriter and visual artist. He writes essays, poetry, articles and most recently, a memoir called The Graphomaniac's Primer. Tania Ketenjian has been finding out about his compulsion to write and write and write.

(Photo: Sector comic book. Credit: Ben Rausch)

Illustrating Syria's Civil War2016100820161009 (WS)

The artist turning experiences of war into a graphic memoir

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Molly Crabapple has teamed up with the Syrian journalist Marwan Hisham to create Brothers of the Gun, a graphic memoir about Marwan's experiences during the civil war. She explains their creative process.

Also, Saudi film director Mahmoud Sabbagh, whose latest film Barakah Meets Barakah, has been described as the Kingdom’s first romantic comedy. The director of the brand new Basrah Museum explains how the project finally got off the ground, 25 years after his predecessor was forced to close it due to looting. Finally, the journalist Saba Imtiaz considers how contemporary fashion photography might be encouraging violence against women in Pakistan.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Image from Molly Crabapple's previous work on Syria Credit: Molly Crabapple)

Illustrating Syria's Civil War20161008

The artist turning experiences of war into a graphic memoir

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Molly Crabapple has teamed up with the Syrian journalist Marwan Hisham to create Brothers of the Gun, a graphic memoir about Marwan's experiences during the civil war. She explains their creative process.

Also, Saudi film director Mahmoud Sabbagh, whose latest film Barakah Meets Barakah, has been described as the Kingdom’s first romantic comedy. The director of the brand new Basrah Museum explains how the project finally got off the ground, 25 years after his predecessor was forced to close it due to looting. Finally, the journalist Saba Imtiaz considers how contemporary fashion photography might be encouraging violence against women in Pakistan.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Image from Molly Crabapple's previous work on Syria Credit: Molly Crabapple)

Innovation, Imagination And Will.i.am20180217

Can you make music through the power of Artificial Intelligence? The French scientist and composer Francois Pachet tells us how he is marrying algorithms with artistry to create new music.

The musician Will.i.am and the futurist Brian David Johnson take us into the fantasy world of their new novel Wizards and Robots.

We celebrate the legacy and the cultural influence of video game music with the pioneering composer Yuzo Koshiro.

Plus we hear from the footballer Sam Mensiro on why the Swedish football team Östersund are hoping that a little bit of cultural study will lead to some cultured performances on the pitch.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo will.i.am attends WORLDZ Cultural Marketing Summit 2017 at Hollywood and Highland on July 31, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Credit: Jerod Harris/Getty Images for PTTOW!)

Exploring stories where technology meets art

Can you make music through the power of Artificial Intelligence? The French scientist and composer Francois Pachet tells us how he is marrying algorithms with artistry to create new music.

The musician Will.i.am and the futurist Brian David Johnson take us into the fantasy world of their new novel Wizards and Robots.

We celebrate the legacy and the cultural influence of video game music with the pioneering composer Yuzo Koshiro.

Plus we hear from the footballer Sam Mensiro on why the Swedish football team Östersund are hoping that a little bit of cultural study will lead to some cultured performances on the pitch.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo will.i.am attends WORLDZ Cultural Marketing Summit 2017 at Hollywood and Highland on July 31, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Credit: Jerod Harris/Getty Images for PTTOW!)

Innovation, Imagination and Will.i.am2018021720180218 (WS)

Exploring stories where technology meets art

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can you make music through the power of Artificial Intelligence? The French scientist and composer Francois Pachet tells us how he is marrying algorithms with artistry to create new music.

The musician Will.i.am and the futurist Brian David Johnson take us into the fantasy world of their new novel Wizards and Robots.

We celebrate the legacy and the cultural influence of video game music with the pioneering composer Yuzo Koshiro.

Plus we hear from the footballer Sam Mensiro on why the Swedish football team Östersund are hoping that a little bit of cultural study will lead to some cultured performances on the pitch.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo will.i.am attends WORLDZ Cultural Marketing Summit 2017 at Hollywood and Highland on July 31, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Credit: Jerod Harris/Getty Images for PTTOW!)

Innovation, Imagination and Will.i.am2018021720180219 (WS)

Exploring stories where technology meets art

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can you make music through the power of Artificial Intelligence? The French scientist and composer Francois Pachet tells us how he is marrying algorithms with artistry to create new music.

The musician Will.i.am and the futurist Brian David Johnson take us into the fantasy world of their new novel Wizards and Robots.

We celebrate the legacy and the cultural influence of video game music with the pioneering composer Yuzo Koshiro.

Plus we hear from the footballer Sam Mensiro on why the Swedish football team Östersund are hoping that a little bit of cultural study will lead to some cultured performances on the pitch.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo will.i.am attends WORLDZ Cultural Marketing Summit 2017 at Hollywood and Highland on July 31, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Credit: Jerod Harris/Getty Images for PTTOW!)

Innovation, Imagination and Will.i.am20180217

Exploring stories where technology meets art

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can you make music through the power of Artificial Intelligence? The French scientist and composer Francois Pachet tells us how he is marrying algorithms with artistry to create new music.

The musician Will.i.am and the futurist Brian David Johnson take us into the fantasy world of their new novel Wizards and Robots.

We celebrate the legacy and the cultural influence of video game music with the pioneering composer Yuzo Koshiro.

Plus we hear from the footballer Sam Mensiro on why the Swedish football team Östersund are hoping that a little bit of cultural study will lead to some cultured performances on the pitch.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo will.i.am attends WORLDZ Cultural Marketing Summit 2017 at Hollywood and Highland on July 31, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Credit: Jerod Harris/Getty Images for PTTOW!)

Iran's Refugee Rocket Man20171028

The Iranian artist who went from a Calais migrant camp to animating for Elton John.

From the migrant camps of Calais to the red carpets of the Cannes Film Festival, we meet the artist who brought Elton John's Rocket Man to life through his animation. Iranian refugee Majid Adin tells the story of his time in Calais' migrant camp "The Jungle" and how he came to make a music video that has now been watched over 11 million times online.

Tina Daheley talks to Rahima Gambo, the Nigerian artist tackling the legacy of Boko Haram through her imagery and we hear from Mexican author, Valeria Liuselli who speaks on behalf of migrant children in the USA through her writing and through her work as a court translator.

Plus we meet Chyno, the rapper responding to conflict through the beats, rhymes and life of Syrian hip-hop.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Picture: Still from Rocket Man Animation Picture Credit: Majid Adin and Stephen McNally)

Iran's Refugee Rocket Man2017102820171029 (WS)

The Iranian artist who went from a Calais migrant camp to animating for Elton John.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

From the migrant camps of Calais to the red carpets of the Cannes Film Festival, we meet the artist who brought Elton John's Rocket Man to life through his animation. Iranian refugee Majid Adin tells the story of his time in Calais' migrant camp "The Jungle" and how he came to make a music video that has now been watched over 11 million times online.

Tina Daheley talks to Rahima Gambo, the Nigerian artist tackling the legacy of Boko Haram through her imagery and we hear from Mexican author, Valeria Luiselli who speaks on behalf of migrant children in the USA through her writing and through her work as a court translator.

Plus we meet Chyno, the rapper responding to conflict through the beats, rhymes and life of Syrian hip-hop.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Picture: Still from Rocket Man Animation Picture Credit: Majid Adin and Stephen McNally)

Iran's Refugee Rocket Man2017102820171030 (WS)

The Iranian artist who went from a Calais migrant camp to animating for Elton John.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

From the migrant camps of Calais to the red carpets of the Cannes Film Festival, we meet the artist who brought Elton John's Rocket Man to life through his animation. Iranian refugee Majid Adin tells the story of his time in Calais' migrant camp "The Jungle" and how he came to make a music video that has now been watched over 11 million times online.

Tina Daheley talks to Rahima Gambo, the Nigerian artist tackling the legacy of Boko Haram through her imagery and we hear from Mexican author, Valeria Luiselli who speaks on behalf of migrant children in the USA through her writing and through her work as a court translator.

Plus we meet Chyno, the rapper responding to conflict through the beats, rhymes and life of Syrian hip-hop.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Picture: Still from Rocket Man Animation Picture Credit: Majid Adin and Stephen McNally)

Iran's Refugee Rocket Man20171028

The Iranian artist who went from a Calais migrant camp to animating for Elton John.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

From the migrant camps of Calais to the red carpets of the Cannes Film Festival, we meet the artist who brought Elton John's Rocket Man to life through his animation. Iranian refugee Majid Adin tells the story of his time in Calais' migrant camp "The Jungle" and how he came to make a music video that has now been watched over 11 million times online.

Tina Daheley talks to Rahima Gambo, the Nigerian artist tackling the legacy of Boko Haram through her imagery and we hear from Mexican author, Valeria Luiselli who speaks on behalf of migrant children in the USA through her writing and through her work as a court translator.

Plus we meet Chyno, the rapper responding to conflict through the beats, rhymes and life of Syrian hip-hop.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Picture: Still from Rocket Man Animation Picture Credit: Majid Adin and Stephen McNally)

Iran's Refugee Rocket Man20171030

The Iranian artist who went from a Calais migrant camp to animating for Elton John.

From the migrant camps of Calais to the red carpets of the Cannes Film Festival, we meet the artist who brought Elton John's Rocket Man to life through his animation. Iranian refugee Majid Adin tells the story of his time in Calais' migrant camp "The Jungle" and how he came to make a music video that has now been watched over 11 million times online.

Tina Daheley talks to Rahima Gambo, the Nigerian artist tackling the legacy of Boko Haram through her imagery and we hear from Mexican author, Valeria Liuselli who speaks on behalf of migrant children in the USA through her writing and through her work as a court translator.

Plus we meet Chyno, the rapper responding to conflict through the beats, rhymes and life of Syrian hip-hop.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Picture: Still from Rocket Man Animation Picture Credit: Majid Adin and Stephen McNally)

Is this a Golden Age for Arab Film?2018042820180429 (WS)

Leading film-makers debate and deliberate Arabic cinema.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How has revolution, conflict and social change in the Middle East shaped cinema? Can film-making thrive in countries facing instability and war?

In front of a live audience in the BBC Radio Theatre, a panel of leading film-makers debate and deliberate these questions and discuss whether we now live in a golden age for Arab film.

Our presenter Nawal al-Maghafi is joined by the Oscar-nominated director Ziad Doueri, documentary-maker Eliane Raheb, Iraqi film-maker Maysoon Pachachi and one of Egypt's emerging directorial talents, Nesma Zazou. We also hear from Haifaa al-Mansour, the pioneering Saudi director.

From the effects of the Arab Spring to strict rules on censorship and the landmark opening of cinemas in Saudi Arabia, the panel explore how to tell extraordinary stories during turbulent times.

Presented by Nawal al-Maghafi

(Photo: A Saudi woman eats popcorn at the AMC cinema during a test screening in Riyadh Photo credit: FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)

Is this a Golden Age for Arab Film?2018042820180430 (WS)

Leading film-makers debate and deliberate Arabic cinema.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How has revolution, conflict and social change in the Middle East shaped cinema? Can film-making thrive in countries facing instability and war?

In front of a live audience in the BBC Radio Theatre, a panel of leading film-makers debate and deliberate these questions and discuss whether we now live in a golden age for Arab film.

Our presenter Nawal al-Maghafi is joined by the Oscar-nominated director Ziad Doueri, documentary-maker Eliane Raheb, Iraqi film-maker Maysoon Pachachi and one of Egypt's emerging directorial talents, Nesma Zazou. We also hear from Haifaa al-Mansour, the pioneering Saudi director.

From the effects of the Arab Spring to strict rules on censorship and the landmark opening of cinemas in Saudi Arabia, the panel explore how to tell extraordinary stories during turbulent times.

Presented by Nawal al-Maghafi

(Photo: A Saudi woman eats popcorn at the AMC cinema during a test screening in Riyadh Photo credit: FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)

Is this a Golden Age for Arab Film?20180428

Leading film-makers debate and deliberate Arabic cinema.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How has revolution, conflict and social change in the Middle East shaped cinema? Can film-making thrive in countries facing instability and war?

In front of a live audience in the BBC Radio Theatre, a panel of leading film-makers debate and deliberate these questions and discuss whether we now live in a golden age for Arab film.

Our presenter Nawal al-Maghafi is joined by the Oscar-nominated director Ziad Doueri, documentary-maker Eliane Raheb, Iraqi film-maker Maysoon Pachachi and one of Egypt's emerging directorial talents, Nesma Zazou. We also hear from Haifaa al-Mansour, the pioneering Saudi director.

From the effects of the Arab Spring to strict rules on censorship and the landmark opening of cinemas in Saudi Arabia, the panel explore how to tell extraordinary stories during turbulent times.

Presented by Nawal al-Maghafi

(Photo: A Saudi woman eats popcorn at the AMC cinema during a test screening in Riyadh Photo credit: FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)

Is this a Golden Age for Arab Film?20180428

Leading film-makers debate and deliberate Arabic cinema.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How has revolution, conflict and social change in the Middle East shaped cinema? Can film-making thrive in countries facing instability and war?

In front of a live audience in the BBC Radio Theatre, a panel of leading film-makers debate and deliberate these questions and discuss whether we now live in a golden age for Arab film.

Our presenter Nawal al-Maghafi is joined by the Oscar-nominated director Ziad Doueri, documentary-maker Eliane Raheb, Iraqi film-maker Maysoon Pachachi and one of Egypt's emerging directorial talents, Nesma Zazou. We also hear from Haifaa al-Mansour, the pioneering Saudi director.

From the effects of the Arab Spring to strict rules on censorship and the landmark opening of cinemas in Saudi Arabia, the panel explore how to tell extraordinary stories during turbulent times.

Presented by Nawal al-Maghafi

Image: A Saudi woman eats popcorn at the AMC cinema during a test screening in Riyadh on April 18, 2018. Credit: FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images

Is This A Golden Age For Arab Film?2018042820180429 (WS)
20180430 (WS)

Leading film-makers debate and deliberate Arabic cinema.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How has revolution, conflict and social change in the Middle East shaped cinema? Can film-making thrive in countries facing instability and war?

