The Cultural Frontline

Episodes

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2020032820200329 (WS)The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

2020082220200823 (WS)The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.
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#metoo: Challenging Sexual Harrassment In Nollywood And Bollywood2017111120171112 (WS)
20171113 (WS)
As Hollywood continues to react to the allegations of sexual harassment and assault against film mogul Harvey Weinstein and other leading stars, we speak to two leading film-makers, Nigeria's Tope Oshin and India's Rahul Aggarwal about the culture of harassment and exploitation within their countries' film industries, Nollywood and Bollywood.

In the light of the United States and Israel's withdrawal from Unesco we speak to Italian writer Marco d'Eramo and French planner Francis Engelmann about the impact the cultural organisation has in two very different parts of the world.

Plus we head to Kenya, where we take a peek behind the scenes of the hit Kenyan satirical comedy show XYZ and meet its production team, including head writer Loi Awat and producer Edward Khaemba, as they prepare its final programme in the run up to the recent Kenyan presidential elections.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: #Me too and #Balancetonporc ('expose your pig') on the hand of a protester. Credit: Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images)

How are Nollywood and Bollywood responding to sexual harassment in Hollywood?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

#mlk50: America After His Dream2018033120180401 (WS)
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Dr Martin Luther King Jr once had a dream that his children "would one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character”.

Fifty years on from his assassination, we speak to the artists working to keep the spirit of Dr King and his dream alive. We head to Dr King's home city of Atlanta, where the award-winning radio presenter Rose Scott speaks to Atlanta's citizens about his legacy.

The gospel and soul legend Mavis Staples shares her memories of Dr King. Plus, actor and playwright, Anna Deavere Smith discusses Notes From The Field, her one woman show, which brings to life the stories of ordinary Americans among them current and former inmates, protesters, educators and politicians.

We hear from the radical revolutionary artist Dread Scott on the power of protest art and how he creates work that speaks out against oppression in the age of #blacklivesmatter.

Presenter: Rose Scott.

(Photo: Artist Al Hornsby walks with his painting of Martin Luther King Jr as he participates in the Martin Luther King Jr. parade in Los Angeles, California. Credit: JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)

Remembering the cultural legacy of Dr Martin Luther King Jr

The world seen through the eyes of artists

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The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

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A Cultural View Of Bolsonaro's Brazil2018120120181202 (WS)Now the vote is over, what comes next? Brazilian writers, musicians and artists reflect on what the new era of Jair Bolsonaro will mean for Brazil, its people and its culture.

On the 1 January 2019, after a divisive and controversial campaign, Jair Bolsonaro will be sworn in as President of Brazil. We speak to one of his supporters, the musician Roger Moreira, about why the far-right former army captain was condemned by the majority of Brazil's creative community but won the support of the majority of its citizens.

What does Bolsonaro's victory mean for artists from Brazil's black, LGBTQI and other marginalised communities? The Cultural Frontline's Marcia Reverdosa is in Sao Paulo to hear the creative and political response of Brazil's eclectic music scene with the superstar rapper Karol Conka, the singer and social activist Linn da Quebrada and KL Jay DJ, of Racionais MC's - one of Brazil's most iconic music groups.

The writer Biju Belinky tells the story of Tropicalia, the artistic and musical movement that came of age during the country's military dictatorship in the 1960s and led to the imprisonment and exile of some of Brazil's star musicians.

Plus the novelist Julian Fuks reflects on his changing nation and asks how he and his fellow Brazilians, of all political viewpoints, can get to know and understand each other a little better.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Supporters of far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro, celebrate in front of the National Congress in Brasilia October 2018. Credit: SERGIO LIMA/AFP/Getty Images

Now the vote is over, what comes next for writers, musicians and artists in Brazil?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

A Cultural Vision For A New Zimbabwe2018081120180812 (WS)
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Following Zimbabwe's historic elections The Cultural Frontline asks what the future holds for Zimbabwe, its culture and its people.

How do you make sense of a history unspoken? The writer Novuyo Rosa Tshuma discusses The House of Stone, her new novel that explores the tragedies and the conflicts of Zimbabwe's past.

Now the vote is over, what comes next? The Chief Curator of the National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Raphael Chikukwa and the celebrated poet and singer, Albert Nyathi reflect on the elections and share their vision of how Zimbabwe can find a new purpose and identity through the power of arts and culture.

For nearly 40 years Zimbabwean life and culture was dominated by the image of one man, former President Robert Mugabe. The author Panashe Chigumadzi reflects on the omnipresence of Mugabe's portrait and asks whether Zimbabweans can now find a new image to represent their nation.

Plus have you ever heard Chimurenga music? The musician Hope Masike explains how Zimbabwe's music of protest has unified the country from the struggle for liberation to the new post-Mugabe era.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Nancy Bennie, Shoku Amirani and Brian Hungwe.

(Picture: People in Mbare celebrate after Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (ZEC) announced the re-election of President Emmerson Mnangagwa Picture Credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

What does the future hold for Zimbabwe, its people and its culture?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

A Passion For Dance2019040620190407 (WS)As part of the BBC's Dance Passion season The Cultural Frontline celebrates great dancers from across the world and talks to performers and choreographers about their passion for dance.

Can dance put marginalised people centre stage? We head to the Small Theatre in Yerevan, Armenia's capital to meet Vahan Badalyan, the theatre director working to provide an artistic platform to the city's disabled citizens.

Have you ever heard of Pantsula? The acclaimed choreographer Gregory Maqoma tells the story of the dance that was born during the apartheid era in South Africa's black townships and grew to become a powerful form of social protest.

Prepare for an audience with the bad boy of classical dance. The performer Sergei Polunin talks to Tina about his support for Vladimir Putin, his love for performance and why he is never far away from controversy.

Plus- she's the choreographer behind the moves of Dua Lipa and Christine and the Queens- Marion Motin tells the Cultural Frontline about the life and art that influences her dance.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Sergei Polunin performing Photo Credit: Rankin)

How dance can change lives and the societies we live in

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

A Poet's Guide To Lagos2018121520181216 (WS)Poet Efe Paul Azino introduces us to the thriving spoken word scene in Lagos and - through their poems and stage performances - the priorities of its young people. From the political to the personal, by listening to them we get a picture of what's happening today and how they feel about it, whether it's disillusionment about the upcoming elections, or their thoughts on navigating the challenges of life in the megacity.

Lagos' spoken word scene - from new monthly 'Poetry Cafes' set up by Efe, to the Lagos International Poetry Festival – affords a platform for a vibrant movement in which women in particular are creating important work. Young people are seeking to make their voices heard where they're otherwise marginalised. The current crop of spoken word poets is conscious of the city's historical contributions to the creative and artistic life of the continent, and the ghosts of Nigeria's heroes of dissent, from Chinua Achebe to Fela Kuti, set the tone of some of the work being performed.

But spoken word in Lagos isn't just a vent, and the new generation are carving out their own path: there's room for joy and the deeply personal, and a craft and beauty to the best work being created. The pulsating city makes its presence felt throughout the programme as Efe takes us around Lagos gearing up for festival season in autumn 2018, and we meet the people the poetry scene draws in.

A megacity seen through the eyes of a new generation of poets

The world seen through the eyes of artists

A Tale Of Defending Our Freedom Wins The Caine Prize 20172017070820170709 (WS)The Caine Prize for African Writing is a powerful springboard for new writers. Tina Daheley speaks to this year's winner Bushra al-Fadil, and shortlisted finalist Magogodi oaMphela Makhene.

German-Egyptian singer Merit Ariane Stephanos talks about adapting the seminal feminist novel ‘Women at Point Zero' by Egyptian activist Nawal El Saadai for the stage.

Close to the Arctic circle, under a shadow of full moon we meet the Icelandic artists Ragnar Helgi Olafson and Dagur Hjartarson burning their own work in an act of poetic defiance.

And from Argentina, writer Mariana Enriquez on how witnessing police brutality in her country against young people, fuels her to twist fact into fiction and horror.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Caine Prize winner 2017 Bushra al-Fadil. Credit: Caine Prize for African Writing)

Caine Prize winner Bushra al-Fadil warns of the relentless threats to our freedom

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

(Photo: Caine Prize winner 2017 Bushra al-Fadil. Credit: Caine Prize for African Writing)

African Writers Now2019070620190707 (WS)The Cultural Frontline speaks to some of Africa's leading writers about the transformative power of literature.

Taking the African story to the world. We speak to the writers Cherrie Kandie and Ngwah-Mbo Nana Nkweti about their latest work which has been nominated for the prestigious Caine Prize and ask what life is like as a contemporary African writer working in the United States.

A generation after the Rwandan genocide, the writer Yolande Mukugasana tells the Cultural Frontline how her writing helped share the story of a life lost amidst one of the most horrific crimes in modern history.

Has a song, a film, or a book ever changed the way you see the world? The Nigerian author Chigozie Obioma, shortlisted for The Man Booker Prize, reveals how the Nigerian literary classic The Palm-Wine Drinkard inspired him to become a writer.

Plus how one of Africa's brightest literary talents, Panashe Chigumadzi, was inspired by her grandmother to tell the personal and political story of Zimbabwe after the fall of former President Robert Mugabe.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Panashe Chigumadzi. Credit: Ropafadzo Murombo

We speak to some of Africa's leading writers about the transformative power of literature

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

African Writers Now: Panashe Chigumadzi And Chigozie Obioma2019070620190707 (WS)The Cultural Frontline speaks to some of Africa's leading writers about the transformative power of literature.

Taking the African story to the world. We speak to the writers Cherrie Kandie and Ngwah-Mbo Nana Nkweti about their latest work which has been nominated for the prestigious Caine Prize and ask what life is like as a contemporary African writer working in the United States.

A generation after the Rwandan genocide, the writer Yolande Mukugasana tells the Cultural Frontline how her writing helped share the story of a life lost amidst one of the most horrific crimes in modern history.

Has a song, a film, or a book ever changed the way you see the world? The Nigerian author Chigozie Obioma, shortlisted for The Man Booker Prize, reveals how the Nigerian literary classic The Palm-Wine Drinkard inspired him to become a writer.

Plus how one of Africa's brightest literary talents, Panashe Chigumadzi, was inspired by her grandmother to tell the personal and political story of Zimbabwe after the fall of former President Robert Mugabe.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Panashe Chigumadzi. Credit: Ropafadzo Murombo

We speak to some of Africa's leading writers about the transformative power of literature

The world seen through the eyes of artists

After Hu Bo2021041020210411 (WS)
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The author and film-maker, Hu Bo, was due a dazzling career. He had graduated from the Beijing Film Academy and successfully pitched at the FIRST International Film Festival, where he won the mentorship of Hungarian director Bela Tarr. From there, his first feature film, An Elephant Sitting Still, came into existence with a confidence of vision and honesty of message that is rare to find in more experienced directors. Yet, on the cusp of greatness, Hu Bo tragically killed himself, leaving a gap at the forefront of Chinese creativity. His contemporaries must take up the burning questions facing Chinese artists without him.

This programme asks what it is like to be a film-maker in China today, and explores where certain pressures, expectations, and freedoms can be found. We hear about the making of Hu Bo's first film from those who knew him. We discover the global audience for Chinese independent film and learn from those who try to bring these films to a wider audience. We discover other artists in China who are reflecting on the same themes as Hu Bo, finding creativity in the everyday. And we ask where next for a film industry that is set to overtake Hollywood at the box office in the near future.

Presenter: Yuan Ren.
Producer: Leonie Thomas

(Photo: Yuan Ren, with kind permission)

What is next for the Chinese film industry after the death of talented director Hu Bo?

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Aida Muluneh: Can You Change Lives Through Art?2019100520191006 (WS)What comes to mind when you think about the world of art?

Perhaps it's million dollar auctions or celebrated galleries like the Louvre and New York's Metropolitan. But what about issues such as land rights, the battle for democracy or access to safe drinking water?

Three acclaimed artists, Aida Muluneh of Ethiopia, Cian Dayrit from the Philippines and Zimbabwe's Kudzanai Chiurai speak to Brenda Emmanus about how their work takes on those issues and reflects upon some of the greatest social and political challenges faced by people in their countries.

We also hear from the artists Angela Su and Mary Sibande about how their new work addresses the continuing democracy protests in Hong Kong and the post apartheid politics of South Africa.

Presented by Brenda Emmanus

Image/Credit: Aida Muluneh

Three international artists discuss whether art can create social and political change

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Perhaps it's million dollar auctions or celebrated galleries such as the Louvre and New York's Metropolitan. But what about issues such as land rights, the battle for democracy or access to safe drinking water?

Three acclaimed artists, Aida Muluneh of Ethiopia, Cian Dayrit from the Philippines and Zimbabwe's Kudzanai Chiurai speak to Brenda Emmanus about how their work takes on those issues and reflects upon some of the greatest social and political challenges faced by people across the world today.

We also hear from the artists Angela Su and Mary Sibande about how their new work addresses the continuing democracy protests in Hong Kong and the gender politics of South Africa.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Alexander Nanau: My Oscar Nominated Film2021042420210425 (WS)
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In 2015, a fire broke out in the Collective nightclub in Bucharest Romania, taking the lives of 64 people and injuring 180 others. Many died from seemingly non-life-threatening injuries in hospital, prompting journalists to investigate claims of corruption in the nation's health system. The documentary Collective explores the aftermath of those events. We speak to its director, double Oscar nominee, Alexander Nanau.

What are the realities of shooting a film in the West Bank? Farah Nabulsi is the British-Palestinian director of the Oscar-nominated short film, The Present. She shot her film in Bethlehem and at an Israeli checkpoint, often in secret. She shares the risks and challenges involved in this form of guerrilla filmmaking.

Has a book, film or song inspired you to take a certain path in life? Oscar-nominated actor Riz Ahmed reveals the song that has influenced his musical and acting career.

Plus, six years on from #oscarssowhite, the campaign's founder April Reign gives us a progress and reality check on diversity at the Oscars.

(Photo: Alexander Nanau. Credit: Alex Galmeanu courtesy of Magnolia Pictures)

We speak to Oscar nominees ahead of the 2021 Academy Awards

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

In 2015, a fire broke out in the Collective nightclub in Bucharest Romania, taking the lives of 64 people and injuring 180 others. Many died from seemingly non-life-threatening injuries in hospital, prompting journalists to investigate claims of corruption in the nation's health system. The documentary Collective explores the aftermath of those events. We speak to its director, double Oscar nominee, Alexander Nanau.

What are the realities of shooting a film in the West Bank? Farah Nabulsi is the British-Palestinian director of the Oscar-nominated short film, The Present. She shot her film in Bethlehem and at an Israeli checkpoint, often in secret. She shares the risks and challenges involved in this form of guerrilla filmmaking.

Has a book, film or song inspired you to take a certain path in life? Oscar-nominated actor Riz Ahmed reveals the song that has influenced his musical and acting career.

Plus, six years on from #oscarssowhite, the campaign's founder April Reign gives us a progress and reality check on diversity at the Oscars.

(Photo: Alexander Nanau. Credit: Alex Galmeanu courtesy of Magnolia Pictures)

We speak to Oscar nominees ahead of the 2021 Academy Awards

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

All The World's A Stage2018071420180715 (WS)
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What does it mean to perform, to stand before an audience and to share your story, your art, your voice? The Cultural Frontline explores the transformative power of performance.

The writer and poet Yrsa Daley-Ward reveals how writing and performing poetry has helped her come to terms with her upbringing, her sexuality and her mental-health battles, as recounted in her new memoir, The Terrible.

How do you give new meaning to an iconic feminist play? We find out why the ground breaking performer Nandar staged Myanmar's first ever performance of The Vagina Monologues.

We head to one of Sao Paulo's most notorious areas, Cracolandia or “land of crack” and meet the people behind an unconventional theatre company reaching out to drug addicts through drama.

Plus, the acclaimed opera star Danielle De Niese shares the story of the work of literature that inspired her to pursue a life of performance.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Performance of The Vagina Monologues in Myanmar. Credit: Rachel Briggs/BBC)

What does it mean to perform, to stand before an audience and to share your art?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Amitav Ghosh And New Writing From India And Pakistan2021022720210228 (WS)
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Multi-award-winning Indian author Amitav Ghosh on using verse and folklore in his new book, Jungle Nama, to tell a cautionary tale about our relationship with the natural world.

Pakistani writers, Awais Khan from Lahore and Saba Karim Khan from Karachi, discuss the challenges in getting their English language stories in front of readers in their own country, and the influence of their foreign audience.

Amna Mufti in Lahore is an author and award-winning television script writer in Urdu. She tells us how that affects the way she writes stories and their content – and who can and cannot read them.

And Assamese author Aruni Kashyap on the vast audiences for Indian literature in the country's indigenous languages and the centrality of farmers and farming when stories are not being written in English.

Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi
Producer: Paul Waters

(Photo: Indian writer Amitav Ghosh. Credit: Barbara Zanon/Getty Images)

Indian author Amitav Ghosh discusses using verse and folklore in his new book Jungle Nama

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

An Act Of Censorship Or Cultural Sensitivity?2017090220170903 (WS)Should a divisive, traumatising sculpture have been dismantled?

‘Scaffold', a sculpture by white American artist Sam Durant, was intended to explore America's relationship with capital punishment. A faithful replica of seven hangman's gallows, the work reflects the execution of 38 Dakota Indians in 1862, in what was the largest government-sanctioned mass-hanging in U.S. history. When erected by a prestigious art gallery in Minnesota, in full sight of Dakota land, protestors called the work insensitive - even, for some, an act of cultural appropriation. We hear from the artist Sam Durant as to why he's decided to give the rights to the work over to the Dakota community, and the lessons he's learned. And in discussion Kate Beane, historian and member of the Dakota community, is joined by Svetlana Mintcheva from the National Coalition Against Censorship to discuss who has the right to portray a traumatic past.

Also this week, 80 years on from the brutal bombing of the Basque town of Guernica, how has Picasso's mural, painted within weeks of the bombing, created such a universal and lasting legacy?

With Tina Daheley

Photo: Protests against the artwork 'Scaffold' at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, U.S.A. Credit: Alamy

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Photo: Protests against the artwork 'Scaffold' at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, U.S.A. Credit: Alamy

An Indigenous Renaissance?2019062220190623 (WS)On this week's Cultural Frontline we're exploring whether Native American and Indigenous artists in Canada are enjoying a renaissance. And celebrating Indigenous artists who are re-inventing traditions for a contemporary audience.

We speak to Indigenous two-spirit musician Jeremy Dutcher about his award winning album and rescuing his community's language from extinction.

For the first time ever, Native American women's art is being exhibited together on a grand scale. Its unusual centre piece is an El Camino car painted as a homage to an artistic hero. We hear from the car's creator Rose B Simpson and curator Teri Greeves on why this show is so important.

Critically acclaimed Inuit throat singer Tanya Tagaq has created a sound world to accompany an installation about polar explorers. She explains why she wanted to highlight the Inuit contribution and recreate an ancient art form for a contemporary audience.

Plus Native American author Tommy Orange on being Indigenous in the city, reading from his novel There There.

Guest presented by Rosanna Deerchild.

Image: Jeremy Dutcher. Credit: Matt Barnes

Are Native American and Indigenous artists in Canada enjoying a renaissance?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Ana Tijoux: Rapping To Change Chile2020021520200216 (WS)Described as Chile's answer to Lauryn Hill, Chilean hip hop em cee Ana Tjoux has made her name rapping against inequality. Ana tells Tina about her recent track #cacerolazo, which became an anthem for the 2019 protests in Chile. The soundtrack of the demonstrations, wooden spoons drummed on pans, form the beat beneath her words.

Taking extreme risks for his rhymes, Iraqi rapper Mr Guti continues to make music about his city, Basra, despite several threats to his life. Drawing attention to the dangerous conditions and civil unrest in his country, we hear why Mr Guti filmed a music video in a burning government building.

Move over Outkast, step aside Run the Jewels. There is a new star duo that could be changing the way we think about rap, Hip-Hop Psych. Hip Hop Psych is made up of Dr Akeem Sule and Dr Becky Inkster, a Consultant Psychiatrist and a Clinical Neuroscientist. They reveal how they are using hip-hop to better treat and understand mental illness.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Ana Tijoux
Image credit: Getty/C Brandon

Hip-hop star Ana Tijoux on politics, protest and rap in Chile

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Angelina Jolie: Documenting Cambodia's History2017022520170226 (WS)First They Killed My Father is a new film set in Cambodia during the devastating years of violence under the Khmer Rouge regime, made by Angelina Jolie for Netflix. She explains how adopting her son Maddox from the country 15 years ago inspired her to explore Cambodia's troubled history through film.

Writer Loung Ung who lived through the mass killings, and whose memoir the film is based on, describes how she managed to overcome her childhood trauma and how she hopes Cambodia can move on through open discussion and education.

Yalda Hakim meets a former guard at one of the Khmer Rouge torture prisons to find out about the impact of the violence on both sides.

Revered Cambodian film director Rithy Panh explains why cinema is so important for documenting this dark period of national history, and how he hopes the arts can contribute to a peaceful future for the next generation.

And Arn Chorn Pond, founder of the heritage organisation Cambodian Living Arts reflects on the need to educate young people about the traditional arts and why he thinks this can encourage understanding.

(Photo: Angelina Jolie in Cambodia promoting the film Credit: Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP/Getty Images)

The actress and director discusses her new film First They Killed My Father

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Animation: Art, Activism And Anime2021022020210221 (WS)
20210222 (WS)
American and Japanese animation is known around the world, but how are other countries telling their own stories through animation? The animation industry is growing in India and Ghana, allowing for new perspectives and styles to reach a global audience. We speak to Sharad Devarajan, producer for the Indian animated TV series The Legend of Hanuman, and Cycil Jones Abban, the director of Ghanaian animated film 28th the Crossroads, about representation and upcoming trends and challenges.

When Latvian director Ilze Burkovska-Jacobsen was seven, she discovered what she thought were the bones of a World War II soldier in her sandbox. In her animated documentary My Favourite War, Ilze remembers a childhood living under the Soviet regime of the 1970s, where she was forbidden to discuss difficult aspects of the past. She tells us about the lasting trauma of living through that time and the healing power of animation.

Can animation be a tool for activism? Over recent months in Poland, demonstrators have taken to the streets protesting against a new ruling which makes nearly all forms of abortion illegal in the country. Students from Łódź Film School decided to create a piece of protest animation against the ban. We hear from artist Weronika Szyma, who co-organised the short film Polish Women's Resistance.

All aboard the Mugen Train! French-Japanese animator Ken Arto describes the art of Japanese animation - anime, and his recent work on a scene in Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba the Movie: Mugen Train, the record-breaking anime that's become Japan's highest-grossing movie ever.

Presented by Sophia Smith Galer

(Photo: Still from Ilze Burkovska-Jacobsen's My Favourite War. Credit: Bivrost Films)

We meet artists redrawing the future of animation

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Antonio Sanchez: Jazz Across Borders2019122120191222 (WS)Antonio Sanchez was born in Mexico City, before moving to the US to study music. Fast forward three decades and the jazz drummer has won four Grammys and composed the soundtrack for Oscar winning film Birdman. Now a dual Mexican-American citizen, Antonio has been outspoken in his criticism of President Trump's comments about migrants and controversial policies on those caught crossing the US-Mexico border. He tells us how these issues have found their way onto his latest album, Lines in the Sand.

We meet the female bass player blazing a trail on the Sudanese music scene. Despite being frequently harassed for being a woman on stage, Islam Elbeiti tells Tina why she is passionate about performing and even celebrates her love of jazz on a weekly radio show.

Have you heard of Azerbaijani jazz? We look at the nation's century long love affair with jazz and the foundations of its own unique style, Jazz Mugham.

The award-winning British saxophonist Soweto Kinch chooses his Art That Changed Me for The Cultural Frontline – a painting by Aaron Douglas, titled The Negro in African Setting.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Image: Antonio Sanchez performing
Image credit: Peter Van Breukelen/Redferns, Getty.

Stories in jazz from North America, Sudan and Azerbaijan

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Arabic Cinema's Fearless Female Film-makers2019033020190331 (WS)Recent years have seen a new wave of female talent and women-focused stories in Arabic cinema. But what are the types of stories being told and can the portrayal of these stories help influence society across the region? We explore the opportunities and challenges faced by women working in front of and behind the camera. In this current era of #MeToo and #TimesUp, we discuss these and other challenges that arise when showing women on screen, as well as those faced by women within the industry.

The award-winning journalist, Nawal al-Maghafi, hosts a panel of leading and emerging filmmakers from the region including the award winning director Annemarie Jacir, the actor and film maker Ahd Kamel, one of Morocco's emerging directorial talents Mariakenzi Lahlou and the film writer and academic Shohini Chaudhuri.

Presented by Nawal al-Maghafi

Image: Ahd Kamel, Nawal al-Maghafi, Mariakenzi Lahlou and Shohini Chaudhuri at the BBC Radio Theatre in London. Credit: BBC

The power of women's stories in Arabic cinema and the challenges in telling their stories

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In front of a live audience in the BBC Radio Theatre, the award-winning journalist, Nawal al-Maghafi, hosts a panel of leading and emerging filmmakers from the region including the award winning director Annemarie Jacir, the actor and film maker Ahd Kamel, one of Morocco's emerging directorial talents Mariakenzi Lahlou and the film writer and academic Shohini Chaudhuri.

In front of a live audience in the BBC Radio Theatre, the award-winning journalist, Nawal al-Maghafi, hosts a panel of leading and emerging filmmakers from the region including the award winning director Annemarie Jacir, the actor and film maker Ahd Kamel, one of Morocco's emerging directorial talents Mariakenzi Lahlou and the film writer and academic Shohini Chaudhuri.

Archiving Tunisia2019020920190210 (WS)Under the dictatorship of Ben Ali, much of Tunisia's rich cultural heritage was left to deteriorate or simply disappear from national memory. But the Arab Spring has brought a new lease of life to Tunisia and a new freedom of expression. As a result, artists from older generations have commenced new work in preserving the country's ancient art.

Tunisian reporter Lilia Blaise reports on this culture clash. First, she meets entrepreneur Leila Ben Ghacem who has restored historic buildings and digitised Tunisia's traditional Malouf music. Lilia also meets Mohamed Ben Sassi, the country's last known book binder who is afraid the craft will die with him.

However, not every Tunisian artist is going along with this way of thinking. There is a wave of angry, spirited young creators who do not believe Tunisia's existing culture needs protecting. Instead, they want to rewrite it entirely. From this group, Lilia meets young rapper Vipa of the DEBO collective, musician Badiaa Bouhrizi, and visual artist Hela Lamine.

Lilia's mission throughout this documentary is to gauge what Tunisia's artistic future might look like and which team of creative soldiers will win the battle and shape Tunisia's cultural legacy.

Produced by Whistledown Productions

(Photo: Mohamed Ben Sassi, Tunisia's last known book binder. Credit: Whistledown)

The clash between Tunisian artists preserving cultural heritage and those rewriting it

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art Against Climate Change2018102020181021 (WS)
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The Cultural Frontline hears from artists who are speaking out against environmental damage and climate change through their work.

We meet the artist bringing climate change to the front doors of one small town in Florida, USA. Xavier Cortada explains why he's creating public art to demonstrate the potential devastation of melting glacial ice.

How do you tackle the issue of environmental damage in Nigeria and across the world through art? The Nigerian artist Otobong Nkanga is taking on that challenge. She talks through her work and discusses how her immersive installations and artworks link everyday luxuries with their detrimental environmental impact on developing nations.

Prepare your nose! We join the BBC's Lucy Ash as she heads to the ocean with the pioneering Norwegian artist Sissel Tolaas. Lucy discovers how Sissel is designing and recreating ‘smellscapes' to raise awareness about pollution in the Baltic Sea.

Plus- plants on the frontline of protest. The green-fingered artist Lucia Monge reveals why she advocates for plant rights and agitates for access to green spaces, using plants not placards, from Lima to London. Her ‘forest flash mob' is part-protest, part-procession and features music and sound art by composers including Nicolás Wangeman and Brian House.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: People and plants participate in Lucia Monge's Plantón Móvil performance art protest in Lima, Peru in 2011 Credit: Jorge Ochoa

We hear from artists who are speaking out against environmental damage and climate change

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art And Protest At The Dakota Access Pipeline2016112620161127 (WS)We hear from the artist behind the project to provide demonstrators with mirrored shields

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Dakota Access Pipeline has been a source of controversy with environmental and indigenous campaigners, who believe it will threaten the water source of a Sioux reservation and disturb sacred burial grounds. Artist Cannupa Hanska Luger discusses his project to distribute mirrored shields to demonstrators, in an attempt to hold a mirror to controversial police tactics at the site.

Negin Khpalwak is Afghanistan's first female conductor and she's still a teenager. Despite threats of violence from her family she is keen to show what women in her country are capable of. From her home in Kabul she explains how she got the musical bug and what it's like to conduct and perform in a country where many girls are prohibited from studying music.

Members of Hong Kong's artistic community have expressed fears that art and culture are falling victim to pressure from Beijing. President of the newly founded PEN Hong Kong writers group Jason Ng, and film journalist Vivienne Chow discuss the situation for artists in Hong Kong.

A production of a play about the French Revolution has been playing to sell-out crowds in the Iraqi Kurdistan city of Sulaymaniyah. Journalist Sarhang Hars explains why this centuries old story resonates with today's residents.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a fist held in the air at a pipeline protest Credit: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Art At A Time Of Protest2019080320190804 (WS)This week, the Cultural Frontline shares stories of artists creating work at a time of protest.

As Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests enter their third month we speak to the theatre director and actor Billy Sy about how the world of arts and theatre are responding to a city in political turmoil.

When protesters staged a momentous sit-in at Sudan's Military Headquarters in Khartoum, an explosion of brightly coloured protest art appeared on the city's walls and soon afterwards the nation's leader, President Omar Al-Bashir was ousted. Two artists present at that historic moment in Khartoum were the Sudanese film maker and activist Hajooj Kuka and the painter Maie Hassan. Hajooj and Maie explain the significance of that art, which was later erased when the sit-in was broken up following a deadly crackdown by the military.

It started as a protest movement at the end of the Yugoslav wars but became a festival that reshaped the future of the Balkans. Festival promoter Dusan Kovacevic charts the history of Exit Festival.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: A Sudanese protestor walks in front of a recently painted mural during a protest outside the army complex in the capital Khartoum on April 20, 2019. Credit: OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images

The Cultural Frontline shares stories of artists creating work at a time of protest

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art Breaking Barriers2019041320190414 (WS)The Cultural Frontline celebrates artists, writers and directors using art to bridge divides and provide a platform for everyone to tell their stories.

Many theatres around the world now include some accessible versions of their shows for people with disabilities, such as captioned performances for Deaf audiences. But how accessible is theatre for performers with disabilities and do disabled audiences feel represented by the content being performed?
We hear from two champions of accessibility in theatre: Amit Sharma, theatre director for disabled theatre company Graeae and Dr Marlene Le Roux from Artscape Theatre in Cape Town.

Prayaag Akbar writes about the divides that separate so much of private and public life in India. His latest novel Leila imagines life in an Indian city in the near future, in which religious and ethnic groups have begun to build enormous walls around their communities to ensure what's described as “purity for all”. Prayaag tells the story of a mother trying to reunite with her daughter in an increasingly hostile society, and shares his own experiences of caste, class and religious divisions.

Moroccan writer Leila Slimani was appointed by French President Emmanuel Macron as his personal representative and global champion of French language and culture – a recognition perhaps that the future of the language is in Africa. It's estimated that by 2050 more than eight out of ten of the world's French speakers will live in that continent. Leila tells us about the classic French song with a special place in her heart.

We also hear about the Sex Workers Opera, giving voice to an often marginalized group of women and men. They're working with SWEAT in Cape Town – that's the Sex Workers Education and Advocacy Taskforce - to establish a sex workers theatre there.

The Wajuku studio and arts club is encouraging creativity in the Makuru informal settlement near the Kenyan capital Nairobi. Artist Shabu Mwangi founded Wajuku to give young people living in poverty access to art.

Plus - the Theatre of Witness in Northern Ireland involves men and women who were in the police or prison service, or paramilitary groups, or whose families were attacked during the 30 year conflict there, known as “The Troubles”. They visit schools in areas deemed to be at high risk from paramilitary activity, to share their stories with schoolchildren in an effort to prompt healing and understanding across the Protestant/Catholic religious divide.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Paul Waters

Image: performer from the Unmute Theatre Company, Cape Town, South Africa. Credit: Danie Coetzee

Lessons from artists, writers and directors using art to bridge divides and involve all

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art From The Anthropocene2019010520190106 (WS)Zoë Comyns goes in search of art from the Anthropocene. She meets artists who are all responding to this geological age driven by humans, the so-called Anthropocene, and our footprint on the planet.

Maria Cristina Finnuci's installation in Rome consists of five million plastic bottle caps spelling out the word HELP across the landscape.

Heather Ackroyd and Dan Harvey from the UK create powerful reminders of our dependence on plants: they grow grass ‘photographs' on gallery walls.

Justin Brice Guariglia from the USA has taken his study and interpretation of global warming to a personal level, tattooing his arms with graphs charting rising surface temperature and carbon levels.

Craig Santos Perez is a native Chamoru from Guam, and a poet, academic and environmentalist. His poetry highlights environmental degradation in the Pacific region.

Courtney Mattison from the USA was a marine biologist, and has taken her knowledge and applied it to recreating fragile ceramic coral reefs.

This is a sound rich journey through artworks that inspire curiosity, help us imagine a new way of living and through creativity help build a sustainable future.

A New Normal Culture production for BBC World Service
Producer: Zoë Comyns

Image: Maria Cristina Finucci's 'HELP the Ocean' installation in the Basilica Gulia in the Roman Forum (Courtesy of Maria Cristina Finucci)

How artists are responding to the footprint humans are leaving on the planet

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Art In The Era Of Fake News2017021120170212 (WS)How should artists respond to the era of fake news? Photographer Alison Jackson is known for her lookalike photographs of public figures in sometimes compromising situations. She discusses why her work is particularly pertinent now.

Australian-Israeli comedian Jeremie Bracka uses humour to explore the ongoing conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. He explains what role he thinks comedy might have in improving dialogue in the region.

The Cuban graffiti artist El Sexto discusses his arrest and detention following the death of Fidel Castro in November, and what he hopes his art can do to encourage freedom of expression in the country.

How might mass immigration to Sweden influence culture? The writer Elin Unnes considers a new study which looks at the impact of increasing diversity on Swedish popular music.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a staged image of a Donald Trump lookalike by Alison Jackson Credit: Alison Jackson)

How should artists respond to fake news and how might it change the way we view images?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art Of The Hong Kong And Sudan Protests2019080320190804 (WS)This week, the Cultural Frontline shares stories of artists creating work at a time of protest.

As Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests enter their third month we speak to the theatre director and actor Billy Sy about how the world of arts and theatre are responding to a city in political turmoil.

When protesters staged a momentous sit-in at Sudan's Military Headquarters in Khartoum, an explosion of brightly coloured protest art appeared on the city's walls and soon afterwards the nation's leader, President Omar Al-Bashir was ousted. Two artists present at that historic moment in Khartoum were the Sudanese film maker and activist Hajooj Kuka and the painter Maie Hassan. Hajooj and Maie explain the significance of that art, which was later erased when the sit-in was broken up following a deadly crackdown by the military.