In front of a live audience in the BBC Radio Theatre, a panel of leading film-makers debate and deliberate these questions and discuss whether we now live in a golden age for Arab film.

Our presenter Nawal al-Maghafi is joined by the Oscar-nominated director Ziad Doueri, documentary-maker Eliane Raheb, Iraqi film-maker Maysoon Pachachi and one of Egypt's emerging directorial talents, Nesma Zazou. We also hear from Haifaa al-Mansour, the pioneering Saudi director.

From the effects of the Arab Spring to strict rules on censorship and the landmark opening of cinemas in Saudi Arabia, the panel explore how to tell extraordinary stories during turbulent times.

Presented by Nawal al-Maghafi

Image: A Saudi woman eats popcorn at the AMC cinema during a test screening in Riyadh on April 18, 2018. Credit: FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Kenya's Tv Shutdown: What Comes Next?20180210

Following the shutdown of three of Kenya’s largest TV channels we speak to Godfrey Mwampembwa, aka Gado, the creator of the hit Kenyan satirical show XYZ and hear his thoughts on the relationship between the Kenyan government and the media.

We speak to the feminist, environmentalist and pop cultural icon Pamela Anderson about her campaigning for Wikileaks and how she views feminism in the age of the #timesup and #metoo movements.

The Oscar winning screenwriter of Spotlight and The Post, Josh Singer and the journalist and novelist Jonathan Freedland talk about why journalism continues to inspire classic drama.

Plus we speak to a superstar and a super fan of Marvel’s Black Panther ahead of the release of the blockbuster superhero movie.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Picture: Staff work in a control room during a news program at NTV studios in Nairobi Picture Credit:YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)

What's the future for Kenyan media following the government shutdown of TV stations.

Following the shutdown of three of Kenya’s largest TV channels we speak to Godfrey Mwampembwa, aka Gado, the creator of the hit Kenyan satirical show XYZ and hear his thoughts on the relationship between the Kenyan government and the media.

We speak to the feminist, environmentalist and pop cultural icon Pamela Anderson about her campaigning for Wikileaks and how she views feminism in the age of the #timesup and #metoo movements.

The Oscar winning screenwriter of Spotlight and The Post, Josh Singer and the journalist and novelist Jonathan Freedland talk about why journalism continues to inspire classic drama.

Plus we speak to a superstar and a super fan of Marvel’s Black Panther ahead of the release of the blockbuster superhero movie.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Picture: Staff work in a control room during a news program at NTV studios in Nairobi Picture Credit:YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)

Kenya's TV Shutdown: What Comes Next?2018021020180211 (WS)

What's the future for Kenyan media following the government shutdown of TV stations.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Following the shutdown of three of Kenya’s largest TV channels we speak to Godfrey Mwampembwa, aka Gado, the creator of the hit Kenyan satirical show XYZ and hear his thoughts on the relationship between the Kenyan government and the media.

We speak to the feminist, environmentalist and pop cultural icon Pamela Anderson about her campaigning for Wikileaks and how she views feminism in the age of the #timesup and #metoo movements.

The Oscar winning screenwriter of Spotlight and The Post, Josh Singer and the journalist and novelist Jonathan Freedland talk about why journalism continues to inspire classic drama.

Plus we speak to a superstar and a super fan of Marvel’s Black Panther ahead of the release of the blockbuster superhero movie.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Picture: Staff work in a control room during a news program at NTV studios in Nairobi Picture Credit:YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)

Kenya's TV Shutdown: What Comes Next?2018021020180212 (WS)

What's the future for Kenyan media following the government shutdown of TV stations.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Following the shutdown of three of Kenya’s largest TV channels we speak to Godfrey Mwampembwa, aka Gado, the creator of the hit Kenyan satirical show XYZ and hear his thoughts on the relationship between the Kenyan government and the media.

We speak to the feminist, environmentalist and pop cultural icon Pamela Anderson about her campaigning for Wikileaks and how she views feminism in the age of the #timesup and #metoo movements.

The Oscar winning screenwriter of Spotlight and The Post, Josh Singer and the journalist and novelist Jonathan Freedland talk about why journalism continues to inspire classic drama.

Plus we speak to a superstar and a super fan of Marvel’s Black Panther ahead of the release of the blockbuster superhero movie.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Picture: Staff work in a control room during a news program at NTV studios in Nairobi Picture Credit:YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)

Kenya's TV Shutdown: What Comes Next?20180210

What's the future for Kenyan media following the government shutdown of TV stations.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Following the shutdown of three of Kenya’s largest TV channels we speak to Godfrey Mwampembwa, aka Gado, the creator of the hit Kenyan satirical show XYZ and hear his thoughts on the relationship between the Kenyan government and the media.

We speak to the feminist, environmentalist and pop cultural icon Pamela Anderson about her campaigning for Wikileaks and how she views feminism in the age of the #timesup and #metoo movements.

The Oscar winning screenwriter of Spotlight and The Post, Josh Singer and the journalist and novelist Jonathan Freedland talk about why journalism continues to inspire classic drama.

Plus we speak to a superstar and a super fan of Marvel’s Black Panther ahead of the release of the blockbuster superhero movie.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Picture: Staff work in a control room during a news program at NTV studios in Nairobi Picture Credit:YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)

Leaving Home and Finding Inspiration20160604

How journeys and travel can expose and inspire culture in Greece, Liberia and Vietnam.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein continues to be a source of fascination for readers, with its macabre exploration of what it means to be alive. The seeds of the story were first sown two hundred years ago when the poet Lord Byron initiated a ghost story competition during a group summer holiday in Europe. Novelist Benjamin Markovits celebrates the anniversary by uncovering some of the less well known literary products of the contest.

Also in the programme; Vietnamese rapper Suboi challenged President Obama to beatbox last week, she describes the hip hop scene in Vietnam, and Liberian writer Hawa Jande Golakai considers her uneasy relationship with her hometown of Monrovia. It’s also two hundred years since the British government bought the Elgin Marbles – a collection of classical Greek marble sculptures, which had been acquired by the Earl of Elgin from the Parthenon in Athens. They now reside in the British Museum but are a source of ongoing controversy and restitution claims from the Greek government. The British historian Professor Paul Cartledge remembers his first visit to their original home on the Athenian Acropolis.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: statue of Frankenstein in Switzerland Credit: FABRICE COFFRINIAFPGetty Images)

Les Amazones d\u2019Afrique2018081820180819 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline celebrates the West African super-group Les Amazones d\u2019Afrique

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline celebrates the music and activism of the pioneering West African super-group Les Amazones d’Afrique - an all-female collective on a mission to fight for women’s rights in Africa.

Broadcaster and DJ Rita Ray hears from band members Angelique Kidjo, Oumou Sangaré, Awa Sangho, Mariam Doumbia and Mamani Keita, to find out how they use their music to change attitudes towards women and encourage access to education. Plus, producer Valerie Malot shares how she kick-started the group with Oumou Sangaré in Bamako, Mali.

This ground-breaking group embrace music as a campaigning tool to tackle taboos that affect women, such as forced marriages, domestic violence, and female genital mutilation.

Despite the challenges they face in West Africa, Rita discovers the strength of this courageous group, sound-tracked by a live set recorded by the BBC on Les Amazones’ latest tour.

Image: Les Amazones d'Afrique band members. Credit: Valerie Malot

Presented by Rita Ray

Produced by Nicky Barranger

Les Amazones d\u2019Afrique2018081820180820 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline celebrates the West African super-group Les Amazones d\u2019Afrique

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline celebrates the music and activism of the pioneering West African super-group Les Amazones d’Afrique - an all-female collective on a mission to fight for women’s rights in Africa.

Broadcaster and DJ Rita Ray hears from band members Angelique Kidjo, Oumou Sangaré, Awa Sangho, Mariam Doumbia and Mamani Keita, to find out how they use their music to change attitudes towards women and encourage access to education. Plus, producer Valerie Malot shares how she kick-started the group with Oumou Sangaré in Bamako, Mali.

This ground-breaking group embrace music as a campaigning tool to tackle taboos that affect women, such as forced marriages, domestic violence, and female genital mutilation.

Despite the challenges they face in West Africa, Rita discovers the strength of this courageous group, sound-tracked by a live set recorded by the BBC on Les Amazones’ latest tour.

Image: Les Amazones d'Afrique band members. Credit: Valerie Malot

Presented by Rita Ray

Produced by Nicky Barranger

Les Amazones d\u2019Afrique20180818

The Cultural Frontline celebrates the West African super-group Les Amazones d\u2019Afrique

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline celebrates the music and activism of the pioneering West African super-group Les Amazones d’Afrique - an all-female collective on a mission to fight for women’s rights in Africa.

Broadcaster and DJ Rita Ray hears from band members Angelique Kidjo, Oumou Sangaré, Awa Sangho, Mariam Doumbia and Mamani Keita, to find out how they use their music to change attitudes towards women and encourage access to education. Plus, producer Valerie Malot shares how she kick-started the group with Oumou Sangaré in Bamako, Mali.

This ground-breaking group embrace music as a campaigning tool to tackle taboos that affect women, such as forced marriages, domestic violence, and female genital mutilation.

Despite the challenges they face in West Africa, Rita discovers the strength of this courageous group, sound-tracked by a live set recorded by the BBC on Les Amazones’ latest tour.

Image: Les Amazones d'Afrique band members. Credit: Valerie Malot

Presented by Rita Ray

Produced by Nicky Barranger

Lily Cole: Changing Wardrobes to Change the World20181013

What is the impact of fashion on the planet, people and politics?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Lily Cole: Changing Wardrobes to Change the World2018101320181014 (WS)

What is the impact of fashion on the planet, people and politics?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Lily Cole: Changing Wardrobes to Change the World2018101320181015 (WS)

What is the impact of fashion on the planet, people and politics?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Lipstick Under My Burkha Censorship Row2017051320170514 (WS)

Director Alankrita Shrivastava explains why it's important for women\u2019s voices to be heard

The world seen through the eyes of artists

It won awards at film festivals around the world, yet Lipstick Under My Burkha was banned by the Indian film censors for being too “lady-oriented”. The film chronicles the secret lives of four women in small town India in search of a little freedom. Its director, Alankrita Shrivastava explains why it’s important for women’s voices to be heard.

In Iran artists and film-makers have to grapple with censorship on an everyday basis, especially during the run up to the elections later this month. Journalist Dr Massoumeh Torfeh, explains how Iranian poets, film directors and musicians have learnt to make their arguments through symbolism and metaphor to escape retribution.

An artist famous for blowing up a shed and putting the actress Tilda Swinton in a glass cabinet for days has been chosen as the official artist of the UK General Election. The final work by Cornelia Parker will join the Westminster parliamentary art collection which documents and illustrates the history of the UK parliament over the centuries.

Octopizzo, one of Kenya’s top hip hop artists, has a new single out this week. Called Nu Afrika it’s been inspired by his experience of growing up in Kibera, Africa’s largest slum, and where he goes at least twice a week to soak up the vibes that influence his music.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Still from ‘Lipstick Under My Burkha’. Credit: Prakash Jha Productions

Lipstick Under My Burkha Censorship Row20170513

Director Alankrita Shrivastava explains why it's important for women\u2019s voices to be heard

The world seen through the eyes of artists

It won awards at film festivals around the world, yet Lipstick Under My Burkha was banned by the Indian film censors for being too “lady-oriented”. The film chronicles the secret lives of four women in small town India in search of a little freedom. Its director, Alankrita Shrivastava explains why it’s important for women’s voices to be heard.

In Iran artists and film-makers have to grapple with censorship on an everyday basis, especially during the run up to the elections later this month. Journalist Dr Massoumeh Torfeh, explains how Iranian poets, film directors and musicians have learnt to make their arguments through symbolism and metaphor to escape retribution.

An artist famous for blowing up a shed and putting the actress Tilda Swinton in a glass cabinet for days has been chosen as the official artist of the UK General Election. The final work by Cornelia Parker will join the Westminster parliamentary art collection which documents and illustrates the history of the UK parliament over the centuries.

Octopizzo, one of Kenya’s top hip hop artists, has a new single out this week. Called Nu Afrika it’s been inspired by his experience of growing up in Kibera, Africa’s largest slum, and where he goes at least twice a week to soak up the vibes that influence his music.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Still from ‘Lipstick Under My Burkha’. Credit: Prakash Jha Productions

Lipstick Under My Burkha Censorship Row20170513

Director Alankrita Shrivastava explains why it's important for women’s voices to be heard

Making Art from Social Media2016123120170101 (WS)

The artists using Twitter, Instagram, WeChat and Facebook to make and spread their work

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The social media artists using platforms like Twitter, Instagram, WeChat and Facebook to make work and spread their message.

Photographer and poet Amaal Said is a British-Somali student in her early 20s but she has caught the attention of Vogue Magazine and 21,000 Instagram followers with her vibrant and colourful photographs of women of colour. She takes Tina out for a photo-shoot and imparts some photographic wisdom.

Artist Gabriel Barcia-Colombo uses social media data to explore questions of what our digital legacy will be when we die. He explains his process and how he first became interested in the digital afterlife.

Both dubbed ‘poet laureate of Twitter’ poets Patricia Lockwood and Brian Bilston discuss why the platform makes a good conduit for poetry and what the success of poets like them might mean for the future of the form.

Digital artist Miao Ying makes art that pays satirical homage to the censorship she faces on the Chinese internet or ‘Chinternet’. From creating a permanently buffering meme to making online pieces for the Chinese platform WeChat, she pokes fun at the problems Chinese people face trying to get online.

(Photo: Visitor takes smart phone photo of painting. Credit: Daniel Leal Olivas/Getty Images)

Making Art from Social Media20161231

The artists using Twitter, Instagram, WeChat and Facebook to make and spread their work

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The social media artists using platforms like Twitter, Instagram, WeChat and Facebook to make work and spread their message.