It started as a protest movement at the end of the Yugoslav wars but became a festival that reshaped the future of the Balkans. Festival promoter Dusan Kovacevic charts the history of Exit Festival.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: A Sudanese protestor walks in front of a recently painted mural during a protest outside the army complex in the capital Khartoum on April 20, 2019. Credit: OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images

Stories of artists creating work following protests in Hong Kong, Sudan and the Balkans.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art To Believe In2019060820190609 (WS)The Cultural Frontline speaks to artists about how their faith informs and inspires their work.

When he was twelve years old, the artist Tsherhin Sherpa began studying traditional Tibetan thangka painting with his father; he is now a celebrated contemporary artist. He tells The Cultural Frontline about how his work combines the ancient traditions of his Buddhist heritage with his personal observations on the political and social issues of today's modern globalised culture.

The graffiti artist Combo says he is French first, Muslim second - and has a lot to say about how religion is discussed in French society. He speaks to the BBC's Sophia Smith Galer about one of his most notable works, a logo called 'co-exist' that he has spray-painted in cities around the world. It celebrates religious diversity, but also led to Combo receiving a lot of criticism in the French media for sparking religious discourse on the streets of a country where secularism, or laïcité, is proudly celebrated.

Plus we speak to the rapper A-Star about how his faith shapes his lyrical message, and why there is a renaissance of gospel in grime music.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Work by the graffiti artist Combo. Credit: Combo

The Cultural Frontline speaks to artists about how their faith inspires their work

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art Versus Climate Change2019071320190714 (WS)The Cultural Frontline speaks to artists tackling climate change and global environmental damage through their work.

It's the protest movement that has hit the headlines and the streets around the world. Tina speaks to members of Extinction Rebellion about why the group place arts and culture at the centre of their actions.

Icelandic film director Benedikt Erlingson explains why he chose to tackle the thorny issue of the environmental impact of industry in a quirky, comic style in his critically acclaimed film Woman at War.

We step inside the art show devoted entirely to rubbish - Material Insanity. The BBC's Lucy Ash speaks to the Kenyan artist Cyrus Kabiru about how he creates extraordinary art from very ordinary waste.

And what is 'Cli-Fi'? Literary journalist Amy Brady talks us through the increasingly popular genre of Climate Fiction.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Extinction Rebellion protest in London. Credit: Brais G. Rouco/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

We speak to artists tackling climate change and environmental damage through their work.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Artist Stories For Rebel Girls2019030920190310 (WS)To mark International Women's Day, The Cultural Frontline celebrates the female artists daring to fight for equality with creativity.

How far would you go to escape your life? The critically acclaimed writer Fatima Bhutto takes on extremism, alienation and identity in her latest novel, The Runaways. She tells Tina about the importance of creating characters that represent the experiences of all women.

The Guerrilla Girls are no ordinary campaign group. For starters, they wear gorilla masks, secondly they are all artists and they are all feminists. Their mission is to make the art world a more equal place - and after more than 30 years they still haven't been able to hang up those masks. We talk creative campaigning with the world's leading feminist artists.

We meet, Jasmeen Patheja, an activist who collects clothes - not to wear or to sell, but as a form of protest. Her ‘I Never Ask For It' wardrobe is full of clothes donated by survivors of sexual violence. She tells The Cultural Frontline why she is on a mission to challenge a culture of victim-blaming that all too often raises the question: ‘what were you wearing'?

Plus she lights up dance floors from Kampala to Kuala Lumpur, the Ugandan DJ, Kampire tells the BBC's Emily Dust why being an African female DJ who tours the world is a political act.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: The Guerrilla Girls Credit: Katie Booth/ Women In The World)

To mark International Women's Day, we celebrate female artists fighting for equality

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Artist’s Response To The Turkish Referendum Result20170422
Artistic Triumph Through Tragedy2018072820180729 (WS)
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Can tragedy, loss and death inspire great art? This week on The Cultural Frontline we meet four artists who have created work born out of some of life's most painful moments.

The artist Petrit Halilaj reveals how the memory of the family home lost during the conflict in Kosovo became the inspiration behind his latest work.

The writer Laia Jufresa takes us to the mountains of Mexico's Guerrero state, a place where violence, disappearances and murder coexist alongside a hub of artistic creativity.

Buckle up and prepare for the world's most dangerous ride with the artist Julijonus Urbonas. We find out why he designed the concept for a “Euthanasia” rollercoaster which aims to both bring joy and to kill its passengers.

Plus has a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The poet and writer Ben Okri reflects on the transformative power of the Greek tragedy, The Oresteia.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Ash, Shoku Amirani, Nancy Bennie, Kate Bullivant and Alice Bloch.

(Photo: Family heart. Photos on the wall of teenage girl's bedroom of her missing brothers in Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico Photo Credit: Yael Martinez)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Artists And The Us Travel Ban2017020420170205 (WS)As President Trump's immigration restrictions for refugees and migrants from certain countries continue, we hear from the Syrian artist Tammam Azzam about what the policy might mean for him.

After the December 2016 attack on a Christmas market in Berlin, the issue of how many refugees Germany has accepted is more potent than ever. Thalia Beaty reports on a theatre company which is trying to improve integration and understanding.

Ghanaian-American writer Yaa Gyasi has scored a huge hit with her debut novel Homegoing, which traces the lives of two Ghanaian sisters caught up in the transatlantic slave trade. She tells Tina how a chance visit to a castle in Ghana inspired the story.

Nigerian writer Chibundu Onuzo explains why research was so important to her while working on her latest novel, but when it came to putting herself in danger for her art, she put her foot down.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: protestors in New York Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Artists in the US and abroad discuss the likely impact of the US travel ban

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Artists' Responses To The Turkish Referendum2017042220170423 (WS)Turkish writer Kaya Genc on what the Turkish referendum means for the country's artists

Acclaimed Turkish writer Kaya Genc who has been covering the growing political rift in his country for the past decade, discusses what the result of the Turkish referendum means for the country's artists and freedom of speech.

As the UK starts negotiating its exit from the European Union, historic tensions with Spain over Gibraltar have emerged again. The novelist M.G. Sanchez describes the human cost of the UK and EU's tussle over Gibraltar.

Indian documentary filmmaker Ram Devineni tells us why he was motivated to create a comic book animation to tackle the issue of gender based violence and acid attacks on women, which are on the rise.

And as the French Presidential elections kick off this week, Lille based journalist Laurie Moniez tells us about a controversial film by Belgian director Lucas Belvaux which portrays the leadership and tactics of the Front Nacional.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Shoku Amirani

(Photo Credit: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Gokhan Sahin, Getty Images)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Australia Says Yes2017112520171126 (WS)
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Australian artists speak out in the name of love. We join comedians, cabaret singers and Priscilla Queen of the Desert star Tony Sheldon as they reflect on their country's historic vote in favour of same sex marriage.

The comedian Ronny Chieng reveals what life was like joining the hit comedy news programme, The Daily Show just as the United States was preparing for one of the most momentous elections in its history.

Plus the author JJ Bola takes us back to his childhood home and tells us why, as a refugee, he always felt like one of the bad guys from the movies.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: People in Melbourne celebrate the outcome of Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey Photo Credit: Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

We hear from Australian artists after the country's historic vote for marriage equality.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Bahara Golestani: From Child Refugee To Tv Star2019110220191103 (WS)From Kabul to California, we talk to the Afghan actress Bahara Golestani about her journey from fleeing a war zone to joining the cast of one of the most popular TV shows on the planet, the award winning American family drama and all round tear-jerker, This is Us.

It's been called the drama that changed Netflix forever. Screenwriter and comedian Varun Grover reveals how Sacred Games reflects the philosophy, the politics and the people of modern India.

We go behind the scenes of one of West Africa's most loved and most debated dramas, Maitresse d'un homme marié (Mistress of a Married Man). Writer and producer Kalista Sy tells us why she wanted to tell a story for all of Senegal's women.

Plus critic and box-set connoisseur Rhianna Dhillon talks to Tina about the TV series that are wowing audiences and causing controversy in Italy and Jordan.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Bahara Golestani [Dr. Asmaan], This is Us
Credit: THIS IS US © 2019-2020 NBCUniversal Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

Afghan actress Bahara Golestani on her journey from fleeing a war zone to being a TV star

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Behind The Lens With Obama's Photographer2018010620180107 (WS)
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This week on The Cultural Frontline we focus on five photographers.

We meet the Pulitzer Prize winner, Lynsey Addario, whose work captures the people at the heart of the world's most dangerous conflict zones.

The official photographer to President Barack Obama, Pete Souza, talks about his experience capturing the key moments of a historic US Presidency.

We explore the work of the South African photographer, Tony Gum, who has been called the coolest girl in Cape Town by Vogue Magazine.

Plus we head to the streets of New Delhi and Nairobi and discover the stories behind two photos taken by two citizens of those cities.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Former U.S. President Barack Obama looks through a photographer's camera in February 2009 Photo credit: Pete Souza/White House/Getty Images)

The world through the eyes of five photographers.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Beyond The Borders Of Partition2017081220170813 (WS)This week on the Cultural Frontline, guided by some of the Indian subcontinent's finest contemporary artists we explore Partition, not as a historical event, but as an open wound.

Award winning authors, Pakistani novelist Kamila Shamsie and Indian writer Urvashi Butalia, both from families of Partition refugees, discuss how the legacy of independence continues to shape the cultural identity of both of their homelands.

Exploring the fallout of Partition across the generations, Indian graphic novelist Vishwajyoti Ghosh. His new anthology ‘This Side, That Side: Restorying Partition' brings together comic artists, writers, and illustrators from across India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Two-time Oscar-winning filmmaker Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy takes us on a tour of her latest immersive exhibition ‘HOME1947'. Around 14 million people are thought to have been displaced with the birth of India and Pakistan. Chinoy's exhibition brings a powerfully personal perspective to their collective story.

Author and activist Arundhati Roy discusses her new novel, ‘The Ministry of Utmost Happiness' with BBC presenter Samira Ahmed. Arundhati explains how the characters in her new book reflect the enduring divisions of gender, caste and religion embedded within the fabric of her home country of India.

And finally, British Punjabi, DJ Swami, explores the spaces in between traditional Punjabi sounds and contemporary dance music with his latest composition, Partitions.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Wagah border post, Pakistan. Credit: Arif Ali / Stringer

Independence day, 70 years on. The birth of two new nations, India and Pakistan.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Photo: Wagah border post, Pakistan. Credit: Arif Ali / Stringer

Bisa Butler: Crafting African American Stories2021020620210207 (WS)
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This week, we meet the craft makers and textile artists telling new stories through traditional techniques.

Sewn in brightly coloured thread and African fabrics, artist Bisa Butler's stunning quilt portraits often focus on unknown African Americans. Creating her quilts from vintage photos found in the American National Archives, she pieces together their stories using carefully chosen textiles. Bisa talks to Chi Chi about her creative process, storytelling through her quilts and the portrait she'd like to stitch next.

When master weaver Porfirio Gutierrez returned home to Mexico after years away, he found the traditional methods he'd grown up with were dying out and he was determined to do something about it. Porfirio Gutierrez tells our reporter Saskia Edwards how he has re-imagined Zapotec rug making to reflect both the ancient and modern world.

South African artist Kimathi Mafafo explains how she uses embroidery to represent traditional women in her series, Voiceless and to empower local women by teaching them her craft.

Plus: has a film, a book or an artwork ever changed the way you see the world? One of Britain's leading tailors, Sir Paul Smith tells us about an influential painting as he celebrates 50 years in the fashion industry.

Presented by Chi Chi Izundu

(Photo: Bisa Butler. Credit: John Butler, courtesy of Claire Oliver Gallery)

We meet the craft makers telling new stories through traditional techniques

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Bitcoin: The Culture Of Cryptocurrency2017120920171210 (WS)
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On The Cultural Frontline this week: borders, journeys and the power of place.

Can Bitcoin change the world of art? We hear from the crypto-artist, Valentina Picozzi and the gallery owner, Eleesa Dadiani, on the impact the borderless cryptocurrency is having on both the making and trading of art.

The writer and President of PEN Hong Kong Jason Ng discusses the challenge of navigating the fine line between censorship and freedom of expression in China and Hong Kong.

The Irish writer Gerard Brennan takes The Cultural Frontline on a visit to the Northern Irish crime literature festival, Noireland, to meet leading writers whose work is shaped by borders.

Plus, the ballet dancer Mthuthuzeli November tells the story of how dance propelled him from the poverty of rural South Africa, to the world stage.

Photo: A visual representation of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, alongside a selection of official currencies Credit: Dan Kitwood/ Getty Images

The artist and gallery owner embracing Bitcoin

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Black Lives Matter In Art And Protest2020060620200607 (WS)Artists reflect on the death of George Floyd and the protests in America

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline explores how America's artists and cultural voices are responding to the death of George Floyd and the protests that have followed.

Telling the stories of black life that don't get told anywhere else. That's the mission of The Nod a hugely popular American podcast presented by Brittany Luse and Eric Eddings. Tina Daheley speaks to Brittany and Eric about the death of George Floyd and confronting the pain felt by black Americans.

It's not just in the United States where the Black Lives Matter movement has been staging protests. In Toronto, Canada the artist and activist Ravyn Wingz shares their experience on taking a stand against white supremacy and using performance as a means of expression and escapism.

What is like to be a photojournalist caught on the front line of protest? The Washington Post's Deputy Director of Photography Robert Miller and staff photojournalist Marvin Joseph talk about the framing of the global protest movement, Black Lives Matter and the power of images to tell stories of black lives in America.

When Michelle Obama first posted about the tragic death of George Floyd, she chose to post her tribute alongside a portrait of George by LA-based artist Nikkolas Smith. The post and painting have since gone viral with over one million likes on Instagram. We speak to Nikkolas about his work and why he paints portraits of victims of police brutality.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Mugabi Turya, Lucy Wai, Jack Thomason, Lucy Collingwood and Shoku Amirani

(Photo: Protests following the death of George Floyd. Credit: Salwan Georges/Washington Post)

Board Games: The Politics Of Play2020121920201220 (WS)
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How do board games encourage players to explore ideas, politics and morals?

We meet Matt Leacock, designer of the game Pandemic, which has been used at medical schools to encourage co-operation, communication and strategy for trainees.

Reiner Knizia, designer of 700 board games, talks about how making a game out of tasks can change players' behaviour in daily life.

We explore the rise of a new generation of games where players collaborate, rather than oppose each other, in titles that deal with politics, hip-hop, ecology, employment, climate change and more. Quintin Smith from Shut Up & Sit Down discusses new trends in design, while Michelle Browne, designer of World of Work, tells us about the game that explores employment and social benefits.

Presented and produced by Zoë Comyns.

A New Normal production for the BBC World Service

Image: The board game Pandemic (Courtesy of Matt Leacock)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Bts Army: Inside The Fandom2021010920210110 (WS)
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BTS are one of the biggest bands in the world. They've sold millions of albums, their music has been streamed billions of times online and tickets to their tours sell out instantly.

The seven members of BTS, RM, Jin, Suga, J-Hope, Jimin, V and Jungkook, are history makers. In 2020 they became the first all-Korean pop act to top the American Billboard Hot 100 singles chart and they set the world record for attracting the most viewers for a concert live stream during the coronavirus pandemic.

At the heart of their success are their fans – BTS ARMY. ARMY is unlike any other fandom and has mobilised not just to celebrate BTS but also to support each other through social engagement, community building, education and charitable acts. In summer 2020 ARMY hit the headlines for matching the band's $1million donation to the Black Lives Matter campaign in less than 24 hours.

Camilla Costa explores how this fandom is revolutionising the well-established rules of the music industry and changing the way we think about the power of art to build community.

Our interviewees are Nicole Santero, Carla Postma-Slabbekoorn, Jiyoung Lee, Adaeze Agbakoba, David Kim and K-Ci Williams.

Our voices of ARMY are Areeba Sheikh, Brenda Ágatha, Michael Dürr, Monika Košťanyová, Snigdha Dutta, Yassin Adam, and Tagseen Samsodien.

With additional content from Waleska Herrera, FO Squad KPop, Amy & Bri and BTS Vlive.

Plus contributions from Nan Panunzo, Cathi Smith and Shelley Hoani.

Presented by Camilla Costa

(Photo: BTS. Credit: Noam Galai/Getty Images)

How BTS ARMY is changing the music industry and pop culture

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Budapest Night Culture2018052620180527 (WS)
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Journalist and music curator Krisztián Puskár and artist Erika Szurcsik take us on an immersive night-time adventure into the heart of Budapest's thriving underground scene. Is the current political climate in Hungary energising or endangering arts and music?

Noisy, unpredictable, political and fun, the night begins after Erika's rehearsal with her art punk band Gustave Tiger. We take a tram to District VIII, one of the most diverse areas in the Hungarian capital. It's here, amongst crumbling communist-era concrete, that many underground bars and clubs are located, pushed out of the city centre by gentrification.

Krisztián and Erika introduce us to artists and musicians from the underground's inner circle. From traditional folk band Erdőfű, to a feminist electronic music collective Rrriot Nerdz, acclaimed underground musician Balázs Pándi, and Pénz, a punk rave crew. For Erika and her friends, a DIY approach to their work is not an aesthetic choice but a reality - everything is done with little or no budget. There are also growing fears about censorship, but, by night this is a city alive with creativity, a determined sense of self-reliance, and absolute freedom to experiment.

Photo: Fogselyemfiu - DJ/Producer of the Pénz rave crew Credit: Gabor Radi

A nocturnal journey into Budapest's underground music scene

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Bulgaria's Art On The Edge2021010220210103 (WS)
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Why does artist Ivo Dimchev pay members of his audience cash to perform naked, and even to simulate sex on stage? The Cultural Frontline encounters three extraordinary Bulgarian artists challenging audiences and blurring the lines between cabaret, theatre and real-life. Kamen Stoyanov straps a giant referee's whistle to the roof of his car and drives around the country, and Gery Georgieva invades an abandoned communist monument to sing a haunting Bulgarian folk song.
Tracy Harris explores this bizarre art and a rapidly changing culture.

A Gritty Production for BBC World Service. Produced by Chris Rushton

Image: Ivo Dimchev (Credit: Karolina Miernik)

Three extraordinary artists blur the lines between cabaret, theatre and real-life

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Cambodia's Cultural Revival2017041520170416 (WS)Four decades after the Khmer Rouge genocide during which almost 90 percent of the country's finest artists, musicians and intellectuals were wiped out, an extraordinary cultural revival and vibrant contemporary arts scene is emerging in Cambodia. We hear from the young artists at the forefront of this revival.

Kavich Neang, one of Cambodia's hottest young filmmakers discusses his forthcoming film about the iconic White Building in Phnom Penh whose evolution tells the story of modern Cambodia.

The young radio host, relationship guru and social media celebrity DJ Nana describes how her outspoken advice on sex and relationships is breaking social taboos and has earned her a UN award for empowering young women.

Arn Chorn-Pound, musician, Khmer Rouge survivor and founder of Cambodian Living Arts explains why it's important to pass on the traditional Cambodian arts to a new generation and how music has saved his life.

Channthy Kak, dubbed Cambodia's Amy Winehouse and the lead singer of the rock group Cambodian Space Project, talks about her rise to fame from a poor village girl with no education or musical training.

And Sok Sangvar, in charge of tourism at Angkor Wat, explains how he is reducing the impact of tourism on the ancient temples that represent the soul of Cambodian culture.

With Tina Daheley

Produced by Shoku Amirani

(Photo Credit: Angkor Wat temple complex in Siem Reap at dawn. ALEX OGLE / Getty Images)

The cultural revival taking place in Cambodia four decades after the Khmer Rouge genocide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can Art Save Endangered Animals?2019121420191215 (WS)We meet Bernie Krause, the man behind The Great Animal Orchestra. Bernie has spent over half a century recording animals and their habitats from rainforests to coral reefs. He reveals why he hopes hearing the sounds of the natural world will inspire the world to take action against catastrophic environmental damage and climate change.

Have you ever seen a pitch black glacier? As a keen climber, Swiss artist Michel Comte has experienced the effect of pollution on the world's glaciers first hand. He tells Tina why he gave up being a fashion photographer to create large scale installations about the damage caused by climate change.

Making music for manatees and macaws. The musician Xavier Bartaburu from the Brazilian band Nhambuzim tells us why they created an album to both celebrate and help protect animals facing extinction.

Last year saw the death of Sudan, the last male northern white rhinoceros. It was thought that would be the last the world would see of the species but now the British artist Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg has brought Sudan back to life using a combination of artificial intelligence and digital technology. Could there now be a virtual future for the world's endangered and extinct species?

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg, The Substitute, 2018-19 (video still).
Image credit: Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg. Visualisation by The Mill.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Presented by Andrea Kennedy

How artists are working to challenge the destruction of the natural world

Can Music Influence Our View Of The World?2017080520170806 (WS)Ramy Essam is an Egyptian musician who believes music can influence our view of the world. His song ‘Irhal' became the anthem for the Arab Spring in 2011. This month he's in Edinburgh, in Scotland, with his show ‘Ramy in the Frontline'. He explains why he believes music has the power to change minds.

There are more than one thousand comics from all over the world performing at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe this year. Many will be left leaning political comedians relishing the opportunities to take on the travails of the American President Donald Trump and the British Prime Minister Teresa May. But what about the handful of comedians who lean to the right politically? Leo Kearse, declares ‘I Can Make You Tory' in his show, and Geoff Norcott describes himself as ‘Right-leaning But Well Meaning', both reveal all.

Like the best comedy, Sujatro Ghosh's photographs first make you smile and then feel uncomfortable when you realise the truth they are portraying. In a country where violence against women is growing, yet where in several states you can be sentenced to life imprisonment for slaughtering a cow, the 23-year-old photographer's new project asks are cows in India treated better than women?

The Kenyan rapper MC Sharon, is one of only a few female hip hop artists and music producers in Africa. Her new song 'Kutupanga' , which can be loosely translated as 'lies and deceit' sends a message to corrupt politicians, and encourage people to vote wisely in the election due to be held on Tuesday.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Ramy Essam Photo credit: Val Denn

Ramy Essam is an Egyptian musician whose song became the anthem for the Arab Spring

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Photo: Ramy Essam Photo credit: Val Denn

Can Podcasts Change The World?2019051120190512 (WS)The Cultural Frontline asks how are podcasts changing the stories we tell each other and what we learn about our world?

Are podcasts just a western phenomenon? According to producer and presenter Yang Yi, podcasts are not even half the story when it comes to audio in China. Yi explains that whilst entertainment podcasts are still in their infancy, it's ‘pay for knowledge' audio that's big business.

He's the podcast pioneer who has interviewed everyone from the Beastie Boys to Barack Obama all from the luxury of his garage. Marc Maron tells us about the art of the interview and how podcasting changed his life.

In Milan, two Italian women are taking on the nation's gender politics through a podcast called Senza Rossetto or Without Lipstick. Its two producers Giulia Cuter and Giulia Perona tell The Cultural Frontline how they are learning lessons through exploring the lives of Italy's women, past and present.

Plus can podcasts give a voice to those who are often forced to remain silent? We speak to one of the creative team behind the AfroQueer podcast, a ground breaking series which tells stories of queer/LGBTQ+ people across Africa.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Woman listens to audio on her phone. Credit: shih-wei/Getty Images

How are podcasts changing the stories we tell and what we learn about our world?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Can Protest Art Change The World?2018063020180701 (WS)
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Novelist Angie Thomas tells Tina how the Black Lives Matter movement motivated her to write the award-winning young adult novel, The Hate U Give.

Artist Santiago Sierra meets the BBC's Guy Hedgecoe to discuss why the photography exhibition Political Prisoners in Contemporary Spain is provoking disapproval and demonstrations.

Writer Ece Temelkuran reflects on the newly re-elected President Erdogan's rebuilding- and rebranding- of the Atatürk Cultural Centre, a focal point for the Gezi Park protests in Istanbul.

Plus, how do you deal with hate mail creatively? Swedish composer Fredrik Österling explains why the Helsingborg Symphony Orchestra turned a homophobic letter into an operatic libretto.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Image: Demonstrators from the Black Lives Matter movement staged a 'Black Resistance March' in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the Democratic Presidential Convention in July 2016. Credit: Albin Lohr-Jones/ Pacific Press/ Light Rocket via Getty Images

Art meets activism with Angie Thomas,Santiago Sierra,Ece Temelkuran and Fredrik \u00d6sterling

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can Virtual Reality Create Empathy?2018061620180617 (WS)
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Filmmakers are using VR to create shared human experiences but can it really help us connect with others as well as literature, theatre or film?

Tina meets documentary filmmaker Nonny de la Pena to get an insight into her film After Solitary, which gives a 360 degree perspective on one former inmate's cell in solitary confinement in the United States.

Academy Award-winning film director Alejandro G. Iñárritu tells reporter Laura Hubber why he hopes his Oscar-winning installation Carne y Arena, or Flesh and Sand, could change attitudes towards migrants.

Artist and filmmaker Lynette Wallworth's Emmy award-winning film Collisions uses cutting edge technology to tell a true story from 1950s Australia.

Plus, self-styled hologram storyteller Asad J Malik makes the case for augmented over virtual reality. He tells Datshiane Navanayagam why he chose AR to create his border-control role-play experience, Terminal 3.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Kirsty McQuire and Johny Cassidy

Image: A couple wearing headphones and virtual reality goggles experience the Rhizomat VR art piece by artist Mona El Gammal at Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin, Germany. Credit: Sean Gallup/ Getty Images

How filmmakers are using VR to create shared human experiences

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can You Report The News Through Song?2018041420180415 (WS)
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On this week's Cultural Frontline we explore the sounds of nature with Iceland's all-female radical performance art collective, the Icelandic Love Corporation. For over two decades, their art has engaged audiences on topics such as the over-sexualisation of women and reflections around aging and the female body. Now taking inspiration from the spirit of water, they are turning their art to another pressing matter, the need to act quickly to save our environment.

The Uncensored Playlist
Can you tell the news through song? That's the aim of the Uncensored Playlist, an innovative project from Reporters without Borders. Tina speaks to the Uzbek journalist Galima Bukharbaeva and the project's music director Lucas Mayer about how they've combined journalism, song writing and music streaming to spread the news and avoid censorship in countries without a free press.

Zimbabwe's Hit Satirical Play
A new satirical play called 'Operation Restore Legacy' has taken Zimbabwe by storm. Just six months after the fall of former President Robert Mugabe the new production which portrays the last days of his government after a military intervention, has wowed sold out audiences. The BBC's Shingai Nyoka met the writer and the director of the play, Charles Munganasa and found out what the play means for the future of the arts and freedom of expression in the country.

Singeli: The Sound of Dar es Salaam
Plus have you ever heard Singeli music? The Cultural Frontline turns up the volume on the Tanzanian music style with one of the stars of the scene, Bampa Pana from the group Sounds of Sisso. We'll find out how Singeli has taken over the airwaves and become not just the sound of Dar es Salaam but a global phenomenon.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Posters promoting the Uncensored Playlist Photo Credit: Reporters Without Borders)

How an innovative project is defying press censorship through music.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Canine Couture: Inside Dog Fashion2020122620201227 (WS)
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A new type of fashionista is taking the design world by storm but the supermodels have four legs instead of two. Reporter JP Devlin takes us inside the world of canine couture or fashion for dogs.

Which country loves to share bears and where do goats get laughs? Internet expert and writer An Xiao Mina reveals how our favourite animal memes reveal a lot about the culture of our countries.

This spring, as lockdowns were enforced across the globe, The Cultural Frontline started a project in collaboration with the British artist and producer Nick Ryan. Our aim was simple: to collect the sounds that you, our listeners, had heard wherever you were during lockdown. Now Nick Ryan returns to share some of those sounds and to also debut an extract from a new work he has created from those sonic submissions.

Have you ever wondered what a spider sounds like? Argentine artist Tomás Saraceno is fascinated by spiders. It has led him to study them, to incorporate them into his visual art and to create music with them in what he calls ‘Spider Jam Sessions.' Tomás spoke to Chi Chi about making music from the vibrations of spider webs for his latest concert.

Presented by Chi Chi Izundu

Image: Bodhi. Credit: @mensweardog

Four-legged fashion \u2013 we go inside the exclusive world of designer clothes for dogs

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Capturing #endsars On Camera2020111420201115 (WS)
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A hashtag that went viral, photographs that caught the world's attention. Rachel Seidu, a photo journalist from Lagos, tells us how she took to the streets to capture the #EndSars protests against police brutality in Nigeria.

In Johannesburg, one woman is using her camera to change perceptions of a nation still plagued by racial injustice, inequality and high crime rates. Angel Khumalo tells reporter Mpho Lakaje about the photo club she runs to show another side of her community.

We hear from two photographers documenting the impact of Covid-19 on mental health. New Zealand based photographer Tatsiana Chypsanava and Spanish photo journalist Manu Brabo are studying the effect of lockdown on their communities as part of The Wellcome Trust's Covid-19 Anxiety Project.

Plus: has a film, a book or a song ever changed the way you see the world? Photographer Misan Harriman, who shot the cover of British Vogue's September activism issue, tells us how a scene from the film Crash has influenced his work.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Image Credit: Rachel Seidu)

Meet the visionaries, artists and storytellers who capture the world through photography

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Catalan Culture And The Question Of Independence2017093020171001 (WS)Two Catalan cultural figures discuss the divisive issue of the disputed independence referendum in Catalonia. Despite being on opposite sides of the debate, Isona Passola, a film producer and president of the Catalan Academy of Cinema and the novelist Eduardo Mendoza, winner of the prestigious Cervantes Prize, remain firm friends.

Jacky-Oh Weinhaus, of the spoof political party Drag for Germany, reflects on using the art of drag to promote tolerance and democracy during the German election campaign.

Poet Naomi Shihab Nye re-visits the poem she wrote ten years ago about a chance meeting in an airport, which has resurfaced on social media in light of President Donald Trump's travel ban.

And Maysaloun Hamoud, the Palestinian film director under fatwa for her film In Between, about the lives and loves of three young women sharing a flat in Tel Aviv.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Image: Catalan flag and ballot paper in the disputed Catalan independence referendum Credit: Pau Barrena/ AFP/ Getty Images

Two Catalan cultural figures discuss the charged issue of the independence referendum.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Image: Catalan flag and ballot paper in the disputed Catalan independence referendum Credit: Pau Barrena/ AFP/ Getty Images

Chen Qiufan: China's Master Of Science Fiction2020040420200405 (WS)A man comes out of isolation and walks in a trance through the centre of Shanghai, marvelling at an empty shopping mall and the changes he sees around him. It sounds like a news report but it's actually the plot of an eerie sci-fi short story written by Chinese author Chen Qiufan (also known as Stanley Chan) last year. He speaks to Tina about his new work and life imitating art in science fiction.

How is COVID-19 influencing artists? The Singaporean art collective PHUNK, tells us about updating their SARS-inspired artwork ‘Control Chaos' to reflect the current global crisis.

‘Stay apart – and keep connecting' – that's the philosophy behind a new daily online comedy broadcast made by the British comedians Robin Ince and Josie Long. Robin and Josie talk to Tina about creating a space to support artists and entertain audiences in the age of lockdown.

Plus from home concerts with John Legend to the campaigning anthems of Bobi Wine we explore how the music world is responding to the coronavirus.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Chen Quifan
Image credit: Lin Yi'an

Chinese sci-fi writer Chen Qiufan on life imitating art

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Cho Nam-joo: The Untold Story Of Korean Women2020020820200209 (WS)As the rise of feminism and the #MeToo movement continue to make a big impact in Korean society, we meet the women who are defying tradition in order to write their own narratives with their art.

Cho Nam-Joo is the author behind the controversial novel, Kim Jiyoung, born 1982, at the centre of Korea's new feminist struggle. She discusses how her book sparked a national discussion and why she's telling the story of a very ordinary woman in order to challenge the country's restrictive gender norms.

K-Pop has long been entangled in the debate about sexist attitudes in Korean culture, and some women from within are speaking out. Amber Liu made her name as one fifth of the Korean girl group f(x), where she was both loved and scorned for her unique androgynous style. She tells us how she's continuing to break the mould with her new solo music.

While some are tearing traditional culture down, visual artist siren eun young jung is fighting to keep it alive. But her focus is a form of traditional performance theatre that is only open to women - yeoseong gukgeuk. Siren tells the Cultural Frontline why she's spent a decade preserving this lost art and staging new performances.

A city and its communities divided by race. The Korean-American author Steph Cha reflects on the continuing legacy of the 1992 Los Angeles riots in her new novel Your House Will Pay.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Cho Nam-Joo
Image credit: Choi Seung-do

How the novelist helped spark Korea's #Metoo movement

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre: From The Streets To The Stage2020031420200315 (WS)From selling slippers on the streets of Taipei as a child to running a world class dance company, we meet the new artistic director of Cloud Gate. Choreographer Cheng Tsung-lung tells us how he transformed his childhood experiences into a sensory explosion of sound, neon light and spectacular movement on stage in the latest production 13 Tongues.

Two dancers on a mission to replace caricature with character. Georgina Pazcoguin and Phil Chan of the campaign group Final Bow for Yellowface tell us why they're working to eliminate offensive stereotypes of East Asians on our stages.

It's been called Georgia's first LGBTQ+ film, has been critically acclaimed but has also attracted controversy. The actor and dancer Levan Gelbakhiani shares the story of making the new drama “And then We Danced.”

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: A dancer on stage in 13 Tongues
Image credit: Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan

Choreographer Cheng Tsung-lung on his new show 13 Tongues

The world seen through the eyes of artists

It's been called Georgia's first LGBTQ+ film, has been critically acclaimed but has also attracted controversy. The actor and dancer Levan Gelbakhiani shares the story of making the new drama “And then We Danced. ?

Combat And Culture: Women On The Frontline2017092320170924 (WS)Tina Daheley discusses the reality and cultural representation of women in combat with actor Avital Lvova and writer Henry Naylor from the play Angel (about Kurdish sniper Rehanna), and Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, author of Ashley's War: The Untold Story of a Team of Women Soldiers on the Special Ops Battlefield. There's room for fighting women on the real frontlines, so why not in the movies?

Also - Russian film director Alexei Uchitel talks about his forthcoming feature film Matilda, based on the love affair between Tsar Nicolas II, the last Tsar of Russia, and ballerina Matilda Kshesinskaya. What does the sometimes violent campaign to get it banned say about Russia today?

We hear from contemporary artist Rozhgar Mustafa, who is using her work to challenge discrimination against women in Iraqi Kurdistan.

And poets Yrsa Daley-Ward and Caleb Femi explain how they use innovative methods and social media to bring their work to new audiences - and the importance of their roots in Jamaica, Nigeria and England to their poetry.

Photo: A Kurdish woman fighter near Kobane, Syria. Credit: Ahmet Sik/Getty Images.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Paul Waters

Women in combat: They're on the real frontline, so why so rarely seen in popular culture?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Paul Waters

Come Together: How Music Festivals Change Culture2019072720190728 (WS)Is festival fever is taking over the African music scene? The Broadcaster and DJ Emily Dust speaks to the creators and musicians behind Africa Bass Culture in Burkina Faso, Uganda's Nyege Nyege and Nigeria's Palm Wine about the growing market for festivals and the challenges and the joy of staging them.

Is the future of festivals female only? We speak to the creative forces behind two revolutionary festivals, Statement in Sweden which was for women, non-binary and transgender persons only and Diva festival in the UK which has a female only line-up.

You've probably heard of Burning Man but do you know what it really is? We speak to the artist Will Roger, one of its co-founders about this experimental community of 80,000 people that gather every year in the middle of the Nevada desert. Whatever you do, don't call it a festival.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Festival goers cheer during a concert at the EXIT festival near Novi Sad in Serbia. Credit: ANDREJ ISAKOVIC/AFP/Getty Images

We explore the world of music festivals from Uganda's Nyege Nyege to Burning Man

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Comedy For Change: Saturday Night Live's Chris Redd2019062920190630 (WS)This week the Cultural Frontline speaks to leading comedians and satirists around the world who use humour to question and expose, sometimes at risk to themselves.

Tina is joined by the American stand-up and sketch comedian Chris Redd, a cast member of the iconic Saturday Night Live TV show. Chris talks about his impersonation of Kanye West meeting President Trump which went viral online, what he thinks of President Trump's reaction to the show, and how he uses rap to highlight social issues like climate change.

Amidst the ongoing political and economic crisis in Venezuela, one of the leading political satirists in the country, Luis Chataing, often referred to as the Venezuelan Jon Stewart, is using comedy to take on the policies of the Nicolas Maduro government. But a crackdown on dissent has made life difficult for comics. We hear why his popular weekly show was taken off air and why he now has to stream his show from Miami.

Has a book, film, song, poem or artist ever changed your outlook on life? One of the rising stars of the Asian stand- up comedy scene, Singapore based Sam See, talks about the comedian who inspired him to change the way he approaches his stand up shows, while navigating the country's red lines.

And two of Uganda's biggest comedians, Patrick Idringi AKA ‘Salvado' and Akite Agnes, discuss the country's booming stand-up scene and the hottest social issues and current affairs dominating the comedy circuit in Uganda.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: comedian Chris Redd. Credit: FilmMagic/Getty Images

We meet leading comedians around the world who use humour to question and expose

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Comedy That Changes Minds2019062920190630 (WS)This week the Cultural Frontline speaks to leading comedians and satirists around the world who use humour to question and expose, sometimes at risk to themselves.

Tina is joined by the American stand-up and sketch comedian Chris Redd, a cast member of the iconic Saturday Night Live TV show. Chris talks about his impersonation of Kanye West meeting President Trump which went viral online, what he thinks of President Trump's reaction to the show, and how he uses rap to highlight social issues like climate change.

Amidst the ongoing political and economic crisis in Venezuela, one of the leading political satirists in the country, Luis Chataing, often referred to as the Venezuelan Jon Stewart, is using comedy to take on the policies of the Nicolas Maduro government. But a crackdown on dissent has made life difficult for comics. We hear why his popular weekly show was taken off air and why he now has to stream his show from Miami.

Has a book, film, song, poem or artist ever changed your outlook on life? One of the rising stars of the Asian stand- up comedy scene, Singapore based Sam See, talks about the comedian who inspired him to change the way he approaches his stand up shows, while navigating the country's red lines.

And two of Uganda's biggest comedians, Patrick Idringi AKA ‘Salvado' and Akite Agnes, discuss the country's booming stand-up scene and the hottest social issues and current affairs dominating the comedy circuit in Uganda.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: comedian Chris Redd. Credit: FilmMagic/Getty Images

We meet leading comedians around the world who use humour to question and expose

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Commemorating Taiwan's 'comfort Women'2016121720161218 (WS)A museum has opened in Taipei to remember the women forced to work in brothels during WW2

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As President-elect Donald Trump provokes ‘serious concern' from China over his policy towards Taiwan, we hear about a new museum in Taiwan's capital Taipei, commemorating the so called ‘comfort women'. Two thousand Taiwanese women, and many more from elsewhere in the region were forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War II. While other countries have commemorated them already, this is Taiwan's first museum to their experience. Cindy Sui has visited the museum and explains its significance.

World famous Ugandan musician Geoffrey Oryema has been in exile in Paris for 40 years. This weekend he returns to his homeland for the first time to perform a concert, he explains what it means to him and how his music has been inspired by life in exile.

Writer Neil Hegarty remembers his childhood growing up in the shadow of the Troubles in Northern Ireland and explains why it took so long for those experiences to make it into his fiction.

And the Sanaa Theatre Awards, Kenya's only awards for the theatre industry are happening in Nairobi this week. But some in the theatre world are unhappy about the perceived preference shown to English language plays above vernacular works. Theatre director Lawrence Murage and awards founder George Orido discuss the situation.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: one of the surviving comfort women Credit: Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images)

Corsak And The Changing Culture Of China2019092820190929 (WS)On this week's Cultural Frontline, seventy years after the birth of the People's Republic, how does China's culture reflect the life of its people?

In the seventy years since Mao Zedong and the Communist Party declared the foundation of the People's Republic of China, the nation has gone from amongst the poorest on earth to a modern day global superpower. The writer Karoline Kan charts the history of her nation through the personal stories of the women of her family.

The Uyghur poet Abduweli Ayup shares the story of how his fight to keep Uyghur culture alive led to his imprisonment in the Chinese province of Xinjiang.

Have you ever heard of Jin Yong? Prepare to explore the world of martial arts, heroes and chivalry made famous by the legendary Chinese author with Jin Yong super fan, the writer Amy Ng.

Plus he's one of the biggest names in China's growing dance music scene, the superstar producer Corsak tells us how he creates music that makes 1 billion people party.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: music producer Corsak. Credit: Will Kyaw

We reflect on China's cultural change through the eyes of its writers, poets & musicians

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Covid-19 And China's Changing Club Scene2020121220201213 (WS)
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How coronavirus is changing the landscape of China's underground electronic music scene. DJ and broadcaster Frank McWeeny speaks to leading DJs and promoters about the collaboration and creativity that is transforming China's electronic music scene after lockdown.

Inside the political battle between the pop star and the President that's dividing Uganda. Journalist Patience Akumu on the political contest between seventy-six year old incumbent President Yoweri Museveni, and the man called the Ghetto President, the thirty-eight year old musician and performer Bobi Wine.

The Venezuelan pop sensation Liana Malva on her new musical project Gotas, that she hopes can help promote environmental awareness and protect her nation's natural beauty.

Plus has a film, a book or a piece of music ever changed the way you see the world? Radiohead guitarist and film composer Jonny Greenwood shares his love for the Polish composer, Krzysztof Penderecki.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo credit: Tao Yun)

How coronavirus is changing China's underground electronic music scene.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Plus has a film, a book or a piece of music ever changed the way you see the world? Radiohead guitarist and film composer Jonny Greenwood shares his love for the Polish composer, Krzysztof Penderecki.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Culture And Holland's Political Climate2017031820170319 (WS)The so called ‘Moroccan issue' featured heavily in the Dutch election campaign. Although populist leader Geert Wilders was beaten into second place, the rhetoric he used in the campaign clearly struck a chord with Dutch voters. Tina speaks to the Dutch Moroccan writer Abdelkader Benali about how the political climate has impacted the cultural sphere.

As firms start bidding for the contract to build President Trump's Mexican wall, activist and musician Glenn Weyant in Arizona and the artist Enrique Chiu in Tijuana speak to Tina about how they're using the existing border fence in their art.

A new romantic comedy about a single woman in search of a sperm donor has shocked Egyptian society. Our reporter Nirvana El Saied speaks to the creative team behind the film about the challenges of making this kind of film in a conservative society.

As Hindu groups demand an apology over a new American TV show that they say promotes Hinduphobia, writer Sandip Roy considers the potential perils when TV and film attempt to sensationalise the religion of a billion plus people.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: election posters on display in Holland Credit:EMMANUEL DUNAND / Getty Images)

Dutch/Moroccan novelist Abdelkader Benali discusses how culture has responded to populism

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Culture And The Conflict In The Former Yugoslavia2017121620171217 (WS)
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In this week's The Cultural Frontline stories of history, legacy and tradition.

Following the final cases in the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the Macedonian writer Lidija Dimkovska reflects on how the conflict shaped a generation of writers.

The BBC's Paula Adamo Idoeta takes us on a whistle stop tour of Sao Paulo following the history of the city's love/hate relationship with street art.

The writer Inua Ellams explores tradition, family, politics and race in his drama Barber Shop Chronicles set in six hairdressers across two continents.

Plus ahead of the release of The Last Jedi we'll hear from a super fan and a superstar of Star Wars on the blockbuster's continuing global appeal.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: A woman looks at pictures of victims inside the memorial of victims, in front of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague Photo credit: JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images)

Reflections on how the conflict in the former Yugoslavia shaped a generation of writers.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Culture And The French Elections2017040820170409 (WS)As France prepares for one of the most unpredictable Presidential elections in recent memory, Tina Daheley speaks to artists, writers and musicians about how they're reflecting on the debates raised by the campaign through their work.

Architect Dietmar Feichtinger discusses his designs for security barriers which will surround the Eiffel Tower, and architect and commentator Dan Dorrell considers how security concerns might impact the geography of the city.

Marie Beschon of the Marseille based theatre company Manifeste Rien explains why their latest show is tackling the waves of immigration that have characterised the city for decades.

Writer and journalist Laurent Dandrieu discusses the challenges of being publicly right-wing for cultural figures in France today.

Thierry Danet, of the Ososphere Festival in Strasbourg explains why his city has such a unique relationship with Europe and how his festival plans to engage with the debates ignited by the election.

Rapper and novelist Gael Faye tells Tina how growing up in Burundi and then moving to France as a teenager gave him the drive to write music about unity and acceptance.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a man looks at the Eiffel Tower Credit: PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

How artists, writers and musicians are reflecting the election campaign in their work

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Culture And The Trump Presidency2017011420170115 (WS)Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States on January 20th. The Cultural Frontline looks ahead to the Trump Presidency and examines how artists, writers and musicians are marking this historic moment.

Booker Prize-winning novelist Paul Beatty looks back at Obama's cultural legacy and looks ahead to how the Trump cultural aesthetic might be expressed.

As inauguration day looms, who will be performing and who has refused? Mark Coles examines what we know so far.

And we hear from visual artists on both sides of the political spectrum about how they have chosen to express their feelings about the election.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Donald Trump at the Capitol Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

How artists are reacting to and reflecting the approaching Presidency of Donald Trump

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Dancing With Lgbtq+ Pride2018072120180722 (WS)
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On this week's Cultural Frontline we explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture around the world.

The Bassiani nightclub in Tbilisi has been a rare safe place for Georgia's LGBTQ+ community to dance freely and express themselves but in May 2018 it was raided by armed police. Many Georgians saw the police raids as an attack on their freedom. Thousands took to the streets and started a protest rave, dancing for freedom. The BBC's Rayhan Demytrie met with one of the artists at the centre of the protests, the author, poet and musician, Erekle Deisadze.

We meet Dope Saint Jude, the South African musician and former drag king turning her life into lyrics and exploring queer culture and race through hip hop.

The BBC's Saskia Edwards takes us into the world of voguing and meets two aspiring dancers striking poses and finding meaning on the dancefloors of New York and Bratislava, Slovakia.

Plus have you heard of bucking? We hear from the choreographer Jamal Sims on how the high-energy dance craze has taken Atlanta's gay nightclubs by storm and even inspired Beyoncé.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Image: Bucking contest in Atlanta, USA. Credit: John Orphan)

We explore how the LGBTQ+ community shape dance culture

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Daring Disabled Artists2018092220180923 (WS)
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What does it mean to be an artist with a disability?

This week on The Cultural Frontline we look at how disabled artists are challenging perceptions and asking questions of their audiences.

Nicholas Ouma Odhiambo found dance at the age of 31 through an inclusive company called Dance Into Space based in Nairobi, Kenya. After contracting polio at the age of 3 and living his life with reduced mobility he reveals how he found happiness in dance.

Why are disabled characters in films being repeatedly played by non-disabled actors? Adam Pearson and Virali Modi, actors based in the UK and India re-count the prejudice they've faced in securing acting work, and discuss why it's so important that the industry changes.

Khairani Barokka takes us inside her latest work using installations and performance to ask important questions of what someone's disability can mean for their place in the world.

And Tina Daheley is joined in the studio with Kat Hawkins, a dancer and double leg amputee who came back to dance three years ago. Together they discuss art and disability and ask whether things are changing for disabled artists around the world.

Presented by Tina Daheley and Kat Hawkins.

Image: Kat Hawkins and Anne Gaelle Thiriot perform on stage as part of AnnieVickySarah. Choreography: Victoria Malin. Credit: Matt Grayson.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Douglas Stuart And Fashion For Change2021011620210117 (WS)
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You might know him as this year's Booker Prize winner, but author Douglas Stuart is also a fashion designer. He tells Nawal Al-Maghafi about how fashion changed his life, taking him from his native Glasgow to New York City. He's since returned to his hometown through the pages of his debut novel Shuggie Bain, in which the characters dress to impress while buying clothes on credit and dream of a different life while dealing with addiction and poverty.

Can clothes change the world? For the Cultural Frontline, journalist and author Tansy Hoskins presents her political fashion look-book: a mini style-guide on how to dress to protest, from the US to Belarus and from trousers to T-shirts.

Next, we meet the woman changing the face of fashion in South America. Karla Martinez, Editor in Chief of Vogue Mexico and Vogue Latin America, on how she creates a distinctly Latinx look for the iconic style magazine.

Plus - has a book, a picture or a piece of clothing ever changed the way you see the world? Acclaimed South African designer David Tlale shares the story of how his uncle's sense of style inspired a career in fashion.

Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi

(Photo: Douglas Stuart Credit: Martyn Pickersgill)

Author Douglas Stuart on the transformative power of clothes in life and literature

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Dramatising The Refugee Crisis, Broken Fingaz Street Art2016110520161106 (WS)Berkun Oya on dramatising the refugee crisis; the Broken Fingaz street art collective

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Turkish playwright Berkun Oya tells presenter Tina Daheley how he tackled the refugee crisis in his latest play Closed, and why he chose to set it in Copenhagen, Denmark. Closed is part of Theatre Uncut, which commissions plays as rapid responses to current events and enables them to be performed by anyone, anywhere in the world for free.

Reporter Sahar Zand meets a member of the Broken Fingaz street art collective from Israel. Against the colourful backdrop of his latest mural in Hackney, east London, they discuss the controversial group's international presence and deep roots in their native Haifa, Israel.

Tina is also joined by Austrian-American film-maker duo, Richard Ladkani and Kief Davidson, who have co-directed The Ivory Game, a new Netflix documentary, executive produced by Hollywood actor Leonardo DiCaprio. The film blends undercover reporting in China and Africa with the suspense of a thriller, to expose the international ivory trade.

Chinese-American author Yiyun Li explains how lessons from her childhood have coloured her approach to the issues of immigration, racial tension and gender inequality in her writing, amid the divisive atmosphere of the US presidential election campaign.

(Photo: A Broken Fingaz mural in Bremen, Germany. Credit: Broken Fingaz)

Turkish playwright Berkun Oya tells Tina how he tackled the refugee crisis in his latest play, 'Closed' and why he chose to set it in Copenhagen, Denmark. 'Closed' is part of Theatre Uncut, which commissions plays as rapid responses to current events and enables them to be performed by anyone, anywhere in the world for free.

Tina is joined by Austrian-American filmmaker duo, Richard Ladkani and Kief Davidson who have co-directed The Ivory Game, a new Netflix documentary, executive produced by Hollywood actor Leonardo DiCaprio. The film blends undercover reporting in China and Africa with the suspense of a thriller, to expose the international ivory trade.

With Tina Daheley.

Emel: The Voice Of The Tunisian Revolution2017031120170312 (WS)Tunisian singer Emel has been called ‘the voice of the Tunisian Revolution'. As she releases her new album she talks to Tina about what this tag has meant to her and why she wants to use her new music to move beyond the clichés associated with her region.

Nigerian novelist Ayobami Adebayo has just been nominated for the Bailey's Women's Prize for Fiction. She explores the way women's hair communicates meaning in Yoruba culture.

As new Wolverine film Logan is cut by 14 minutes for release in China, culture critic Vivienne Chow describes how the country's censorship laws are impacting creativity.

We get a tour of Jamaica's capital Kingston to find out how the political graffiti that has decorated the walls since the 1970s is being replaced by a more positive image of the city's cultural heritage.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Tunisian singer Emel Credit: AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/GettyImages)

The singer explains how she feels about her permanent association with the Arab Spring

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Emilia Clarke: My Lockdown Discovery2021040320210404 (WS)
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During lockdown, BAFTA-winning actor Emilia Clarke discovered the work of the late British novelist and essayist Jenny Diski. Jenny had been a fan of Game of Thrones, the TV series in which Emilia starred as Daenerys Targaryen. Emilia speaks to poet and academic Dr Ian Patterson, who was married to Jenny until her death in 2016, to discuss Jenny's work and their shared love of cultural escapism.

Nigerian author Oyinkan Braithwaite was long-listed for the Booker Prize in 2019 for her debut novel My Sister, the Serial Killer. Lockdown has not slowed her down, and has in fact provided inspiration for the plot of her latest novella The Baby is Mine. She shares how her love of Japanese animation, or anime, has shaped her writing during this time.

After a hiatus of ten years, Hong Kong director Yonfan returned to filmmaking with an animation debut, No 7 Cherry Lane. He reveals how he turned to the work of American director Stanley Kramer when its release was impacted by the Covid-19 outbreak.

Plus we hear from our listeners across the world about the art that has changed them during the pandemic.

Presented by Tumi Morake

Produced by Lucy Wai, Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Collingwood and Nancy Bennie.

(Photo: Actor Emilia Clarke. Credit: VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images)

Actor Emilia Clarke on how the work of the writer Jenny Diski inspired her in lockdown

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Experimental Theatre In Tokyo2021050120210502 (WS)
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We go to Tokyo, where artists are creating theatre that interacts with the human body. At the experimental festival, Theater Commons Tokyo ‘21, the audience is centre stage and immersed in the action, even during a pandemic.

At Aya Momose's Performing Acupuncture, needles turn the body into a stage. By combining art and therapy, she creates sensations which make us think about our body and relationships to one another.

Using VR headsets, Meiro Koizumi takes us into the nightmares of Tokyo's marginalised migrant workers. In this unsettling virtual space, we are transported into their pandemic experiences.

And as the world adjusts to coronavirus, Akira Takayama and Port B use radio to transmit voices from Fukushima into the masked crowds of Tokyo streets. We are reminded of frightening contamination and radioactivity. A decade since the earthquake, and a year since the pandemic's onset, both these stories are still unfolding.

Presenter: Kyoko Iwaki
Producer: Alice Armstrong

(Photo: Theater Commons Tokyo '21. Credit: Shun Sato)

Immersive performances in a pandemic, but can theatre change us and how we see the world?

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Extinction Rebellion: Art Versus Climate Change2019071320190714 (WS)The Cultural Frontline speaks to artists tackling climate change and global environmental damage through their work.

It's the protest movement that has hit the headlines and the streets around the world. Tina speaks to members of Extinction Rebellion about why the group place arts and culture at the centre of their actions.

Icelandic film director Benedikt Erlingson explains why he chose to tackle the thorny issue of the environmental impact of industry in a quirky, comic style in his critically acclaimed film Woman at War.

We step inside the art show devoted entirely to rubbish - Material Insanity. The BBC's Lucy Ash speaks to the Kenyan artist Cyrus Kabiru about how he creates extraordinary art from very ordinary waste.

And what is 'Cli-Fi'? Literary journalist Amy Brady talks us through the increasingly popular genre of Climate Fiction.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Extinction Rebellion protest in London. Credit: Brais G. Rouco/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

How Extinction Rebellion and global artists are tackling climate change with art.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Fatoumata Diawara: Music, Mali And Migration2021031320210314 (WS)
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Malian singer-songwriter Fatoumata Diawara has collaborated with international superstar musicians such as Damon Albarn, Paul McCartney and Cuban pianist Roberto Fonseca alongside her successful career as an actress. Beyond her critical and popular success, her music engages with social issues such as women's rights, the treatment of migrants and human trafficking. Fatoumata's most recent album ‘Fenfo' translates from Bambara as ‘Something to Say'. Fatoumata tells Nawal why she's chosen to be a voice for the voiceless.

With sold out shows in London, Amsterdam and Nepal, an opera about sex workers, made by sex workers is addressing clichés and tackling stigmas through performance. The Sex Workers Opera aims to portray the reality of their lives without glamourizing it or victimising those involved. Our reporter Constanza Hola speaks to the co-director Alex Etchart and some of the performers about the project.

Armenian-American musician Serj Tankian from the award-winning heavy metal band, System of a Down talks to Nawal about his music and political activism. A new film, Truth to Power charts Serj's continuing efforts to speak up on behalf of the Armenian people and explores how rock music can be a unique mechanism for rebellion.

Plus: has a book, film or song inspired you to take a certain path in life? The British rock singer Skin from band Skunk Anansie reveals how an unforgettable play influenced her music.

Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi

(Photo: Fatoumata Diawara. Credit: Aida Muluneh)

We hear from musicians using their music to fight injustice and spark debate

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Fiction From The Arab World2017042920170430 (WS)What kinds of subjects have preoccupuied writers in the region for the last decade?

Saudi writer Mohammed Hasan Alwan has been announced as the winner of the International Prize for Arabic Fiction. Now in its 10th year, the prize aims to bring the region's rich and varied literary output to a wider audience. Alwan and commentator Anwar Hamed discuss how the upheavals of the past 10 years have been reflected in novels and poetry.

As France prepares to choose between Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen in next month's Presidential election, writer Agnes Poirier considers how Macron the outsider may represent more cultural continuity than it appears.

A literary exercise called The Black Obituary Project is encouraging black men and women in the US to write their own obituaries. It aims to highlight the psychological impact of police shootings on the wider black community. Founder Ja'han Jones explains what has surprised him most about the response.

Israeli singer David Broza discusses a career that spans more than 40 years and in the week that Radiohead have been criticised for planning to perform in Israel, reflects on why he doesn't think cultural boycotts are productive.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a woman reads in a bookshop Credit:SAFIN HAMED/AFP/Getty Images)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Fidel Castro's Cultural Legacy2016120320161204 (WS)How arts and culture fared under his rule, and how artists have reacted to his death.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

As Cuba mourns the death of Fidel Castro, artist Geandy Pavón and blogger Harold Cárdenas Lema discuss his cultural legacy, and how artists have responded to news of his death.

The young residents of Mitrovica in Kosovo are used to growing up in a city divided along ethnic lines but playing rock music together is breaking down barriers, we hear the story of Mitrovica Rock School.

This week was meant to mark the opening of a landmark exhibition of Iranian owned contemporary art in Berlin but it was cancelled at the last minute. Journalist Saeed Kamali Dehghan and German diplomat Andreas Gorgen discuss what happened.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a painting of Fidel Castro in a Havana Street Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Film, Feminism And Frankenstein2018062320180624 (WS)
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How artists are stitching stories together from other cultures, places and times to speak to audiences today about gender equality and conflict in the Middle East.

At a time of radical change in Saudi Arabia, the BBC's Nawal al-Maghafi asks Saudi's first female filmmaker Haifaa al-Mansour why she wanted to tell the story of English science fiction pioneer, Mary Shelley.

The award-winning Iraqi novelist Ahmed Saadawi tells the BBC's Mona Deeley why he chose to transplant Mary Shelley's Frankenstein to Baghdad.

Iranian artist Morehshin Allahyari tells a story that re-writes mythology to interrogate misogyny in the Middle East and beyond.

Plus, the award-winning poet and artist Imtiaz Dharker on the film that showed her that art can be a rich tapestry.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Kirsty McQuire

Image: Prop of Bride of Frankenstein and Son of Frankenstein Credit: Albert L. Ortega/ Getty Images

How artists are stitching stories together from other cultures,places and times for today

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Finding Freedom Through Art2018102720181028 (WS)From convict to comedian: the acclaimed American stand-up Ali Siddiq reveals how he found freedom through comedy and why he is speaking out for prison reform in the United States.

The artist giving voice to silenced poets. We discover why Shilpa Gupta has brought together the words and voices of one hundred imprisoned and persecuted poets in an immersive sound art installation.

Can music free your mind? The writer Adam Gopnik explains why rock music played such a key role in bringing about change in autocratic states.

Plus has a book, a film, a song ever changed the way you see the world? The award-winning actor and comedian, Omid Djalili shares the story of how the music of Carlos Santana inspired him to embrace both his spirituality and his Iranian roots.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Shilpa Gupta's installation 'Jailed Poets, For In Your Tongue I Cannot Fit.' Credit: Pat Verbruggen

We meet the artists expressing what it means to be free.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Food, Glorious Food2019061520190616 (WS)On this week's Cultural Frontline we celebrate the writers, musicians and designers combining the creative arts with the culinary arts in innovative and imaginative ways.

Tina takes a tour of the mouth-watering exhibition FOOD: Bigger than the Plate at London's Victoria and Albert museum. The Mexican designer Fernando Laposse reveals how his brightly coloured corn-based textile helped a Mexican community facing unemployment.

Can you find family in a bowl of Nigerian soup? The food writer Yemisi Aribisala reminisces on the recipes and the rituals that go into the creation of a beautiful bowl of Ogbono soup, just like her auntie used to make.

The Palestinian artist Mirna Bamieh takes us behind the scenes of the live art project that seeks to rediscover and revive traditional Palestinian recipes and practices that are disappearing.

Plus more than just milkshakes - we hear from the pop star and Cordon Bleu chef Kelis about how her food inspires her music and her music inspires her food.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Kelis. (Credit: Dave J Hogan/Getty Images)

We celebrate artists combining the creative and the culinary in innovative ways

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The world seen through the eyes of artists

From Burning Man To Nyege Nyege: How Music Festivals Change Culture2019072720190728 (WS)Is festival fever is taking over the African music scene? The Broadcaster and DJ Emily Dust speaks to the creators and musicians behind Africa Bass Culture in Burkina Faso, Uganda's Nyege Nyege and Nigeria's Palm Wine about the growing market for festivals and the challenges and the joy of staging them.

Is the future of festivals female only? We speak to the creative forces behind two revolutionary festivals, Statement in Sweden which was for women, non-binary and transgender persons only and Diva festival in the UK which has a female only line-up.

You've probably heard of Burning Man but do you know what it really is? We speak to the artist Will Roger, one of its co-founders about this experimental community of 80,000 people that gather every year in the middle of the Nevada desert. Whatever you do, don't call it a festival.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Festival goers cheer during a concert at the EXIT festival near Novi Sad in Serbia. Credit: ANDREJ ISAKOVIC/AFP/Getty Images

We explore the world of music festivals from Uganda's Nyege Nyege to Burning Man

The world seen through the eyes of artists

From Gangsta Rap To Religious Redemption2018042120180422 (WS)
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On this week's Cultural Frontline, stories of place and identity from a musician, a writer and a curator.

We meet the rapper who took an unorthodox route to embracing Orthodox Judaism, after turning his back on gangsta rap. Nissim Black talks about his spiritual and lyrical journey with The Cultural Frontline's Datshiane Navanayagam.

The Roma are one of the most marginalised groups in Europe and for many years their cultural identity has been portrayed negatively with few Roma artists having the platform to tell their own stories. Delaine Le Bas is trying to change that narrative. She tells Tina how she came to launch a ground breaking new arts event, the Roma Biennale.

Failaka Island is a peaceful place found off the coast of Kuwait which belies a chequered past. It was occupied by an invading Iraqi army during the Gulf War and was a former outpost of Alexander the Great thousands of years before. But could its unique history be threatened by vast urban development in the region? The writer Mai Al-Nakib takes us on journey to an island frozen in time.

Has a book, a song, a film or a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? The critically acclaimed Danish film director and screenwriter Lone Scherfig reveals how the work of Austrian director Michael Haneke shaped her vision as a film maker.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Nissim Black Picture Credit: Nissim Official)

The musician who gave up gangsta rap for a new life as an Orthodox Jew.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Future Art Of Africa2018100620181007 (WS)
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We meet the artist questioning whether South Africa has lived up to its promise to be a “Rainbow Nation.” Athi Patra Ruga takes us on a tour of his new exhibition, Of Gods, Rainbows and Omissions - a series of highly charged films, performances and photographs which questions South Africa's post-apartheid identity.

What is Afro-futurism? From the sci-fi funk of the 1970s to the creation of Wakanda, the home of Marvel's Black Panther, the writer Ytasha Womack breaks down what Afrofuturism is and why viewing the future through a black cultural lens is a positive step for all.

We take a look into the future of African art with the artists Zina Saro-Wiwa and Paul Onditi and the publisher Anna-Alix Koffi. They discuss how the art scene across the continent is developing into a multi-million dollar industry and they share their views on the ideas and the artists that will continue to shape African art in the years to come.

Plus has a song, a film or a book ever changed the way you see the world? The Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Angelique Kidjo, shares the story of the Senegalese book which made her question the tension between modernity and tradition in her life and her community.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Night of the Long Knives by artist Athi-Patra Ruga. Credit : Athi-Patra Ruga and WHATIFTHEWORLD. Photography: Hayden Phipps

What does the future hold for art and artists across the African continent?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Gavin Hood And Katharine Gun: How We Made Official Secrets2019101220191013 (WS)From government whistle blower to Hollywood movie. The director Gavin Hood and the former British intelligence worker Katharine Gun speak to The Cultural Frontline about how her decision to leak the details of an alleged US plan to bug UN delegates before the Iraq war changed her life and became an acclaimed film starring Keira Knightley.

How far would you go for a good story? Taking untrained child actors on a rehearsal boot camp or filming in the jungle with the help of local goldminers? We speak to Alejandro Landes the director of Colombian kidnap drama Monos about the lengths he went to for his art.

Plus the Saudi writer-director Shahad Ameen reveals how she was inspired by Arabic folklore to make her new film, the feminist mermaid fantasy, Scales.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Keira Knightly as Katharine Gun and Director Gavin Hood. Credit: Entertainment One/Columbia Pictures)

The story behind the making of Official Secrets

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Giving Banned Music A New Voice2017012820170129 (WS)Norwegian singer Moddi explains what drove him to make an album of banned music, and why one of the songs got him in hot water with the Russian government.

From the Mexican border city of Juarez, once known as the murder capital of the world, we hear about a new electronic music movement which is helping the city's youth come to terms with the violence they grew up with.

Comedian Bilal Zafar shares the story of how a Twitter prank led to him becoming the target of far right hatred online, and why he made it into a comedy show.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: crowds at a concert Credit: KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)

Norweigan singer Moddi tells why he chose to record 12 banned songs from around the world

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti: Telling Britain's Story On Stage2019113020191201 (WS)Does British theatre truly represent the nation? The Welsh director Rhiannon White and the English playwright Michael McManus share their views on what needs to be done for British theatre to reflect the stories and the lives of the whole of the United Kingdom.

We meet the Scottish folk musician keeping an ancient language alive. The singer Julie Fowlis reveals why writing and performing in Scots Gaelic connects her not just to her heritage in the Outer Hebrides but also to people and places across the world.

Cracks begin to show between family and friends after an incident at an impromptu party. And there's no going back. The acclaimed playwright Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti's talks to Tina about her new play, A Kind of People, the story of a small multi-cultural community struggling to move forward amidst unspoken inequality and prejudice.

Plus she is a poet, a comedian, a theatre-maker, and a flirtatious amputee. The multi award-winning performer Jackie Hagan tells us why she wants to create theatre that is truly accessible to all.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Publicity image for 'A Kind of People'

The playwright Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti on reflecting the UK on stage

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Hao Wu: Wuhan Under Lockdown On Film2021021320210214 (WS)
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This week, we go behind the camera with some of the world's leading documentary filmmakers.

As the World Health Organisation begin their visit to Wuhan to determine the origins of Covid-19, perhaps some clues can be gleaned from Hao Wu's documentary 76 days. Alongside his co-directors Weixi Chen and Anonymous, he documented the early days of the pandemic by following the staff and patients of four Wuhan hospitals from January to April 2020. He speaks to Chi Chi about the making of his film.

From marches in the streets to meetings in city halls, Suvi West‘s new documentary Eatnameamet - Our Silent Struggle, follows the Sámi people's fight for their culture and land. Shannon Kring's documentary, End of the Line: The Women of Standing Rock, tells the story of the indigenous women who risk their lives to stop the Dakota Access oil pipeline construction in the United States. Suvi and Shannon discuss the challenges, and the urgency of telling the stories of indigenous communities through film.

When you think of a secret agent, your mind might not jump to an 85-year-old man. However, in the Chilean documentary The Mole Agent, director Maite Alberdi follows the story of 85-year-old Sergio who has been hired by a private detective to infiltrate a retirement home. Maite spent four months filming inside the retirement home and shares the lessons she learnt while making the documentary.

Presented by Chi Chi Izundu

(Photo Credit: Hao Wu from the film 76 Days)

We go behind the camera with some of the world's leading documentary filmmakers

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Hong Kong's Foo Tak Building2019021620190217 (WS)The Foo Tak building is a hidden artists' hub in the centre of Hong Kong island. Fourteen storeys high, it stands inconspicuous amongst the futuristic malls and towering skyscrapers that have been crammed into this small, densely populated area. We explore the building studio by studio, meeting an intriguing mix of experimental musicians, illustrators, conceptual artists, painters, community radio producers, academics and journalists.

Lack of space is huge problem for Hong Kong artists - this is one of the world's most expensive regions to rent and buy property. But for 15 years the Foo Tak building has offered subsidised rents whilst remaining completely financially and politically independent. Managed by an artist-led organisation, Art and Culture Outreach, their aim is to improve Hong Kong's art ecology by using the building to nurture up-and-coming artists and provide a home for underground, experimental arts and civil society groups. Previous residents include internationally-renowned artists Ivy Ma and Samson Young.

Moving from floor to floor, we interrupt workshops, live broadcasts, and even an experimental music concert. Many of the studios are keen to open their doors to the local community, offering a space for learning and collaboration. The artists here are actively responding to political issues, problems of urbanisation, censorship and questions over Hong Kong's future.

Image: The Foo Tak building (Credit: Just Radio)

The Foo Tak building is home to underground, experimental arts and civil society groups

The world seen through the eyes of artists

House Of Kenzo, Art Collective2018091520180916 (WS)
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House of Kenzo are the underground dance collective revolutionising Texan nightlife. We join Breezy, Roxy, Flo, Gemel and Toni over a weekend, as they perform at the opening of a queer film festival in Austin and in their hometown of San Antonio.

Each performance is a conceptual piece of artwork with built in messages of radical self-expression, body positivity, ecology and community. Constructing a DIY stage on the dancefloor, House of Kenzo blend jaw-dropping dance moves - voguing, krumping, break dancing in ten inch heels - with avant garde club music, shouting explicit mantras at the audience, inviting them to join in a communal, often cathartic, dance battle.

For local artist Ben Aqua, they represent the future of queer culture. Their volatile energy, flamboyant fashion, and total freedom of expression are inspiring a movement in Texas - a traditionally conservative state. Their events are often a springboard for other LGBT artists of colour in the underground nightlife scene.

Local journalist and DJ, Dan Gentile, believes House of Kenzo have a real future not in just music but in performance art, the type of higher end culture that would traditionally be difficult for an underground art collective to break into.

To date, they've performed showcases at Austin's SXSW, Day For Night Festival in Houston, and are beginning to tour all over the US, and will be travelling to Europe for the first time this October.

A Just Radio Production for BBC World Service. Produced by Victoria Ferran.

Image: Roxy and Breezy from underground arts collective House of Kenzo (Credit: Ben Aqua)

The underground dance collective revolutionising nightlife in Texas

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How Can We Design A Better World?2018090820180909 (WS)
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In partnership with the London Design Biennale, The Cultural Frontline presents a panel discussion on the social impact of design.

In front of a live audience in London's historic Somerset House, a panel of leading designers and creative minds discuss how design can transform people and society.