Photographer and poet Amaal Said is a British-Somali student in her early 20s but she has caught the attention of Vogue Magazine and 21,000 Instagram followers with her vibrant and colourful photographs of women of colour. She takes Tina out for a photo-shoot and imparts some photographic wisdom.

Artist Gabriel Barcia-Colombo uses social media data to explore questions of what our digital legacy will be when we die. He explains his process and how he first became interested in the digital afterlife.

Both dubbed ‘poet laureate of Twitter’ poets Patricia Lockwood and Brian Bilston discuss why the platform makes a good conduit for poetry and what the success of poets like them might mean for the future of the form.

Digital artist Miao Ying makes art that pays satirical homage to the censorship she faces on the Chinese internet or ‘Chinternet’. From creating a permanently buffering meme to making online pieces for the Chinese platform WeChat, she pokes fun at the problems Chinese people face trying to get online.

(Photo: Visitor takes smart phone photo of painting. Credit: Daniel Leal Olivas/Getty Images)

Making Art From Social Media2016123120170101 (WS)

The social media artists using platforms like Twitter, Instagram, WeChat and Facebook to make work and spread their message.

Photographer and poet Amaal Said is a British-Somali student in her early 20s but she has caught the attention of Vogue Magazine and 21,000 Instagram followers with her vibrant and colourful photographs of women of colour. She takes Tina out for a photo-shoot and imparts some photographic wisdom.

Artist Gabriel Barcia-Colombo uses social media data to explore questions of what our digital legacy will be when we die. He explains his process and how he first became interested in the digital afterlife.

Both dubbed ‘poet laureate of Twitter’ poets Patricia Lockwood and Brian Bilston discuss why the platform makes a good conduit for poetry and what the success of poets like them might mean for the future of the form.

Digital artist Miao Ying makes art that pays satirical homage to the censorship she faces on the Chinese internet or ‘Chinternet’. From creating a permanently buffering meme to making online pieces for the Chinese platform WeChat, she pokes fun at the problems Chinese people face trying to get online.

(Photo: Visitor takes smart phone photo of painting. Credit: Daniel Leal Olivas/Getty Images)

The artists using Twitter, Instagram, WeChat and Facebook to make and spread their work

Mashrou Leila: How To Make Social Change Through Music20180203

Stories of artists tackling environmental and social issues through their work.

This week on The Cultural Frontline, we meet Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Mashrou Leila, the Lebanese band whose socially conscious rock songs have shaken up the Middle East.

Two survivors of Cambodia’s deadly Khmer Rouge regime, the musician Him Sophy and the film maker Rithy Panh, describe how they created the epic stage production Bangsokol: A Requiem for Cambodia, as an act of memory and peace for their country's dead.

Plus we’ll find out why the sculptor, Gilles Cenazandotti and the furniture designer, Brodie Neill have been inspired to create new works of art from the plastic pollution in our oceans and we hear how one Swiss university has decided to start a degree course in yodelling.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Lebanese band Mashrou Leila Picture Credit: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images)

Meet The Band Rocking The Middle East20180203

We speak to Hamed Sinno, lead singer of the socially conscious rock band Mashrou Leila.

This week on The Cultural Frontline, we meet Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Mashrou Leila, the Lebanese band whose socially conscious rock songs have shaken up the Middle East.

Two survivors of Cambodia’s deadly Khmer Rouge regime, the musician Him Sophy and the film maker Rithy Panh, describe how they created the epic stage production Bangsokol: A Requiem for Cambodia, as an act of memory and peace for their country's dead.

Plus we’ll find out why the sculptor, Gilles Cenazandotti and the furniture designer, Brodie Neill have been inspired to create new works of art from the plastic pollution in our oceans and we hear how one Swiss university has decided to start a degree course in yodelling.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Lebanese band Mashrou Leila Picture Credit: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images)

Meet the Band Rocking the Middle East2018020320180204 (WS)

We speak to Hamed Sinno, lead singer of the socially conscious rock band Mashrou Leila.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline, we meet Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Mashrou Leila, the Lebanese band whose socially conscious rock songs have shaken up the Middle East.

Two survivors of Cambodia’s deadly Khmer Rouge regime, the musician Him Sophy and the film maker Rithy Panh, describe how they created the epic stage production Bangsokol: A Requiem for Cambodia, as an act of memory and peace for their country's dead.

Plus we’ll find out why the sculptor, Gilles Cenazandotti and the furniture designer, Brodie Neill have been inspired to create new works of art from the plastic pollution in our oceans and we hear how one Swiss university has decided to start a degree course in yodelling .

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Lebanese band Mashrou Leila Picture Credit: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images)

Meet the Band Rocking the Middle East2018020320180205 (WS)

We speak to Hamed Sinno, lead singer of the socially conscious rock band Mashrou Leila.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline, we meet Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Mashrou Leila, the Lebanese band whose socially conscious rock songs have shaken up the Middle East.

Two survivors of Cambodia’s deadly Khmer Rouge regime, the musician Him Sophy and the film maker Rithy Panh, describe how they created the epic stage production Bangsokol: A Requiem for Cambodia, as an act of memory and peace for their country's dead.

Plus we’ll find out why the sculptor, Gilles Cenazandotti and the furniture designer, Brodie Neill have been inspired to create new works of art from the plastic pollution in our oceans and we hear how one Swiss university has decided to start a degree course in yodelling .

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Lebanese band Mashrou Leila Picture Credit: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images)

Meet the Band Rocking the Middle East20180203

We speak to Hamed Sinno, lead singer of the socially conscious rock band Mashrou Leila.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline, we meet Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Mashrou Leila, the Lebanese band whose socially conscious rock songs have shaken up the Middle East.

Two survivors of Cambodia’s deadly Khmer Rouge regime, the musician Him Sophy and the film maker Rithy Panh, describe how they created the epic stage production Bangsokol: A Requiem for Cambodia, as an act of memory and peace for their country's dead.

Plus we’ll find out why the sculptor, Gilles Cenazandotti and the furniture designer, Brodie Neill have been inspired to create new works of art from the plastic pollution in our oceans and we hear how one Swiss university has decided to start a degree course in yodelling .

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Lebanese band Mashrou Leila Picture Credit: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images)

Muhammad Ali on Stage, Iraq in 100 Years2016101520161016 (WS)

How Cassius Clay became Muhammad Ali, writers imagine Iraq in 2103, J\u00f3n Kalman Stef\u00e1nsson

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Tina meets the American playwright Kemp Powers whose play One Night in Miami imagines what took place between Cassius Clay, Sam Cooke and Malcolm X, the night Clay became world heavyweight champion at the age of 22 in 1964.

Also in the programme, Iraqi writers Hassan Blasim and Anoud discuss their anthology of science fiction which imagines what Iraq will be like in 100 years and Icelandic novelist Jón Kalman Stefánsson argues that fiction is an important tool for fighting division and violence.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Sope Dirisu as Cassius Clay at the Donmar Warehouse Credit: Johan Persson)

Muhammad Ali on Stage, Iraq in 100 Years20161015

How Cassius Clay became Muhammad Ali, writers imagine Iraq in 2103, J\u00f3n Kalman Stef\u00e1nsson

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Tina meets the American playwright Kemp Powers whose play One Night in Miami imagines what took place between Cassius Clay, Sam Cooke and Malcolm X, the night Clay became world heavyweight champion at the age of 22 in 1964.

Also in the programme, Iraqi writers Hassan Blasim and Anoud discuss their anthology of science fiction which imagines what Iraq will be like in 100 years and Icelandic novelist Jón Kalman Stefánsson argues that fiction is an important tool for fighting division and violence.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Sope Dirisu as Cassius Clay at the Donmar Warehouse Credit: Johan Persson)

Music In Extremis: A Pop Concert in Kabul2017082620170827 (WS)

Singer Aryana Sayeed defied clerics and conservatives to mark Afghan Independence Day.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In the week of another tragic bomb attack in Kabul, singer Aryana Sayeed defied clerics and conservatives to stage a pop concert in the capital, celebrating Afghan Independence Day. The ‘Kim Kardashian of Kabul’ tells us why she believes in bringing music back to her home country and how her lyrics aim to give women a voice.

Does body armour make you a safer or braver artist on the streets of Kabul? Performance artist Kubra Khademi reflects on the act of provocation and protection that set out to reclaim public space for Afghan women but ultimately sent her into hiding.

An absent father, a terminal illness and a sweet tooth in Trinidad and Tobago: the ingredients for the short story The Sweet Sop, which won this year’s Commonwealth Short Story Prize. Author Ingrid Persaud tells Tina how she drew on personal experience and the legacy of the Caribbean’s colonial past in her writing.

And the Egyptian man, born a woman, whose transgender journey also transcended borders and language. Adam Kashmiry speaks to Tina from the Edinburgh Festival, where he’s currently starring in the play Adam, based on his own transformative story.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Photo: Singer Aryana Sayeed performs on stage in Kabul Credit: BBC/ Alia Rajai

Music In Extremis: A Pop Concert in Kabul20170826

Singer Aryana Sayeed defied clerics and conservatives to mark Afghan Independence Day.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In the week of another tragic bomb attack in Kabul, singer Aryana Sayeed defied clerics and conservatives to stage a pop concert in the capital, celebrating Afghan Independence Day. The ‘Kim Kardashian of Kabul’ tells us why she believes in bringing music back to her home country and how her lyrics aim to give women a voice.

Does body armour make you a safer or braver artist on the streets of Kabul? Performance artist Kubra Khademi reflects on the act of provocation and protection that set out to reclaim public space for Afghan women but ultimately sent her into hiding.

An absent father, a terminal illness and a sweet tooth in Trinidad and Tobago: the ingredients for the short story The Sweet Sop, which won this year’s Commonwealth Short Story Prize. Author Ingrid Persaud tells Tina how she drew on personal experience and the legacy of the Caribbean’s colonial past in her writing.

And the Egyptian man, born a woman, whose transgender journey also transcended borders and language. Adam Kashmiry speaks to Tina from the Edinburgh Festival, where he’s currently starring in the play Adam, based on his own transformative story.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Photo: Singer Aryana Sayeed performs on stage in Kabul Credit: BBC/ Alia Rajai

New Words and Changing Forms2016061120160612 (WS)

How language is making waves in Sweden, Kenya, London and Spain

The world seen through the eyes of artists

From Sweden, the writer Elin Unnes discusses the new word which has caused conversation and controversy, and explains why she cannot wait to use it in her writing.

Also, Kenyan spoken word artist Dan Mwangi reveals how he uses his platform to spread important social messages, and we meet poetry collective Octavia and hear a poem on the theme of language and the female body. Plus, Argentinian novelist Andrés Neuman considers the writer’s experience of being translated. Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: Microphone resting on a stool Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images))

New Words and Changing Forms20160611

How language is making waves in Sweden, Kenya, London and Spain

The world seen through the eyes of artists

From Sweden, the writer Elin Unnes discusses the new word which has caused conversation and controversy, and explains why she cannot wait to use it in her writing.

Also, Kenyan spoken word artist Dan Mwangi reveals how he uses his platform to spread important social messages, and we meet poetry collective Octavia and hear a poem on the theme of language and the female body. Plus, Argentinian novelist Andrés Neuman considers the writer’s experience of being translated. Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: Microphone resting on a stool Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images))

Novelist Mohsin Hamid on Borders and Migration2017030420170305 (WS)

The award-winning writer discusses his new novel which explores the refugee crisis

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Best-selling novelist Mohsin Hamid discusses his latest novel Exit West, which imagines what would happen if mysterious black doors cropped up all over the world which allowed refugees to reach safety. He tells Tina why he believes it is the job of the artist to help the world to imagine a positive outcome, even for the most seemingly intractable problems.

As President Trump announces that he won’t be attending the annual White House Correspondents’ Dinner, where comedians traditionally ‘roast’ the incumbent, Republican comedians Evan Sayet and Adam Richmond reflect on the experience of being conservative on the US comedy circuit.

Iranian director Asghar Farhadi refused to travel to the United States to collect his Best Foreign Language Film Oscar last weekend. We find out how his win was received in Iran.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: migrants queuing at a European border Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Novelist Mohsin Hamid on Borders and Migration20170304

The award-winning writer discusses his new novel which explores the refugee crisis

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Best-selling novelist Mohsin Hamid discusses his latest novel Exit West, which imagines what would happen if mysterious black doors cropped up all over the world which allowed refugees to reach safety. He tells Tina why he believes it is the job of the artist to help the world to imagine a positive outcome, even for the most seemingly intractable problems.

As President Trump announces that he won’t be attending the annual White House Correspondents’ Dinner, where comedians traditionally ‘roast’ the incumbent, Republican comedians Evan Sayet and Adam Richmond reflect on the experience of being conservative on the US comedy circuit.

Iranian director Asghar Farhadi refused to travel to the United States to collect his Best Foreign Language Film Oscar last weekend. We find out how his win was received in Iran.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: migrants queuing at a European border Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Performing for Peace at the United Nations20180929

Meet the Syrian musician using her voice and her violin to call for peace

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Performing for Peace at the United Nations2018092920180930 (WS)

Meet the Syrian musician using her voice and her violin to call for peace

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Performing for Peace at the United Nations2018092920181001 (WS)

Meet the Syrian musician using her voice and her violin to call for peace

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Picturing A New Zimbabwe20171202

Making art under Mugabe and opening a new chapter for Zimbabwe

After the fall of Mugabe, two leading Zimbabwean artists reflect on his presidency and look ahead to the future of their country. With hip hop musician Sharky, AKA Marshall Muchenje, and the novelist Ignatius Mabasa.

We take a step inside the rehearsal room of the choreographer Kyle Abrahams as he prepares his new show, Pavement, inspired by the writing of WE Dubois and the film Boyz in the Hood.

The ground breaking Icelandic musician Björk tells us why she’s dreaming of Utopia in her latest album, while speaking out to change the world.

Plus, what’s the problem with Apu? The comedian Hari Kondabolu on why he thinks the much loved character from The Simpsons may be doing more harm than good.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

Photo: A supporter holds a sign during the inauguration ceremony of President Mnangagwa at the National Sport Stadium in Harare, Zimbabwe
Credit: Zinyange Auntony/ AFP/ Getty Images

Picturing a New Zimbabwe2017120220171203 (WS)

Making art under Mugabe and opening a new chapter for Zimbabwe

The world seen through the eyes of artists

After the fall of Mugabe, two leading Zimbabwean artists reflect on his presidency and look ahead to the future of their country. With hip hop musician Sharky, AKA Marshall Muchenje, and the novelist Ignatius Mabasa.

We take a step inside the rehearsal room of the choreographer Kyle Abraham as he prepares his new show, Pavement, inspired by the writing of WE Dubois and the film Boyz in the Hood.

The ground breaking Icelandic musician Björk tells us why she’s dreaming of Utopia in her latest album, while speaking out to change the world.

Plus, what’s the problem with Apu? The comedian Hari Kondabolu on why he thinks the much loved character from The Simpsons may be doing more harm than good.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

Photo: A supporter holds a sign during the inauguration ceremony of President Mnangagwa at the National Sport Stadium in Harare, Zimbabwe
Credit: Zinyange Auntony/ AFP/ Getty Images

Picturing a New Zimbabwe2017120220171204 (WS)

Making art under Mugabe and opening a new chapter for Zimbabwe

The world seen through the eyes of artists

After the fall of Mugabe, two leading Zimbabwean artists reflect on his presidency and look ahead to the future of their country. With hip hop musician Sharky, AKA Marshall Muchenje, and the novelist Ignatius Mabasa.

We take a step inside the rehearsal room of the choreographer Kyle Abraham as he prepares his new show, Pavement, inspired by the writing of WE Dubois and the film Boyz in the Hood.

The ground breaking Icelandic musician Björk tells us why she’s dreaming of Utopia in her latest album, while speaking out to change the world.

Plus, what’s the problem with Apu? The comedian Hari Kondabolu on why he thinks the much loved character from The Simpsons may be doing more harm than good.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

Photo: A supporter holds a sign during the inauguration ceremony of President Mnangagwa at the National Sport Stadium in Harare, Zimbabwe
Credit: Zinyange Auntony/ AFP/ Getty Images

Picturing a New Zimbabwe20171202

Making art under Mugabe and opening a new chapter for Zimbabwe

The world seen through the eyes of artists

After the fall of Mugabe, two leading Zimbabwean artists reflect on his presidency and look ahead to the future of their country. With hip hop musician Sharky, AKA Marshall Muchenje, and the novelist Ignatius Mabasa.

We take a step inside the rehearsal room of the choreographer Kyle Abraham as he prepares his new show, Pavement, inspired by the writing of WE Dubois and the film Boyz in the Hood.

The ground breaking Icelandic musician Björk tells us why she’s dreaming of Utopia in her latest album, while speaking out to change the world.

Plus, what’s the problem with Apu? The comedian Hari Kondabolu on why he thinks the much loved character from The Simpsons may be doing more harm than good.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

Photo: A supporter holds a sign during the inauguration ceremony of President Mnangagwa at the National Sport Stadium in Harare, Zimbabwe
Credit: Zinyange Auntony/ AFP/ Getty Images

Picturing Politics: An Artist\u2019s Response to the Kenyan Election2017081920170820 (WS)

Kenyan-British artist Michael Armitage explores the visual spectacle of an election rally

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Michael Armitage is a Kenyan-British artist whose work combines materials and techniques from European and African traditions - layers of oil paint on Lubugo, a traditional bark fabric from Uganda. It explores themes from East African folklore, his own memory, and often responds to what’s going on in the news and current affairs of Kenya. We joined Michael at an opposition rally in the run-up to last week’s election in Kenya to see how it looked from a visual artist's point of view.

Ruth Behar is an anthropologist-turned-novelist who was born in Havana but grew up in New York after her family fled Cuba. Following Obama’s thawing of relations between Cuba and the US, she initiated a project for young writers from both countries to share stories with one another. As Trump talks about reversing Obama’s diplomatic efforts, what role now for Ruth’s bridge-building work?

André Naffis-Sahely is a poet with an Italian mother and Iranian father. He lives in Los Angeles now but he grew up in Abu Dhabi. His debut collection of poetry is called The Promised Land, and it offers glimpses of what life is like for different sections of society in the United Arab Emirates. They’re unflinching observations of the disparities between comfortable expat professionals and temporary migrant workers. The book also charts his own search for a place to call home.

Mamela Nyamza is a South African dancer and choreographer trained in classical ballet, modern dance, African dance, jazz, mime - even Butoh, a traditional Japanese form of dance theatre. She also happens to be a lesbian, and being gay in South Africa can be very dangerous indeed. She talks to us about the prevalence of homophobia in her country, and how she’s using her art to fight back, and change minds.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Artist Michael Armitage films supporters at the final election rally of the National Super Alliance opposition coalition in Nairobi, Kenya. Credit: Anthony Irungu

Picturing Politics: An Artist\u2019s Response to the Kenyan Election20170819

Kenyan-British artist Michael Armitage explores the visual spectacle of an election rally

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Michael Armitage is a Kenyan-British artist whose work combines materials and techniques from European and African traditions - layers of oil paint on Lubugo, a traditional bark fabric from Uganda. It explores themes from East African folklore, his own memory, and often responds to what’s going on in the news and current affairs of Kenya. We joined Michael at an opposition rally in the run-up to last week’s election in Kenya to see how it looked from a visual artist's point of view.

Ruth Behar is an anthropologist-turned-novelist who was born in Havana but grew up in New York after her family fled Cuba. Following Obama’s thawing of relations between Cuba and the US, she initiated a project for young writers from both countries to share stories with one another. As Trump talks about reversing Obama’s diplomatic efforts, what role now for Ruth’s bridge-building work?

André Naffis-Sahely is a poet with an Italian mother and Iranian father. He lives in Los Angeles now but he grew up in Abu Dhabi. His debut collection of poetry is called The Promised Land, and it offers glimpses of what life is like for different sections of society in the United Arab Emirates. They’re unflinching observations of the disparities between comfortable expat professionals and temporary migrant workers. The book also charts his own search for a place to call home.

Mamela Nyamza is a South African dancer and choreographer trained in classical ballet, modern dance, African dance, jazz, mime - even Butoh, a traditional Japanese form of dance theatre. She also happens to be a lesbian, and being gay in South Africa can be very dangerous indeed. She talks to us about the prevalence of homophobia in her country, and how she’s using her art to fight back, and change minds.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Artist Michael Armitage films supporters at the final election rally of the National Super Alliance opposition coalition in Nairobi, Kenya. Credit: Anthony Irungu

Prose, Poetry and Spoken Word20151212

How the written and spoken word are reflecting changes in society from Nigeria to Russia

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Jamaican novelist and winner of the Man Booker Prize Marlon James reflects on the ways that where he writes can influence what he writes. From Rio how ‘string’ literature is documenting life in the city’s favelas, why Russian writing is having a renaissance, and from Nigeria, how young poets are making their voices heard through slam poetry. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Marlon James (c) Oneworld Publications)

Punk, Protest And Pussy Riot20171118

Pussy Riot's Maria Alyokhina on her manifesto for change through artistic action.

Can you change the world through art and activism? Maria Alyokhina of Pussy Riot tells the Cultural Frontline about her manifesto for change through artistic action that she advocates in her new book, Riot Days.

Shut for 10 years, we find out why the reopening of Belgrade’s Museum of Contemporary Art has been met with both praise and protest.

The award winning South Korean writer Han Kang on how the streets of Warsaw inspired her new novel, The White Book, a work shaped by memories of personal grief and political protest.

Plus when a hurricane ravages the island you call home, what comes next? The poet Amanda Calderon shares her thoughts on life in the US and Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: Pussy Riot Rehearsal 2012 Photo Credit: Igor Tsukanov/Pussy Riot)

Punk, Protest and Pussy Riot2017111820171119 (WS)

Pussy Riot's Maria Alyokhina on her manifesto for change through artistic action.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can you change the world through art and activism? Maria Alyokhina of Pussy Riot tells the Cultural Frontline about her manifesto for change through artistic action that she advocates in her new book, Riot Days.

Shut for 10 years, we find out why the reopening of Belgrade’s Museum of Contemporary Art has been met with both praise and protest.

The award winning South Korean writer Han Kang on how the streets of Warsaw inspired her new novel, The White Book, a work shaped by memories of personal grief and political protest.

Plus when a hurricane ravages the island you call home, what comes next? The poet Amanda Calderon shares her thoughts on life in the US and Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: Pussy Riot Rehearsal 2012 Photo Credit: Igor Tsukanov/Pussy Riot)

Punk, Protest and Pussy Riot2017111820171120 (WS)

Pussy Riot's Maria Alyokhina on her manifesto for change through artistic action.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can you change the world through art and activism? Maria Alyokhina of Pussy Riot tells the Cultural Frontline about her manifesto for change through artistic action that she advocates in her new book, Riot Days.

Shut for 10 years, we find out why the reopening of Belgrade’s Museum of Contemporary Art has been met with both praise and protest.

The award winning South Korean writer Han Kang on how the streets of Warsaw inspired her new novel, The White Book, a work shaped by memories of personal grief and political protest.

Plus when a hurricane ravages the island you call home, what comes next? The poet Amanda Calderon shares her thoughts on life in the US and Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: Pussy Riot Rehearsal 2012 Photo Credit: Igor Tsukanov/Pussy Riot)

Punk, Protest and Pussy Riot20171118

Pussy Riot's Maria Alyokhina on her manifesto for change through artistic action.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can you change the world through art and activism? Maria Alyokhina of Pussy Riot tells the Cultural Frontline about her manifesto for change through artistic action that she advocates in her new book, Riot Days.

Shut for 10 years, we find out why the reopening of Belgrade’s Museum of Contemporary Art has been met with both praise and protest.

The award winning South Korean writer Han Kang on how the streets of Warsaw inspired her new novel, The White Book, a work shaped by memories of personal grief and political protest.

Plus when a hurricane ravages the island you call home, what comes next? The poet Amanda Calderon shares her thoughts on life in the US and Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: Pussy Riot Rehearsal 2012 Photo Credit: Igor Tsukanov/Pussy Riot)

Reimagining Iraq's Lost Culture2018040720180408 (WS)

The stories of artists responding to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore the artistic response to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

We join the American artist Michael Rakowitz in London’s Trafalgar Square, as he unveils his new work, a reimagining of an ancient Iraqi artefact, which was destroyed by the so-called Islamic state.

The audio investigator and sound artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan tell us why he has helped former detainees of a notorious Syrian prison to create “ear-witness testimonies ? of their experiences.

The acclaimed Chinese artist Ai Weiwei talks about why he continues to tell the stories of refugees through his work and the Indian singer Harshdeep Kaur shares the story of the artist that inspires her to make music.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Picture: Michael Rakowitz's sculpture The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist on Trafalgar Square's Fourth Plinth in London.
Picture Credit: Gautier DeBlonde

Reimagining Iraq's Lost Culture2018040720180408 (WS)

The stories of artists responding to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore the artistic response to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

We join the American artist Michael Rakowitz in London’s Trafalgar Square, as he unveils his new work, a reimagining of an ancient Iraqi artefact, which was destroyed by the so-called Islamic state.

The audio investigator and sound artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan tell us why he has helped former detainees of a notorious Syrian prison to create “ear-witness testimonies” of their experiences.

The acclaimed Chinese artist Ai Weiwei talks about why he continues to tell the stories of refugees through his work and the Indian singer Harshdeep Kaur shares the story of the artist that inspires her to make music.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Picture: Michael Rakowitz's sculpture The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist on Trafalgar Square's Fourth Plinth in London.
Picture Credit: Gautier DeBlonde

Reimagining Iraq's Lost Culture2018040720180409 (WS)

The stories of artists responding to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore the artistic response to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

We join the American artist Michael Rakowitz in London’s Trafalgar Square, as he unveils his new work, a reimagining of an ancient Iraqi artefact, which was destroyed by the so-called Islamic state.

The audio investigator and sound artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan tell us why he has helped former detainees of a notorious Syrian prison to create “ear-witness testimonies ? of their experiences.

The acclaimed Chinese artist Ai Weiwei talks about why he continues to tell the stories of refugees through his work and the Indian singer Harshdeep Kaur shares the story of the artist that inspires her to make music.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Picture: Michael Rakowitz's sculpture The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist on Trafalgar Square's Fourth Plinth in London.
Picture Credit: Gautier DeBlonde

Reimagining Iraq's Lost Culture2018040720180409 (WS)

The stories of artists responding to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore the artistic response to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

We join the American artist Michael Rakowitz in London’s Trafalgar Square, as he unveils his new work, a reimagining of an ancient Iraqi artefact, which was destroyed by the so-called Islamic state.

The audio investigator and sound artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan tell us why he has helped former detainees of a notorious Syrian prison to create “ear-witness testimonies” of their experiences.

The acclaimed Chinese artist Ai Weiwei talks about why he continues to tell the stories of refugees through his work and the Indian singer Harshdeep Kaur shares the story of the artist that inspires her to make music.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Picture: Michael Rakowitz's sculpture The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist on Trafalgar Square's Fourth Plinth in London.
Picture Credit: Gautier DeBlonde

Reimagining Iraq's Lost Culture20180407

The stories of artists responding to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore the artistic response to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

We join the American artist Michael Rakowitz in London’s Trafalgar Square, as he unveils his new work, a reimagining of an ancient Iraqi artefact, which was destroyed by the so-called Islamic state.

The audio investigator and sound artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan tell us why he has helped former detainees of a notorious Syrian prison to create “ear-witness testimonies ? of their experiences.