From the reimagining of a Guatemalan town through the craft and creativity of local artisans to the forging of an architectural vision of a future Mogadishu, we explore how architects and urban designers are working to reinvent areas afflicted by poverty or conflict. Plus we will take a step into the future and hear how the Norwegian government plan to make the nation “inclusively” designed, from classroom to hospital, by 2025.

Our presenter Tina Daheley is joined by Paola Antonelli of New York's Museum of Modern Art, Onny Eikhaug of the Norwegian Design and Architecture Centre, Madina Scacchi of the Somali Architecture Project and from the Guatemalan Design Pavilion, social entrepreneur and industrial designer, Diego Olivero.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Shoku Amirani, Laura Hyde and Nancy Bennie.

(Photo: Guatemalan Design Pavilion at the London Design Biennale Photo Credit Tricia Yourkevich/BBC)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How Does The Experience Of Emigration Affect A Writer's Work?2017052020170521 (WS)Lila Azam Zanganeh was born in Paris to Iranian parents who fled the country during the Revolution. She talks about the creativity that comes from having ‘multiple identities', and why she writes in English; a language she describes as elastic and flexible, and which allows her to explore her many selves.

The EU wants to stop the migrants and asylum seekers who gather in Libya and pay huge sums to traffickers to cross in leaky boats to Europe. Now photo journalist Narciso Contreras has discovered that the real horror is how many are being enslaved and used almost as currency by the militias who run the country. Libya: A Human Marketplace tells their story.

The Canadian writer, Paul E. Hardisty, writes thrillers, but he's also an engineer, hydrologist and environmental scientist. His work often takes him to countries that are experiencing conflict and he frequently draws on these experiences for his novels. He argues that fiction allows him to tell the truth about the devastating effects of civil war.

When 19-year-old US photographer Myles Loftin typed the words “four black teenagers ? into a search engine he was concerned that the majority of the pictures he saw were of grim faced boys wearing sweatshirts with the hood up. So he started his project Hooded, which shows young black people in brightly coloured hoodies, smiling broadly at the camera.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Lila Azam Zanganeh. Credit: Marcelo Correa 2017)

This content has been re-edited for accuracy (22.05.17)

Lila Azam Zanganeh on the creativity that comes from having multiple identities

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How Germany Reunified On The Dance Floor2019110920191110 (WS)In November 1989, after the fall of the Berlin Wall clubs, bars, galleries, and studios began taking over empty buildings, factories, and vacant lots with a new culturally vibrant life. For many young Germans the burgeoning club and cultural scene was their first encounter with people from the other side of the wall. The curator Heiko Hoffmann was one of those young Germans; he guides us through the new photo exhibition No Photos on the Dance Floor which charts Berlin's changing club culture from the fall of the wall to present day.

How does society normalise objects that may restrict our freedom? That's the question at the heart of the work of the Lebanese painter Tagreed Darghouth which places nuclear weapons, CCTV cameras and drones at the centre of her canvas. From the separation of Berlin to the division of Beirut, Tagreed discusses both the physical and metaphorical walls which divide us.

This weekend, as Germany marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin wall and the beginning of the reunification of Germany. Our reporter William Noah Glucroft takes a cultural tour of the public art of East and West Berlin and speaks to the writers Tanja Horstmann, Katja Hensel and Jörg Uwe Albig about the cultural legacy of reunification and how German theatre and literature today reflect a changing nation.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Image: Outside Snax Club, 2001 © Wolfgang Tillmans. Courtesy Galerie Buchholz Berlin/Köln courtesy of C/O gallery Berlin

Artists reflect on the cultural legacy of the fall of the Berlin wall

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

How I Made My Own Emoji2017110420171105 (WS)
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We meet the high school student, Rayouf Alhumedhi, who is trying to change the world of emojis. Rayouf tells the Cultural Frontline about how, with the help of Unicode's Jenny Lee, she set out on a campaign to create an emoji for women who wear hijabs.

Tina Daheley goes on a tour of the futuristic exhibition, 'Zhongguo 2185' and speaks to its curator Victor Wang about its artistic vision of China in the year 2185.

The British-Zambian poet, Kayo Chingonyi talks about how he bridges cultures through his life and his work and we hear from the Swedish photographers responding to President Trump's criticisms of their country through their book “Last Night in Sweden. ?

(Picture: Hijabi Emoji: Picture Credit: Aphee Messer)

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

Meet the high school student who set out to make the first hijabi emoji.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How The Arab Spring Has Impacted Cinema2017032520170326 (WS)Film-makers from Syria and Egypt join Tina to discuss how the upheavals in the Arab world over the last six years have impacted the region's cinema scene.

Artist Ai Weiwei explains why so much of his recent work has focused on Europe's migrant crisis and reflects on how he thinks art can influence public opinion.

As President Trump signals his desire to cut federal funding for the arts via the National Endowment for the Arts, we find out what that might mean in practice for US arts organisations.

A mobile literary festival is travelling through Africa, taking books and performance to towns and cities that aren't usually seen as cultural hubs. We hear from some of the participants in the Kenyan city of Nakuru.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: a man walks past a cinema in Damascus Credit: LOUAI BESHARA/AFP/Getty Images)

Film-makers from Egypt and Syria discuss how recent upheavals have impacted film

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How To Find The Funny Side Of Brexit2019030220190303 (WS)Can you find the funny side of Brexit? The British comedian Andrew Doyle tells Tina how he believes British comedy and culture have been changed since the EU referendum.

From Victor Hugo to Emile Zola, France has a long legacy of writers who seek to speak for the disenfranchised. But which writer represents the disaffected and the socially marginalised in the age of the anti-government yellow vest protests? The writer and journalist Anne Elisabeth Moutet traces the legacy of French social writing from Les Miserables to les gilet jaunes.

With fears of rising populism across Europe, we hear from the Turkish writer Ece Temelkuran on what it takes for a country to turn from democracy to dictatorship.

You've heard of One Direction, *NSync and Westlife but now there is a new boyband on the scene - the Breunion Boys. We meet the Dutch pop group who are trying to convince the UK to remain in the European Union all through the power of the ballad.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: The Breunion Boys. Credit: Marta Capilla

We hear from writers, comedians and musicians about the culture of a changing Europe

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How To Fix The World Of Fashion2019092120190922 (WS)You are what you wear? We head to London Fashion Week and speak to a new generation of designers and fashionistas working to solve humanitarian and environmental challenges through ethical and sustainable fashion.

High fashion but minimal pay. Tina speaks to the writer and fashion activist Giulia Mensitieri and the campaigning model Ekaterina Ozhiganova about challenging exploitative working practices for creatives and models in the global luxury fashion industry.

Get your fashion fix while fixing the world. In an exclusive preview of the new podcast, Fashion Fix, the model and activist Charli Howard reveals how we can right the wrongs of the fashion industry while staying stylish.

Plus we meet the creative forces behind ADISH, the Israeli and Palestinian streetwear brand trying to build bridges through fashion.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Activists demonstrate outside the Foreign Office ahead of Victoria Beckham's show at the London Fashion Week on 15 September, 2019 in London. (Credit: Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto/Getty Images)

Can we solve humanitarian and environmental challenges through sustainable fashion?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Ilaria Bernardini: My Country Under Lockdown2020032120200322 (WS)As countries around the world face up to the challenge of the coronavirus we hear how life and culture are changing in Milan, Italy. The Italian author and screenwriter Ilaria Bernardini, reflects on how musicians, poets, writers and even chefs, are uniting to bring hope during an uncertain time.

For the Lebanese poet, Zeina Hashem Beck poetry is how she channels her creative energy, her emotions and her questions. She talks to Tina about how a sense of place and particularly the cities of Tripoli and Beirut inform her poetry.

The internationally renowned designer Christian Louboutin talks about how his childhood love for the Parisian institution, the Museum of African and Oceanic Arts, inspired a life in fashion.

Corruption, crime and the seedy underbelly of Warsaw. Features you wouldn't expect to find included in a ‘love letter' to your home city. But that's how novelist Jakub Zulcyzck describes his book, Blinded by the Light which is being made into a TV series for HBO. Jakub Zulcyzck tells The Cultural Frontline why Warsaw is such a special city despite its darker side.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: A family making music on an Italian balcony
Image credit: Nicolò Campo/LightRocket via Getty Images

Ilaria Bernardini on how Italy is uniting during an uncertain time.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Illustrating Syria's Civil War2016100820161009 (WS)The artist turning experiences of war into a graphic memoir

The world seen through the eyes of artists

India Through The Eyes Of Its Artists2019052520190526 (WS)Following India's momentous elections, we hear from the writers, comedians, directors and artists who are shaping the nation's cultural future.

Bollywood stars, political biopics and patriotic saris. The writer Sandip Roy reviews the sights and sounds of the campaign trail and reveals how entertainment and politics have become ever closer this election.

Seen any Salman Rushdie on a rickshaw or poetry on the side of a street food stand? Brightly coloured sticker quotes are appearing all over India. We speak to one of the masterminds behind the #StickLit project aiming to become the world's largest public library.

Two of India's brightest comics Anuvab Pal and Neeti Palta reveal how the comedy world has reacted to the government of Prime Minister Nahendra Modi and the drama of this year's vote.

It was a crime that shocked India and made headlines around the world. And it's now the focus of a gripping, multi layered series on Netflix. Writer and director of Delhi Crime, Richie Mehta, tells us why he chose to dramatize the story of the brutal attack and gang rape on a bus in 2012.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: An Indian man walks in front of posters of the Bollywood film "PM Narendra Modi" - a biopic on Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Credit: INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images

We meet writers, comedians, directors and artists shaping India's cultural future

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Indonesia Through The Eyes Of Its Artists2019042720190428 (WS)Welcome to Indonesia - the third-largest democracy on earth, home to more than 260 million people including the world's largest Muslim community. Following the country's momentous presidential elections, we hear from the comedians, writers and artists shaping its cultural future.

Two of the nation's most celebrated literary voices Leila Chudori and Norman Erikson Pasaribu discuss how they are addressing the legacy of Indonesia's political past and speaking up for today's marginalised communities through their work.

From musical stars to the nation's most popular soap actors, the writer Feby Indirani explains why an increasing number of Indonesian millennials are renouncing secular lifestyles for religious ones but without compromising on glamour or their social media profile.

Plus we explore the funny side of Indonesian life with the comedian Sakdiyah Maruf. She tells Tina why she is using humour to challenge prejudice against Muslim women and take on rising religious intolerance.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: comedian Sakdiyah Maruf

We hear from the comedians, writers and artists shaping Indonesia's cultural future

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Innovation, Imagination And Will.i.am2018021720180218 (WS)
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Can you make music through the power of Artificial Intelligence? The French scientist and composer Francois Pachet tells us how he is marrying algorithms with artistry to create new music.

The musician Will.i.am and the futurist Brian David Johnson take us into the fantasy world of their new novel Wizards and Robots.

We celebrate the legacy and the cultural influence of video game music with the pioneering composer Yuzo Koshiro.

Plus we hear from the footballer Sam Mensiro on why the Swedish football team Östersund are hoping that a little bit of cultural study will lead to some cultured performances on the pitch.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo will.i.am attends WORLDZ Cultural Marketing Summit 2017 at Hollywood and Highland on July 31, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Credit: Jerod Harris/Getty Images for PTTOW!)

Exploring stories where technology meets art

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Inside And Out: Digital Experiences Of The Body2020010420200105 (WS)What happens when digital technology and our bodies start to merge? Zoë Comyns meet artists who are growing body parts with human cells, implanting technology into their bodies and questioning whether we can have meaningful relationships with sex robots. She will also meet an artist who exists only in the digital realm.

Amy Karle has been named one of the most influential women in 3D printing. Born with a rare skin condition, she grew up fascinated by technology and how it can be used to heal and enhance our bodies. As a bioartist, her work includes a human hand design made with 3D-printed scaffolds and human bone cells.

Lans King has surgically implanted a microchip into his hand as a conceptual artwork entitled “This is my body (of work)”. It contains cryptographic blockchain code which represents the work itself. It is perhaps the first artwork ever to be fully integrated within the body of an artist.

Kate Davis used mixed media images, soundscapes and video in her Logging on to Love installations. The series is influenced by the development of sex robots and how our identities might be manipulated as technology becomes more sophisticated.

La Turbo Avedon is the avatar of an anonymous artist. Nobody knows who the artist behind her is, as she exists only in digital form. You can interact with her on social media platforms and in online games. She shares her views on a possible future digital existence.

Image: Amy Karle (Courtesy of Amy Karle)

Zo\u00eb Comyns meets artists exploring how technology and human bodies can merge

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Lans King has surgically implanted a microchip into his hand as a conceptual artwork entitled “This is my body (of work) ? It contains cryptographic blockchain code which represents the work itself. It is perhaps the first artwork ever to be fully integrated within the body of an artist.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Iran Through The Eyes Of Its Artists2019022320190224 (WS)This month marks the 40th anniversary of the 1979 Iranian Revolution which toppled the Shah of Iran and brought in an Islamic Republic. The seismic changes which swept the country included strict Islamic dress codes for women in public and censorship of music and the arts. But 40 years on, how has Iran changed culturally?

Tina speaks to two designers inside and outside of Iran about how Iranian wardrobes mix modesty with modernity. Iranian designer and stylist Shadi Parand has dedicated her long career to reviving the rich heritage of Persian textiles and embroidery with a contemporary twist. While as a designer and the founding editor of the Tehran Times blog, Araz Fazaeli has a dual perspective on how the street and the social media screen inspire young Iranians.

You've heard of a pub crawl, but what about a gallery crawl? We hear from Haleh Anvari, an arts reporter based in Tehran and Salman Matinfar, who owns one of the leading galleries for modern art in the capital, on the growing trend for ‘gallery hopping' amongst the young and the blossoming arts scene in the country.

Iran has produced some of the world's most celebrated films and directors over the last 40 years, including masters like Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf and more recently the Oscar winning Asghar Farhadi. But how are the new generation of Iranian film makers making their mark and how do they navigate the red lines of censorship? We hear from one of those young film makers, Ali Jaberansari, whose film Tehran City of Love featured in the London Film Festival and Dr Saeed Zeydabadi, an expert on Iranian cinema from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London.

And has a book, a song or a film ever changed the way you think about life? The acclaimed singer-songwriter Gola shares the story of the film that changed her life, inspiring her to overcome the obstacles she has faced as Iranian female musician and giving her the confidence to express herself fully as an artist.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: photo exhibition by Iranian photographer Newsha Tavakolian in Ab-Anbar Art Gallery in Tehran, Iran. Credit: Kaveh Kazemi/Getty Images

Forty years after the 1979 Iranian Revolution, how has Iran changed culturally?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Iran's Refugee Rocket Man2017102820171029 (WS)
20171030 (WS)
From the migrant camps of Calais to the red carpets of the Cannes Film Festival, we meet the artist who brought Elton John's Rocket Man to life through his animation. Iranian refugee Majid Adin tells the story of his time in Calais' migrant camp "The Jungle" and how he came to make a music video that has now been watched over 11 million times online.

Tina Daheley talks to Rahima Gambo, the Nigerian artist tackling the legacy of Boko Haram through her imagery and we hear from Mexican author, Valeria Luiselli who speaks on behalf of migrant children in the USA through her writing and through her work as a court translator.

Plus we meet Chyno, the rapper responding to conflict through the beats, rhymes and life of Syrian hip-hop.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Picture: Still from Rocket Man Animation Picture Credit: Majid Adin and Stephen McNally)

The Iranian artist who went from a Calais migrant camp to animating for Elton John.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Is This A Golden Age For Arab Film?2018042820180429 (WS)
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How has revolution, conflict and social change in the Middle East shaped cinema? Can film-making thrive in countries facing instability and war?

In front of a live audience in the BBC Radio Theatre, a panel of leading film-makers debate and deliberate these questions and discuss whether we now live in a golden age for Arab film.

Our presenter Nawal al-Maghafi is joined by the Oscar-nominated director Ziad Doueri, documentary-maker Eliane Raheb, Iraqi film-maker Maysoon Pachachi and one of Egypt's emerging directorial talents, Nesma Zazou. We also hear from Haifaa al-Mansour, the pioneering Saudi director.

From the effects of the Arab Spring to strict rules on censorship and the landmark opening of cinemas in Saudi Arabia, the panel explore how to tell extraordinary stories during turbulent times.

Presented by Nawal al-Maghafi

(Photo: A Saudi woman eats popcorn at the AMC cinema during a test screening in Riyadh Photo credit: FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)

Leading film-makers debate and deliberate Arabic cinema.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Isabel Sandoval: Finding My Place In Film2020042520200426 (WS)Isabel Sandoval on politics, immigration and filmmaking in the USA

The world seen through the eyes of artists

A deftly woven tale of love and inequality for a Filipina transwoman living under the radar in New York. The director Isabel Sandoval talks to Tina Daheley about her new film, Lingua Franca, a personal and politically charged insight into racial discrimination and immigration in 21st-century America.

The Brazilian rapper and musician Edgar speaks to the BBC's Frank McWeeny about a life of struggle and inequality in the favelas of Sao Paulo, and why he is making music that reflects politics and sexuality in Bolsonaro's Brazil.

Iranian poet and writer Golnoosh Noor discusses her new collection of short stories The Ministry of Guidance, which explores queerness and sexuality in Iran. She tells Tina why she wants to challenge the often simplistic mainstream narratives about Iran, to give a more nuanced depiction of a complex country.

Plus the South African writer Jamil Khan writes a letter to his younger self reflecting on the journey he has taken to being open about his sexuality.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Isabel Sandoval
Image credit: Laurent Koffel/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

James Graham And Ola Ince: Performance In A Pandemic2020053020200531 (WS)James Graham and Ola Ince on creating drama during Covid-19

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week we're celebrating theatre-makers and dancers re-inventing their craft for online audiences.

How do you write, film and produce a play under lockdown? Tina speaks to playwright James Graham and theatre director Ola Ince about the play Viral, part of a series filmed in homes across Britain using digital conference technology.

If you have ever wished you could learn to dance, but never had the opportunity, now is your chance. World class dancers have been sharing their choreography with anyone with an internet connection and the passion to learn. From Ballet to Afro Beat, our reporter Saskia Edwards takes to the dance floor to discover what moves are on offer.

What is it like to arrive in a foreign country as a refugee, only to be locked in a detention centre or mental asylum? As Far as Isolation Goes, is a one on one performance created by the Lebanese artist Tania El Khoury which focuses on the mental health experiences of refugees. Tania tells Tina how her interactive work uses touch and sound to bring the experience of refugees to life.

And we head to Chile where 50 theatrical practitioners have come together to create an interactive ‘game' where the online audience are invited to build their own experience. Come in and play.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Ola Ince
Image credit: Colin Ince

Jaquel Knight: The Man Behind Beyonce9's Single Ladies Dance2021032720210329 (WS)Many of us like to copy the dance moves we see on screen, but award-winning choreographer, JaQuel Knight in the United States, is on a mission to copyright the sequences that he has devised, and encourage others to do the same. You may have watched and tried to imitate his work. He created the steps for Beyoncé's performance of Single Ladies.

For the award-winning poet and dancer Tishani Doshi, sometimes words aren't enough to convey the power of the female body, or the anger she feels when it's violated. It's then that her poetry ‘demands choreography.' She tells Nawal how she fuses verse and movement to embody the message of her writing.

How do you go viral in the time of coronavirus? Quang Dang is a Vietnamese dancer and choreographer, who went viral a year ago with a video that made a public health campaign about hand-washing look like fun. Now he's made a new video, exclusively for the BBC #WSDanceChallenge, imagining the freedom he hopes we'll all enjoy when we step into the post-Covid world.

And French choreographer Marion Motin shares what inspires her steps - hip hop, life on the street and the French film, La Haine.

Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi
Producers: Paul Waters, Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Collingwood

(Photo: Choreographer JaQuel Knight. Credit: Jake Green.)

JaQuel Knight, Tishani Doshi and Quang Dang on driving change through dance

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Jenny Slate: Writing My Fear2020011120200112 (WS)Can you create great art out of fear and anxiety? The American comedian Jenny Slate reveals how she was driven to write a weird and wonderful collection of essays by despair, divorce and the election of Donald Trump.

The award-winning writer Jeet Thayil talks to Tina about grappling with grief in his latest book, the darkly comic yet personal novel Low. It's a work which draws on Jeet's own feelings of grief, as the central character embarks on a rollercoaster of a weekend in Bombay in an attempt to forget his pain and feel closer to his dead wife.

We hear from the digital artist and video game designer Dan Hett on how he was driven to create a series of video games tackling the issue of grief and loss following the death of his brother Martyn in the Manchester Arena bombing.

Plus Nigerian actor and singer David Jones David on why he has picked up the mic to sing and speak out against drug addiction.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Image: Jenny Slate
Image credit: Cassie Wright/Getty Images for SXSW

The US comedian Jenny Slate on her new book, Little Weirds.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Can you create great art out of fear and anxiety? The American comedian Jenny Slate reveals how she was driven to write a weird and wonderful collection of essays by despair, divorce and the election of Donald Trump.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Joe Sacco: The Political Power Of The Graphic Novel2020050920200510 (WS)Graphic novelist Joe Sacco talks about his latest work, Paying the Land.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

He's been hailed as one of the world's greatest cartoonists and the creator of war reportage comics. The artist Joe Sacco talks to Tina about the political power of the graphic novel and why he's telling the story of the indigenous communities of the Canadian North West in his latest book, Paying the Land.

The Indian comic book and graphic novel writer Ram V explores the clash of cultures and what happens to a country when it is colonised, though the mythology of vampirism, in his series These Savage Shores.

Swedish comic book artist and activist Lisa Wool-Rim Sjöblom shares the story of her adoption from South Korea in the graphic memoir Palimpsest. She speaks to the BBC's Karl Bos about her childhood experiences of racism, her search for jer birth parents and why the ethics of adoption can be far more complicated than people think.

Plus how's the sounds of your world changed during lockdown? The sound artist Nick Ryan shares the sounds we've received from our listeners during the coronavirus lockdown.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Joe Sacco
Credit: Philippe Huguen/Getty Images

Juno Dawson And Dean Atta: Taking Pride In Storytelling2020052320200524 (WS)Juno Dawson and Dean Atta on writing celebratory stories for LGBTQ+ teenagers

The world seen through the eyes of artists

This week, we go inside the world of children's books and teen fiction.

What were your favourite books growing up? What stories were you drawn to? We hear from the prize-winning authors Juno Dawson and Dean Atta about creating celebratory stories for LGBTQ+ teenagers of coming of age and coming out.

In Japan, there's one tradition that can take a story from the pages of a book and bring it out on to a street corner for crowds of children to enjoy. It's called Kamishibai which means ‘paper play.' The picture book author and illustrator Satoshi Kitamura tells the story of this unique performance art.

We meet the author and activist taking on US immigration policy through the power of a children's story. The Mexican-American writer Aida Salazar talks to the BBC's Mugabi Turya about how the recent detention of child migrants and her personal memories living as an undocumented migrant led her to write her new book, The Land of the Cranes.

Has a film, a song or a book ever changed the way you see the world? We hear from the illustrator of The Gruffalo, Axel Scheffler, on how his love for the work of French-German artist Tomi Ungerer set him on a path of artistic expression.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Kano: Finding Truth Through Music2019090720190908 (WS)“My only obligation is to give inspiration.” The critically acclaimed musician Kano speaks to Tina about his new album Hoodies All Summer and reveals why it was urgent for his work to both inspire young people and to reflect life in an increasingly troubled British society.

Meet the Argentine musicians aiming to take the opera to places it's never been before. The BBC's Valeria Perasso speaks to the team behind Opera Periférica about their journey to bring classic opera to the masses through performances at train stations, parks, and slums across Buenos Aires.

Plus the Brazilian rapper Dexter reflects on why he swapped a life of crime for a life in music after serving time in Sao Paulo's notorious Carandiru prison.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Kano performs onstage in London. Credit: Tabatha Fireman/Getty Images)

The musician Kano on how his new album reflects life in Britain today.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Kano: Grime's Top Boy20190907
Karen Lord: What Makes A Great Story?2020041820200419 (WS)Sci-fi writer Karen Lord on the power of great storytelling.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

What makes a great story? Perhaps it's the characters, a gripping plot, or a narrative that helps us understand the world we live in. The award winning writer Karen Lord tells us what really goes into writing fiction and she shares an extract from her recent short story the Plague Doctors, a dystopian tale of social inequality exposed by a future pandemic.

Sci-fi meets forbidden love in a novel that spans centuries and continents. That's just one of the descriptions used to describe the critically acclaimed novel, The Old Drift. Its author Namwali Serpell talks to the Cultural Frontline about three moments in her life that shaped her as a storyteller.

Plus Amy Brady, the writerof climate fiction column Burning Worlds, on why sci-fi offers us the opportunity for both immersion and escapism.

Presented by Nawal al-Maghafi

Image: Karen Lord
Image credit: Marlon James

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

What makes a great story? Perhaps it's the characters, a gripping plot, or a narrative that helps us understand the world we live in. The award winning writer Karen Lord tells us what really goes into writing fiction and she shares an extract from her recent short story ‘The Plague Doctors', a dystopian tale of social inequality exposed by a future pandemic. ‘The Plague Doctors' was published as part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's anthology Take Us to a Better Place.

Kelis: Adventures In Food, Music And Art2019061520190616 (WS)On this week's Cultural Frontline we celebrate the writers, musicians and designers combining the creative arts with the culinary arts in innovative and imaginative ways.

Tina takes a tour of the mouth-watering exhibition FOOD: Bigger than the Plate at London's Victoria and Albert museum. The Mexican designer Fernando Laposse reveals how his brightly coloured corn-based textile helped a Mexican community facing unemployment.

Can you find family in a bowl of Nigerian soup? The food writer Yemisi Aribisala reminisces on the recipes and the rituals that go into the creation of a beautiful bowl of Ogbono soup, just like her auntie used to make.

The Palestinian artist Mirna Bamieh takes us behind the scenes of the live art project that seeks to rediscover and revive traditional Palestinian recipes and practices that are disappearing.

Plus more than just milkshakes - we hear from the pop star and Cordon Bleu chef Kelis about how her food inspires her music and her music inspires her food.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Kelis. (Credit: Dave J Hogan/Getty Images)

We celebrate artists combining the creative and the culinary in innovative ways

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Kenya's Tv Shutdown: What Comes Next?2018021020180211 (WS)
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Following the shutdown of three of Kenya's largest TV channels we speak to Godfrey Mwampembwa, aka Gado, the creator of the hit Kenyan satirical show XYZ and hear his thoughts on the relationship between the Kenyan government and the media.

We speak to the feminist, environmentalist and pop cultural icon Pamela Anderson about her campaigning for Wikileaks and how she views feminism in the age of the #timesup and #metoo movements.

The Oscar winning screenwriter of Spotlight and The Post, Josh Singer and the journalist and novelist Jonathan Freedland talk about why journalism continues to inspire classic drama.

Plus we speak to a superstar and a super fan of Marvel's Black Panther ahead of the release of the blockbuster superhero movie.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Picture: Staff work in a control room during a news program at NTV studios in Nairobi Picture Credit:YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)

What's the future for Kenyan media following the government shutdown of TV stations.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Kit Kat: A Provocative New Drama About Climate Change2019083120190901 (WS)What would two seven-year-olds do to save the planet? That's the question at the heart of a bold new play from the Traverse theatre in Edinburgh.

Two young girls secretly take a wounded squirrel home to their treehouse in order to nurse it. But when it is discovered by one of their mothers, the girls decide to take drastic action against climate change and their peaceful home life spirals out of control…

The Cultural Frontline presents the radio premiere of the play, Kit Kat, by Kolbrún Björt Sigfúsdóttir recorded on location at the Edinburgh Festival.

Join the award winning playwright Zinnie Harris as she speaks to the writer Kolbrún about the inspiration for this shockingly relevant drama.

The featured play was commissioned by the Traverse Theatre with the support of their partners.

Presenter: Zinnie Harris
Written by Kolbrún Björt Sigfúsdóttir
Cast: Ashleigh More, Titana Muthui, Rebecca Elise
Director and producer: Lucy Collingwood

Image: children at a lagoon. Credit: Getty Images

The radio premiere of Kolbr\u00fan Bj\u00f6rt Sigf\u00fasd\u00f3ttir's play Kit Kat recorded in Edinburgh

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Kitty Green: Film-making In The Age Of #metoo2020030720200308 (WS)As the world reacts to the guilty verdicts against the former Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein we speak to directors, actors and producers about creating film in the age of #Metoo.

A young woman who works for a media mogul and the degrading climate he's created at the office. That's the subject of the latest film by the acclaimed Australian writer and director Kitty Green. She talks to Tina Daheley about the challenges and the real life inspirations behind her new drama, The Assistant.

In the 92 year history of the Academy Awards there has only been one female winner of the best director Oscar; Kathryn Bigelow. This year as #OscarsSoMale trended on social media many people asked: Does Hollywood has a problem with female directors? The American director Rachel Feldman and the Bangladeshi film maker Rubaiyat Hossain, share their experiences of working in the film industry and tell us why their films tell the stories of strong women fighting for justice and equality.

How do you direct love scenes in the age of #MeToo? South African actor Nthati Moshesh and film director Sara Blecher tell Megha Mohan how they are working to create a comfortable and safe environment for all actors when filming intimate scenes.

Presented by Megha Mohan

Image: Kitty Green on the set of the Assistant
Image credit: Ty Johnson

Director Kitty Green on making films in the #metoo era

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Lee Tzu-tung: Taiwan's Political Artist2020012520200126 (WS)Can art heal divisions in Taiwan? The political activist and conceptual artist Lee Tzu-Tung reflects on Taiwan's political past and gives her vision of how art can play a role in creating a better future for all its citizens.

We discover the songs that have formed the soundtrack to a city at protest. The writer and journalist Vivienne Chow reveals why pro-government and opposition groups are creating new music in the battle for the political future of the Hong Kong.

Can you find laughs at a time of protest? The comedian Vivek Mahbubani tells us how he is responding to the Hong Kong protests through stand-up.

Plus the writer Elaine Chiew shares her secrets for the perfect Chinese New Year.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Image: Lee Tzu-Tung
Image credit: MOCA, Taipei

Artist Lee Tzu-Tung reflects on art, culture and politics in Taiwan

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Les Amazones D'afrique2018081820180819 (WS)
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The Cultural Frontline celebrates the music and activism of the pioneering West African super-group Les Amazones d'Afrique - an all-female collective on a mission to fight for women's rights in Africa.

Broadcaster and DJ Rita Ray hears from band members Angelique Kidjo, Oumou Sangaré, Awa Sangho, Mariam Doumbia and Mamani Keita, to find out how they use their music to change attitudes towards women and encourage access to education. Plus, producer Valerie Malot shares how she kick-started the group with Oumou Sangaré in Bamako, Mali.

This ground-breaking group embrace music as a campaigning tool to tackle taboos that affect women, such as forced marriages, domestic violence, and female genital mutilation.

Despite the challenges they face in West Africa, Rita discovers the strength of this courageous group, sound-tracked by a live set recorded by the BBC on Les Amazones' latest tour.

Image: Les Amazones d'Afrique band members. Credit: Valerie Malot

Presented by Rita Ray

Produced by Nicky Barranger

The Cultural Frontline celebrates the West African super-group Les Amazones d'Afrique

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Level Up: How Video Games Are Changing Society2019032320190324 (WS)The Cultural Frontline speaks to the gamers, designers and artists who are revolutionising the video game industry and trying to create a positive social change through gaming.

What is life like for a professional e-sports player? Getting paid to play games all day and night may sound like a dream job, but in reality, what does it take to be an e-sports champion? The French League of Legends player Paul Boyer aka SOAZ tells The Cultural Frontline about a day in his life as an e-sports star.

Can video games help solve some of society's biggest problems? We speak to the Brazilian games designer Thais Weiller and the Lebanese developer Reine Abbas about the social impact of their games and their experiences as women working in a male dominated industry.

We head to Yaoundé, Cameroon and speak to the developer Madiba Olivier who is working to put his company Kiro'o Games alongside the big names of the industry with a distinctly African fantasy game.

Plus has a song, a film or a video game ever changed your life? The music producer Fatima Al Qadiri shares the story of how the soundtrack to her favourite game evokes the memories of her childhood in Kuwait during the First Gulf War.

Presented by Chi Chi Izundu

Produced by Nancy Bennie, Mugabi Turya, Lucy Collingwood and William Noah Glucroft.

Image: Video game controllers. Credit: Getty Images

We meet gamers, designers and artists creating a positive social change through gaming

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Like, Subscribe, Share? Inside The World Of Youtube2019072020190721 (WS)The Cultural Frontline speaks to YouTubers from around the world about the online video platform.

Every minute over 500 hours of content is uploaded on YouTube and each day, over a billion hours of video is watched. Yet with so much content being uploaded and viewed how does YouTube ensure that everything on the platform is appropriate to be seen? The reporter Julia Alexander tells us how the platform decides what stays up and what must come down.

What is it like being a world famous YouTuber at just 20 years old? We meet Indian vlogger Ajey Nagar, the online sensation whose videos have brought him fame and seven million subscribers to his channel.

One of the Middle East's rising online stars, the Iraqi- Sudanese vlogger Maha Jaafar on her journey from dentist to YouTube comedy sensation. She tells us how she came to interview the Nobel prize winner Malala Yousafzai, and why she's focused on challenging misconceptions of Middle Eastern women.

Plus behind the scenes of the video craze that's giving viewers the tingles. We take a look at the online trend for ASMR, a phenomenon that is said to induce feelings of euphoria from the most subtle of sounds.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Kati Marton speaks onstage during VidCon 2018 in Anaheim, California. Credit: FilmMagic/FilmMagic for YouTube/Getty Images

We speak to YouTubers from around the world about the online video platform.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Lily Cole: Changing Wardrobes To Change The World2018101320181014 (WS)
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The model, actor and environmentalist Lily Cole shares the story of the item of clothing that was a game-changer for fashion and sustainability.

You are what you wear? We discuss whether we can tackle environmental and humanitarian crises through the clothes on our backs, in our wardrobes and in our stores. Tina meets two advocates of sustainable fashion whose locations are linked by the invisible threads of the globalised supply chain- designer Silvia Giovanardi, who lives and works in the Italian fashion capital Milan and Iftekhar Rahman, fashion designer turned fashion professor in Dhaka, Bangladesh, home to many of the garment factories supplying western retailers.

Out with the old, in with the new? We explore whether an eventual ban on second hand clothing imports will mean a boom in home-grown fashion in Rwanda. Reporter Cynthia Umurungi meets Joselyne Umutoniwase, designer and founder of Rwanda Clothing in Kigali, and those who rely on the second hand clothing industry.

Finally, what does fashion activism look like? The BBC's Shaimaa Khalil speaks to Céline Semaan, a former child refugee and founder of New York label Slow Factory about how she responded to President Trump's travel ban- not through demonstration but through design.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire, Mugabi Turya, Shoku Amirani

(Photo: Model Lily Cole in London Credit: Danny Martindale/Getty Images)

What is the impact of fashion on the planet, people and politics?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Lipstick Under My Burkha Censorship Row2017051320170514 (WS)Director Alankrita Shrivastava explains why it's important for women's voices to be heard

It won awards at film festivals around the world, yet Lipstick Under My Burkha was banned by the Indian film censors for being too “lady-oriented ? The film chronicles the secret lives of four women in small town India in search of a little freedom. Its director, Alankrita Shrivastava explains why it's important for women's voices to be heard.