The acclaimed Chinese artist Ai Weiwei talks about why he continues to tell the stories of refugees through his work and the Indian singer Harshdeep Kaur shares the story of the artist that inspires her to make music.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Picture: Michael Rakowitz's sculpture The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist on Trafalgar Square's Fourth Plinth in London.
Picture Credit: Gautier DeBlonde

Reimagining Iraq's Lost Culture20180407

The stories of artists responding to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we explore the artistic response to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

We join the American artist Michael Rakowitz in London’s Trafalgar Square, as he unveils his new work, a reimagining of an ancient Iraqi artefact, which was destroyed by the so-called Islamic state.

The audio investigator and sound artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan tell us why he has helped former detainees of a notorious Syrian prison to create “ear-witness testimonies” of their experiences.

The acclaimed Chinese artist Ai Weiwei talks about why he continues to tell the stories of refugees through his work and the Indian singer Harshdeep Kaur shares the story of the artist that inspires her to make music.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Picture: Michael Rakowitz's sculpture The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist on Trafalgar Square's Fourth Plinth in London.
Picture Credit: Gautier DeBlonde

Rejecting the Urge to 'Make America Great Again'2017052720170528 (WS)

Author Richard Ford argues everyone has a dream not just Americans

The world seen through the eyes of artists

US writer Richard Ford’s new book, ‘Between Them: Remembering My Parents’, tells the story of their peripatetic life in America during The Great Depression. He explains why he rejects the nostalgia for apple pie and picket fences and the current urge to Make America Great Again.

As animal rights activists protest over Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch's plans to make art from a slaughtered bull in Tasmania, Yvette Watt, who studies artists who feature animals in their work, explores the argument for using animals in art.

In his book ‘Rock in a Hard Place’ the author and lifelong music fan Orlando Crowcroft pays tribute to the courage and determination of musicians who are willing to risk everything for their music; including musician Adel Saflou whose passion for heavy metal began to endanger his life in Syria.

Since the 13th century, the Island of Murano, (just to the north of Venice), has been famous for its fabulous glass. At its peak there were six thousand furnaces burning on the small island but now fewer than a thousand are still working. Marcantonio Brandolini is a glass artist with plans to halt the decline.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Photo: Richard Ford as a child with his parents. Credit: Richard Ford

Rejecting the Urge to 'Make America Great Again'20170527

Author Richard Ford argues everyone has a dream not just Americans

The world seen through the eyes of artists

US writer Richard Ford’s new book, ‘Between Them: Remembering My Parents’, tells the story of their peripatetic life in America during The Great Depression. He explains why he rejects the nostalgia for apple pie and picket fences and the current urge to Make America Great Again.

As animal rights activists protest over Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch's plans to make art from a slaughtered bull in Tasmania, Yvette Watt, who studies artists who feature animals in their work, explores the argument for using animals in art.

In his book ‘Rock in a Hard Place’ the author and lifelong music fan Orlando Crowcroft pays tribute to the courage and determination of musicians who are willing to risk everything for their music; including musician Adel Saflou whose passion for heavy metal began to endanger his life in Syria.

Since the 13th century, the Island of Murano, (just to the north of Venice), has been famous for its fabulous glass. At its peak there were six thousand furnaces burning on the small island but now fewer than a thousand are still working. Marcantonio Brandolini is a glass artist with plans to halt the decline.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Photo: Richard Ford as a child with his parents. Credit: Richard Ford

Reviving and Reclaiming Culture2016051420160515 (WS)

How culture from Shakespeare to the Swinging Sixties is being revisited and remixed.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

With Tina Daheley.

To mark 6 months of the new government in Argentina, writer Pola Oloixarac considers the Mauricio Macri administration’s attitude towards the arts. She finds that, not for the first time, the Argentine government is championing the art of the past, in order to influence the future.

In Iran a new, independent online drama has been transporting viewers back to the 1950s. Set in the time of the military coup that overthrew Prime Minister Mosaddeq and bolstered the rule of the Shah, it depicts scenes that might be considered shocking by Iranian standards. Cultural critic & BBC Persian producer Maghsood Salehi tells us what sets Shahrzad apart from the competition, amid a fashion for nostalgia on Iran’s TV- & computer- screens.

In a new commission for the Royal Shakespeare Company, British Nigerian poet and playwright Inua Ellams has written a prequel to the Shakespeare’s The Tempest. For The Cultural Frontline, Inua sets out his case for righting- and re-writing- the wrongs of the original play and describes how his version reinvents the character of Caliban.

The possum skin cloak in Aboriginal culture was both a garment and a canvas, on which the stories of the land and its people were inscribed. In an interview produced for The Cultural Frontline by Jarni Blakkarly, the Aboriginal artist Tiriki Onus shares his determination to revive the custom and the craft of traditional possum skin cloak-making in Australia.

(Photo: The Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires Credit: Juan Mabromata/ AFP/ Getty)

Reviving and Reclaiming Culture20160514

How culture from Shakespeare to the Swinging Sixties is being revisited and remixed.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

With Tina Daheley.

To mark 6 months of the new government in Argentina, writer Pola Oloixarac considers the Mauricio Macri administration’s attitude towards the arts. She finds that, not for the first time, the Argentine government is championing the art of the past, in order to influence the future.

In Iran a new, independent online drama has been transporting viewers back to the 1950s. Set in the time of the military coup that overthrew Prime Minister Mosaddeq and bolstered the rule of the Shah, it depicts scenes that might be considered shocking by Iranian standards. Cultural critic & BBC Persian producer Maghsood Salehi tells us what sets Shahrzad apart from the competition, amid a fashion for nostalgia on Iran’s TV- & computer- screens.

In a new commission for the Royal Shakespeare Company, British Nigerian poet and playwright Inua Ellams has written a prequel to the Shakespeare’s The Tempest. For The Cultural Frontline, Inua sets out his case for righting- and re-writing- the wrongs of the original play and describes how his version reinvents the character of Caliban.

The possum skin cloak in Aboriginal culture was both a garment and a canvas, on which the stories of the land and its people were inscribed. In an interview produced for The Cultural Frontline by Jarni Blakkarly, the Aboriginal artist Tiriki Onus shares his determination to revive the custom and the craft of traditional possum skin cloak-making in Australia.

(Photo: The Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires Credit: Juan Mabromata/ AFP/ Getty)

Rockin' Out with Indonesia's Hijabi Heavy Metal Band2018031720180318 (WS)

Exploring the art of rock 'n' roll from mosh pits to Indonesia's hijabi heavy metal band.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore the art of rock n’roll.

We meet Dan Witz, the American painter trying to create art from the middle of a mosh pit.

The Peruvian artist Claudia Martinez Garay takes us behind the scenes of the exhibition Songs for Sabotage, which explores symbols of iconic imagery and propaganda.

The Lebanese rock star Hamed Sinno reveals why Kate Bush is one of his musical heroines and we rock out with Indonesia’s all-girl, hijab-wearing heavy metal band, Voice of Baceprot.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Indonesian band, Voice of Baceprot Picture Credit: BBC/Rebecca Henschke)

Rockin' Out with Indonesia's Hijabi Heavy Metal Band2018031720180319 (WS)

Exploring the art of rock 'n' roll from mosh pits to Indonesia's hijabi heavy metal band.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore the art of rock n’roll.

We meet Dan Witz, the American painter trying to create art from the middle of a mosh pit.

The Peruvian artist Claudia Martinez Garay takes us behind the scenes of the exhibition Songs for Sabotage, which explores symbols of iconic imagery and propaganda.

The Lebanese rock star Hamed Sinno reveals why Kate Bush is one of his musical heroines and we rock out with Indonesia’s all-girl, hijab-wearing heavy metal band, Voice of Baceprot.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Indonesian band, Voice of Baceprot Picture Credit: BBC/Rebecca Henschke)

Rockin' Out with Indonesia's Hijabi Heavy Metal Band20180317

Exploring the art of rock 'n' roll from mosh pits to Indonesia's hijabi heavy metal band.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore the art of rock n’roll.

We meet Dan Witz, the American painter trying to create art from the middle of a mosh pit.

The Peruvian artist Claudia Martinez Garay takes us behind the scenes of the exhibition Songs for Sabotage, which explores symbols of iconic imagery and propaganda.

The Lebanese rock star Hamed Sinno reveals why Kate Bush is one of his musical heroines and we rock out with Indonesia’s all-girl, hijab-wearing heavy metal band, Voice of Baceprot.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Indonesian band, Voice of Baceprot Picture Credit: BBC/Rebecca Henschke)

Rockin' Out With Indonesia's Hijabi Heavy Metal Band2018031720180319 (WS)
20180318 (WS)

Exploring the art of rock 'n' roll from mosh pits to Indonesia's hijabi heavy metal band.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore the art of rock n’roll.

We meet Dan Witz, the American painter trying to create art from the middle of a mosh pit.

The Peruvian artist Claudia Martinez Garay takes us behind the scenes of the exhibition Songs for Sabotage, which explores symbols of iconic imagery and propaganda.

The Lebanese rock star Hamed Sinno reveals why Kate Bush is one of his musical heroines and we rock out with Indonesia’s all-girl, hijab-wearing heavy metal band, Voice of Baceprot.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Indonesian band, Voice of Baceprot Picture Credit: BBC/Rebecca Henschke)

Exploring the art of rock 'n' roll from mosh pits to Indonesia's hijabi heavy metal band.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore the art of rock n’roll.

We meet Dan Witz, the American painter trying to create art from the middle of a mosh pit.

The Peruvian artist Claudia Martinez Garay takes us behind the scenes of the exhibition Songs for Sabotage, which explores symbols of iconic imagery and propaganda.

The Lebanese rock star Hamed Sinno reveals why Kate Bush is one of his musical heroines and we rock out with Indonesia’s all-girl, hijab-wearing heavy metal band, Voice of Baceprot.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Indonesian band, Voice of Baceprot Picture Credit: BBC/Rebecca Henschke)

Exploring the art of rock 'n' roll from mosh pits to Indonesia's hijabi heavy metal band.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore the art of rock n’roll.

We meet Dan Witz, the American painter trying to create art from the middle of a mosh pit.

The Peruvian artist Claudia Martinez Garay takes us behind the scenes of the exhibition Songs for Sabotage, which explores symbols of iconic imagery and propaganda.

The Lebanese rock star Hamed Sinno reveals why Kate Bush is one of his musical heroines and we rock out with Indonesia’s all-girl, hijab-wearing heavy metal band, Voice of Baceprot.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Indonesian band, Voice of Baceprot Picture Credit: BBC/Rebecca Henschke)

Exploring the art of rock 'n' roll from mosh pits to Indonesia's hijabi heavy metal band.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Rosa Parks' House Finds a New Home2017061020170611 (WS)

Why is the house of American civil rights hero Rosa Parks now in a Berlin suburb?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Why is the house of American civil rights hero Rosa Parks now in a German suburb? Her niece, Rhea McCauley, who grew up in the house, explains its' importance and artist Ryan Mendoza describes how he saved it from demolition in Detroit and moved it, piece by piece, to his back garden in Berlin.

As Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel the Handmaid's Tale is adapted for TV, Mona Eltahawy, the author of 'Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution', argues that it depicts reality for millions of women.

The subjugation of young women is also explored by the sculptor Peju Alatise whose work is presently on show in the Nigerian pavilion at the Venice Biennale. She describes the inspiration for her art work "Flying Girls" which portrays eight life-sized sculptures of a young woman with wings.

Hay El-Matar, a thrice-weekly radio drama currently broadcast on the BBC Arabic service, has been recorded in English to be aired in the UK. Boz Temple-Morris, the series producer, and Hussam Sharwany who plays Ghaly, a character who runs the local mini-market and makes daily announcements on a megaphone, discuss why it’s important to reflect the reality of people living in Syria today.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Picture: Ryan Mendoza and Rhea McCauley in front of Rosa Parks House in Berlin. Credit: Fabia Mendoza

Rosa Parks' House Finds a New Home20170610

Why is the house of American civil rights hero Rosa Parks now in a Berlin suburb?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Why is the house of American civil rights hero Rosa Parks now in a German suburb? Her niece, Rhea McCauley, who grew up in the house, explains its' importance and artist Ryan Mendoza describes how he saved it from demolition in Detroit and moved it, piece by piece, to his back garden in Berlin.

As Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel the Handmaid's Tale is adapted for TV, Mona Eltahawy, the author of 'Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution', argues that it depicts reality for millions of women.

The subjugation of young women is also explored by the sculptor Peju Alatise whose work is presently on show in the Nigerian pavilion at the Venice Biennale. She describes the inspiration for her art work "Flying Girls" which portrays eight life-sized sculptures of a young woman with wings.

Hay El-Matar, a thrice-weekly radio drama currently broadcast on the BBC Arabic service, has been recorded in English to be aired in the UK. Boz Temple-Morris, the series producer, and Hussam Sharwany who plays Ghaly, a character who runs the local mini-market and makes daily announcements on a megaphone, discuss why it’s important to reflect the reality of people living in Syria today.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Picture: Ryan Mendoza and Rhea McCauley in front of Rosa Parks House in Berlin. Credit: Fabia Mendoza

Rupi Kaur: Rewriting the Migration Narrative2018060220180603 (WS)

How writers from India to Kenya are reshaping the story of migration

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How poet Rupi Kaur, playwright Quiara Alegria Hudes, novelist Peter Kimani and writer Khaled Diab are all re-writing the story of migration, from India to Kenya.

Canadian poet Rupi Kaur tells The Cultural Frontline’s Datshiane Navanayagam how her family’s history of migration from India informed her latest poetry collection, The Sun and Her Flowers.

Reporter Will Coley goes backstage in New York at the road trip musical Miss You Like Hell to meet its Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Quiara Alegria Hudes.

Tina meets writer and poet Peter Kimani and hears how his novel, Dance of the Jakaranda, draws a thread between the dawn of Kenyan independence and its colonial past, to better understand Kenya's present.

Plus, writer Khaled Diab on 'baladi': an Arabic word that, in Egypt at least, shows how even the most local of customs can travel.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Kirsty McQuire

Image: Rupi Kaur Credit: Baljit Singh

Rupi Kaur: Rewriting the Migration Narrative2018060220180604 (WS)

How writers from India to Kenya are reshaping the story of migration

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How poet Rupi Kaur, playwright Quiara Alegria Hudes, novelist Peter Kimani and writer Khaled Diab are all re-writing the story of migration, from India to Kenya.

Canadian poet Rupi Kaur tells The Cultural Frontline’s Datshiane Navanayagam how her family’s history of migration from India informed her latest poetry collection, The Sun and Her Flowers.

Reporter Will Coley goes backstage in New York at the road trip musical Miss You Like Hell to meet its Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Quiara Alegria Hudes.

Tina meets writer and poet Peter Kimani and hears how his novel, Dance of the Jakaranda, draws a thread between the dawn of Kenyan independence and its colonial past, to better understand Kenya's present.

Plus, writer Khaled Diab on 'baladi': an Arabic word that, in Egypt at least, shows how even the most local of customs can travel.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Kirsty McQuire

Image: Rupi Kaur Credit: Baljit Singh

Rupi Kaur: Rewriting the Migration Narrative20180602

How writers from India to Kenya are reshaping the story of migration

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How poet Rupi Kaur, playwright Quiara Alegria Hudes, novelist Peter Kimani and writer Khaled Diab are all re-writing the story of migration, from India to Kenya.

Canadian poet Rupi Kaur tells The Cultural Frontline’s Datshiane Navanayagam how her family’s history of migration from India informed her latest poetry collection, The Sun and Her Flowers.

Reporter Will Coley goes backstage in New York at the road trip musical Miss You Like Hell to meet its Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Quiara Alegria Hudes.

Tina meets writer and poet Peter Kimani and hears how his novel, Dance of the Jakaranda, draws a thread between the dawn of Kenyan independence and its colonial past, to better understand Kenya's present.

Plus, writer Khaled Diab on 'baladi': an Arabic word that, in Egypt at least, shows how even the most local of customs can travel.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Kirsty McQuire

Image: Rupi Kaur Credit: Baljit Singh

Rupi Kaur: Rewriting The Migration Narrative2018060220180603 (WS)

How writers from India to Kenya are reshaping the story of migration

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How poet Rupi Kaur, playwright Quiara Alegria Hudes, novelist Peter Kimani and writer Khaled Diab are all re-writing the story of migration, from India to Kenya.

Canadian poet Rupi Kaur tells The Cultural Frontline’s Datshiane Navanayagam how her family’s history of migration from India informed her latest poetry collection, The Sun and Her Flowers.

Reporter Will Coley goes backstage in New York at the road trip musical Miss You Like Hell to meet its Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Quiara Alegria Hudes.

Tina meets writer and poet Peter Kimani and hears how his novel, Dance of the Jakaranda, draws a thread between the dawn of Kenyan independence and its colonial past, to better understand Kenya's present.

Plus, writer Khaled Diab on 'baladi': an Arabic word that, in Egypt at least, shows how even the most local of customs can travel.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Kirsty McQuire

Image: Rupi Kaur Credit: Baljit Singh

Russian Art Under Putin2018032420180325 (WS)

The Russian art of patriotism, protest and paranoia, after President Putin's re-election

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In the week that Vladimir Putin was re-elected as Russian president, while a diplomatic row rages over the poisoning of a former Russian spy in the UK, The Cultural Frontline explores the Russian art of patriotism, protest and paranoia.

Tina speaks to visual artist Alexey Belyaev-Gintovt, the controversial winner of Russia’s prestigious Kandinsky Prize, whose work depicting what he calls ‘the motherland’ is often described as nationalist.

The BBC’s Lucy Ash meets Victoria Lomasko, whose ‘graphic reportage’ portrays people on the margins of Russian society and pays homage to the country’s last mass demonstrations in 2012.

Russian playwright Mikhail Durnenkov reflects on the atmosphere of fear and mistrust born of fake news and censorship, while the BBC’s Alexander Kan considers an obscure Russian word that’s been popularised by both political rhetoric and satirical rap.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Image: A portrait of Russian president Vladimir Putin, on display at a Moscow art market in January 2018. Credit: Mladen Antonov/ AFP/ Getty Images

Russian Art Under Putin2018032420180326 (WS)

The Russian art of patriotism, protest and paranoia, after President Putin's re-election

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In the week that Vladimir Putin was re-elected as Russian president, while a diplomatic row rages over the poisoning of a former Russian spy in the UK, The Cultural Frontline explores the Russian art of patriotism, protest and paranoia.

Tina speaks to visual artist Alexey Belyaev-Gintovt, the controversial winner of Russia’s prestigious Kandinsky Prize, whose work depicting what he calls ‘the motherland’ is often described as nationalist.

The BBC’s Lucy Ash meets Victoria Lomasko, whose ‘graphic reportage’ portrays people on the margins of Russian society and pays homage to the country’s last mass demonstrations in 2012.

Russian playwright Mikhail Durnenkov reflects on the atmosphere of fear and mistrust born of fake news and censorship, while the BBC’s Alexander Kan considers an obscure Russian word that’s been popularised by both political rhetoric and satirical rap.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Image: A portrait of Russian president Vladimir Putin, on display at a Moscow art market in January 2018. Credit: Mladen Antonov/ AFP/ Getty Images

Russian Art Under Putin20180324

The Russian art of patriotism, protest and paranoia, after President Putin's re-election

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In the week that Vladimir Putin was re-elected as Russian president, while a diplomatic row rages over the poisoning of a former Russian spy in the UK, The Cultural Frontline explores the Russian art of patriotism, protest and paranoia.

Tina speaks to visual artist Alexey Belyaev-Gintovt, the controversial winner of Russia’s prestigious Kandinsky Prize, whose work depicting what he calls ‘the motherland’ is often described as nationalist.

The BBC’s Lucy Ash meets Victoria Lomasko, whose ‘graphic reportage’ portrays people on the margins of Russian society and pays homage to the country’s last mass demonstrations in 2012.

Russian playwright Mikhail Durnenkov reflects on the atmosphere of fear and mistrust born of fake news and censorship, while the BBC’s Alexander Kan considers an obscure Russian word that’s been popularised by both political rhetoric and satirical rap.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Image: A portrait of Russian president Vladimir Putin, on display at a Moscow art market in January 2018. Credit: Mladen Antonov/ AFP/ Getty Images

Sacred Places and Sounds2016061820160619 (WS)

How music, art and sculpture can provide sanctuary and convey spirituality

The world seen through the eyes of artists

From India, novelist Anuradha Roy considers what the ancient sculptures at Khajuraho temple in central India can tell us about how the experience of being Hindu in the country has changed.

Journalist Ha-young Choi reports from South Korea on the ways that outside organisations are trying to spread religious and cultural messages into North Korea.

Also, Swedish writer Jonas Hassen Khemiri remembers his childhood visits to his family's sacred space - the local library, and Indian poet and producer Vandana Arimardan explains how she wrote a song to commemorate this year’s International Yoga Day. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Khajuraho temple)

Sacred Places and Sounds20160618

How music, art and sculpture can provide sanctuary and convey spirituality

The world seen through the eyes of artists

From India, novelist Anuradha Roy considers what the ancient sculptures at Khajuraho temple in central India can tell us about how the experience of being Hindu in the country has changed.

Journalist Ha-young Choi reports from South Korea on the ways that outside organisations are trying to spread religious and cultural messages into North Korea.

Also, Swedish writer Jonas Hassen Khemiri remembers his childhood visits to his family's sacred space - the local library, and Indian poet and producer Vandana Arimardan explains how she wrote a song to commemorate this year’s International Yoga Day. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Khajuraho temple)

Saudi TV Drama on Life Under So-Called Islamic State2017062420170625 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

During Ramadan, the Saudi TV conglomerate, MBC, has been showing the first ever TV drama to depict life under the so called Islamic state in Syria. Called `Gharabeeb Saoud`, or `Black Crows`, it is based on real life stories of women who join Jihadis in their city stronghold of Raqqa and is an attempt to counter extremist media propaganda. The show has scored highly in MBC’s ratings for the Ramadan season, but it has been controversial. We discuss the ambitions of `Black Crows` with MBC spokesperson Mazen Hayek, and Dr Massoumeh Torfeh, a specialist on anti-terrorist media strategy.

As Iceland celebrates the long, light days of Midsummer, best-selling crime author and civil engineer, Yrsa Sigurðardóttir gives us a glimpse of green power in Iceland.

To mark the United Nations World Refugee Day this week, we hear how Iranian rapper Farhood ended up in a British prison when he fled Iran and why he believes rap is vital for a generation of young Iranians.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Female member of IS in the TV drama Black Crows. Credit: MBC Group)

Saudi TV Drama on Life Under So-Called Islamic State20170624

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

During Ramadan, the Saudi TV conglomerate, MBC, has been showing the first ever TV drama to depict life under the so called Islamic state in Syria. Called `Gharabeeb Saoud`, or `Black Crows`, it is based on real life stories of women who join Jihadis in their city stronghold of Raqqa and is an attempt to counter extremist media propaganda. The show has scored highly in MBC’s ratings for the Ramadan season, but it has been controversial. We discuss the ambitions of `Black Crows` with MBC spokesperson Mazen Hayek, and Dr Massoumeh Torfeh, a specialist on anti-terrorist media strategy.

As Iceland celebrates the long, light days of Midsummer, best-selling crime author and civil engineer, Yrsa Sigurðardóttir gives us a glimpse of green power in Iceland.

To mark the United Nations World Refugee Day this week, we hear how Iranian rapper Farhood ended up in a British prison when he fled Iran and why he believes rap is vital for a generation of young Iranians.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Female member of IS in the TV drama Black Crows. Credit: MBC Group)

Seun Kuti: Life, Legacy And Afrobeat20180120

The Cultural Frontline explores how memory and legacy have shaped the work of artists.

This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore how memory and legacy have shaped the work of artists.

We hear from the musician Seun Kuti on making political music and following in the footsteps of his father, the Afrobeat pioneer and political activist Fela Kuti.

The American filmmaker Greg Campbell shares his memories of the life and work of his friend, the celebrated photojournalist Chris Hondros.

The Chinese writer Lijia Zhang reveals how the award winning film Angels Wear White brought back painful memories from her childhood.

Plus the British-Nigerian poet Tolu Agbelusi shares her poem, The Anthropology of Belonging: Star with the Self.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Seun Kuti performing with Egypt 80 Picture Credit: Rich Fury/Getty Images for FYF)

Seun Kuti: Life, Legacy and Afrobeat2018012020180121 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline explores how memory and legacy have shaped the work of artists.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore how memory and legacy have shaped the work of artists.

We hear from the musician Seun Kuti on making political music and following in the footsteps of his father, the Afrobeat pioneer and political activist Fela Kuti.

The American filmmaker Greg Campbell shares his memories of the life and work of his friend, the celebrated photojournalist Chris Hondros.

The Chinese writer Lijia Zhang reveals how the award winning film Angels Wear White brought back painful memories from her childhood.

Plus the British-Nigerian poet Tolu Agbelusi shares her poem, The Anthropology of Belonging: Start with the Self.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Seun Kuti performing with Egypt 80 Picture Credit: Rich Fury/Getty Images for FYF)

Seun Kuti: Life, Legacy and Afrobeat2018012020180122 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline explores how memory and legacy have shaped the work of artists.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore how memory and legacy have shaped the work of artists.

We hear from the musician Seun Kuti on making political music and following in the footsteps of his father, the Afrobeat pioneer and political activist Fela Kuti.

The American filmmaker Greg Campbell shares his memories of the life and work of his friend, the celebrated photojournalist Chris Hondros.

The Chinese writer Lijia Zhang reveals how the award winning film Angels Wear White brought back painful memories from her childhood.

Plus the British-Nigerian poet Tolu Agbelusi shares her poem, The Anthropology of Belonging: Start with the Self.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Seun Kuti performing with Egypt 80 Picture Credit: Rich Fury/Getty Images for FYF)

Seun Kuti: Life, Legacy and Afrobeat20180120

The Cultural Frontline explores how memory and legacy have shaped the work of artists.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore how memory and legacy have shaped the work of artists.

We hear from the musician Seun Kuti on making political music and following in the footsteps of his father, the Afrobeat pioneer and political activist Fela Kuti.

The American filmmaker Greg Campbell shares his memories of the life and work of his friend, the celebrated photojournalist Chris Hondros.

The Chinese writer Lijia Zhang reveals how the award winning film Angels Wear White brought back painful memories from her childhood.

Plus the British-Nigerian poet Tolu Agbelusi shares her poem, The Anthropology of Belonging: Start with the Self.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Seun Kuti performing with Egypt 80 Picture Credit: Rich Fury/Getty Images for FYF)

She Who Dares: Feminist Artists2018030320180304 (WS)

Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates risk-taking women in art.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Ahead of International Women’s Day, Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates the female artists daring to fight for equality with creativity, in the age of #MeToo and #TimesUp.

Actor and dancer Suhaee Abro stars in My Pure Land, a film set in rural Pakistan and described as a ‘feminist western.’ She discusses the challenges of being a feminist- on and off screen- and the impact of the social media movements #MeToo and #MosqueMeToo on Muslim women.

Can periods ever be public art? Swedish comic book artist Liv Strömquist shares her story of daring to depict menstruation on the metro in Stockholm. The artist-activist Li Maizi, one of China’s Feminist Five, was detained for daring to challenge sexual harassment on public transport. For The Cultural Frontline, she delivers her ‘Woman-ifesto’ of feminist art principles.

Plus, the musicians Björk and Anoushka Shankar each pay tribute to their personal art heroines and the novelist Chloe Aridjis remembers an inspirational artist who broke the mould in Mexico.

Presenter: Elif Shafak
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Photo: Feminist activists participate in a women’s march in Berlin, Germany on 21st January, 2018 Credit: Adam Berry/ Getty Images

She Who Dares: Feminist Artists2018030320180305 (WS)

Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates risk-taking women in art.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Ahead of International Women’s Day, Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates the female artists daring to fight for equality with creativity, in the age of #MeToo and #TimesUp.