In Iran artists and film-makers have to grapple with censorship on an everyday basis, especially during the run up to the elections later this month. Journalist Dr Massoumeh Torfeh, explains how Iranian poets, film directors and musicians have learnt to make their arguments through symbolism and metaphor to escape retribution.

An artist famous for blowing up a shed and putting the actress Tilda Swinton in a glass cabinet for days has been chosen as the official artist of the UK General Election. The final work by Cornelia Parker will join the Westminster parliamentary art collection which documents and illustrates the history of the UK parliament over the centuries.

Octopizzo, one of Kenya's top hip hop artists, has a new single out this week. Called Nu Afrika it's been inspired by his experience of growing up in Kibera, Africa's largest slum, and where he goes at least twice a week to soak up the vibes that influence his music.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Still from ‘Lipstick Under My Burkha'. Credit: Prakash Jha Productions

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Making Art From Social Media2016123120170101 (WS)The social media artists using platforms like Twitter, Instagram, WeChat and Facebook to make work and spread their message.

Photographer and poet Amaal Said is a British-Somali student in her early 20s but she has caught the attention of Vogue Magazine and 21,000 Instagram followers with her vibrant and colourful photographs of women of colour. She takes Tina out for a photo-shoot and imparts some photographic wisdom.

Artist Gabriel Barcia-Colombo uses social media data to explore questions of what our digital legacy will be when we die. He explains his process and how he first became interested in the digital afterlife.

Both dubbed ‘poet laureate of Twitter' poets Patricia Lockwood and Brian Bilston discuss why the platform makes a good conduit for poetry and what the success of poets like them might mean for the future of the form.

Digital artist Miao Ying makes art that pays satirical homage to the censorship she faces on the Chinese internet or ‘Chinternet'. From creating a permanently buffering meme to making online pieces for the Chinese platform WeChat, she pokes fun at the problems Chinese people face trying to get online.

(Photo: Visitor takes smart phone photo of painting. Credit: Daniel Leal Olivas/Getty Images)

The artists using Twitter, Instagram, WeChat and Facebook to make and spread their work

The world seen through the eyes of artists

(Photo: Visitor takes smart phone photo of painting. Credit: Daniel Leal Olivas/Getty Images)

Manuel Rossner: An Artist In A Digital Playground2020051620200517 (WS)German artist Manuel Rossner on the infinite artistic possibilities of the virtual world

The world seen through the eyes of artists

At a time when many art galleries have closed their doors, Berlin's König Galerie has released an app that allows you to experience an exhibition like never before. German artist Manuel Rossner tells Tina about his project Surprisingly This Rather Works and the infinite artistic possibilities of the virtual world.

We head to South Africa for a house party with a difference and discover how a new pop culture phenomenon is bringing parties directly to the homes of music lovers during lockdown.

Can you put on a fashion show without models? Or create a product line with no real materials? One group trying to answer those questions are Digi-Gxl, a collective of international women, trans, inter sex and non-binary digital artists. Two of their artists talk to the BBC's Sophia Smith Galer about creating work in the world of 3-D art, design and animation.

What is it like to feel isolated and left out in the cold? In her interactive show called Elision performed remotely from her living room in Glasgow, the Icelandic artist Gudrun Soley Sigurdardottir explores otherness and ideas of belonging. She tells Tina how as an immigrant living in a post Brexit climate of division and disconnection, her light hearted attempts to stay warm and connected in her performance, take on a deeper meaning.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Manuel Rossner, Surprisingly This Rather Works, Exhibition view
image credit: König Galerie, 2020

Meet Dimash, Central Asia's Biggest Pop Star2018112420181125 (WS)Sell out tours, millions of social media followers and adoring fans across the globe. Welcome to the world of Dimash, Central Asia's biggest pop star. We find out how he went from a child singer to a pioneer of pop music and why he is trying to change the world's perception of his home country, Kazakhstan.

Has a song, a book, a work of art ever changed the way you see the world? Zandra Rhodes, one of British fashion's leading trend setters, reveals why the work of the artist Duggie Fields inspires her.

They have been dubbed “the wildest DJ crew and label in Mexico” and have been credited with revolutionising a dance music scene in Mexico City that has been devastated by the War on Drugs. The BBC's Emmanuella Kwenortey speaks to the creative minds behind the pioneering artistic collective NAAFI and finds out what drives these cultural mavericks.

Plus we find out why the sky is the limit for Indian statues. The writer Sandip Roy explores the increasingly competitive and record breaking nature of public art and public life in India.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Dimash in concert. Credit: Nikita Basov

We meet pioneering artists who are changing the cultural landscape in their countries

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Meet The Band Rocking The Middle East2018020320180204 (WS)
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This week on The Cultural Frontline, we meet Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Mashrou Leila, the Lebanese band whose socially conscious rock songs have shaken up the Middle East.

Two survivors of Cambodia's deadly Khmer Rouge regime, the musician Him Sophy and the film maker Rithy Panh, describe how they created the epic stage production Bangsokol: A Requiem for Cambodia, as an act of memory and peace for their country's dead.

Plus we'll find out why the sculptor, Gilles Cenazandotti and the furniture designer, Brodie Neill have been inspired to create new works of art from the plastic pollution in our oceans and we hear how one Swiss university has decided to start a degree course in yodelling.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Hamed Sinno, the lead singer of Lebanese band Mashrou Leila Picture Credit: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images)

We speak to Hamed Sinno, lead singer of the socially conscious rock band Mashrou Leila.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Meet Theatre's Bold Change-makers2019050420190505 (WS)We meet the writers, playwrights and performers who are changing the face of theatre.

He is the fearless playwright whose productions have been met with protests and even banned. Abhishek Majumdar tells The Cultural Frontline what drives him to explore some of the world's most volatile political conflicts on stage.

What do you want from your local theatre? How about productions that not only tell dramatic stories but also confront economic inequality, racism, and social injustice. We hear how New York's Theatre of the Oppressed is speaking up for its audience and its community.

East Asian characters are amongst the most underrepresented on the stages of Australia, the US and the UK. In recent years, major theatres have continued to cast white actors in East Asian roles but now a new generation of actors and playwrights are working to change that. We speak to Anchuli Felicia King and Tuyen Do about creating stories for East Asian characters on stage.

What happens when a performance turns a traditional African folk-tale on its head? Ghanaian artist and theatre director Elisabeth Sutherland explains how her piece ‘Anansi's Wife/Akua's Daughter' re-imagines the classic story of Anansi The Spider through a feminist lens to challenge individual and national attitudes.

Presented by Nawal al-Maghafi

Image: Pah-La being performed onstage. Credit: Helen Murray

We meet the writers, actors and performers who are changing the face of theatre

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Mon Laferte: Singing For Change In Chile2019111620191117 (WS)As historic protests continue in Chile, we explore the nation's social crisis through the eyes of its artists.

From the slums to the Latin Grammys. The superstar singer Mon Laferte speaks to Tina about why her experience of growing up as a child surrounded by poverty in the city of Viña del Mar has inspired her to join the protests and to help Chile's poorest citizens.

How would you feel if you had no choice but to take your child to a job interview? That's the question at the heart of Chilean writer Paulina Flores' award winning story, Humiliation. We hear an extract of the moving tale of one father's struggle to save face after losing his livelihood.

A playful rhythm that tells the stories of the underworld. Actor and singer Daniel Muñoz reveals the secret behind of one of the most typical Chilean dances, cueca brava. It's like a Chilean tango, but with a lively flow.

Meet the woman standing up for Chile through comedy. Natalia Valdebenito talks about how she uses humour to challenge authority and speak out against sexism and corruption.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Mon Laferte performs on stage during a concert in tribute to Jose Jose on October 2019, Mexico City, Mexico. Credit: Adrián Monroy/Medios y Media/Getty Images)

We explore Chile, at a time of protest, through the eyes of its artists

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Muhammad Ali On Stage, Iraq In 100 Years2016101520161016 (WS)How Cassius Clay became Muhammad Ali, writers imagine Iraq in 2103, J\u00f3n Kalman Stef\u00e1nsson

The world seen through the eyes of artists

How Cassius Clay became Muhammad Ali, writers imagine Iraq in 2103, Jón Kalman Stefánsson

Tina meets the American playwright Kemp Powers whose play One Night in Miami imagines what took place between Cassius Clay, Sam Cooke and Malcolm X, the night Clay became world heavyweight champion at the age of 22 in 1964.

Also in the programme, Iraqi writers Hassan Blasim and Anoud discuss their anthology of science fiction which imagines what Iraq will be like in 100 years and Icelandic novelist Jón Kalman Stefánsson argues that fiction is an important tool for fighting division and violence.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Sope Dirisu as Cassius Clay at the Donmar Warehouse Credit: Johan Persson)

Murad Subay: The Walls Remember2019082420190825 (WS)When war broke out in Yemen, Murad Subay began painting murals on the shelled and bullet-marked buildings of his home city of Sana'a.
His colourful messages of protest and hope raised awareness of the conflict's impact on Yemeni civilians. He encouraged passers by to join him as he worked, and together they filled ruined homes with images of peace.
Journalist Sumaya Bakhsh traces Murad's journey as he leaves Sana'a for Cairo. International travel is rarely simple for citizens of Yemen, and we hear from Murad as he languishes in Egypt, stuck without a visa and unable to create new work. Murad is used to living and working in the toughest of conditions, but this period of inactivity is a new test for the prolific artist.
Eventually Murad receives a visa and arrives in the UK to launch a new campaign. Painting with Murad on the streets of London, Sumaya digs into his process as Murad explains why ultimately he must return to the conflict in Yemen, armed only with his brushes and spray cans.

Photo: A mural by Murad Subay Credit: Murad Subay

Murad Subay is voiced by Fayez Bakhsh
Presenter: Sumaya Bakhsh
Producers: Robbie MacInnes and Simona Rata
An SPG production for the BBC World Service

When war broke out in Yemen, Murad Subay painted murals on the bullet-marked buildings

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Murder, Mystery And The Perfect Crime Story2019012620190127 (WS)Are true crime podcasts making detectives of us all? Tina speaks to two investigative journalists, Norway's Marit Higraff and Canada's Connie Walker about their award-winning podcasts, Death In Ice Valley and Missing and Murdered: Finding Cleo, and asks whether podcasting is revolutionising true crime storytelling.

The Danish writer Søren Sveistrup tells Tina why seven years after the conclusion of his hit TV series, The Killing, he has swapped screen writing for books, to write his first novel, the crime thriller, The Chestnut Man.

You've heard of film noir, LA Noir, Nordic Noir- but Lagos Noir? Nigerian crime writer Leye Adenle has made the west African mega-city the lead character in his novels and short stories. For The Cultural Frontline, he goes thriller-seeking in Lagos.

Plus what does Hong Kong crime drama tell us about the darker side of Hong Kong? The writer Vivienne Chow traces the link between the popularity of the genre and the rise and fall of organised crime in the city state.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Shoku Amirani and Nancy Bennie

Image: Forest crime scene. Credit: Getty Images

We explore the art of crime storytelling in fact and in fiction, from Lagos to Copenhagen

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Music In Extremis: A Pop Concert In Kabul2017082620170827 (WS)In the week of another tragic bomb attack in Kabul, singer Aryana Sayeed defied clerics and conservatives to stage a pop concert in the capital, celebrating Afghan Independence Day. The ‘Kim Kardashian of Kabul' tells us why she believes in bringing music back to her home country and how her lyrics aim to give women a voice.

Does body armour make you a safer or braver artist on the streets of Kabul? Performance artist Kubra Khademi reflects on the act of provocation and protection that set out to reclaim public space for Afghan women but ultimately sent her into hiding.

An absent father, a terminal illness and a sweet tooth in Trinidad and Tobago: the ingredients for the short story The Sweet Sop, which won this year's Commonwealth Short Story Prize. Author Ingrid Persaud tells Tina how she drew on personal experience and the legacy of the Caribbean's colonial past in her writing.

And the Egyptian man, born a woman, whose transgender journey also transcended borders and language. Adam Kashmiry speaks to Tina from the Edinburgh Festival, where he's currently starring in the play Adam, based on his own transformative story.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Photo: Singer Aryana Sayeed performs on stage in Kabul Credit: BBC/ Alia Rajai

Singer Aryana Sayeed defied clerics and conservatives to mark Afghan Independence Day.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Photo: Singer Aryana Sayeed performs on stage in Kabul Credit: BBC/ Alia Rajai

My Art And My Mental Health2019011920190120 (WS)We speak to creative minds about their mental health to find out how it shapes their art and their lives.

Two artists from two different continents, the painter Hana Alfikih and the photographer Tsoku Maela discuss how they use their artistic platform to challenge attitudes toward mental illness in their home countries of Indonesia and South Africa.

We meet the comedian finding the funny side of her mental health battles. Maria Bamford, the star of the TV series Lady Dynamite shares the story of how many of her most difficult moments inspired her most celebrated comedy.

In the city of Mumbai, India, a group of creative minds have come together to try and change attitudes toward mental health – all through the power of a podcast. One of its producers Zain Calcuttawala tells The Cultural Frontline how he was inspired to create the podcast, Marbles Lost and Found, by his own personal experience.

Plus has a book, a song or a film ever changed the way you think about life? The award-winning choreographer and performer Akram Khan shares the story of the film that changed his life, giving him the sense of humour and confidence to express himself that he lacked as a tongue-tied teenager who loved to dance.

If you have been affected by the content of this programme, or if you have found anything in this programme distressing, support is available.
It may help to talk to a health professional or trusted friend, or you can go online to the website befrienders.org which lists organisations around the world that can provide support.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Nancy Bennie, Anna Bailey and Shoku Amirani

Image:Sehlaga from Abstract Peaces by Tsoku Maela. Credit: Tsoku Maela

We speak to creative minds about their mental health and their art

The world seen through the eyes of artists

In the city of Mumbai, India, a group of creative minds have come together to try and change attitudes toward mental health – all through the power of a podcast. One of its producers Zain Calcuttawala tells The Cultural Frontline how he was inspired to create the podcast, Marbles Lost and Found by his own personal experience.

If you have been affected by the content of this programme or if you have found anything in this programme distressing support is available.
It may help to talk to a health professional or trusted friend or you can go online to the website befrienders.org which lists organisations in around the world which can provide support.

My Art, My Gender Identity And Me2019051820190519 (WS)The Cultural Frontline talks to artists, performers and cultural voices from around the world about their gender identity and the role it plays in the stories they tell and the art they create.

Joining Tina are Caitlin Benedict and Amrou Al-Kadhi the creative forces behind the critically acclaimed BBC podcast NB – which stands for non-binary. They will be talking about their series and how it explores what being non-binary means and feels.

The indigenous Zapotec community of Mexico recognises an alternative gender identity- the Muxe, a term usually adopted by a person born male, who rejects a masculine gender role. It's this identity that performance artist Lukas Avendaño has made their career exploring on stage. But as reporter James Fredrick discovers, today there's even more to Lukas' art than being Muxe.

Brazil is one of the most dangerous places in the world to be LGBTQ+. One of the leading lights of the LGBTQ+ community is the artist, singer and superstar drag performer Pablo Vittar. We hear from Pablo on why he is speaking out against the increasing homophobic and transphobic sentiment that has taken hold in the country since the election of President Jair Bolsonaro.

The artist, activist and academic Syrus Marcus Ware tells The Cultural Frontline about how he uses his platform, his pencil and his paintbrush to speak up for transgender and gender non-conforming people in Canada.

Presented by Tina Daheley with Caitlin Benedict and Amrou Al-Kadhi

Image: Presenters of the NB Podcast Caitlin Benedict and Amrou Al-Kadhi. Credit: Tricia Yourkevich

We talk to artists and cultural voices from around the world about their gender identity

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Image: Presenters of the NB Podcast Caitlin Benedict and Amrou Al-Kadhi. Credit: Tricia Yourkevich

My Camera, My Country2019060120190602 (WS)This week, the Cultural Frontline speaks to leading filmmakers from around the world about how they share the story of their country on screen.

This week, Cyril Ramaphosa was sworn in as President of South Africa. But amid corruption, inequality and controversy over land reform, how is the so-called Rainbow Nation being painted by the nation's filmmakers? Lineo Sekeleoane, director and producer of Zulu Wedding and Samantha Nell, director of Miles From Nowhere, share the story of the South Africa that they show on screen.

Now the President al-Bashir is gone what will it mean for the people and the story of Sudan? Filmmaker and activist Hajooj Kuka takes us inside the ‘sit in' at Khartoum's ex-military headquarters and tells us why he is using his camera to document the nation's ongoing protests.

History was made at this year's Cannes Film Festival by the French Senegalese director Mati Diop. Her film entitled Atlantique, was the first film in the festival's 72 year history directed by a black woman to be in competition for the festival's top prize, the Palme d'Or. We speak to Mati about her history making film.

Plus one of the pioneers of Hong Kong cinema, Angie Chen, on why her films tell the story of a different side of the city away from the sky scrapers and the bright lights.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: French director Mati Diop poses with her Grand Prize of the Festival at Cannes at the 72nd annual Cannes Film Festival, 2019
Credit: EPA/IAN LANGSDON

We speak to leading filmmakers about how they share the story of their country on screen.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Image: French director Mati Diop poses with her Grand Prize of the Festival at Cannes at the 72nd annual Cannes Film Festival, 2019
Credit: EPA/IAN LANGSDON

New Iranian Art And The Censors2020112120201122 (WS)
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The repeatedly arrested film maker and women's rights activist, Mahnaz Mohammadi, speaks from Iran about the censors and interrogators she had to deal with while making her award-winning debut feature film, Son-Mother. In the story, a young widow struggles to look after her two children in Tehran. When a kind local man offers her marriage, she must choose between poverty and sending her young son away. Mahnaz Mohammadi talks about making art through personal pain.

Female singers in Iran have been prevented from performing solo since the Islamic revolution in 1979. But Farvaraz Farvardin was determined that her voice would be heard. She speaks to reporter Sahar Zand about her musical journey from singing in the classroom, to online videos, prosecution and seeking asylum in Germany.

Visual artist Barbad Golshiri shares his artistic response to the Covid-19 pandemic in Iran. Tuba Mirum is an audio-visual installation that moves between viral spores and loudspeakers heralding the last judgement, and it draws on both Islamic and Christian iconography.

Plus: Film director Shahram Mokri on how sanctions on Iran undermine hit film making, and why his new movie, Careless Crime, revisits the 1978 mass murder of a cinema audience, which fuelled the revolution in his country.

Presenter: Pooneh Ghoddoosi
Produced by Paul Waters, Sahar Zand, Lucy Collingwood and Shoku Amirani
(Image: From the film Son-Mother by Mahnaz Mohammadi Image credit: Mahnaz Mohammadi)

Meet the Iranians making new art despite the censors

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Nick Ryan: Recording Our World Under Lockdown2020041120200412 (WS)Nick Ryan is an artist who has dedicated himself to the exploration and understanding of sound – and he wants to hear what you hear. Nick talks to Nawal about his ambitious project to collect the sounds heard by people around the world during the coronavirus pandemic.

Have you seen the videos of famous songs with the lyrics changed to fit lockdown or of people desperately trying not to touch their faces? We're being inundated by Coronavirus internet memes responding to the global pandemic and being shared on social media. Technologist and writer An Xiao Mina sheds light on the ins and outs of meme culture.

Would you be tempted to have a cute pet-like device in your home? Or would the idea of it having cameras for eyes or being operated remotely by a stranger put you off? Samanta Schweblin's new novel Little Eyes follows characters from around the world as they interact with these fictional machines. The Argentinian author tells us why she wanted to explore the sinister side of technology in her new book.

Plus Charlie Brooker, the mastermind behind the hit TV series Black Mirror, on how his love for video games changed his life.

You can contact The Cultural Frontline and send us your sounds from lockdown. Just email us at theculturalfrontline@bbc.co.uk

Presented by Nawal al-Maghafi

Image: Sound artist Nick Ryan
Image credit: Nick Ryan

The artist Nick Ryan on recording the sounds of the coronavirus lockdown

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Nikita Gill and creative renewal20210417

During lockdown, the Irish-Indian poet Nikita Gill created a poetic pandemic time capsule on social media. She shares how she rebuilt hope for herself and her followers, through a daily ritual of writing and sharing.

For Malian singer-songwriter Fatoumata Diawara, music has a revitalising, redemptive power. She has overcome challenging personal circumstances and gone on to collaborate with international superstar musicians such as Damon Albarn, Paul McCartney and fellow Malians, Amadou and Mariam. Fatoumata tells Nawal how music has helped her survive - and how she hopes it can do the same for others.

And, how will we refresh our wardrobes after a year of dressing down in lockdown? For The Cultural Frontline, US fashion editor Lindsay Peoples Wagner opens her post-pandemic fashion look book.

Plus, has a song, a book or a film ever re-energised you and the way you see the world? The acclaimed Turkish author Elif Shafak reveals the work that recharged her creativity.

Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi

(Photo: Nikita Gill. Credit: Peace Ofure)

How poet Nikita Gill rebuilt hope through a daily ritual of writing and sharing

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Nikita Gill And Creative Renewal2021041720210418 (WS)
20210419 (WS)
During lockdown, the Irish-Indian poet Nikita Gill created a poetic pandemic time capsule on social media. She shares how she rebuilt hope for herself and her followers, through a daily ritual of writing and sharing.

For Malian singer-songwriter Fatoumata Diawara, music has a revitalising, redemptive power. She has overcome challenging personal circumstances and gone on to collaborate with international superstar musicians such as Damon Albarn, Paul McCartney and fellow Malians, Amadou and Mariam. Fatoumata tells Nawal how music has helped her survive - and how she hopes it can do the same for others.

And, how will we refresh our wardrobes after a year of dressing down in lockdown? For The Cultural Frontline, US fashion editor Lindsay Peoples Wagner opens her post-pandemic fashion look book.

Plus, has a song, a book or a film ever re-energised you and the way you see the world? The acclaimed Turkish author Elif Shafak reveals the work that recharged her creativity.

Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi

(Photo: Nikita Gill. Credit: Peace Ofure)

How poet Nikita Gill rebuilt hope through a daily ritual of writing and sharing

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

During lockdown, the Irish-Indian poet Nikita Gill created a poetic pandemic time capsule on social media. She shares how she rebuilt hope for herself and her followers, through a daily ritual of writing and sharing.

For Malian singer-songwriter Fatoumata Diawara, music has a revitalising, redemptive power. She has overcome challenging personal circumstances and gone on to collaborate with international superstar musicians such as Damon Albarn, Paul McCartney and fellow Malians, Amadou and Mariam. Fatoumata tells Nawal how music has helped her survive - and how she hopes it can do the same for others.

And, how will we refresh our wardrobes after a year of dressing down in lockdown? For The Cultural Frontline, US fashion editor Lindsay Peoples Wagner opens her post-pandemic fashion look book.

Plus, has a song, a book or a film ever re-energised you and the way you see the world? The acclaimed Turkish author Elif Shafak reveals the work that recharged her creativity.

Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi

(Photo: Nikita Gill. Credit: Peace Ofure)

How poet Nikita Gill rebuilt hope through a daily ritual of writing and sharing

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Njambi Mcgrath: My Family Story Through Comedy2020011820200119 (WS)From the villages of rural Kenya to starring on some of British comedy's biggest stages. The comedian Njambi McGrath tells Tina how when she takes to the stage she is not just telling her own story but the story of a family and a country devastated by the impact of colonialism.

Has a song, a film or a book ever changed the way you see the world? The American stand-up and actor Rob Delaney on how reading the work of graphic novelist Phoebe Gloeckner was a turning point in his life.

Indian comic and YouTube sensation Kanan Gill, tells Tina about his latest comedy show, Yours Sincerely – which reflects on him trying to live up to the dreams of his youth.

She's been called the voice of a new generation in Germany and can make you laugh in English, German and Farsi. Enissa Amani reveals her comedy secrets to the Cultural Frontline.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Njambi McGrath
Image credit: Steve Ullathorne

Why Njambi McGrath is sharing her family story through stand-up comedy.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

North America's Indigenous Renaissance?2019062220190623 (WS)On this week's Cultural Frontline we're exploring whether Native American and Indigenous artists in Canada are enjoying a renaissance. And celebrating Indigenous artists who are re-inventing traditions for a contemporary audience.

We speak to Indigenous two-spirit musician Jeremy Dutcher about his award winning album and rescuing his community's language from extinction.

For the first time ever, Native American women's art is being exhibited together on a grand scale. Its unusual centre piece is an El Camino car painted as a homage to an artistic hero. We hear from the car's creator Rose B Simpson and curator Teri Greeves on why this show is so important.

Critically acclaimed Inuit throat singer Tanya Tagaq has created a sound world to accompany an installation about polar explorers. She explains why she wanted to highlight the Inuit contribution and recreate an ancient art form for a contemporary audience.

Plus Native American author Tommy Orange on being Indigenous in the city, reading from his novel There There.

Guest presented by Rosanna Deerchild.

Image: Jeremy Dutcher. Credit: Matt Barnes

Are Native American and Indigenous artists in Canada enjoying a renaissance?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Notre-dame And The Art That Changes Us2019042020190421 (WS)This week, we reflect on the power of art and culture to change the way we see the world.

It's a building that has been a source of inspiration for musicians, painters and writers for nine centuries. Following the devastating fire earlier this week the Parisian writer, Agnes Poirier reflects on what Notre-Dame means to her, her city and the culture of France.

Has watching a band live onstage ever changed your outlook on life? Cameroonian musician Blick Bassy tells The Cultural Frontline why seeing the group Les Têtes Brulées perform their unique blend of traditional Bikutsi rhythms and live electric guitar taught him how to be himself.

What happens when you lose the art that you lived for? The pioneering Japanese dancer Mana Hashimoto shares the story of how she reinvented her life and her dance practice after she lost her sight.

Plus we hit the streets of Lagos and Nairobi to hear from both cities' citizens about the art that has changed their lives.

Presented by Mugabi Turya

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Lucy Collingwood and Nancy Bennie

Image: View from the Notre Dame, Paris. Credit: Getty Images

We reflect on the power of art and culture to change the way we see the world

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Novelist Mohsin Hamid On Borders And Migration2017030420170305 (WS)Best-selling novelist Mohsin Hamid discusses his latest novel Exit West, which imagines what would happen if mysterious black doors cropped up all over the world which allowed refugees to reach safety. He tells Tina why he believes it is the job of the artist to help the world to imagine a positive outcome, even for the most seemingly intractable problems.

As President Trump announces that he won't be attending the annual White House Correspondents' Dinner, where comedians traditionally ‘roast' the incumbent, Republican comedians Evan Sayet and Adam Richmond reflect on the experience of being conservative on the US comedy circuit.

Iranian director Asghar Farhadi refused to travel to the United States to collect his Best Foreign Language Film Oscar last weekend. We find out how his win was received in Iran.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: migrants queuing at a European border Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

The award-winning writer discusses his new novel which explores the refugee crisis

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Olafur Eliasson: Public Art Made Virtual2021013020210131 (WS)
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The Icelandic-Danish artist Olafur Eliasson is celebrated for his playful and tactile works, from shining suns to melting ice installations. Yet with so many galleries closed in lockdown, he's turning his attention to augmented reality. It's now possible to download the imagination of the environmental artist to a street near you, via an app. But is it as good as the real thing? Reporter Anna Bailey pressed download and spoke to Olafur to find out.

Public art has long been the preserve of men but feminist artists Nikki Luna from the Philippines and Bahia Shehab in Egypt challenge the patriarchy, by taking up space on the street and online. Nikki Luna's audio-visual installations confront gender-based violence with the voices of marginalised women, while Bahia Shehab's street art foregrounds the female form and addresses consent.

Mexican-American portrait artist Aliza Nisenbaum gives us a glimpse of the private moments behind public service. She talks to Nawal about why her latest project honours healthcare workers at the frontline of the battle against coronavirus.

Plus, we hear how a group of artists have been inspired to create a giant painting that highlights growing insecurity and political instability in Nigeria.

Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi

(Image: Olafur Eliasson, Caring Northern Light and Lucky Stone. Augmented reality. Courtesy of the artist and Acute Art.)

Download the imagination of artist Olafur Eliasson on to a street near you

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Opera singer Joshua Hopkins: Remembering my sister in song20210508Joshua Hopkins is an award-winning Canadian baritone who is using his voice to call out violence against women, after the loss of his sister in 2015. Joshua tells Sophia Smith Galer how collaborating with Booker Prize winning author Margaret Atwood on Songs for Murdered Sisters offers consolation, while opening up conversation about gender-based violence across the world.

Sun and Sea is a Lithuanian production that takes its international audiences on a playful trip to the beach. For The Cultural Frontline, the director Rugilė Barzdžiukaitė and writer Vaiva Grainytė share how they use humour to highlight the climate crisis.

Opera is an enduring, evolving art form, but is everyone invited? Rising stars J’Nai Bridges from the US, Angélica Negrón from Puerto Rico and Adrian Angelico from Norway tell Sophia how they’re opening up the genre to make it more inclusive, on and off stage.

Plus, has a song, a poem or a book ever changed the course of your life? South African soprano Vuvu Mpofu shares the work that set her on a different path.

Presenter: Sophia Smith Galer

(Photo: Joshua Hopkins. Credit: Songs for Murdered Sisters, directed by James Niebuhr)

We speak to Joshua Hopkins, a singer using his voice to call out violence against women.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Opera singer Joshua Hopkins: Remembering my sister in song2021050820210509 (WS)Joshua Hopkins is an award-winning Canadian baritone who is using his voice to call out violence against women, after the loss of his sister in 2015. Joshua tells Sophia Smith Galer how collaborating with Booker Prize winning author Margaret Atwood on Songs for Murdered Sisters offers consolation, while opening up conversation about gender-based violence across the world.

Sun and Sea is a Lithuanian production that takes its international audiences on a playful trip to the beach. For The Cultural Frontline, the director Rugilė Barzdžiukaitė and writer Vaiva Grainytė share how they use humour to highlight the climate crisis.

Opera is an enduring, evolving art form, but is everyone invited? Rising stars J’Nai Bridges from the US, Angélica Negrón from Puerto Rico and Adrian Angelico from Norway tell Sophia how they’re opening up the genre to make it more inclusive, on and off stage.

Plus, has a song, a poem or a book ever changed the course of your life? South African soprano Vuvu Mpofu shares the work that set her on a different path.

Presenter: Sophia Smith Galer

(Photo: Joshua Hopkins. Credit: Songs for Murdered Sisters, directed by James Niebuhr)

We speak to Joshua Hopkins, a singer using his voice to call out violence against women.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Opera singer Joshua Hopkins: Remembering my sister in song2021050820210510 (WS)Joshua Hopkins is an award-winning Canadian baritone who is using his voice to call out violence against women, after the loss of his sister in 2015. Joshua tells Sophia Smith Galer how collaborating with Booker Prize winning author Margaret Atwood on Songs for Murdered Sisters offers consolation, while opening up conversation about gender-based violence across the world.

Sun and Sea is a Lithuanian production that takes its international audiences on a playful trip to the beach. For The Cultural Frontline, the director Rugilė Barzdžiukaitė and writer Vaiva Grainytė share how they use humour to highlight the climate crisis.

Opera is an enduring, evolving art form, but is everyone invited? Rising stars J’Nai Bridges from the US, Angélica Negrón from Puerto Rico and Adrian Angelico from Norway tell Sophia how they’re opening up the genre to make it more inclusive, on and off stage.

Plus, has a song, a poem or a book ever changed the course of your life? South African soprano Vuvu Mpofu shares the work that set her on a different path.

Presenter: Sophia Smith Galer

(Photo: Joshua Hopkins. Credit: Songs for Murdered Sisters, directed by James Niebuhr)

We speak to Joshua Hopkins, a singer using his voice to call out violence against women.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Pedro Reyes: Destroying Guns, Creating Art2020072520200726 (WS)
20200823 (WS)
Despite a rich tradition of art, music and food, Mexico is often depicted negatively in popular culture. Artist Pedro Reyes is using his work to challenge violent stereotypes of his country, creating intricate music boxes out of guns. Pedro Reyes tells our reporter Saskia Reeves why he's making works of art from weapons of war.

American author Eve L Ewing explains why she's brought the 1919 Chicago Race Riots to life through poetry and how those events resonate a 100 years on. She also shares what her poetry and Marvel Comic book series have in common.

We hear from Indian photographer Sohrab Hura who reflects the lives of the people of Kashmir in his photography. He tells us how his photo collection Snow reveals what's it's like for those caught up in the ever-shifting politics between India and Pakistan.

Plus: Has a film, a book or a song ever changed the way you see the world? The Grammy award-winning singer and songwriter Norah Jones tells us how a master of European cinema influences her creative process.

Presented by Chi Chi Izundu

(Photo: Pedro Reyes. Credit: Ago Projects)

Artist Pedro Reyes on why he's making weapons of war into art.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Despite a rich tradition of art, music and food, Mexico is often depicted negatively in popular culture. Artist Pedro Reyes is using his work to challenge violent stereotypes of his country, creating intricate music boxes out of guns. Pedro Reyes tells our reporter Saskia Edwards why he's making works of art from weapons of war.

American author Eve L Ewing explains why she's brought the 1919 Chicago Riots to life through poetry and how those events resonate a 100 years on. She also shares what her poetry and Marvel Comic book series have in common.

We hear from Indian photographer Sohrab Hura who reflects the lives of the people of Kashmir in his photography. He speaks to reporter Cleo Roberts about how his photo collection Snow reveals what's it's like for those caught up in the ever-shifting politics between India and Pakistan.

(Photo: Pedro Reyes. Credit: Ago Projects)

Performing For Peace At The United Nations2018092920180930 (WS)
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Meet the Syrian violin virtuoso who has performed for peace at the White House and the United Nations. Mariela Shaker tells us why she uses her violin to tell the story of the life and the war she left behind in her home city of Aleppo.

Has a song, a film or a poem ever changed the way you see the world? The Russian writer Grigori Chkhartishvili better known by his pen name, Boris Akunin, shares the story of the Japanese poem which has had a profound impact on his life and his writing.

The critically acclaimed writer Sulaiman Addonia reveals how a childhood spent as an Eritrean refugee in Sudan inspired him to write his new novel and to launch a writing academy for refugees.

Plus - prepare for an audience with GRRRL, the all-female international super group formed by musicians from countries from all over the world. We head backstage at one of their performances and discover how they tell their collective stories of life, conflict, inequality and change through music.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Shoku Amirani, Kirsty McQuire, Nancy Bennie, Milly Chowles and Will Coley.

Image: Violinist Mariela Shaker. Credit: Getty Images

Meet the Syrian musician using her voice and her violin to call for peace

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Picturing A New Zimbabwe2017120220171203 (WS)
20171204 (WS)
After the fall of Mugabe, two leading Zimbabwean artists reflect on his presidency and look ahead to the future of their country. With hip hop musician Sharky, AKA Marshall Muchenje, and the novelist Ignatius Mabasa.

We take a step inside the rehearsal room of the choreographer Kyle Abraham as he prepares his new show, Pavement, inspired by the writing of WE Dubois and the film Boyz in the Hood.

The ground breaking Icelandic musician Björk tells us why she's dreaming of Utopia in her latest album, while speaking out to change the world.