Actor and dancer Suhaee Abro stars in My Pure Land, a film set in rural Pakistan and described as a ‘feminist western.’ She discusses the challenges of being a feminist- on and off screen- and the impact of the social media movements #MeToo and #MosqueMeToo on Muslim women.

Can periods ever be public art? Swedish comic book artist Liv Strömquist shares her story of daring to depict menstruation on the metro in Stockholm. The artist-activist Li Maizi, one of China’s Feminist Five, was detained for daring to challenge sexual harassment on public transport. For The Cultural Frontline, she delivers her ‘Woman-ifesto’ of feminist art principles.

Plus, the musicians Björk and Anoushka Shankar each pay tribute to their personal art heroines and the novelist Chloe Aridjis remembers an inspirational artist who broke the mould in Mexico.

Presenter: Elif Shafak
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Photo: Feminist activists participate in a women’s march in Berlin, Germany on 21st January, 2018 Credit: Adam Berry/ Getty Images

She Who Dares: Feminist Artists20180303

Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates risk-taking women in art.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Ahead of International Women’s Day, Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates the female artists daring to fight for equality with creativity, in the age of #MeToo and #TimesUp.

Actor and dancer Suhaee Abro stars in My Pure Land, a film set in rural Pakistan and described as a ‘feminist western.’ She discusses the challenges of being a feminist- on and off screen- and the impact of the social media movements #MeToo and #MosqueMeToo on Muslim women.

Can periods ever be public art? Swedish comic book artist Liv Strömquist shares her story of daring to depict menstruation on the metro in Stockholm. The artist-activist Li Maizi, one of China’s Feminist Five, was detained for daring to challenge sexual harassment on public transport. For The Cultural Frontline, she delivers her ‘Woman-ifesto’ of feminist art principles.

Plus, the musicians Björk and Anoushka Shankar each pay tribute to their personal art heroines and the novelist Chloe Aridjis remembers an inspirational artist who broke the mould in Mexico.

Presenter: Elif Shafak
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Photo: Feminist activists participate in a women’s march in Berlin, Germany on 21st January, 2018 Credit: Adam Berry/ Getty Images

She Who Dares: Feminist Artists2018030320180305 (WS)

Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates risk-taking women in art.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Ahead of International Women’s Day, Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates the female artists daring to fight for equality with creativity, in the age of #MeToo and #TimesUp.

Actor and dancer Suhaee Abro stars in My Pure Land, a film set in rural Pakistan and described as a ‘feminist western.’ She discusses the challenges of being a feminist- on and off screen- and the impact of the social media movements #MeToo and #MosqueMeToo on Muslim women.

Can periods ever be public art? Swedish comic book artist Liv Strömquist shares her story of daring to depict menstruation on the metro in Stockholm. The artist-activist Li Maizi, one of China’s Feminist Five, was detained for daring to challenge sexual harassment on public transport. For The Cultural Frontline, she delivers her ‘Woman-ifesto’ of feminist art principles.

Plus, the musicians Björk and Anoushka Shankar each pay tribute to their personal art heroines and the novelist Chloe Aridjis remembers an inspirational artist who broke the mould in Mexico.

Presenter: Elif Shafak
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Photo: Feminist activists participate in a women’s march in Berlin, Germany on 21st January, 2018 Credit: Adam Berry/ Getty Images

Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates risk-taking women in art.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Ahead of International Women’s Day, Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates the female artists daring to fight for equality with creativity, in the age of #MeToo and #TimesUp.

Actor and dancer Suhaee Abro stars in My Pure Land, a film set in rural Pakistan and described as a ‘feminist western.’ She discusses the challenges of being a feminist- on and off screen- and the impact of the social media movements #MeToo and #MosqueMeToo on Muslim women.

Can periods ever be public art? Swedish comic book artist Liv Strömquist shares her story of daring to depict menstruation on the metro in Stockholm. The artist-activist Li Maizi, one of China’s Feminist Five, was detained for daring to challenge sexual harassment on public transport. For The Cultural Frontline, she delivers her ‘Woman-ifesto’ of feminist art principles.

Plus, the musicians Björk and Anoushka Shankar each pay tribute to their personal art heroines and the novelist Chloe Aridjis remembers an inspirational artist who broke the mould in Mexico.

Presenter: Elif Shafak
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Photo: Feminist activists participate in a women’s march in Berlin, Germany on 21st January, 2018 Credit: Adam Berry/ Getty Images

Ahead of International Women’s Day, Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates the female artists daring to fight for equality with creativity, in the age of #MeToo and #TimesUp.

Actor and dancer Suhaee Abro stars in My Pure Land, a film set in rural Pakistan and described as a ‘feminist western.’ She discusses the challenges of being a feminist- on and off screen- and the impact of the social media movements #MeToo and #MosqueMeToo on Muslim women.

Can periods ever be public art? Swedish comic book artist Liv Strömquist shares her story of daring to depict menstruation on the metro in Stockholm. The artist-activist Li Maizi, one of China’s Feminist Five, was detained for daring to challenge sexual harassment on public transport. For The Cultural Frontline, she delivers her ‘Woman-ifesto’ of feminist art principles.

Plus, the musicians Björk and Anoushka Shankar each pay tribute to their personal art heroines and the novelist Chloe Aridjis remembers an inspirational artist who broke the mould in Mexico.

Presenter: Elif Shafak
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Photo: Feminist activists participate in a women’s march in Berlin, Germany on 21st January, 2018 Credit: Adam Berry/ Getty Images

Singing The Troubles: Music & Identity In Ireland2018051920180520 (WS)
20180521 (WS)

Music and cultural identity north and south of Ireland\u2019s border

The world seen through the eyes of artists

On this week’s Cultural Frontline: art, pop music, literature and folk song from the island of Ireland.

As Ireland readies itself to go to the polls to vote on whether or not to liberalise its abortion laws, Irish writers Louise O'Neill and Nell McCafferty discuss the art and literature influenced by the campaign.

Rosemary Jenkinson is a playwright with a self-confessed identity problem. She explains the challenges of identifying as both an East Belfast protestant and as an Irish writer, against the backdrop of Northern Ireland's identity politics.

Belfast based broadcaster and journalist Stuart Bailey talks us through the musical landscape of Northern Ireland, from its troubled past to the historic peace deal of the Good Friday Agreement.

Plus, Jinx Lennon, a punk poet and folk singer from the border region of the Republic of Ireland, sings an untold story from his home town of Dundalk.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Johny Cassidy

Image: Irish rock band U2 at the MTV Europe Music Awards in November 2017 Credit: Dave J Hogan/ Getty Images

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Singing the Troubles: Music and Identity in Ireland2018051920180520 (WS)

Music and cultural identity north and south of Ireland\u2019s border

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art, pop music, literature and folk song from the island of Ireland. As Ireland gets ready to go to the polls to vote on whether or not to liberalise its abortion laws, Irish writers Louise O'Neill and Nell McCafferty discuss the art and literature influenced by the campaign.

Rosemary Jenkinson is a playwright with a self-confessed identity problem. She explains the challenges of identifying as both an East Belfast protestant and as an Irish writer, against the backdrop of Northern Ireland's identity politics.

Belfast based broadcaster and journalist Stuart Bailey talks us through the musical landscape of Northern Ireland, from its troubled past to the historic peace deal of the Good Friday Agreement.

Plus, Jinx Lennon, a punk poet and folk singer from the border region of the Republic of Ireland, sings an untold story from his home town of Dundalk.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Johny Cassidy

(Photo: Irish rock band U2 at the MTV Europe Music Awards in November 2017 Credit: Dave J Hogan/Getty Images)

Singing the Troubles: Music and Identity in Ireland2018051920180521 (WS)

Music and cultural identity north and south of Ireland\u2019s border

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art, pop music, literature and folk song from the island of Ireland. As Ireland gets ready to go to the polls to vote on whether or not to liberalise its abortion laws, Irish writers Louise O'Neill and Nell McCafferty discuss the art and literature influenced by the campaign.

Rosemary Jenkinson is a playwright with a self-confessed identity problem. She explains the challenges of identifying as both an East Belfast protestant and as an Irish writer, against the backdrop of Northern Ireland's identity politics.

Belfast based broadcaster and journalist Stuart Bailey talks us through the musical landscape of Northern Ireland, from its troubled past to the historic peace deal of the Good Friday Agreement.

Plus, Jinx Lennon, a punk poet and folk singer from the border region of the Republic of Ireland, sings an untold story from his home town of Dundalk.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Johny Cassidy

(Photo: Irish rock band U2 at the MTV Europe Music Awards in November 2017 Credit: Dave J Hogan/Getty Images)

South Korean Artists on the Summit of Change2018060920180611 (WS)
20180610 (WS)

How do a history of division and the prospect of unity inspire South Korean artists?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How do a history of division and the prospect of unity inspire South Korean artists, ahead of the on-off meeting between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un? Can art and music cross the border between north and south, both on the map and in the mind?

Novelist Krys Lee tells Tina what her novel, How I Became a North Korean, reveals about how identity is constructed by national borders.

Music agent Bernie Cho gives us his guide to how K-pop propaganda became K-pop diplomacy.

Multi-media artists Moon Kyungwon and Jeon Joonho give Tina an insight into Freedom Village, their video and photo installation based on a mysterious settlement in the demilitarised zone between North and South Korea.

Plus, Kevin Kim of the BBC’s Korea Service explores the phenomenon of Korean men swapping military service for competitive dance, with choreographer Lyon Eun Kwon and sound designer Jimmy Sert.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire and Alice Bloch

(Photo: South and North Korean musicians perform a cross-border show in Pyongyang, North Korea on 3rd April, 2018. The message on the backdrop reads 'We Are One.' Credit: AFP/ Getty Images)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How do a history of division and the prospect of unity inspire South Korean artists?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How do a history of division and the prospect of unity inspire South Korean artists, ahead of the on-off meeting between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un? Can art and music cross the border between north and south, both on the map and in the mind?

Novelist Krys Lee tells Tina what her novel, How I Became a North Korean, reveals about how identity is constructed by national borders.

Music agent Bernie Cho gives us his guide to how K-pop propaganda became K-pop diplomacy.

Multi-media artists Moon Kyungwon and Jeon Joonho give Tina an insight into Freedom Village, their video and photo installation based on a mysterious settlement in the demilitarised zone between North and South Korea.

Plus, Kevin Kim of the BBC’s Korea Service explores the phenomenon of Korean men swapping military service for competitive dance, with choreographer Lyon Eun Kwon and sound designer Jimmy Sert.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire and Alice Bloch

(Photo: South and North Korean musicians perform a cross-border show in Pyongyang, North Korea on 3rd April, 2018. The message on the backdrop reads 'We Are One.' Credit: AFP/ Getty Images)

South Korean Artists on the Summit of Change20180609

How do a history of division and the prospect of unity inspire South Korean artists?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How do a history of division and the prospect of unity inspire South Korean artists, ahead of the on-off meeting between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un? Can art and music cross the border between north and south, both on the map and in the mind?

Novelist Krys Lee tells Tina what her novel, How I Became a North Korean, reveals about how identity is constructed by national borders.

Music agent Bernie Cho gives us his guide to how K-pop propaganda became K-pop diplomacy.

Multi-media artists Moon Kyungwon and Jeon Joonho give Tina an insight into Freedom Village, their video and photo installation based on a mysterious settlement in the demilitarised zone between North and South Korea.

Plus, Kevin Kim of the BBC’s Korea Service explores the phenomenon of Korean men swapping military service for competitive dance, with choreographer Lyon Eun Kwon and sound designer Jimmy Sert.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire and Alice Bloch

(Photo: South and North Korean musicians perform a cross-border show in Pyongyang, North Korea on 3rd April, 2018. The message on the backdrop reads 'We Are One.' Credit: AFP/ Getty Images)

South Korea's Unlikely Buddy Comedy2017021820170219 (WS)

What can a hit film about cross border cooperation tell us about real life relations?

In the week that North Korea conducted a controversial missile test, we hear about the hit South Korean film Confidential Assignment, which portrays cooperation between secret agents from both sides of the border. Film lecturer Dr Jinhee Choi explains what it can tell us about relations between the two countries.

Turkish writer Ece Temelkuran explains how living in Zagreb, and writing in English, inspires feelings of guilt about forgetting her mother tongue.

Tina meets Kenyan law student Charles Muchori, whose short story about life for Nairobi’s Uber drivers went viral, and led to a knock on the door from a top Kenyan film director.

Berlin based Polish artist Anna Krenz explains why the political situation in Poland pushed her to start making art again after a break, and to take it, for the first time, to the streets.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: actor Bin Hyun Credit: VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)

South Korea's Unlikely Buddy Comedy2017021820170219 (WS)

What can a hit film about cross border cooperation tell us about real life relations?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In the week that North Korea conducted a controversial missile test, we hear about the hit South Korean film Confidential Assignment, which portrays cooperation between secret agents from both sides of the border. Film lecturer Dr Jinhee Choi explains what it can tell us about relations between the two countries.

Turkish writer Ece Temelkuran explains how living in Zagreb, and writing in English, inspires feelings of guilt about forgetting her mother tongue.

Tina meets Kenyan law student Charles Muchori, whose short story about life for Nairobi’s Uber drivers went viral, and led to a knock on the door from a top Kenyan film director.

Berlin based Polish artist Anna Krenz explains why the political situation in Poland pushed her to start making art again after a break, and to take it, for the first time, to the streets.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: actor Bin Hyun Credit: VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)

South Korea's Unlikely Buddy Comedy20170218

What can a hit film about cross border cooperation tell us about real life relations?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In the week that North Korea conducted a controversial missile test, we hear about the hit South Korean film Confidential Assignment, which portrays cooperation between secret agents from both sides of the border. Film lecturer Dr Jinhee Choi explains what it can tell us about relations between the two countries.