Plus, what's the problem with Apu? The comedian Hari Kondabolu on why he thinks the much loved character from The Simpsons may be doing more harm than good.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

Photo: A supporter holds a sign during the inauguration ceremony of President Mnangagwa at the National Sport Stadium in Harare, Zimbabwe
Credit: Zinyange Auntony/ AFP/ Getty Images

Making art under Mugabe and opening a new chapter for Zimbabwe

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Picturing Politics: An Artist's Response To The Kenyan Election2017081920170820 (WS)Michael Armitage is a Kenyan-British artist whose work combines materials and techniques from European and African traditions - layers of oil paint on Lubugo, a traditional bark fabric from Uganda. It explores themes from East African folklore, his own memory, and often responds to what's going on in the news and current affairs of Kenya. We joined Michael at an opposition rally in the run-up to last week's election in Kenya to see how it looked from a visual artist's point of view.

Ruth Behar is an anthropologist-turned-novelist who was born in Havana but grew up in New York after her family fled Cuba. Following Obama's thawing of relations between Cuba and the US, she initiated a project for young writers from both countries to share stories with one another. As Trump talks about reversing Obama's diplomatic efforts, what role now for Ruth's bridge-building work?

André Naffis-Sahely is a poet with an Italian mother and Iranian father. He lives in Los Angeles now but he grew up in Abu Dhabi. His debut collection of poetry is called The Promised Land, and it offers glimpses of what life is like for different sections of society in the United Arab Emirates. They're unflinching observations of the disparities between comfortable expat professionals and temporary migrant workers. The book also charts his own search for a place to call home.

Mamela Nyamza is a South African dancer and choreographer trained in classical ballet, modern dance, African dance, jazz, mime - even Butoh, a traditional Japanese form of dance theatre. She also happens to be a lesbian, and being gay in South Africa can be very dangerous indeed. She talks to us about the prevalence of homophobia in her country, and how she's using her art to fight back, and change minds.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Photo: Artist Michael Armitage films supporters at the final election rally of the National Super Alliance opposition coalition in Nairobi, Kenya. Credit: Anthony Irungu

Kenyan-British artist Michael Armitage explores the visual spectacle of an election rally

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Photo: Artist Michael Armitage films supporters at the final election rally of the National Super Alliance opposition coalition in Nairobi, Kenya. Credit: Anthony Irungu

Punk, Protest And Pussy Riot2017111820171119 (WS)
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Can you change the world through art and activism? Maria Alyokhina of Pussy Riot tells the Cultural Frontline about her manifesto for change through artistic action that she advocates in her new book, Riot Days.

Shut for 10 years, we find out why the reopening of Belgrade's Museum of Contemporary Art has been met with both praise and protest.

The award winning South Korean writer Han Kang on how the streets of Warsaw inspired her new novel, The White Book, a work shaped by memories of personal grief and political protest.

Plus when a hurricane ravages the island you call home, what comes next? The poet Amanda Calderon shares her thoughts on life in the US and Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: Pussy Riot Rehearsal 2012 Photo Credit: Igor Tsukanov/Pussy Riot)

Pussy Riot's Maria Alyokhina on her manifesto for change through artistic action.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Rave For A Revolution2019120720191208 (WS)There is a burgeoning underground music scene bursting with talented artists in Palestine but, because of the political situation, many have their movement restricted.

DJ Sama is from Ramallah. After a live streaming of her playing in the West Bank she is now in demand worldwide but many other artists cannot leave. Sama says that with their community scattered across Gaza, the West Bank and Israel, the music becomes even more integral to survival. Sama explains that, “It's very hard for many young Palestinians living in the West Bank to get permits to leave the area, so music is a way to escape these restrictions.”

Jazar Crew, a cultural and art collective based in Haifa, formed by Palestinian techno DJs, including Rojeh Khleif, together with the Union collective from Ramallah are creating a small cultural revolution across Palestinian communities through music. DJ Dar, from the Union collective, is trying to breathe new life into the music scene by organising parties and raves. DJ Dar explains there was once a divide between the techno scenes in Haifa, Jaffa and Ramallah but now artists are going behind the wall to play at raves, building bridges between the two scenes..

Vera Sajrawi meets young people in the West Bank who say attending these raves and parties is a way to reach across borders and maintain their identity.

Presenter: Vera Sajrawi
Producer: Kate Bissell

(Photo: DJ Sama. Credit: Jan Beddegenoodts)

Palestinian DJs are at the forefront of a rave revolution to unite communities

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Rebeca Omordia: African Classical Music Pioneer2020071120200712 (WS)Name the first classical music composer that comes to mind and it's likely to be one of the big European names like Bach, Brahms or Beethoven. Nigerian-Romanian pianist Rebeca Omordia grew up playing this music until she decided to explore her heritage and look deeper into African classical music. She tells the Cultural Frontline about the music she discovered along the way and what she's doing to bring composers such as Ayo Bankole and and Christian Onyeji to a wider audience.

We go behind the scenes of the new opera, Osman Bey and the Snails. Its composer Nigel Osbourne tells Tina how the work was created by artists to raise awareness of the case of the Turkish political prisoner, Osman Kavala.

Has a book, a film or a piece of music ever changed the way you see the world? The drummer and composer Stewart Copeland shares his love for the work of Jimi Hendrix.

When the Liceu Opera Barcelona opened its doors after many months of lockdown, they did so with an unusual new performance devised by the artist Eugenio Ampudia. Instead of playing to an audience, the Liceu String Quartet performed to an audience of 2,292 plants in a “Concert for the Biocene”. Víctor Garcia de Gomar, the Liceu's Artistic Director, tells us why.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Photo: Rebeca Omordia.

The pianist shares her passion for African and European classical music

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Reimagining Iraq's Lost Culture2018040720180408 (WS)
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On this week's Cultural Frontline we explore the artistic response to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

We join the American artist Michael Rakowitz in London's Trafalgar Square, as he unveils his new work, a reimagining of an ancient Iraqi artefact, which was destroyed by the so-called Islamic state.

The audio investigator and sound artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan tell us why he has helped former detainees of a notorious Syrian prison to create “ear-witness testimonies” of their experiences.

The acclaimed Chinese artist Ai Weiwei talks about why he continues to tell the stories of refugees through his work and the Indian singer Harshdeep Kaur shares the story of the artist that inspires her to make music.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Picture: Michael Rakowitz's sculpture The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist on Trafalgar Square's Fourth Plinth in London.
Picture Credit: Gautier DeBlonde

The stories of artists responding to the continuing conflicts in Iraq and Syria.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Rejecting The Urge To 'make America Great Again'2017052720170528 (WS)US writer Richard Ford's new book, ‘Between Them: Remembering My Parents', tells the story of their peripatetic life in America during The Great Depression. He explains why he rejects the nostalgia for apple pie and picket fences and the current urge to Make America Great Again.

As animal rights activists protest over Austrian artist Hermann Nitsch's plans to make art from a slaughtered bull in Tasmania, Yvette Watt, who studies artists who feature animals in their work, explores the argument for using animals in art.

In his book ‘Rock in a Hard Place' the author and lifelong music fan Orlando Crowcroft pays tribute to the courage and determination of musicians who are willing to risk everything for their music; including musician Adel Saflou whose passion for heavy metal began to endanger his life in Syria.

Since the 13th century, the Island of Murano, (just to the north of Venice), has been famous for its fabulous glass. At its peak there were six thousand furnaces burning on the small island but now fewer than a thousand are still working. Marcantonio Brandolini is a glass artist with plans to halt the decline.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Photo: Richard Ford as a child with his parents. Credit: Richard Ford

Author Richard Ford argues everyone has a dream not just Americans

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Restitution And Art: What Does It Mean To Return?2019020220190203 (WS)Last November a ground-breaking report commissioned by the French President Emmanuel Macron sent shock waves through the art world. It recommended the return or restitution of artefacts from France back to Africa. But what would this mean for museums and cultural institutions? We take the view of leading figures from two cultural institutions in the two continents – Dr Bongani Ndhlovu from the Iziko Museums of South Africa and Professor Nicholas Thomas, Director of the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Cambridge.

Before World War II, Simon Goodman's German-Jewish ancestors owned an incredible collection of fine art, including masterpieces by Degas, Renoir and Botticelli. Under the Nazi regime, that world class collection was confiscated and Simon's grandparents were murdered in a concentration camp. For The Cultural Frontline, Simon shares his mission to recover his family's stolen art, after more than half a century.

Can technology help bring lost artefacts back to life? A new exhibition called Return to Mosul which opened at the Mosul Museum in northern Iraq this week aims to do just that. We speak to the man behind the project, Mohammed Al-Hashimie about his journey to restore the cultural heritage destroyed by the so-called Islamic State.

What does cultural restitution mean to the First Nations people of Canada? The curator Lucy Bell tells the story of why she fought for the return of ancestral remains to her First Nations community, the Haida Nation.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Shoku Amirani, Mpho Lakaje, Laura Hubber and Nancy Bennie.

Image: The Benin Bronzes displayed at the British Museum in London. Credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Should museums return art and artefacts to their country of origin?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Rockin' Out With Indonesia's Hijabi Heavy Metal Band2018031720180318 (WS)
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This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore the art of rock n'roll.

We meet Dan Witz, the American painter trying to create art from the middle of a mosh pit.

The Peruvian artist Claudia Martinez Garay takes us behind the scenes of the exhibition Songs for Sabotage, which explores symbols of iconic imagery and propaganda.

The Lebanese rock star Hamed Sinno reveals why Kate Bush is one of his musical heroines and we rock out with Indonesia's all-girl, hijab-wearing heavy metal band, Voice of Baceprot.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Indonesian band, Voice of Baceprot Picture Credit: BBC/Rebecca Henschke)

Exploring the art of rock 'n' roll from mosh pits to Indonesia's hijabi heavy metal band.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Roger Robinson: Finding Paradise In Poetry2020022220200223 (WS)What does paradise mean to you? The British Trinidadian poet, writer, activist and musician Roger Robinson shares his new collection A Portable Paradise. He tells Tina why his work was framed through the lens of slavery, the tragedy of London's Grenfell Tower fire disaster and the premature birth of his son and how he wants his poems to inspire people to practice more empathy.

We meet the man giving a voice to the Rohingya people through poetry. The poet Mayyu Ali on how he's telling the story of his community amidst turmoil, tragedy and trauma.

Plus has a book, a song or a poem ever changed the way you see the world? The acclaimed novellist Ha Jin reflects on the work of an icon of Chinese literature, the romantic poet Li Bai.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Roger Robinson
Image credit: Adrian Pope

The poet Roger Robinson on creating personal and political work

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Rosa Parks' House Finds A New Home2017061020170611 (WS)Why is the house of American civil rights hero Rosa Parks now in a German suburb? Her niece, Rhea McCauley, who grew up in the house, explains its' importance and artist Ryan Mendoza describes how he saved it from demolition in Detroit and moved it, piece by piece, to his back garden in Berlin.

As Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel the Handmaid's Tale is adapted for TV, Mona Eltahawy, the author of 'Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution', argues that it depicts reality for millions of women.

The subjugation of young women is also explored by the sculptor Peju Alatise whose work is presently on show in the Nigerian pavilion at the Venice Biennale. She describes the inspiration for her art work "Flying Girls" which portrays eight life-sized sculptures of a young woman with wings.

Hay El-Matar, a thrice-weekly radio drama currently broadcast on the BBC Arabic service, has been recorded in English to be aired in the UK. Boz Temple-Morris, the series producer, and Hussam Sharwany who plays Ghaly, a character who runs the local mini-market and makes daily announcements on a megaphone, discuss why it's important to reflect the reality of people living in Syria today.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

Picture: Ryan Mendoza and Rhea McCauley in front of Rosa Parks House in Berlin. Credit: Fabia Mendoza

Why is the house of American civil rights hero Rosa Parks now in a Berlin suburb?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Picture: Ryan Mendoza and Rhea McCauley in front of Rosa Parks House in Berlin. Credit: Fabia Mendoza

Roxane Gay: Writing The Personal And Political2020071820200719 (WS)This week we're celebrating writing from some of the world's leading Black writers.

The novelist, essayist and cultural commentator Roxane Gay on the political and personal power of writing. Roxane reflects on the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement, cancel culture and how publishing needs to change to become an industry that celebrates all voices.

We hear from two short story writers each offering us a glimpse of very different sides of Africa. Tanzanian author Erica Sugo Anyadike charts the rise to power of an African President's wife while Namibian writer Rémy Ngamije follows the daily routine of a group of homeless people in the suburbs of Windhoek. Both stories are shortlisted for the AKO Caine Prize for African Writing.

When British writer Candice Brathwaite couldn't find any books about Black British motherhood she could relate to, she decided to write her own. Candice tells us about her best-selling new book I Am Not Your Baby Mother.

Plus: Are there poems that you return to again and again? The pioneering Jamaican dub poet Linton Kwesi Johnson explains what Martin Carter's Poems of Succession mean to him.

Presented by Raifa Rafiq

(Photo: Roxane Gay. Credit: Reginald Cunningham)

The writer Roxane Gay on publishing, cancel culture and Black Lives Matter

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Rupi Kaur: Rewriting The Migration Narrative2018060220180603 (WS)
20180604 (WS)
How poet Rupi Kaur, playwright Quiara Alegria Hudes, novelist Peter Kimani and writer Khaled Diab are all re-writing the story of migration, from India to Kenya.

Canadian poet Rupi Kaur tells The Cultural Frontline's Datshiane Navanayagam how her family's history of migration from India informed her latest poetry collection, The Sun and Her Flowers.

Reporter Will Coley goes backstage in New York at the road trip musical Miss You Like Hell to meet its Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Quiara Alegria Hudes.

Tina meets writer and poet Peter Kimani and hears how his novel, Dance of the Jakaranda, draws a thread between the dawn of Kenyan independence and its colonial past, to better understand Kenya's present.

Plus, writer Khaled Diab on 'baladi': an Arabic word that, in Egypt at least, shows how even the most local of customs can travel.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Kirsty McQuire

Image: Rupi Kaur Credit: Baljit Singh

How writers from India to Kenya are reshaping the story of migration

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Russian Art Under Putin2018032420180325 (WS)
20180326 (WS)
In the week that Vladimir Putin was re-elected as Russian president, while a diplomatic row rages over the poisoning of a former Russian spy in the UK, The Cultural Frontline explores the Russian art of patriotism, protest and paranoia.

Tina speaks to visual artist Alexey Belyaev-Gintovt, the controversial winner of Russia's prestigious Kandinsky Prize, whose work depicting what he calls ‘the motherland' is often described as nationalist.

The BBC's Lucy Ash meets Victoria Lomasko, whose ‘graphic reportage' portrays people on the margins of Russian society and pays homage to the country's last mass demonstrations in 2012.

Russian playwright Mikhail Durnenkov reflects on the atmosphere of fear and mistrust born of fake news and censorship, while the BBC's Alexander Kan considers an obscure Russian word that's been popularised by both political rhetoric and satirical rap.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Image: A portrait of Russian president Vladimir Putin, on display at a Moscow art market in January 2018. Credit: Mladen Antonov/ AFP/ Getty Images

The Russian art of patriotism, protest and paranoia, after President Putin's re-election

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Saudi Tv Drama On Life Under So-called Islamic State2017062420170625 (WS)During Ramadan, the Saudi TV conglomerate, MBC, has been showing the first ever TV drama to depict life under the so called Islamic state in Syria. Called `Gharabeeb Saoud`, or `Black Crows`, it is based on real life stories of women who join Jihadis in their city stronghold of Raqqa and is an attempt to counter extremist media propaganda. The show has scored highly in MBC's ratings for the Ramadan season, but it has been controversial. We discuss the ambitions of `Black Crows` with MBC spokesperson Mazen Hayek, and Dr Massoumeh Torfeh, a specialist on anti-terrorist media strategy.

As Iceland celebrates the long, light days of Midsummer, best-selling crime author and civil engineer, Yrsa Sigurðardóttir gives us a glimpse of green power in Iceland.

To mark the United Nations World Refugee Day this week, we hear how Iranian rapper Farhood ended up in a British prison when he fled Iran and why he believes rap is vital for a generation of young Iranians.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Female member of IS in the TV drama Black Crows. Credit: MBC Group)

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Seun Kuti: Life, Legacy And Afrobeat2018012020180121 (WS)
20180122 (WS)
This week on The Cultural Frontline we explore how memory and legacy have shaped the work of artists.

We hear from the musician Seun Kuti on making political music and following in the footsteps of his father, the Afrobeat pioneer and political activist Fela Kuti.

The American filmmaker Greg Campbell shares his memories of the life and work of his friend, the celebrated photojournalist Chris Hondros.

The Chinese writer Lijia Zhang reveals how the award winning film Angels Wear White brought back painful memories from her childhood.

Plus the British-Nigerian poet Tolu Agbelusi shares her poem, The Anthropology of Belonging: Start with the Self.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Seun Kuti performing with Egypt 80 Picture Credit: Rich Fury/Getty Images for FYF)

The Cultural Frontline explores how memory and legacy have shaped the work of artists.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Sharona Franklin: Making Art Accessible For All2020062720200628 (WS)The Canadian sculptor on exploring disability through her work

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Sharona Franklin's jelly sculptures may look delicious but they are grand artworks that she makes to tackle her experience of the world as a disabled person. Confronting the fragility of the human body, and the complicated relationship she has with biopharmaceuticals and medicines, her work is made from her small home in Vancouver, where she feels safe to explore, make and rest her body as much as she needs - essential for her health, but all too often ignored by arts institutions. She talks to the Cultural Frontline about her work, and some of the barriers she faces as a disabled artist.

From his studio in Lagos Nigeria, renowned singer-songwriter and UNICEF ambassador Cobhams Asuquo tells us how his blindness contributes to his heightened sense of musicality, and how he overcame widespread prejudices in the music industry to become a household name.

Can we make arts truly accessible for all? As much of the world faced lockdown as a result of Covid 19 and people began to talk about the difficulties of not being able to visit museums, theatres and exhibitions, many disabled people have taken this moment to highlight that they have never been able to access these spaces due to their needs being continually ignored. Two disabled artists, Bella Milroy and Diana Niepce, talk to the Cultural Frontline about their experiences of inaccessibility in the arts world, and what needs to change.

Performing Ben E. King's iconic song Stand by Me, a group of disabled artists from 15 countries have come together virtually to record a music video as part of the True Colours Festival. Raising awareness of how disabled people have been affected by the pandemic, we hear from two performers in Singapore and Australia about why they want to be involved.

Presented by Kat Hawkins

(Photo: Sharona Franklin)

She Who Dares: Feminist Artists2018030320180304 (WS)
20180305 (WS)
Ahead of International Women's Day, Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates the female artists daring to fight for equality with creativity, in the age of #MeToo and #TimesUp.

Actor and dancer Suhaee Abro stars in My Pure Land, a film set in rural Pakistan and described as a ‘feminist western.' She discusses the challenges of being a feminist- on and off screen- and the impact of the social media movements #MeToo and #MosqueMeToo on Muslim women.

Can periods ever be public art? Swedish comic book artist Liv Strömquist shares her story of daring to depict menstruation on the metro in Stockholm. The artist-activist Li Maizi, one of China's Feminist Five, was detained for daring to challenge sexual harassment on public transport. For The Cultural Frontline, she delivers her ‘Woman-ifesto' of feminist art principles.

Plus, the musicians Björk and Anoushka Shankar each pay tribute to their personal art heroines and the novelist Chloe Aridjis remembers an inspirational artist who broke the mould in Mexico.

Presenter: Elif Shafak
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Photo: Feminist activists participate in a women's march in Berlin, Germany on 21st January, 2018 Credit: Adam Berry/ Getty Images

Turkish author and feminist activist Elif Shafak celebrates risk-taking women in art.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Singing The Troubles: Music And Identity In Ireland2018051920180520 (WS)
20180521 (WS)
Art, pop music, literature and folk song from the island of Ireland. As Ireland gets ready to go to the polls to vote on whether or not to liberalise its abortion laws, Irish writers Louise O'Neill and Nell McCafferty discuss the art and literature influenced by the campaign.

Rosemary Jenkinson is a playwright with a self-confessed identity problem. She explains the challenges of identifying as both an East Belfast protestant and as an Irish writer, against the backdrop of Northern Ireland's identity politics.

Belfast based broadcaster and journalist Stuart Bailey talks us through the musical landscape of Northern Ireland, from its troubled past to the historic peace deal of the Good Friday Agreement.

Plus, Jinx Lennon, a punk poet and folk singer from the border region of the Republic of Ireland, sings an untold story from his home town of Dundalk.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Johny Cassidy

(Photo: Irish rock band U2 at the MTV Europe Music Awards in November 2017 Credit: Dave J Hogan/Getty Images)

Music and cultural identity north and south of Ireland's border

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Sir Steve Mcqueen: Great British Artist2020022920200301 (WS)
20200329 (WS)
The working class London kid who became an Oscar winning director, the artistic maverick who became a knight of the realm. Tina Daheley speaks to Sir Steve McQueen about the influences that turned him into one of Britain's greatest living artists as a career spanning exhibition of his work opens at London's Tate Modern gallery.

Plus the visionary Iranian film-maker and artist Shirin Neshat talks about her latest work, Land of Dreams. She reveals why she has turned her lens to Trump's America, to tell the stories of ordinary people, their hopes and dreams and how she hopes art can foster a greater understanding between the United States and Iran.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: Steve McQueen. Credit: Getty Images/Michael Kovac)

The artist and film-maker Sir Steve McQueen reflects on his life and career

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Songhoy Blues: Mali's Musical Optimists2020120520201206 (WS)
20201207 (WS)
An audience with Mali's messengers of hope; Aliou Touré, the lead singer of rock revolutionaries Songhoy Blues, tells Tina about their new album and why they believe optimism is the only way to challenge the ongoing civil unrest in their country.

He's been described as perhaps the greatest writer of Arabic fiction alive, but as well as a being a celebrated writer, poet and filmmaker, Hassan Blasim is also a refugee. Hassan discusses his latest novel God 99 - a work that tells the tale of 99 refugees and the man, also called Hassan, travelling through Europe to share their stories.

Belarusian playwright Andrei Kureichik talks to reporter Lucy Ash about the nation's pro-democracy protest movement. Andrei reveals how his latest production, Insulted Belarus(sia) reflects the legacy of President Alexander Lukashenko, the man often called Europe's Last Dictator.

Plus has a film, a play or a book ever changed the way you see the world? The activist and photographer Sunil Gupta shares the story of his discovery of the work of the Canadian writer, Alice Munro.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: Songhoy Blues. Credit: Kiss Diouara, Millennium Communication, Bamako)

Aliou Tour\u00e9, lead singer of rock revolutionaries Songhoy Blues, discusses their new album

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Songs For Change2019031620190317 (WS)The Cultural Frontline speaks to singers and songwriters from across the world about how music can tell the story of their country, their people and themselves.

Recent weeks have seen tensions rise between India and Pakistan following the continuing dispute over the territory of Kashmir. Military action has been taken and each nation has banned the other's films and music. Asim Azhar is a rising star of Pakistani music, he tells Tina what this ban will mean for singers, like him, caught between the two nations.

He's known as the Golden Voice of Africa, the legendary singer Salif Keita talks to the BBC's Kim Chakanetsa about facing prejudice growing up in Mali as an albino and why he uses his voice to sing and speak up for albinos everywhere.

Has a song, a book, a poem ever changed the way you see the world? The critically acclaimed singer Laura Mvula shares the story of how she found the inspiration for her latest work, Love Like a Lion, in the poetry of Ben Okri.

Plus we meet the man bidding for Eurovision glory, the Italian singer Mahmood. We find out why his recent singing success has sparked political debate across Italy.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Musician Salif Keita. Credit: Samir Hussein/Getty Images

We speak to musicians from across the world telling stories through song

The world seen through the eyes of artists

South Korean Artists On The Summit Of Change2018060920180610 (WS)
20180611 (WS)
How do a history of division and the prospect of unity inspire South Korean artists, ahead of the on-off meeting between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un? Can art and music cross the border between north and south, both on the map and in the mind?

Novelist Krys Lee tells Tina what her novel, How I Became a North Korean, reveals about how identity is constructed by national borders.

Music agent Bernie Cho gives us his guide to how K-pop propaganda became K-pop diplomacy.

Multi-media artists Moon Kyungwon and Jeon Joonho give Tina an insight into Freedom Village, their video and photo installation based on a mysterious settlement in the demilitarised zone between North and South Korea.

Plus, Kevin Kim of the BBC's Korea Service explores the phenomenon of Korean men swapping military service for competitive dance, with choreographer Lyon Eun Kwon and sound designer Jimmy Sert.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire and Alice Bloch

(Photo: South and North Korean musicians perform a cross-border show in Pyongyang, North Korea on 3rd April, 2018. The message on the backdrop reads 'We Are One.' Credit: AFP/ Getty Images)

How do a history of division and the prospect of unity inspire South Korean artists?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

South Korea's Unlikely Buddy Comedy2017021820170219 (WS)In the week that North Korea conducted a controversial missile test, we hear about the hit South Korean film Confidential Assignment, which portrays cooperation between secret agents from both sides of the border. Film lecturer Dr Jinhee Choi explains what it can tell us about relations between the two countries.

Turkish writer Ece Temelkuran explains how living in Zagreb, and writing in English, inspires feelings of guilt about forgetting her mother tongue.

Tina meets Kenyan law student Charles Muchori, whose short story about life for Nairobi's Uber drivers went viral, and led to a knock on the door from a top Kenyan film director.

Berlin based Polish artist Anna Krenz explains why the political situation in Poland pushed her to start making art again after a break, and to take it, for the first time, to the streets.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: actor Bin Hyun Credit: VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)

What can a hit film about cross border cooperation tell us about real life relations?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Speaking Up For Survivors Through Art2018080420180805 (WS)
20180806 (WS)
Stories of artists who have been inspired to create work by the survivors and victims of violence and trafficking.

We hear the remarkable tale of Circus Kathmandu, the Nepalese troupe founded by trafficking survivors who now educate children through performance and who are the subjects of a new film "Even When I Fall" directed by Sky Neal and Kate Mclarnon.

The Guyanese artist Akima McPherson reveals why she is giving a voice to survivors of domestic violence through her emotive art installation, Walk with Me.

The acclaimed Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo has created pieces on the theme of mourning for more than thirty years, from honouring those who died in the on-going migrant crisis to the victims of the civil war which ravaged her home country for over half a century. She reveals how through her latest work she is sharing the stories of survivors of sexual violence.

Plus has a work of art, a play, a book, a film ever changed the way you see the world? The acclaimed writer Louis de Bernieres shares the story of how he was inspired by the epic poem Ithaka.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Shoku Amirani, Nancy Bennie, Carinya Sharples and Hannah Copeland.

(Photo: Renu from Circus Kathmandu performs on a Kathmandu rooftop Photo Credit: Tom Swindell / Even When I Fall)

How artists are sharing the stories of victims of violence and trafficking through art.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Standing Up For Political Comedy2018090120180902 (WS)
20180903 (WS)
Can comedy and satire change the world - or change minds? We find out what drives Nigeria's Adeola Fayehun and the Brazilian comic Gregório Duviver to take on the politics of their home countries through satire.

Lebanese-Iraqi writer Karl Sharro is a political commentator, an architect and a self-confessed “extremely bad cartoonist”, but he's perhaps best known as the satirist Karl ReMarks. He joins us to discuss how he addresses the politics and media portrayal of the Middle East through humour.

The Cultural Frontline's Mpho Lakaje takes us on a trip to the stand-up comedy club scene of Johannesburg, South Africa. He meets a new generation of comics challenging society and seeking stardom on stage: Tshekedi Monyemore and Vuyo Jiya, plus veteran comic David Kau.

Finally, can comedy change your world? The French Moroccan stand-up comedian Gad Elmaleh reveals how the work of the Hollywood legend Charlie Chaplin showed him how to keep his comedy simple, while helping him keep his family close.

Presented by Shaimaa Khalil
Produced by Kirsty McQuire, Mugabi Turya, Shoku Amirani, Sally Garwood and Mpho Lakaje

Image: Comedian Gad Elmaleh performing on stage in Tunisia (Credit: Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Street Artist And Photographer Jr2017040120170402 (WS)Internationally acclaimed street artist and photographer JR explains why his latest huge piece of public art takes him back to the Paris housing estates or banlieues, where he began his career. His work is currently the subject of a major retrospective at QM Gallery Katara in Doha.

A new initiative in Berlin is offering tours of the city with a focus on the stories of refugees and migrants. We tag along to find out about the alternative side of their home city that locals are being invited to experience.

New York Times best-selling novelist Nicola Yoon tells Tina why she considers it her duty to write books for young people featuring diverse characters, and how the recent debates around immigration in the US have coincided with the subjects she tackles in her books.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: JR outside the Louvre museum in Paris Credit: JOEL SAGET_AFP_Getty Images)

The superstar artist on how he thinks art can encourage understanding in today's France

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Swet Shop Boys, Drone Art2016102920161030 (WS)The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Riz Ahmed, the actor and rapper known for HBO's The Night Of, and the rapper Heems discuss Cashmere, their debut hip hop album as the group Swet Shop Boys. With songs inspired by racial profiling, Islamophobia and One Direction star Zayn Malik, they tell Tina how their experiences have informed their music.

Also on the programme; next week a huge statue of Vladimir the Great will be erected outside the Kremlin in Moscow, we hear why it has been a controversial project from day one, film-maker Khalik Allah reflects on how he developed his signature style on the streets of Harlem and artist Mahwish Chishty reveals the moment she knew she had to make work that explored the drone warfare in her native Pakistan.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Riz MC and Heems of Swet Shop Boys Credit:Erez Avissar)

Telling Fairy Tales For Today2018050520180506 (WS)
20180507 (WS)
This week on The Cultural Frontline we're telling tales of modern magic, myth and morality, from Mexico to the UK and from Italy to South Africa.

Mexican-American cartoonist Lalo Alacaraz tells the BBC's Maria Elena Navas how he helped shape a different narrative for the Mexican fantasy film, Coco.

Super-fan Megha Sharma meets the graphic designers Miraphora Mina and Eduardo Lima at The House of MinaLima, who mix magic and graphics in the Harry Potter movies.

Alessandro Rak, co-director of Cinderella The Cat, reveals how he re-mixed a Neapolitan fairy tale for a dystopian future.

Plus, South African author and columnist Zukiswa Wanner reads us a pan-African parable of political history and gender equality.

We'll explore how the art of the fairy tale can transport you to another world- and change the way you see the real world.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Kirsty McQuire

Image: Miguel plays a magical guitar in the animated film Coco Credit: Disney/ Pixar

Tales of modern myth, magic and morality on The Cultural Frontline

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Aboriginal Comedy All Stars And Mojo Juju2019091420190915 (WS)We head to southern Australia and the land of the Kulin Nations for the Blak & Bright Festival, a celebration of Australia's First Nations writers, playwrights and poets. The writer and festival director Jane Harrison and the poet and educator Evelyn Araluen explain why the festival is essential for culture in today's Australia.

First we make them laugh then we make them think. Two of the brightest stars in Australian comedy, Steph Tisdell and Andy Saunders of the Aboriginal Comedy All Stars tell Tina how they combine comedy and culture to cook up fierce, fresh and funny stand-up.

Meet the indigenous Australian film team who have wowed crowds in London and New York. We hear from the Karrabing Film Collective on how they use film to tell the story of their community's fight against land restrictions and racism.

Plus the singer Mojo Juju shares the story of how her life and her award winning album Native Tongue were shaped by her mixed indigenous Wiradjuri and Filipino heritage.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Image: The comedian Steph Tisdell performing onstage. Credit: Jim Lee

We explore comedy, literature, music and film from Australia's aboriginal communities

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The American Presidential Election2016111220161113 (WS)The Trump effect on culture; singing the election; emojis as art; literary ancestry

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Trump effect on culture; singing the election; emojis as art; literary ancestry.

Following Donald Trump's victory in the US presidential election, we discuss the implications for arts and culture with screenwriter and novelist, Roger L. Simon in Los Angeles, author of ‘The Perils of Coming Out Conservative in Hollywood' and writer and academic, Moustafa Bayoumi in New York, author of ‘This Muslim American Life.' Composer Michael Friedman talks us through his 'State of the Union Song Book', a musical odyssey that saw him travel to twelve US states during the presidential campaign. In an emotionally charged week in politics, New York Times journalist Amanda Hess tells Tina why a New York gallery has acquired the original digital 'emoji' symbols. And after months of identity politics dominating public discourse in America, Sigal Samuel goes on a literary quest to trace her Jewish ancestry among the hidden bookshelves of Brooklyn.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: American football fans wearing emoji masks Credit: Norm Hall / Getty Images)

The Art Of Artificial Intelligence2018110320181104 (WS)This week on the Cultural Frontline we meet the artists working with AI to reimagine the worlds of visual art, music and movies.

Scientist and AI aficionado Janelle Shane sorts AI science fiction from AI science fact and explains how this new technology is being harnessed by artists across the world.

As an AI-generated piece of art goes under the auction hammer at Christie's in New York for the first time, we meet two pioneering artists creating surreal visual art in collaboration with machines, Mario Klingemann and Harshit Agrawal. Is this the start of a new era in the art world?

We discover what happened when Iranian composer and electronic musician Ash Koosha made an “AI singer” that produces surprisingly emotional lyrics.

Plus how is AI changing what we see on the silver screen? The Cultural Frontline's Laura Hubber speaks to Kelly Port, part of the team who used innovative machine learning to create the villain Thanos in the blockbuster movie, Avengers: Infinity War.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Produced by Nancy Bennie, Mugabi Turya, Kirsty McQuire, Shoku Amirani, Laura Hubber and Will Coley.

Image: 79530 Self-Portraits (2018) by artist Mario Klingemann on display at the Gradient Descent exhibition at Nature Morte. Credit: SV Photographic, New Delhi, courtesy of Nature Morte, New Delhi.

What does AI mean for the creative arts?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Art Of Inauguration Speeches2017012120170122 (WS)As the world catches inauguration fever, the poet Nii Ayikwei Parkes discusses the recent scandal of the new President of Ghana plagiarising parts of his inauguration speech from Bill Clinton and George W Bush.

Gambia has reached political crisis point with defeated leader Yahya Jammeh refusing to leave office. The rap activist Killa Ace discusses the situation in his home country from exile in Senegal and reflects on how music can bring about change.

Poland saw mass protests in October when a new harsh anti-abortion law was proposed. Novelist and poet Wioletta Greg discusses how the conservative Law and Justice party is also impacting the arts.

What might you find a museum 15 metres down under the sea? We hear about a new museum off the coast of Lanzarote which aims to highlight the environmental and political concerns of our time.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Ghana's President Nana Akufo-Addo Credit: CRISTINA ALDEHUELA/AFP/Getty Images

What makes a great inauguration speech and is plagiarism forgivable?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Art Of Storytelling2019011220190113 (WS)How do you tell the story of your country through music? The Iranian composer Mehdi Rajabian tells the BBC's Sahar Zand why he's brought musicians from across the Middle East together to promote peace in the region through an ambitious new album.

One of Africa's brightest new film makers, Blitz Bazawule, tells The Cultural Frontline how he fused magical realism and social commentary to tell the story of the tumultuous relationship between two Ghanaian brothers in his new film The Burial of Kojo.

Has a book, a film, or a poem ever changed the way you see the world? Acclaimed poet, storyteller and social media star Rupi Kaur shares her love for the poem ‘On Marriage' from The Prophet by the Lebanese writer and poet Khalil Gibran.

Plus we take to the stage with the renowned theatre director Ola Ince. She shares her views on the transformative power of the theatre and reveals how she brought her latest production The Convert, written by Black Panther star Danai Gurira, to life.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Produced by Mugabi Turya, Sahar Zand, Shoku Amirani, Kirsty McQuire and Nancy Bennie.

(Picture: A scene from the film the Burial of Kojo Photo Credit: Blitz Bazuwale and Michael Fernandez)

How do you tell a great story through music, film, theatre and poetry?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Art Of The Gift2018122220181223 (WS)What does it take for a poet to create a new work to mark a season of celebration and religious tradition? The poets and professors, Dr Kwame Dawes, and Jaqueline Osherow talk about writing verse, song and poetry for festive occasions.

A painting, a pair of trainers or a horse– those are just a few of the gifts received by world leaders this year but what's the meaning behind these political presents? The writer Agnes Poirier unwraps the do's and don'ts of diplomatic gifting.

Has a book, a film, a painting ever changed the way you see the world? The education activist Ziauddin Yousafzai tells the story of the work of art that inspired him to name his daughter, Malala.

We pay a visit to Harlem, New York City and the historic New Amsterdam Music Association. Two of its members take us behind the scenes at this iconic music venue and community cultural treasure.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

Image: A bon voyage gift wrapped with map paper and pink bow. Credit: Getty Images

Celebrating the power and the meaning of gifts in culture, in politics and in life.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Art Of The Political Cartoon2017050620170507 (WS)As voters in the UK get used to the fact that a snap election has been called, political cartoonists Dave Brown and Martin Rowson have been sharpening their pencils to expose what they see as the truth beneath the spin.

Kenya Hakuna Matata is a happy, carefree song praising the beauty of the country. So why did a Kenyan musician Teddy Kalanda Harrison change his song into a warning for politicians ahead of the August elections there?

As the civil unrest in Venezuela escalates, author Angelica Alvaray argues that her country must stop forgetting its history and start to learn lessons from its past.

How participating in a literary festival to discuss murder mysteries in one of the world's most dangerous cities, Karachi in Pakistan, proved a thrilling experience for novelist SS Mausoof.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

( Photo: Political cartoon of the three main party leaders in the UK. Credit: Martin Rowson)

How are political cartoonists portraying UK politicians in the build-up to the election?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Art Of The Vietnam War2020050220200503 (WS)The female view of the impact of the Vietnam War via the prism of art

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Vietnamese American author Monique Truong presents an examination of the female perspective of the Vietnam War, through the prism of art.

Featuring American artists who were at the vanguard of the opposition to the war, along with women who shared the same experiences as Monique - born in Vietnam during the conflict, who experienced the war first hand and whose lives were changed forever - this programme explores five decades of protest art, offering a female perspective on the fallout of a conflict that virtually defined the 60s.

In America, it was called the Vietnam War; in South East Asia, it was referred to as the American War. It was a long, costly and divisive conflict that pitted the communist government of North Vietnam against South Vietnam and its principal ally, the United States - intensified by the ongoing Cold War between America and the Soviet Union.

More than 3 million people (including over 58,000 Americans) were killed in the war, and more than half of the dead were Vietnamese civilians.

The war and its human toll had a profound impact on artists addressing the turbulent times. In this edition of The Cultural Frontline, female artists explain how their lives were changed by the war, and the importance of their work being seen by new generations.

Produced by Des Shaw.
A Zinc Media Production for BBC World Service.

Image: A piece by Tiffany Chung (Credit: Tiffany Chung)

The Art That Changed Me During The Pandemic2021032020210321 (WS)
20210322 (WS)
As part of the BBC World Service festival, South African comic Tumi Morake speaks to global stars and listeners about the art that's inspired them during lockdown.

The actor Dr. John Kani is an icon to many in South Africa and beyond. He is best known from his work in films such as Black Panther and The Lion King, and plays such as Sizwe Banzi Is Dead. When Covid-19 first broke out, he still had two weeks left in a sold-out London run of Kunene and the King, his play about the legacy of apartheid. He tells Tumi how its sudden cancellation affected him and how his passion for South African jazz has kept him going during lockdown.

At the start of the pandemic actor and #MeToo activist Rose McGowan relocated to Mexico, which also happens to be the home of her favourite artist, Frida Kahlo. She reveals how Frida's paintings have helped her heal from the trauma of Hollywood fame, and how they've inspired her to pick up her paintbrush once again.

While many comedians have been kept away from the stage for the past year, comic Rose Matafeo was lucky enough to perform stand-up in her native New Zealand. She shares the challenges of writing and performing stand-up during the pandemic, and how a literary classic has given her hope for a glittering post-pandemic social life.

Plus we hear from our listeners in Cuba, Uganda, Vietnam and beyond about the art that has changed them during the pandemic.

Presented by Tumi Morake

Produced by Lucy Wai

Tumi Morake speaks to global stars about the art that's inspired them during lockdown

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Artist Under Attack By Pizzagate Trolls2017071520170716 (WS)The video artist Maria Marshall frequently features her children in her work and now she's being threatened by conspiracy theorists in the US who have branded her a paedophile and believe her work is connected to the fabricated Pizzagate scandal. She describes what it's like to be falsely accused.

When Njambi McGrath arrived in Britain from Kenya she was shocked by how Africa as a continent was portrayed. She says it's only seen as suffering war, famine or Ebola. Now she has channelled that frustration into a comedy routine called ‘Breaking Black' about what it's like to be a black woman living in the UK today.

The Standing Rock demonstrations, which aimed to shut down the Dakota Access oil pipeline, attracted the attention of the world. Now museums are opening exhibitions reacting to the growing interest in Native American culture. We hear how one artist who was there, Cannupa Hanska Luger, is responding.

Despite dodging bombs in Damascus, and death threats from ISIS, Ahmad Joudeh was determined to become a ballet dancer. Then he caught the eye of the artistic director of the Dutch National Ballet and his dream came true.

Presenter: Tina Daheley

(Photo: Picture of Maria Marshall. Credit: Maria Marshall.)

Maria Marshall often features her children in her work; now she's being attacked for it

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

(Photo: Picture of Maria Marshall. Credit: Maria Marshall.)

The Artistic Power Of Money2018070720180708 (WS)
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How does money and power influence art? Why are these fundamental building blocks shaping the world in which we live and how do artists react?

Venezuelan artist Oscar Olivares explains why his cartoon-like depictions of protest against the Maduro government have become symbols of hope for the thousands of people who want to see an end to the country's socialist regime.

Later this summer Greece will come to the end of its third economic bailout. Nearly a decade of crippling austerity cuts has taken their toll on a country whose public debt is still roughly 180% of its GDP. We're in Athens on the trail of the art which has emerged from the country's economic catastrophe.

And, as the price people are prepared to pay for works of art continues to soar, Australian artist and author Brad Buckley considers the money behind the masterpieces and the people pulling the strings in this multi-billion dollar industry.

Plus, South Korean violin virtuoso Min Kym talks to us about the power of a painting and how it helped her following the theft of her £1.2million Stradivarius violin in 2010.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Johny Cassidy

Image: Greek street art. Credit: Theopi Skarlatos

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Cost Of Hurricane Harvey2017090920170910 (WS)As residents of Texas and Louisiana begin to pick up the pieces of the destruction wrought by Hurricane Harvey, we find out the cultural cost of the storm. We speak to Dean Gladden, the Managing Director of the AlleyTheater, one of the oldest resident theaters the US, and Adam Wagner, former actor, now an arts consultant who is co-ordinating a grassroots fundraising campaign.

Is comedy a threat to authoritarian regimes? Bassem Youssef, a heart surgeon turned comedian who is often called the ‘Jon Stewart of Egypt', launched a satirical TV show in Egypt after the fall of President Mubarak in 2011. It quickly became the most popular TV show in the nation's history with nightly audiences of 30 million, but also made him a target of the authorities. Youssef's story is the subject of a new documentary Tickling Giants. He talks about the power of comedy to hold autocrats to account, whoever they may be.

Toilet: A Love Story is a Bollywood blockbuster with a difference, dealing with an issue never tackled before in Bollywood- India's problem with open defecation. How much influence can such a film have in changing attitudes?

Presenter:Tina Daheley
Producer: Shoku Amirani

Photo: Theatre district of Houston flooded. Credit: THOMAS B. SHEA, Getty Images

How important are the arts at a time of great human cost in a natural disaster?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Photo: Theatre district of Houston flooded. Credit: THOMAS B. SHEA, Getty Images

The Cultural Frontline20170624: where arts and news collide.

During Ramadan, the Saudi TV conglomerate, MBC, has been showing the first ever TV drama to depict life under the so called Islamic state in Syria. Called `Gharabeeb Saoud`, or `Black Crows`, it is based on real life stories of women who join Jihadis in their city stronghold of Raqqa and is an attempt to counter extremist media propaganda. The show has scored highly in MBC's ratings for the Ramadan season, but it has been controversial. We discuss the ambitions of `Black Crows` with MBC spokesperson Mazen Hayek, and Dr Massoumeh Torfeh, a specialist on anti-terrorist media strategy.

As Iceland celebrates the long, light days of Midsummer, best-selling crime author and civil engineer, Yrsa Sigurðardóttir gives us a glimpse of green power in Iceland.

To mark the United Nations World Refugee Day this week, we hear how Iranian rapper Farhood ended up in a British prison when he fled Iran and why he believes rap is vital for a generation of young Iranians.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo: Female member of IS in the TV drama Black Crows. Credit: MBC Group)

The Cultural Frontline20170701: where arts and news collide.

New York Art critic Ben Davis acts as our guide to Ai Wei Wei's latest exhibition, Hansel and Gretel, which explores Surveillance tracking visitors with drones and infrared technology.

Artist Faiza Ramadan and journalist Danya Hajjaji discuss how despite ongoing chaos in Libya, a new and more expressive art scene is blossoming in the country.

To mark Canada Day, we talk to poetry superstar Rupi Kaur about her new collection and how she's become more influenced by politics.

And Columbian short story writer Julianne Pachico explains how the exotic animals living in her neighbourhood have influenced and appeared in her fiction.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Surveillance cameras in the US. Credit: Getty Images)

The Cultural Frontline - B!rth: Syria2017122320171224 (WS)
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At the time of year when many are reflecting on one of the most famous birth stories in history, the nativity, The Cultural Frontline presents a compelling drama about motherhood at a time of conflict.

We join three Syrian women - a mother in Damascus, a young wife sold into prostitution in Lebanon, and a refugee desperate to start a family in Calais - as they embark on the hardest challenge of their lives.

And we speak to the writer, Liwaa Yazji about what moved her to write this ground-breaking drama.

Cast:
Maryam Hamidi as Talar
Sirine Saba as Nouf
Lara Sawalha as Hind
All other roles are played by Ellie Darvill, Clive Hayward, Tayla Kovacevic-Ebong and Kath Weare

Written by Liwaa Yazji, translated by Clem Naylor and adapted for radio by Emma Callander

Directed and produced by Lucy Collingwood

Presenter: Tina Daheley

B!RTH: Syria was one of seven plays originally commissioned by the Royal Exchange Theatre Manchester. The B!rth project is now led by the Centre for Maternal Health at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine.

(Image: A Syrian woman holds her baby in the makeshift migrants camp at the Greek-Macedonian border, Credit: Getty)

The Cultural Frontline presents a compelling drama about motherhood during conflict

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline Presents: Lurker2018122920181230 (WS)Natalie Mackinnon's new drama Lurker shows how social media fandom can become obsession. This urgent play exposes the void left online and offline when a teenage vlogger disappears. Has Verity McAlpine decided to do a digital detox, is she deliberately ghosting her followers, or could the more sinister conspiracy theories be true? As student journalist Anya Kine investigates, she turns the camera on herself. In blurring the lines between vlogger, lurker and stalker, this tense two-hander invites us all to examine our own addictions.

Following an intimate performance of the play, recorded at the world's biggest arts festival in Edinburgh, Natalie lets the listener in on the real events and personal experiences that inspired her to write about life lived online.

In Lurker by Natalie MacKinnon, Anya is played by Neshla Caplan and Josh is played by Alasdair Hankinson. The play was directed for the stage by Caitlin Skinner and for radio by Emma Harding. Lurker was commissioned by The Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh for their Youthquake season.

Presented and produced by Kirsty McQuire

Photo: Internet Addiction- girl viewing two screens, sitting on a beanbag Credit: Kevin Candland/ Getty Images

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline Presents: Squall2018082520180826 (WS)
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Should teachers be armed? That's the question confronted in a fearless and funny new play about guns, schools and millennials from a young Scottish writer.

Rebecca Sweeney's play Squall debates gun control in drama. It's a playwright's urgent response to both the mass school shooting in Parkland, Florida and the March for Our Lives youth protest movement sweeping across the United States.

Following an intimate performance of the play, Rebecca shares why she created an alternative reality of drills and lockdowns, imagining a world in which Scotland armed teachers after the Dunblane primary school massacre in 1996.

In Squall, Rob is played by Michael Ajao, Alice is played by Jamie Marie Leary and Erin is played by Kay McAllister. Squall was directed for the stage by Adura Onashile, then adapted and directed for radio by Emma Harding. Squall was commissioned by The Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, as part of their Youthquake season of new writing.

Presented and produced by Kirsty McQuire

Photo: Michael Ajao, Jamie Marie Leary and Kay McAllister performing in the play Squall at The Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh Credit: David Anderson

Rebecca Sweeney's new play Squall debates gun control in drama

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: Music Without Borders2017123020171231 (WS)
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Music is a language without borders but what does it mean to those who've had to cross borders to survive? Rihab Azar, a classical oud player from Syria, Yasmin Kadi, an Afrobeat singer from Sierra Leone, and Tabrae, an underground hip-hop artist from Iran, are three talented, young musicians forced to leave their home countries.

With some help from award winning music producer Chad Hobson, the three come together for a Cultural Frontline special, not only to share their experiences, but to write an original piece of music to tell their collective story.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Ben Davis

(Image: Yasmin Kadi, Chad Hobson, Rihab Azar, Tabrae, Credit: Gareth Kay/BBC)

Three musicians forced to leave their home come together to tell their story in song.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Legacy Of The Russian Revolution2017060320170604 (WS)The Russian Revolution was a time of great artistic creativity; from the brutality of Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago, to the horror of Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago. The BBC's Alexander Kan and curator Katya Rogatchevskaia take us on a tour of the Hope, Tragedy, Myths exhibition at the British Library in London to examine its cultural legacy.

In Soviet Russia writers were seen as useful tools in the propaganda machine that supported the system, however since the breakup of the Union the demands on novelists has changed. Uzbek author and poet, Hamid Ismailov, considers the role of the writer in Uzbekistan.

What favourite food reminds you of home? Itab Azzam and Dina Mousawi are passionate cooks who set out to preserve Syria's cuisine in their book ‘Syria – Recipes From Home' and by doing so have captured the experiences of women in this conflict torn region.

In his exploration of what it means to be an Icelander, the author Sjon argues that his country should acknowledge the influence of the Nazi regime in the years leading up to the Second World War.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Angie Nehring

Photo: Propaganda poster Credit: The British Library

Take a tour of the Hope, Tragedy, Myths exhibition at the British Library in London

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Photo: Propaganda poster Credit: The British Library

The Day That Divides Australia2018012720180128 (WS)
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This week on The Cultural Frontline, as a debate about the colonial legacy of Australia Day divides the country, we hear from two Australian musicians, Sharon Carpenter and Jacinta Nampijinpa Price, about what the day means to them.

The award winning French-Moroccan novelist Leila Slimani discusses her new role as President Macron's champion of French culture and language.

The Russian drama Loveless was nominated for best foreign language film in this week's Oscars announcement, the film's director Andrey Zvyagintsev reveals what inspired him to make the film.

Plus the composer Anoushka Shankar shares the story of a special moment that shaped the way she thinks about music, her father Ravi Shankhar's Concert for Bangladesh.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: A protester waves a flag during an 'Invasion Day' rally on Australia Day in Melbourne calling for equal rights for indigenous people and for an end to the celebration of Australia Day on January 26th Photo credit: PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images)

We hear from two Australian musicians on what Australia Day means to them.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Future Of Visual Arts2020080120200802 (WS)Art galleries and museums globally are struggling with the coronavirus pandemic, with some closing permanently.

This week on The Cultural Frontline, Tina Daheley hosts a discussion on what's next for the visual arts and how artists and curators are radically re-thinking the future of the art world.

Her panel includes Israeli artist and educator Oreet Ashery; South Sudanese artist and photographer Atong Atem; Ben Vickers, Chief Technology Officer at the Serpentine Gallery; and Tim Marlow, Director and Chief Executive of the Design Museum in London and former Artistic Director of the Royal Academy of Arts.

(Photo: A visitor at the newly reopened State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow. Credit: Dimitar Dilkoff /AFP via Getty Images)

Tina Daheley hosts a discussion on what's next for the visual arts globally

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Kadak Collective2020020120200202 (WS)Kadak is a collective of womxn artists, illustrators, and zine-makers from India, all working in the field of graphic storytelling.

In Hindi, Kadak is a word which means strong and sharp, like Indian tea. The collective was established in 2016 to address the lack of women and people of colour at international comic festivals. Members are spread out across the world, particularly India, the USA and the UK.

The collective's work is personal, political and outspokenly feminist. They've exhibited at comic festivals from St Louis (Missouri), to Chicago, London, Switzerland, and the UAE, and collaborated with the British Council to create a travelling library of their work. For the Goethe Institute's Gender Bender festival in Bangalore, the Kadak collective created a series of works about breasts.

We follow them as they create their first anthology, which will be both a printed book and collection of digital narratives on the web. It's their biggest project to date and the pressures are enormous - inviting more than 50 South Asian artists from 13 different countries to produce graphic narratives on the theme of the bystander. This connects to themes of being an outsider, unsafe public and private spaces, experiences of being in a minority because of religion, caste, and class, patriarchy in families and reflections on sexuality, tribe, ethnicity, nationality, race relationships, systematic displacement,violence, mental health and disability.

Kadak's editorial team have an enormous task on their hands, racing to put the anthology together while also taking an active role in the recent political events and protests unfolding right across India.

Presented by Akhila Krishnan

Image: Sketches of members of the Kadak collective (Courtesy of Shreyas R Krishnan)

Following the work of a team of female Indian artists, illustrators, and zine-makers

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Kadak is a collective of women artists, illustrators, and zine-makers from India, all working in the field of graphic storytelling.

Presenter: Akhila Krishnan

(Photo: Sketches of members of the Kadak collective, courtesy of Shreyas R Krishnan)

The Kenyan Film On The Verge Of Oscar Glory2018022420180225 (WS)
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Could the makers of the Kenyan/German short film Watu Wote be on the path to Oscar glory? The film about a bus attack in Kenya has been nominated in the best short live action film category. We speak to two of its producers, Tobias Rosen and Bramwel Iro, as they prepare for the Academy Awards.

We go behind the lens with the Ethiopian photographer Aida Muluneh, who is aiming to share a more positive image of her country.

Is it le or la? The writer Agnes Poirier sheds light on the gender debate that is tearing up the rules of French grammar.

Plus the best-selling writer Jussi Adler Olsen shares his story of the song that gave him light during a dark time.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Cast and Crew of Watu Wote Picture Credit: Tobias Rosen/Hamburg Media School)

We meet the makers of the Kenyan/German film nominated for an Oscar.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Lagos Comic Con And Nigerian Superheroes2017091620170917 (WS)Tina Daheley is joined by Lagos Comic Con founder, Ayodele Elegba, to talk comics, characters and costumes coming together for the convention billed as ‘Africa's biggest Geek event.' Also, what might American publisher Marvel's first Nigerian superhero mean for the home-grown Nigerian comic book scene?

We take a tour of The Angkor Panorama, a mysterious museum showcasing North Korean art in Cambodia and Tina talks to Song Byeok, a propaganda artist-turned-satirist, who defected from North to South Korea.

From Kolkata, writer Sandip Roy explores the limits of satire through the work of the Indian comedians who keep pushing their politicians to take a joke.

Also, Tina talks to Niviaq Korneliussen about her novel Homo Sapienne, which caused controversy with its candid take on Greenland's challenging social issues.

Photo: An image from the Voyager Comic Credit: Spoof Media

Lagos Comic Con founder Ayodele Elegba on the rise of the Nigerian comic book industry.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Photo: An image from the Voyager Comic Credit: Spoof Media

The Lasting Cultural Impact Of Partition2017010720170108 (WS)This August will mark 70 years since the partition of India and the creation of the nation of Pakistan. Pakistani author Kamila Shamsie and Indian writer Urvashi Butalia discuss how the legacy of partition continues to influence culture in the two countries seven decades on.

As Kenya prepares for elections this year, Kaz and Nini of the successful sex podcast The Spread, discuss how they're challenging conservative attitudes to sex in Kenya.

As the centenary approaches, award-winning Russian novelist Eugene Vodolazkin reflects on why the Russian Revolution of 1917 continues to fascinate the country's novelists.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: flags of India and Pakistan Credit: PRAKASH SINGH/AFP/GettyImages)

How the partition of India in 1947 continues to influence culture in India and Pakistan

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Movie Making Inmate Of Manus Island2017101420171015 (WS)A new documentary film called 'Chauka, Please tell us the time' gives an insider's view of the treatment of inmates at Australia's controversial Manus Island detention centre, who are mostly asylum seekers that have arrived on boats. We speak to the Iranian producer and co-director Arash Kamali Sarvestani who approached an Iranian inmate on the Island, Behrouz Boochani, to make shot the film in secret on his smartphone.

A landmark court ruling in Osaka which states that only a qualified doctor can apply tattoos, has left Japan's tattoo industry facing an uncertain future. We hear from Hori Benny a tattoo artist in Osaka and Yoshimi Yamamoto, Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Tsuru University in Japan about the implications of the ruling for Japanese culture and the changing attitudes towards this art form in a conservative society.

This year's PEN Pinter Prize, the renowned Irish poet Michael Longley, speaks about a poet's role in times of unrest and turmoil and the impact of conflict on children.

Presnter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Shoku Amirani

How a detainee's smartphone film shed light on Australia's controversial detention centre

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Presnter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Shoku Amirani

The British Zambian poet Kayo Chingonyi settled in Britain when he was just 6 years old and started writing when he was 10. He talks about searching for his identity in the space between these two cultures, and how questions around rites of passage from boyhood to manhood have inspired his first full collection of poetry Kumukanda.

The Saudi Artist Putting Women In The Driving Seat2017102120171022 (WS)Tina Daheley talks to digital artist Fida al-Hussan about creating empowering art in Saudi Arabia at a time of social change. Fida's viral music video Hwages puts women in the driving seat and it is a sight that could soon become commonplace, after Saudi women won the right to drive in September 2017.

Kurdish street photographer Saman Ali, tells us why he chooses to capture the details of people's everyday lives rather than the war and destruction. Following Liberia's Presidential Elections, we find out why some of the nation's biggest pop musicians are writing hit songs for presidential candidates.

Plus, two of the cast of the critically acclaimed play The Fall, tell us how they created a show inspired by their involvement in South Africa's #RhodesMustFall student protests.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Mugabi Turya

(Photo: Still image from music video Hwages Photo Credit: Fida Al Hussan)

The Saudi digital artist bringing her aspirations alive through her imagery

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

(Photo: Still image from music video Hwages Photo Credit: Fida Al Hussan)

The Serious Business Of Comedy2017072220170723 (WS)Comedy often ventures where no other artistic medium dares.

Stand up comedians are used to straddling the line between funny and offensive. But as Germany upholds its ban of a comedian's satirical poem mocking Turkish President Erdogan, and Facebook promises to hire 3,000 extra human moderators to capture offensive content, it begs the question - can we still take a joke? Navigating the line between funny and offensive, ground-breaking Indian comedian Aditi Mittal and British sensation Shazia Mirza.

Over the course of 2017, Canada is celebrating turning 150. The anniversary marks the birth of the ‘Canadian Confederation', the coming together of the British colonies of Canada, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. But for many native Canadians, they argue it denies their very existence. Despite the backlash, Cree Indian folk icon Buffy Sainte Marie explains why she believes performing at the birthday celebrations is a chance for change.

Growing up in Beirut amidst the aftermath of civil war, female MC Malikah took to the stage when she was just 16. She is proof of the city's rich underground hip hop movement. But as political unrest continues, there are few opportunities for Lebanon's emerging artists beyond street level. However for Malikah, who's now keeping company with Snoop Dogg, rapping in Arabic is one way she believes she can promote her country on the international stage.

And finally to South Korea. Koreans are huge consumers of digital media. But according to TV comedian Lee Young Joo, despite being able to boast the fastest internet on the planet, the country's high level of connectedness is yet to penetrate a culturally conservative landscape. Lee Young Joo explains how as a comedian he is attempting to challenging the status quo.

Photo : Comedian Aditi Mittal

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Photo : Comedian Aditi Mittal

The Stories Of 2016 Through Art And Culture2016122420161225 (WS)How have artists responded to Syria, Brexit, the US elections and the migrant crisis?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Syrian film-maker Avo Kaprealian and American artist Molly Crabapple discuss two very different projects documenting the Syrian Civil War.

Tina visits the Good Chance Theatre Company to take part in The Machine to be Another, a virtual reality simulation of the life of a refugee in the UK.

Novelist Panos Karnezis reflects on why artists and writers were taken by surprise by Britain's vote to leave the European Union.

Tina hears about a rare pro-Donald Trump art exhibition and finds out what impact a Trump Presidency might have on culture in the United States.

Alexander Kan considers what a new statue in Moscow can tell us about President Vladimir Putin's state of mind and Eurovision winner Jamala discusses 1944, her award-winning song which provoked controversy in Russia.

And blogger Blaire Moskowitz describes how the phenomenon of Pokemon Go might impact the world's museums.

Photo: A demonstration about the situation in Aleppo, Credit: AFP/Getty Images

The Street Photographers Reframing Africa2019101920191020 (WS)Picture an Africa that is more than sunsets and safaris, or where war, poverty and famine aren't the focus. Young street photographers are using their phones and digital cameras to document a continent that's changing at breakneck speed.

Adora Mba meets the talented young photographers who are subverting stereotype and capturing the everyday.

In Harare, husband-and-wife team Chiedza and Zash Chinhara want to show that there's more to Zimbabwe than the Mugabe aftermath. She's a stylist and he's a photographer, and together they set up glossy fashion shoots in largely ignored parts of the city.

Moroccan street photographer Yoriyas shows us Casablanca in all its colour and contrast. He tells us how his North African heritage and his dance training have led to a unique style of composition: women in hijabs sit next to African B-Boys, while skyscrapers stand beside colonial buildings.

The photographs of Eyerusalem Jiregna capture the people of Ethiopia as they go to school, to work, and to worship. She explains why it's important to tell their stories as a female photographer.

In Accra, Ghana, a new wave of photographers are showing what ordinary life is like for residents of one of Africa's fastest growing cities. Nana Kofi Acquah, Francis Kokoroko and Prince Gyasi, who have thousands of followers on Instagram, meet Adora during the Chale Wote festival, to explain why it's so important to offer a counterpoint to the mainstream media by documenting the energy, optimism and diversity of the modern Africa in which they live.

Produced by Blakeway Productions

Image: Moroccan photographer Yoriyas (Courtesy of Yoriyas)

Profiling photographers who are capturing Africa's optimism, dynamism and diversity

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald and Fleur Macdonald, Blakeway Productions

Image: Francis Kokoroko (Credit: Nana Kofi Acquah)

The Us Country Singer Calling For Tighter Gun Controls2018031020180311 (WS)
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As the gun control debate continues to divide the United States we meet Will Hoge, the country music star who believes it's time for more than “thoughts and prayers” when it comes to discussing gun violence.

Following the resignation of Jacob Zuma, we speak to two artists, Ayanda Mabulu and Jonathan Shapiro, who have courted controversy with their artistic depictions of South Africa's former president.

The Venezuelan rock band ViniloVersus talk about how they tackle the current political crisis in their nation through music.

Plus the comedian Hasan Mihnaj shares his memories of a special moment from former host of The Daily Show, Jon Stewart, that changed his outlook on the role of comedy and satire in society.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Las Vegas memorial following the mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival in Las Vegas in October 2017 Photo credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

We speak to Will Hoge, the American country music star calling for tighter gun controls.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Tiktok: The App That's Transforming Social Media2020070420200705 (WS)Welcome to the world of TikTok, one of the world's fastest growing and most controversial social media platforms. The BBC's Sophia Smith Galer speaks to the TikTok creators Melissa Ong aka @chunkysdead and Robert Tolppi about the world of elite and deep TikTok and finds there is a lot more to the platform than the dance trends and viral comedy clips that have made it so popular.

We hear from the creators of a surprising TikTok hit: an Australian drama micro-series about a woman's struggle with infertility. Short videos of intimate, honest moments of Charlie's IVF journey have received over 2 million TikTok views and sparked heartfelt conversations with audiences online. The creative team behind All Our Eggs discuss why they think the drama has captured the TIkTok audience's imagination.

Meet the TikTok dance star putting his own personal twist on popular trends such as the Toosie Slide. Dancer, singer and Indigenous activist Theland Kicknosway tells us why he is using TikTok as a platform to share his culture with the world.

Presented by Tina Daheley with Sophia Smith-Galer

Photo: TikTok on a smartphone. Credit: Getty

How TikTok is changing our culture and storytelling

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Welcome to the world of Tik Tok, one of the world's fastest growing and most controversial social media platforms. The BBC's Sophia Smith Galer speaks to the Tik Tok creators Melissa Ong aka @chunkysdead and Robert Tolppi about the world of elite and deep Tik Tok and finds there is a lot more to the platform than the dance trends and viral comedy clips that have made it so popular.

Meet the Tik Tok dance star putting his own personal twist on popular trends such as the Toosie Slide. Dancer, singer and Indigenous activist Theland Kicknosway tells us why he is using Tik Tok as a platform to share his culture with the world.

Photo: TikTok on a smartphone. Credit: Getty

Toni Morrison: Power In Prose And Poetry2019081020190811 (WS)A tribute to the life and work of Toni Morrison and an exploration of the work of contemporary poets from Puerto Rico and Ukraine.

"As good a storyteller, as captivating, in person as she was on the page" that is how President Obama remembered Toni Morrison, a titan of American literature, who died this week. We remember her life and reflect on the influence of the Nobel Prize-winning author.

The Ukrainian poet Ilya Kaminsky tells us about his extraordinary new collection Deaf Republic about a deaf boy being shot in an occupied country.  It's a haunting story which defies categorisation, feeling more like a drama than a poetry collection.  And as a Deaf person writing poetry, Ilya explains, it also offers insight into what it feels like to be deaf.

Political change has come to Puerto Rico following recent demonstrations which eventually led to the resignation of Governor Ricardo Rosello. We hear from the poet Raquel Salas Rivera on how Puerto Rico's political situation and the continuing aftermath of Hurricane Maria have shaped their poetry.

Presented by Chi Chi Izundu

Image: Toni Morrison, 2008. Credit: Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

A tribute to Toni Morrison and we explore the work of poets from Puerto Rico and Ukraine.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Truth And Taboo From Malaysia To The Middle East2018051220180513 (WS)
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On this week's Cultural Frontline: censorship and the artists and satirists who use their creativity to evade it.

Malaysian writer Bernice Chauly discusses her taboo-breaking political protest novel, Once We Were There, after Malaysia's historic election result this week.

Reporter Milly Chowles meets comedian Hasan Minhaj of US TV's The Daily Show, to find out what it's like to perform at the White House Correspondents' Dinner and to ask whether jokes can change the world.

Sodienye Kurubo, head writer at Nigeria's only satirical TV show, The Other News, and Isam Uraiqat, Jordanian founder of Middle East satirical website, Al-Hudood, compare the red lines of ridicule that exist in their parts of the world.

Plus, award-winning actor and activist Sir Ian McKellen reveals the comic film that transformed his acting technique.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Kirsty McQuire

(Photo: A supporter wearing a T-shirt showing Mahathir Mohamad, the former Malaysian prime minister who was newly elected in May 2018.
Credit: Manan Vatsyayana/ AFP/ Getty Images)

Censorship and the artists and satirists who use their creativity to evade it

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Tsitsi Dangarembga: Writing Zimbabwe's Women2020112820201129 (WS)
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This week as part of the BBC World Service's 100 Women Season we're celebrating the female writers, artists and performers overcoming challenges and making their voices heard.

Shortlisted for the prestigious Booker prize, Tsitsi Dangarembga's latest novel This Mournable Body reveals late 1990s Zimbabwe through the eyes of her female lead, Tambusai. Tsitsi talks to Tina about exploring the experience of Zimbabwean women through her characters and how she feels about being shortlisted at this point in her writing career.

Chilean female collective Las Tesis speak to our reporter Constanza Hola about their viral protest song The Rapist in Your Path and how it's inspired women worldwide to speak out against sexual violence.

British Somali poet Hibaq Osman's writing explores family history and identity with heartfelt honesty. She shares a poem from her first full collection, Where the Memory Was.

Plus: has a film, a book or a song ever changed the way you see the world? South African singer-songwriter Zahara on how she took courage from the film A Walk to Remember.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Tsitsi Dangarembga. Credit: DANIEL ROLAND/AFP via Getty Images)

We celebrate the female writers, artists and performers making their voices heard

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Tumi Morake: South Africa's Pioneering Comedian2020062020200621 (WS)The South African star on using comedy to make her voice heard

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Tumi Morake's comedy confronts tough areas from discrimination to poverty, corruption to inequality. Her fearless performances have seen her both lauded and severely criticized. In 2018 she became the first African woman to have her own stand-up show on Netflix but she has also received threats for her work which highlights the continuing inequalities of modern day South Africa. Reporter Mpho Lakaje speaks to Tumi about using comedy to make her voice heard.

At the start of the coronavirus lockdown comedy duo Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini swapped their New York apartment for a remote cabin in the Canadian wilderness. For the Cultural Frontline they share a postcard with their views on the events taking place back in the USA.

Making an audience laugh is tricky at the best of times, but lockdown has made it much harder. Comedians Bright Okpocha AKA Basketmouth and Prashasti Singh tell us about the brave new world of producing comedy for social media, and discuss the future of the industry in Nigeria and India.

Has a comedian, a musician or a sports star ever changed the way you see the world? Have they made you stand a little bit taller or feel that little bit more confident as you take on life's challenges? The Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani reflects on the impact of his idol and inspiration the boxer, Muhammad Ali.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: Tumi Morake. Credit: Kevin Mark Pass/Blu Blood Africa)

Us Surveillance As Art2017070120170702 (WS)New York Art critic Ben Davis acts as our guide to Ai Wei Wei's latest exhibition, Hansel and Gretel, which explores Surveillance tracking visitors with drones and infrared technology.

Artist Faiza Ramadan and journalist Danya Hajjaji discuss how despite ongoing chaos in Libya, a new and more expressive art scene is blossoming in the country.

To mark Canada Day, we talk to poetry superstar Rupi Kaur about her new collection and how she's become more influenced by politics.

And Columbian short story writer Julianne Pachico explains how the exotic animals living in her neighbourhood have influenced and appeared in her fiction.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Surveillance cameras in the US. Credit: Getty Images)

Exploring Ai Wei Wei's exhibition on surveillance which tracks visitors with drones.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Waad Al-kateab And Fearless Female Storytellers2021030620210307 (WS)
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Ahead of International Women's Day, Nawal al-Maghafi hears taboo-busting personal stories from fearless female creatives on this week's Cultural Frontline.