Turkish writer Ece Temelkuran explains how living in Zagreb, and writing in English, inspires feelings of guilt about forgetting her mother tongue.

Tina meets Kenyan law student Charles Muchori, whose short story about life for Nairobi’s Uber drivers went viral, and led to a knock on the door from a top Kenyan film director.

Berlin based Polish artist Anna Krenz explains why the political situation in Poland pushed her to start making art again after a break, and to take it, for the first time, to the streets.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: actor Bin Hyun Credit: VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)

Speaking Up for Survivors through Art2018080420180805 (WS)

How artists are sharing the stories of victims of violence and trafficking through art.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Stories of artists who have been inspired to create work by the survivors and victims of violence and trafficking.

We hear the remarkable tale of Circus Kathmandu, the Nepalese troupe founded by trafficking survivors who now educate children through performance.

The Guyanese artist Akima McPherson reveals why she is giving a voice to survivors of domestic violence through her emotive art installation, Walk with Me.

The acclaimed Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo has created pieces on the theme of mourning for more than thirty years, from honouring those who died in the on-going migrant crisis to the victims of the civil war which ravaged her home country for over half a century. She reveals how through her latest work she is sharing the stories of survivors of sexual violence.

Plus has a work of art, a play, a book, a film ever changed the way you see the world? The acclaimed writer Louis de Bernieres shares the story of how he was inspired by the epic poem Ithaka.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Shoku Amirani, Nancy Bennie, Carinya Sharples and Hannah Copeland.

(Photo: Renu from Circus Kathmandu performs on a Kathmandu rooftop Photo Credit: Tom Swindell / Even When I Fall)

Speaking Up for Survivors through Art2018080420180806 (WS)

How artists are sharing the stories of victims of violence and trafficking through art.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Stories of artists who have been inspired to create work by the survivors and victims of violence and trafficking.

We hear the remarkable tale of Circus Kathmandu, the Nepalese troupe founded by trafficking survivors who now educate children through performance.

The Guyanese artist Akima McPherson reveals why she is giving a voice to survivors of domestic violence through her emotive art installation, Walk with Me.

The acclaimed Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo has created pieces on the theme of mourning for more than thirty years, from honouring those who died in the on-going migrant crisis to the victims of the civil war which ravaged her home country for over half a century. She reveals how through her latest work she is sharing the stories of survivors of sexual violence.

Plus has a work of art, a play, a book, a film ever changed the way you see the world? The acclaimed writer Louis de Bernieres shares the story of how he was inspired by the epic poem Ithaka.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Shoku Amirani, Nancy Bennie, Carinya Sharples and Hannah Copeland.

(Photo: Renu from Circus Kathmandu performs on a Kathmandu rooftop Photo Credit: Tom Swindell / Even When I Fall)

Speaking Up for Survivors through Art20180804

How artists are sharing the stories of victims of violence and trafficking through art.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Stories of artists who have been inspired to create work by the survivors and victims of violence and trafficking.

We hear the remarkable tale of Circus Kathmandu, the Nepalese troupe founded by trafficking survivors who now educate children through performance.

The Guyanese artist Akima McPherson reveals why she is giving a voice to survivors of domestic violence through her emotive art installation, Walk with Me.

The acclaimed Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo has created pieces on the theme of mourning for more than thirty years, from honouring those who died in the on-going migrant crisis to the victims of the civil war which ravaged her home country for over half a century. She reveals how through her latest work she is sharing the stories of survivors of sexual violence.

Plus has a work of art, a play, a book, a film ever changed the way you see the world? The acclaimed writer Louis de Bernieres shares the story of how he was inspired by the epic poem Ithaka.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Shoku Amirani, Nancy Bennie, Carinya Sharples and Hannah Copeland.

(Photo: Renu from Circus Kathmandu performs on a Kathmandu rooftop Photo Credit: Tom Swindell / Even When I Fall)

Standing Up for Comedy2018090120180902 (WS)

Can comedy and satire change the world - or change minds?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can comedy and satire change the world - or change minds? We find out what drives Nigeria’s Adeola Fayehun and the Brazilian comic Gregório Duviver to take on the politics of their home countries through satire.

Lebanese-Iraqi writer Karl Sharro is a political commentator, an architect and a self-confessed “extremely bad cartoonist”, but he's perhaps best known as the satirist Karl ReMarks. He joins us to discuss how he addresses the politics and media portrayal of the Middle East through humour.

The Cultural Frontline’s Mpho Lakaje takes us on a trip to the stand-up comedy club scene of Johannesburg, South Africa. He meets a new generation of comics challenging society and seeking stardom on stage: Tshekedi Monyemore and Vuyo Jiya, plus veteran comic David Kau.

Finally, can comedy change your world? The French Moroccan stand-up comedian Gad Elmaleh reveals how the work of the Hollywood legend Charlie Chaplin showed him how to keep his comedy simple, while helping him keep his family close.

Presented by Shaimaa Khalil
Produced by Kirsty McQuire, Mugabi Turya, Shoku Amirani, Sally Garwood and Mpho Lakaje

Image: Comedian Gad Elmaleh performing on stage in Tunisia (Credit: Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

Standing Up for Comedy2018090120180903 (WS)

Can comedy and satire change the world - or change minds?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can comedy and satire change the world - or change minds? We find out what drives Nigeria’s Adeola Fayehun and the Brazilian comic Gregório Duviver to take on the politics of their home countries through satire.

Lebanese-Iraqi writer Karl Sharro is a political commentator, an architect and a self-confessed “extremely bad cartoonist”, but he's perhaps best known as the satirist Karl ReMarks. He joins us to discuss how he addresses the politics and media portrayal of the Middle East through humour.

The Cultural Frontline’s Mpho Lakaje takes us on a trip to the stand-up comedy club scene of Johannesburg, South Africa. He meets a new generation of comics challenging society and seeking stardom on stage: Tshekedi Monyemore and Vuyo Jiya, plus veteran comic David Kau.

Finally, can comedy change your world? The French Moroccan stand-up comedian Gad Elmaleh reveals how the work of the Hollywood legend Charlie Chaplin showed him how to keep his comedy simple, while helping him keep his family close.

Presented by Shaimaa Khalil
Produced by Kirsty McQuire, Mugabi Turya, Shoku Amirani, Sally Garwood and Mpho Lakaje

Image: Comedian Gad Elmaleh performing on stage in Tunisia (Credit: Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

Standing Up for Comedy20180901

Can comedy and satire change the world - or change minds?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can comedy and satire change the world - or change minds? We find out what drives Nigeria’s Adeola Fayehun and the Brazilian comic Gregório Duviver to take on the politics of their home countries through satire.

Lebanese-Iraqi writer Karl Sharro is a political commentator, an architect and a self-confessed “extremely bad cartoonist”, but he's perhaps best known as the satirist Karl ReMarks. He joins us to discuss how he addresses the politics and media portrayal of the Middle East through humour.

The Cultural Frontline’s Mpho Lakaje takes us on a trip to the stand-up comedy club scene of Johannesburg, South Africa. He meets a new generation of comics challenging society and seeking stardom on stage: Tshekedi Monyemore and Vuyo Jiya, plus veteran comic David Kau.

Finally, can comedy change your world? The French Moroccan stand-up comedian Gad Elmaleh reveals how the work of the Hollywood legend Charlie Chaplin showed him how to keep his comedy simple, while helping him keep his family close.

Presented by Shaimaa Khalil
Produced by Kirsty McQuire, Mugabi Turya, Shoku Amirani, Sally Garwood and Mpho Lakaje

Image: Comedian Gad Elmaleh performing on stage in Tunisia (Credit: Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

Street Artist And Photographer Jr2017040120170402 (WS)

The superstar artist on how he thinks art can encourage understanding in today's France

Internationally acclaimed street artist and photographer JR explains why his latest huge piece of public art takes him back to the Paris housing estates or banlieues, where he began his career. His work is currently the subject of a major retrospective at QM Gallery Katara in Doha.

A new initiative in Berlin is offering tours of the city with a focus on the stories of refugees and migrants. We tag along to find out about the alternative side of their home city that locals are being invited to experience.

New York Times best-selling novelist Nicola Yoon tells Tina why she considers it her duty to write books for young people featuring diverse characters, and how the recent debates around immigration in the US have coincided with the subjects she tackles in her books.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: JR outside the Louvre museum in Paris Credit: JOEL SAGET_AFP_Getty Images)

Street Artist and Photographer JR2017040120170402 (WS)

The superstar artist on how he thinks art can encourage understanding in today's France

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Internationally acclaimed street artist and photographer JR explains why his latest huge piece of public art takes him back to the Paris housing estates or banlieues, where he began his career. His work is currently the subject of a major retrospective at QM Gallery Katara in Doha.

A new initiative in Berlin is offering tours of the city with a focus on the stories of refugees and migrants. We tag along to find out about the alternative side of their home city that locals are being invited to experience.

New York Times best-selling novelist Nicola Yoon tells Tina why she considers it her duty to write books for young people featuring diverse characters, and how the recent debates around immigration in the US have coincided with the subjects she tackles in her books.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: JR outside the Louvre museum in Paris Credit: JOEL SAGET_AFP_Getty Images)

Street Artist and Photographer JR20170401

The superstar artist on how he thinks art can encourage understanding in today's France

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Internationally acclaimed street artist and photographer JR explains why his latest huge piece of public art takes him back to the Paris housing estates or banlieues, where he began his career. His work is currently the subject of a major retrospective at QM Gallery Katara in Doha.

A new initiative in Berlin is offering tours of the city with a focus on the stories of refugees and migrants. We tag along to find out about the alternative side of their home city that locals are being invited to experience.

New York Times best-selling novelist Nicola Yoon tells Tina why she considers it her duty to write books for young people featuring diverse characters, and how the recent debates around immigration in the US have coincided with the subjects she tackles in her books.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: JR outside the Louvre museum in Paris Credit: JOEL SAGET_AFP_Getty Images)

Swet Shop Boys, Drone Art2016102920161030 (WS)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Riz Ahmed, the actor and rapper known for HBO’s The Night Of, and the rapper Heems discuss Cashmere, their debut hip hop album as the group Swet Shop Boys. With songs inspired by racial profiling, Islamophobia and One Direction star Zayn Malik, they tell Tina how their experiences have informed their music.

Also on the programme; next week a huge statue of Vladimir the Great will be erected outside the Kremlin in Moscow, we hear why it has been a controversial project from day one, film-maker Khalik Allah reflects on how he developed his signature style on the streets of Harlem and artist Mahwish Chishty reveals the moment she knew she had to make work that explored the drone warfare in her native Pakistan.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Riz MC and Heems of Swet Shop Boys Credit:Erez Avissar)

Swet Shop Boys, Drone Art20161029

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Riz Ahmed, the actor and rapper known for HBO’s The Night Of, and the rapper Heems discuss Cashmere, their debut hip hop album as the group Swet Shop Boys. With songs inspired by racial profiling, Islamophobia and One Direction star Zayn Malik, they tell Tina how their experiences have informed their music.

Also on the programme; next week a huge statue of Vladimir the Great will be erected outside the Kremlin in Moscow, we hear why it has been a controversial project from day one, film-maker Khalik Allah reflects on how he developed his signature style on the streets of Harlem and artist Mahwish Chishty reveals the moment she knew she had to make work that explored the drone warfare in her native Pakistan.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Riz MC and Heems of Swet Shop Boys Credit:Erez Avissar)

Telling Fairy Tales for Today2018050520180506 (WS)

Tales of modern myth, magic and morality on The Cultural Frontline

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we’re telling tales of modern magic, myth and morality, from Mexico to the UK and from Italy to South Africa.

Mexican-American cartoonist Lalo Alacaraz tells the BBC’s Maria Elena Navas how he helped shape a different narrative for the Mexican fantasy film, Coco.

Super-fan Megha Sharma meets the graphic designers Miraphora Mina and Eduardo Lima at The House of MinaLima, who mix magic and graphics in the Harry Potter movies.

Alessandro Rak, co-director of Cinderella The Cat, reveals how he re-mixed a Neapolitan fairy tale for a dystopian future.

Plus, South African author and columnist Zukiswa Wanner reads us a pan-African parable of political history and gender equality.

We’ll explore how the art of the fairy tale can transport you to another world- and change the way you see the real world.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Kirsty McQuire

Image: Miguel plays a magical guitar in the animated film Coco Credit: Disney/ Pixar

Telling Fairy Tales for Today2018050520180507 (WS)

Tales of modern myth, magic and morality on The Cultural Frontline

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we’re telling tales of modern magic, myth and morality, from Mexico to the UK and from Italy to South Africa.

Mexican-American cartoonist Lalo Alacaraz tells the BBC’s Maria Elena Navas how he helped shape a different narrative for the Mexican fantasy film, Coco.

Super-fan Megha Sharma meets the graphic designers Miraphora Mina and Eduardo Lima at The House of MinaLima, who mix magic and graphics in the Harry Potter movies.

Alessandro Rak, co-director of Cinderella The Cat, reveals how he re-mixed a Neapolitan fairy tale for a dystopian future.

Plus, South African author and columnist Zukiswa Wanner reads us a pan-African parable of political history and gender equality.

We’ll explore how the art of the fairy tale can transport you to another world- and change the way you see the real world.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Kirsty McQuire

Image: Miguel plays a magical guitar in the animated film Coco Credit: Disney/ Pixar

Telling Fairy Tales for Today20180505

Tales of modern myth, magic and morality on The Cultural Frontline

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week on The Cultural Frontline we’re telling tales of modern magic, myth and morality, from Mexico to the UK and from Italy to South Africa.

Mexican-American cartoonist Lalo Alacaraz tells the BBC’s Maria Elena Navas how he helped shape a different narrative for the Mexican fantasy film, Coco.

Super-fan Megha Sharma meets the graphic designers Miraphora Mina and Eduardo Lima at The House of MinaLima, who mix magic and graphics in the Harry Potter movies.

Ales