After almost a decade of civil war in Syria, Nawal speaks to the Oscar-nominated filmmaker Waad al-Kateab and the journalist Wafa Ali Mustafa about collaborating to share the female experience of conflict. Waad tells Nawal about her award-winning film For Sama, made as a new mother during the siege of Aleppo. Their new film documents the disappearance of Wafa's father, one of tens of thousands estimated by the UN to have disappeared during the conflict.

British activist Charlie Craggs has created a safe space to combat transphobia. Her unique beauty salon, Nail Transphobia, shares the stories of her trans-sisters over a shape and polish. In the BBC's Beauty Fix podcast, Charlie reveals the rituals of self-care that are keeping her spirits up during lockdown, with model and author Naomi Shimada.

And it might be one of the last taboos in the fight for gender equality - women choosing not to have children. Israeli novelist Sarah Blau tells Nawal about combining a personal truth with a page-turning thriller, to challenge the stigma of child-free women in her religious community.

Plus, Patricia Cornwell, one of America's best-selling crime writers, who puts female characters front and centre. She tells The Cultural Frontline about the pioneering female author who set her on course to be a writer.

Presenter: Nawal al-Maghafi

(Photo: Waad Al-Kateab. Credit: Courtesy of Channel 4 News/ITN Productions)

Ahead of International Women's Day, we speak to Oscar-nominated filmmaker Waad al-Kateab

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

What's Left Of Iraq's Nimrud?2016111920161120 (WS)As the ancient city is recaptured from IS, what's left of the historic site?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The ancient city of Nimrud in Northern Iraq has been liberated from Islamic State control, but how much damage has been done during the two year occupation? Dr Mark Altaweel discusses the situation.

Also in the programme, which books make it into US prisons? As Donald Trump vows to deport or imprison millions of illegal migrants, a group of volunteers for a charity called Books through Bars in New York discuss the letter requests they get from prisoners and how they work out which books will make the cut.

After extremist violence in Bangladesh this summer, co-founder of the Dhaka Literary Festival Ahsan Akbar describes what it's like organising a books festival in a city where writers have been threatened.

Novelist Sandip Roy explains why the current conflict between India and Pakistan has taken a cultural turn.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Destruction at Nimrud Credit: SAFIN HAMED/AFP/Getty Images)

What's The Future Of Film?2020081520200816 (WS)This week, as part of a series of special programmes, we look to the future of cinema and TV.

One of the biggest changes to our cultural landscape has been the transformation in the way so many of us watch films.

Cinemas around the world have been off limits and streaming services have never been popular. Production is being drastically reimagined to include social distancing and coronavirus prevention measures. Plus in the light of the resurgent Black Lives Matter movement calls to make the global film industry truly diverse and inclusive are growing ever louder.

We ask what's next for film. How can cinema and the film industry be reinvented in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic?

Tina is joined by award winning American-Iranian writer director Maryam Keshavarz, Nigerian activist and documentarian Pamela Adie, Swiss choreographer and virtual reality pioneer Gilles Jobin and in London the British director Francis Annan and film critic Rhianna Dhillon.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: Moviegoers begin to attend reopened cinemas. Credit: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Tina Daheley hosts a discussion on what's next for film globally

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

What's The Future Of Performing Arts?2020080820200809 (WS)This week, as part of a series of special programmes, we look to the future of the performing arts.

As many theatres around the world remain dark, closed to audiences for months and with a largely freelance community of actors, writers, directors, musicians and production crews unable to work, we talk to four global theatre makers about the impact of the pandemic on performing arts communities.

We ask what's next for theatre. Is the outlook bleak or is there cause for hope from the creativity and invention shown in lockdown? What does the future of stage performance hold?

Tina Daheley is joined by Rwandan theatre director and curator of the Ubumuntu International Arts festival, Hope Azeda, Chilean playwright and theatre director Guillermo Calderon, Indian playwright, theatre director and lecturer Abhishek Majumdar and the artistic director of the Kiln theatre in London, Indhu Rubasingham.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: The empty auditorium of the London Coliseum. Credit: Richard Baker/In Pictures via Getty Images)

Tina Daheley hosts a discussion on what's next for the performing arts globally

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

What's The Future Of Visual Arts?2020080120200802 (WS)Art galleries and museums globally are struggling with the coronavirus pandemic, with some closing permanently.

This week on The Cultural Frontline, Tina Daheley hosts a discussion on what's next for the visual arts and how artists and curators are radically re-thinking the future of the art world.

Her panel includes Israeli born artist and educator Oreet Ashery; South Sudanese artist and photographer Atong Atem; Ben Vickers, Chief Technology Officer at the Serpentine Gallery; and Tim Marlow, Director and Chief Executive of the Design Museum in London and former Artistic Director of the Royal Academy of Arts.

(Photo: A visitor at the newly reopened State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow. Credit: Dimitar Dilkoff /AFP via Getty Images)

Tina Daheley hosts a discussion on what's next for the visual arts globally

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

When Coming Out Is A Dangerous Thing2017072920170730 (WS)As the BBC celebrates the contribution that lesbian and gay people have made to popular culture and the arts, we acknowledge the many LGBTQ artists around the world for whom coming out in their work is a dangerous thing to do.

‘Rainbow Riots' is an album which features LGBTQ artists from countries all over the world; including Uganda where homosexuality is a crime. Musician Kowa Tigs, from Kampala, and Swedish music producer Petter Wallenberg discuss how adversity can encourage creativity.

At this year's Pride parade in London, India's first LGBTQ choir, Rainbow Voices Mumbai, joined forces with the UK-based Pink Singers. It was a bold statement that drew attention to the fact that India still criminalises same-sex relationships under a law introduced by the British under colonial rule. Simon Pearson and Ashish Pandya talk about the courage that comes from the gay community supporting each other worldwide.

In February the American playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney won an Oscar for co-writing Moonlight a film which explores the experiences of gay black men and which he based on his own childhood in Miami. He explains why ‘Paris is Burning', a documentary film which captures the US underground drag scene in the 1980's, was a source of great comfort as a young man.

Scottee is an artist who describes himself as “fat and working class, with a penchant for ladies clothes ? His work addresses what it is to be an outsider; whether because of race, class, age or sexuality. His new art installation ‘You Are Not Alone' is currently on show in Southend on Sea in England and aims to sum up the reality of being queer in Britain.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Picture: Gay man in Uganda. Copyright: Tania Marti

Acknowledging the artists for whom coming out in their work is a risky thing to do.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Picture: Gay man in Uganda. Copyright: Tania Marti

When Pop Music Gets Political2018111720181118 (WS)This week the Ugandan pop star turned opposition MP Bobi Wine performed for the first time since being charged and jailed for treason. We explore the political appeal of the man dubbed “The Ghetto President” with the award winning Ugandan journalist Patience Akumu.

In recent months hundreds of people have been killed in Nicaragua following protests against the country's president, Daniel Ortega and his government. One musician speaking out against the violence in his home country is Luis Enrique, known as The Prince of Salsa. He tells The Cultural Frontline's Maria Bakkalapulo why he is now challenging Ortega's government through his latest song ‘Mordaza.'

From Kanye West to Kendrick Lamar – how does hip hop relate to US politics today? We hear from the hip-hop writer Shawn Setaro on the relationship between rap music and politics and how President Trump went from hip-hop idol to hip hop's public enemy.

Plus have you ever heard of Grindcore? The film-maker and musician Doug Brown explains the political messages behind this abrasive and confrontational music style.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Ugandan musician turned politician Robert Kyagulanyi, commonly known as Bobi Wine, sings on a stage in Busabala, suburb of Kampala, Uganda, on November 10, 2018.Photo Credit: Isaac KASAMANI / AFP)

Political voices from the world of pop music.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Why I Instagram The Hong Kong Protests2020061320200614 (WS)From a rooftop in Hong Kong, a photographer records a major chapter in his city's history

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

In Hong Kong thousands of demonstrators have been protesting against a controversial new security law announced by the Chinese government, a law which many state is used to suppress political opponents in mainland China. From a rooftop in the city, one Instagram photographer tells us why he is taking pictures of this crucial chapter of history.

Have you ever wondered what happens on the other side of the wall, in the home of a neighbour? Gail Albert Halaban is known for just that, taking photos of her neighbours and capturing what life is like next door. She speaks to the BBC's Mugabi Turya about how her photography is bringing neighbours together during the coronavirus lockdown.

Medellin was once considered the most dangerous city in the world. But what is it like now? Photographer Santiago Mesa's images of contemporary civil unrest and gang violence reveal the Colombian city through the eyes of one of its citizens. Santiago Mesa tells us how he uses his camera to tell stories of real life in Colombia now.

Plus the Washington Post's Deputy Director of Photography Robert Miller and the photojournalist Marvin Joseph share their experiences of covering the continuing Black Lives Matter protests.

Presented by Mugabi Turya

(Photo: Protesters in Hong Kong. Credit: Ivan)

Why The Gruffalo's Axel Scheffler Draws For Europe2018011320180114 (WS)
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This week on The Cultural Frontline we find out how leading international artists are responding to some of the world's biggest news stories.

The Grufallo illustrator Axel Scheffler tells The Cultural Frontline why he has responded to Brexit through illustration.

The superstar Puerto Rican artist iLe speaks to The Cultural Frontline's Maria Bakkalapulo about the political future of Puerto Rico following the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

We hear from the writer Sandip Roy on how violence, protest and controversy gripped India, following the release of the controversial film Padmavat.

Plus Jeff Garlin, one of the stars of the hit US comedy Curb Your Enthusiasm shares the story of the film that changed the way he saw the world.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Picture: Axel Scheffler's ‘EU-le' drawing from the Drawings For Europe Exhibition Picture Credit: Axel Scheffler)

How leading artists are responding to some of the world's biggest news stories.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Will Franken: Comedy And Culture In Trump's America2019112320191124 (WS)He's a fan of Monty Python and Donald Trump. We find out what makes US comedian Will Franken tick. He speaks to Tina about performing conservative satire, being anti-political correctness and why he's remaining loyal to the US President despite recent scandals.

A game-changer in the world of tap, Michelle Dorrance talks to the Cultural Frontline about how the history of tap dance mirrors the social story of America from slavery through the civil rights movement to today's 21st Century dance.

Beats, rhymes and saving lives. We head to Baltimore to hear how the community arts project Beats not Bullets is helping the city's youth turn their back on gang violence for a brighter future in hip-hop.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Will Franken
Image credit: Scott Ambrose

The comedian Will Franken on why he supports President Trump

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Wonder Woman Ban In Lebanon2017061720170618 (WS)Why has the new Wonder Woman superhero movie been banned from cinemas in Lebanon? We hear about the campaign to boycott the film starring Israeli actress Gal Gadot and speak to political analyst Halim Shebaya in Beirut and Hollywood screenwriter Kamran Pasha in LA, on their arguments for and against the boycott and the ban.

The Turkish author Ece Temelkuran shares her concerns on how the increased powers of President Erdogan will impact on a generation of Turkish women.

As the far right AFD or Alternative for Germany party seeks to enter the national parliament for the first time in September's German elections, we hear why a play called Fear by theater director Falk Richter provoked legal action from a member of the AFD.

With Tina Daheley

Photo: Gal Gadot in Wonder Woman Credit: 2017Warner Bros. Entertainment and Ratpac Entertainment LLC

Why has the new Hollywood superhero movie Wonder Woman been banned in Lebanon?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Photo: Gal Gadot in Wonder Woman Credit: 2017Warner Bros. Entertainment and Ratpac Entertainment LLC

Work-life: A Provocative New Drama About Our Near Future2019122820191229 (WS)How would you feel if a robot took your job? That's the question at the heart of a new play exploring how work place pressures spill over into our family relationships.

Katy works long hours at the local warehouse with no one to talk to but her new colleague, a machine. She then unexpectedly loses her job. Will she fight to get her role back or pursue a new career for a cause she can believe in?

The Cultural Frontline presents the radio premiere of the play, Work-Life by Diane Stewart recorded on location at the Edinburgh Festival. Accompanied by an interview between the writer Diane Stewart and award winning playwright Zinnie Harris.

The featured play was commissioned by The Traverse Theatre with the support of their partners.

Writer: Diane Stewart

Cast: Dawn Sievewright, Neshla Caplan and Gail Watson.

Produced and Presented by Lucy Collingwood.

Image credit: Getty

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

World War One: The Art Of Remembrance2018111020181111 (WS)We explore how writers, poets and artists remember the legacy of World War One through their work.

On a British beach, Oscar-winning filmmaker Danny Boyle looks ahead to Armistice Day. On the centenary of the end of the First World War, Pages of the Sea invites the public to draw faces of the fallen in the sand, as a nationwide gesture of remembrance.

Award-winning Jamaican poet Tanya Shirley performs Madness is Not For Everybody, her poem meditating on mental health and colonial masters in the trenches. Tanya's poem is published in Unwritten: Caribbean Poems After the First World War, a collection of new poems honouring the contribution of the British West Indian Regiment to World War One.

An estimated 1.5 million Indians served during World War One – but how are they remembered? Literary historians Dr Rakhshanda Jalil and Professor Santanu Das discuss how the nation responded to the conflict through poetry and prose.

Plus, we focus on the current conflict in a country shaped and reshaped many times since World War One- Yemen. Ahmed Jahaf is a graphic designer turned war artist. The BBC's Afra Ahmed asks him why he swapped commercial graphics for images campaigning for an end to the war in Yemen.

Presented by Tina Daheley
Produced by Kirsty McQuire, Mugabi Turya, Jerome Weatherald, Nancy Bennie

Image: An artist's impression of a soldier's portrait in the sand for Pages of the Sea Credit:14-18 NOW

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Wounds Of War: Angola's Troubled Past2017100720171008 (WS)As Angola chooses a new president, João Lourenço, award-winning Angolan artist Kiluanji Kia Henda discusses how artists can interact with his country's recent violent history and politics.

Argentinian rapper Romina Bernardo, better known as Chocolate Remix, talks about taking Reggaeton music, which is known for its sexist and homophobic overtones, and remixing it for a feminist, gender-fluid audience in Buenos Aires, the gay capital of South America.

Male circumcision is the backdrop of a new feature film called The Wound, South Africa's submission for the foreign-language Oscar. The film's star is South African singer, songwriter and author, Nakhane. He explains why he's defying traditionalists to expose the issue of botched adult male circumcisions, the result of a traditional manhood initiation ritual practised by the Xhosa tribe.

And Bijan Khalili, owner of the Ketab bookshop in the heart of Los Angeles, which is home to a huge Iranian diaspora, talks about getting around censorship of books in Iran by publishing and selling banned Persian books since 1981.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Producer: Paul Waters

(Photo: Kiluanji Kia Henda. Credit: Muamby Wassaky)

Artist Kiluanji Kia Henda on using art to examine Angola's civil war wounds

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

(Photo: Kiluanji Kia Henda. Credit: Muamby Wassaky)

Writing America's New Chapter2021012320210124 (WS)
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As their nation starts a new chapter with the inauguration of President Joe Biden, we hear from the novelists Michael Farris Smith and Zaina Arafat on writing the American story at a time of national crisis.

Monique Roffey is one of Trinidad's most celebrated writers. This month she won a Costa award for her new novel The Mermaid of Conch: A Love Story. Monique shares the story of how William Golding's novel, The Inheritors shaped her life and her love of literature

This week, Russian opposition politician Alexei Navalny was detained by state authorities as he returned to Moscow after nearly being killed by a nerve agent attack. The writer Sergei Lebedev discusses how he reflects political truths in his new novel Untraceable, a story about physical, moral and political poisons in Putin's Russia.

Plus literary journalist Amy Brady explains why the increasingly popular genre Cli-Fi or climate fiction is bringing the issues of climate change and environmental damage to readers through novels.

Presented by Nawal al-Maghafi

(Photo: Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th President of the United States in Washington, DC. Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Novelists Michael Farris Smith and Zaina Arafat on how they write the American story

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

Writing Dystopia Now2018120820181209 (WS)From Nigeria to Pakistan we speak to leading authors about writing dystopian literature today.

From critically acclaimed novel to award winning television series, Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale moved the genre of feminist dystopia from the margins to the mainstream. But now, in the age of #Metoo and #TimesUp, how do you tackle the oppression of women without being exploitative? We speak to two writers championed by Atwood, the British debut novelist Sophie Mackintosh and Pakistani writer Bina Shah about their novels The Water Cure and Before She Sleeps.

Picture a near-future with neon cities filled with robots, crime, hackers and anti-heroes- this is Cyberpunk. From American novels to Japanese manga and anime, Kumiko Saito explains how the futuristic sci-fi genre blends high technology with low life to create cult stories with enduring appeal.

They call it Mad Horse City – it's a place where your space determines who you are and how you dream. We take a trip to Lagos, Nigeria in the year 2115 with the writer Wale Lawal to discover an African vision of dystopia.

Climate change, civil war and an America set apart from the rest of the world is the setting of the award winning novel American War. We speak to its author Omar El Akkad about how his futuristic novel reflects America today and why it encourages western readers to put themselves in the shoes of the world's displaced peoples.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Supporters of Planned Parenthood dressed as characters from 'The Handmaid's Tale,' hold a rally as they protest the US Senate Republicans' healthcare bill outside the US Capitol in Washington, DC, June 27, 2017. Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

From Nigeria to Pakistan we speak to leading authors writing dystopian literature today

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Writing Inspired By Chibok, Us Election Art2016102220161023 (WS)Art inspired by this year's US election and a return home for a lost choral work.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Art inspired by this year's election, a return home to Russia for a lost choral work

21 of the Chibok school girls abducted by Boko Haram in 2014 were returned last week, 197 are still missing. Playwright Theresa Ikoko and poet Titilope Sonuga discuss why they've both drawn on this story in their work and what they think art can achieve in the face of tragedy.

Also in the programme; art critic Ben Davis reports on why Donald Trump has become a source of inspiration for artists this election cycle, a long lost choral work is being staged in Russia next week nearly 100 years after it was smuggled out of the country, we find out why it's an American choir who'll be performing it, and novelist Neil Hegarty considers why it took so long for his childhood memories of The Troubles in Northern Ireland to make it into his fiction.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Yvette Boakye in a scene from the play Girls Credit:Creative Nation)

Zaha Hadid's Artistic Inspiration2016121020161211 (WS)How the architect developed her distinctive style through drawing and painting.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Zaha Hadid, the influential Iraqi architect known for her curved, futuristic designs died earlier this year. A new exhibition in London examines her early paintings and drawings to try and catch a glimpse of the distinctive style that made her a star of the architecture world. Tina meets her close friend, the world famous curator Hans Ulrich Obrist to discuss the work.

As Zimbabwe's government attempts to ease the country's economic woes by introducing new currency, writer and journalist Tinashe Mushakavanhu examines how Harare's cultural scene is faring.

Since the failed military coup in Turkey this July, many in the arts community feel there is extra pressure on artists, writers and academics in the country. Writer Ece Temelkuran explains how the unpredictability of the current climate stifles creativity.

And actress and writer Mallika Taneja discusses her one woman stage play, examining the harassment and double standards Indian women face in public space. She begins the play completely naked and describes how she tries to make the audience just as uncomfortable as she feels.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: The Sackler wing of the Serpentine Gallery, designed by Zaha Hadid Credit: Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

Zere, Zvuk And Central Asia's Bold New Voices2019081720190818 (WS)Meet the ground breaking artists speaking up for Kyrgyz women through video. The film maker Elnura Osmonalieva and the musician Zere on how they're taking on gender based violence in Kyrgyzstan through their work.

It's been described as an Uzbek Game of Thrones. The writer Hamid Ismailov shares the story behind his latest book The Devil's Dance and reveals how one of its central characters was inspired by one of Uzbekistan's most celebrated writers, the poet, Chulpon.

Have you heard of ZVUK? The Kazakh techno DJ, Nazira Kassenovat tells us how the DIY music collective are changing the underground club scene in Almaty by creating a safe and inclusive space for a new generation.

Plus he just might be Central Asia's answer to Justin Bieber; the pop star Dimash on why he makes music.

Presented by Catharina Moh

The stories of Zere, Dimash and ZVUK some of Central Asia bold new artistic voices.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

Zeruya Shalev: Why I Write2019102620191027 (WS)It's a powerful story about love, family and living with the past. The Israeli novelist Zeruya Shalev talks to Tina about her latest book Pain, a novel shaped by her experience of being seriously injured in a Jerusalem suicide bombing.

Following the decision of President Donald Trump to withdraw US forces from predominantly Kurdish-controlled north-eastern Syria, a new conflict in the war-torn country erupted. Reporter Sarhang Hars spoke to radio host and songwriter Sefqan Orkêş about living through that conflict and speaking up for Syria's Kurdish people through music.

Ten of Nigeria's biggest stars come together on stage to tell stories of domestic violence, overturning the status quo, abuse, disrespect, bravery, sisterhood and joy. That's the idea behind Hear Word and the show's writer and director, Ifeoma Fafunwa speaks to BBC's Mugabi Turya about the inspiration behind this powerful piece of performance art.

Plus, has a song, a book or poem ever changed the way you see the world? The best-selling writer Alexander McCall Smith reveals how a borrowed book picked off a dusty library shelf inspired his love for the work of one of England's greatest poets, WH Auden.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Image: Zeruya Shalev
Credit: Ulf Andersen/Getty

Zeruya Shalev on how being injured in a Jerusalem suicide bombing shaped her latest novel

The world seen through the eyes of artists

The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

01The Palestinian Museum Uniting Story And Memory20151031As the first Palestinian National Museum prepares to open its doors, writer and lawyer Raja Shehadeh explores how a museum without borders can unite a disparate community.

Meanwhile artist Ana Teresa Fernandez explains why she chose the US Mexico border for her latest art installation and novelist Sigal Samuel reflects on how the recent destruction of ancient sites in Iraq has unsettled long held beliefs about cultural restitution.

Finally, as writers in India return their literary awards in political protest, we hear from novelist Sandip Roy about other cultural responses to India's current political climate. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Image: An artist's impression of the Palestinian Museum)

A museum without borders; art on the Mexican border; Nimrud destruction; literary protest

02The Artists Using Their Work To Make A Political Point20151107Political graffiti in Athens, Mexican Day of the Dead iconography, Jacob Zuma in art

From Athens two street artists explain why they have taken to using graffiti to express their political frustrations. Mexican poet Gabriela Jauregui explains what last weekend's Day of the Dead celebrations can tell us about Mexican attitudes to death, amid the disappearances that have become a feature of Mexican life. And, South African blogger and writer Nas Hoosen describes why he is troubled by recent artistic representations of President Jacob Zuma.

With Tina Daheley

(Photo Credit: Getty Images)

03The Role Of Buildings In The Cultural Life Of Cities20151114How urban design is shaping cultural life in Buenos Aires, Berlin, Lisbon and Luanda

From Buenos Aires Irene Caselli reports on a new $2.5 million cultural centre giving everything away for free. As Angola celebrates 40 years of independence from Portugal, how much cultural exchange still exists between the two countries? We hear from Lisbon and Luanda to find out. And Berlin is a city with a rich literary tradition, but where is the ideal spot to sit and write? Novelist Gregor Hens reveals his favourite place. Presented by Tina Daheley.

04The Spontaneous Artistic Response That Went Viral20151121How it feels for your art to become the defining symbol of a news story.

How does it feel when your art becomes the defining symbol of a news story? Artist Jean Jullien joins Tina to discuss his artistic response to the Paris attacks.

Cuban writer and blogger Harold Cardenas paints a portrait of the booksellers in Havana's Arms Square, some of whom have spent 20 years running their stalls.

Why is a devotional Islamic song all the rage amongst the youth of Pakistan? Journalist and author Saba Imtiaz has the answer.

And what is inside a Museum of Broken Relationships? The Croatian philosopher Srecko Horvat explores and reports back.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: A banner depicts a CND sign with the centre symbolising the Eiffel Tower. Credit: AFP)

05How Music Can Unite, Influence And Persuade20151128With Tina Daheley.

As Burkina Faso prepares for presidential elections, rapper Smockey remembers his role in last year's popular uprising which ended the rule of former President Blaise Compaore. In neighbouring Mali how did the terror attack in Bamako affect music in Timbuktu? From music being censored to a music video produced by India's chief censor, Sandip Roy reports. And, we hear about an attempt to create musical solidarity with the migrants camped out in Calais.

(Photo credit: AFP)

Music as political persuasion in Burkina Faso and India

06How Art Interacts With How We Think And Feel20151205With Tina Daheley.

Have our brains become too tapped into technology to be able to appreciate art properly? Performance artist Marina Abramovic tells us why she thinks so. Journalist Agnes Poirier reports from Paris where an exhibition is providing much needed comfort through art and music. Plus scary films can make a lasting impact on our psyche, but only if we get a chance to watch them. Horror fan and artist Aowen Jin explores the murky subject of whether the ghost films she loves are really banned in China.

(Photo credit: AFP/Getty Images)

The power of art, music, film and poetry to alter our state of mind

07Prose, Poetry And Spoken Word20151212Jamaican novelist and winner of the Man Booker Prize Marlon James reflects on the ways that where he writes can influence what he writes. From Rio how ‘string' literature is documenting life in the city's favelas, why Russian writing is having a renaissance, and from Nigeria, how young poets are making their voices heard through slam poetry. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Marlon James (c) Oneworld Publications)

How the written and spoken word are reflecting changes in society from Nigeria to Russia

08Culture And Identity20151219With Tina Daheley.

From Jerusalem the essayist and biographer Adina Hoffman explores what her local food market can tell us about the cultural identity of the city. As photographs become easier than ever to take and store, how important are they for shaping our memories and sense of self, and can photojournalism change minds about the migrant crisis? And from Paris, why Ernest Hemingway's novel A Moveable Feast became a symbol of Parisian identity after last month's attacks.

(Photo: Migrants queuing on the border between Greece and Macedonia (c) Rocco Rorandelli / TerraProject)

How food, photographs and books inform our identity

09Festive Traditions And Magical Places20151226With Tina Daheley.

Buying apples as festive gifts has become big business in China at this time of year, the artist Aowen Jin investigates what this trend has to do with the Chinese fondness for wordplay. From Italy, author Simona Vinci explains how the bird shaped flute, the ocarina became the soundtrack to Christmas in Bologna. Beatboxer Ben Mirin explains why he began to incorporate bird sounds into his act. And in Madrid, the writer Laia Jufresa explores a library with an enchanting collection of books.

(Photo: Shopkeeper in Beijing Credit: Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

Discovering festive traditions in China and Italy

10Protecting And Promoting Local Culture20160102With Tina Daheley.

From Kenya and Malawi we hear about the challenges local musicians can face getting their music heard above foreign imports. Also in the programme, what does a country fill its first national gallery with? We hear from Singapore to find out. And from Cape Town in South Africa, a walk down a historic street which tells a story about the cultural life of the city.

(Photo: Eric Wainaina and Emmanuel Jal in Nairobi Credit: TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)

How countries and people promote and commemorate their culture

The world seen through the eyes of artists

11Changing Minds And Challenging Prejudices20160109With Tina Daheley.

From India how one young artist is using fabric design to send a message about women's experience of public transport in the country. Also in the programme how Egyptian cinema is beginning to reflect the reality of sexual harassment for women in Cairo and from Gaza, what political art can tell us about the changing role of women. Finally Jamaican novelist Marlon James describes how literature helped him gain self-acceptance.

(Photo:Roshnee Desai's taxi Credit: Amey Kadam)

How art, design, literature and film are challenging gender attitudes

The world seen through the eyes of artists

12Creative Transformations20160116With Tina Daheley.

Writer Samar Yazbek looks back to the beginning of the Syria's civil war and the revolutionary dances which transformed town squares into theatres. From Australia how one woman discovered a new identity through art and why a hip hop musical about America's founding fathers has been a smash hit on Broadway. Finally from Israel Ayelet Gundar-Goshen, writer of One Night, Markovitch, considers the impact of a decision to prevent a controversial novel from appearing on the high school curriculum.

(Photo: Syrian men dancing Credit: PHIL MOORE/AFP/GettyImages)

Stories of how culture can inspire transformations in people, places and attitudes.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

13Cultural Exchanges20160123With Tina Daheley.

What South Korea is broadcasting through speakers on the border with North Korea and can an exhibition in Tehran featuring Western art tell us anything about Iran's relationship with Western powers? Also a new musical epic that celebrates the stories of Vietnam's 'boat people' and what Russians think of the BBC's adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace.

(Photo by Korea Pool-Donga Daily via Getty Images)

How culture travels across borders

The world seen through the eyes of artists

14Culture Operating In The Margins20160130With Tina Daheley.

From China we hear the story of Li Zhong Dong, a so called 'outsider artist' who is gaining recognition for his work made from rubbish and other cheap materials.

How a nightclub called Mejunje - meaning potion - led the way in changing perceptions of gay people in Cuba.

Why the art therapy methods of Nise da Silveira have become part of public debate about the treatment of mental illness in Brazil.

Brothers Rene and Clifford, or Flash and Risky, discuss the prejudice they encountered growing up with albinism in Cameroon, and how they're using music to change perceptions of their condition.

(Photo: Artwork by Li Zhong Dong Credit: Han Yong)

Outsiders and marginalised groups making a cultural impact through music, theatre, film

The world seen through the eyes of artists

15Cultural Give And Take20160206Loaning, giving and taking culture in Iraq, India and Lebanon

As the UK celebrates National Libraries Day, Anita Sethi reflects on the democratising power of libraries, in the UK and beyond and the Iraqi artist Wafaa Bilal explains his project to restock the library at The University of Baghdad's College of Fine Arts which was burnt down in 2003.

Sandip Roy contemplates the furore over a new Coldplay video set in India, which has seen the band and guest vocalist Beyonce, accused of cultural appropriation.

And as Sony prepares to halt for good production of the Betamax format, satirist Karl Sharro reflects on the mark it made on his childhood in Lebanon.

(Photo: Damaged book from Iraq National Library Credit: Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

16Acts Of Artistic Defiance20160213Five years after Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak was overthrown, the government's counter-revolutionary war is being fought through cartoons and music. Khaled Diab reflects on the artistic merits of the state sponsored art and propaganda.

Despite recent terror attacks and Islamist attempts to ban music, a new music festival has been established in Mali's capital Bamako. Organiser Fatoumata Sow explains what the Festival Acoustik Bamako wants to achieve.

Wana Udobang considers why art featuring nudes is still seen as subversive in Nigeria.

On the eve of Valentines Day, Dean Atta shares a new poem about self love.

(Photo: Protest at the Egyptian embassy in Berlin. Credit: Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images)

Culture which confronts and unsettles

The world seen through the eyes of artists

17Celebrating And Protecting Language20160220Preserving local language in Bangladesh, Hong Kong and Italy.

As Bangladesh prepares to celebrate Amar Ekushey - Langauge Movement Day - writer and publisher K Anis Ahmed considers the role the Bengali language has played in the country's history.

Ghanaian/Greek rapper Negros Tou Moria explains why it's important to him to rap in Greek, rather than the more obvious rap language of English.

Novelist Diego Marani remembers the dialect he spoke growing up in Italy, and reflects on the ways the language helps him express his true self.

The film Ten Years has been a runaway success in Hong Kong, despite receiving few reviews and little publicity. Melissa Lee explains how the film taps in to Hong Kongers' anxiety about the threat to local culture from mainland China.

(Photo: Preparations for Language Martyrs Day in Dhaka Credit: Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

18Oscars Diversity And Fiction In Times Of Crisis20160227On the eve of the Oscars, the Caine Prize-winning writer Tope Folarin reflects on the debate the #OscarsSoWhite movement has sparked, and how it applies to writers too.

Angelique Kidjo won the Grammy Award for Best World Music Album last week. For The Cultural Frontline she considers the part music has played in her life and why her identity as an activist is so important to her.

Twenty-five years after Kuwait's liberation from Iraq, Mai al-Nakib reconsiders what it means to write fiction in the midst of regional catastrophe. And she does so from the far-removed island nation of Iceland.

Russia's biggest art prize cancelled its visual art category last week after dissident artist Pyotr Pavlensky's nomination was revoked. Russian culture expert Alexander Kan discusses the Russian trend for activist performance art, and the current situation for artists in Russia.

(Photo: Oscars statues in production. Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

How outside forces impact the kind of work that gets produced

The world seen through the eyes of artists

19Art Working With And Outside The Establishment20160305With Tina Daheley.

From Sao Paulo, art dealer João Correia takes us on an insider's journey to a special weekly meeting of the city's Pixadores or Pixo artists.

Nigerian novelist Chinelo Okparanta explains how the different locations she has written in, from Port Harcourt, to New York, have informed her work.

Ethnomusicologist Ian Coss leads a tour around Lokananta, Indonesia's national record company.

Cuban artist Tania Bruguera discusses her forthcoming project, which involves staging a referendum in New York's Union Square on the subject of whether all borders should be abolished.

(Photo: Pixo in Sao Paulo Credit: Cripta Djan)

Government creating art and artists simulating goverment

The world seen through the eyes of artists

20Religion, Race And Environment20160312With Tina Daheley.

Life of Pi author Yann Martel explains why so many of his novels draw inspiration from religion.

As Anish Kapoor acquires exclusive rights to a new shade of black, painter Nicola Green reflects on how she has used the colour in her work, and the meaning it holds.

Ayelet Gundar Goshen, author of Waking Lions, reflects on why cultural relations between Israel and Egypt remain fraught, despite improvements in political cooperation.

Five years on from the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan and caused a nuclear disaster at Fukushima, photographers Lieko Shiga and Tomoko Yoneda discuss the work they made in response.

(Photo: beach at Kitakama, Japan Credit: Lieko Shiga)

How art is inspired and informed by race, religion and the environment.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

21World Culture Festival And Poetry Drones20160319With Tina Daheley.

Sandip Roy considers why the high profile World Culture Festival, which took place last weekend in Delhi, ruffled the feathers of environmentalists.

Fashion designer Vaishali Morjaria explains how her hand painted textile designs draw inspiration from her Kenyan Indian heritage and the endangered wildlife of her beloved local landscape.

Poet and translator David Shook explains his project to use drones to spread the written word.

As la Sagrada Familia in Barcelona celebrates its 134th birthday, architecture writer Ethel Baraona Pohl reflects on the effect of the structure on the urban landscape of the city and the debate about whether Gaudi's gothic church should ever be completed.

(Photo: Construction for the World Culture Festival Credit: MONEY SHARMA/AFP/Getty Images)

Stories of art that makes an impression on the environment.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

22Culture That Travels20160326With Tina Daheley.

From Berlin how a new initiative to enlist migrants to conduct museum tours in Arabic has made the novelist Gregor Hens see his home country in a new light.

Why the artist Maayan Strauss has chosen seven fellow artists to spend weeks on container ships traversing the seas and make work in response.

Japanese Australian playwright Mayu Kanamori explains why she was inspired to delve into Australian history to discover the forgotten story of a Japanese photographer for her new work.

Writer Khaled Diab explains why Mizrahi, or Eastern Jewish, music is becoming popular amongst both Israeli and Palestinian young people.

(Photo: Syrian artefacts at the Pergamon Museum Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

How art and culture travel from Japan to Australia, Syria to Germany and Iraq to Israel.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

23Culture And Memory2016040220160403 (WS)With Tina Daheley.

The first South American film to win the Best Foreign Language Oscar was Argentina's The Official Story in 1986. Irene Caselli explains why thirty years after its release, it still has relevance to today's politics.

As Venice is declared the most at risk heritage site in Europe due to floods and heavy tourist numbers, Agnes Poirier highlights a more subtle threat to the city's cultural identity.

The TV dramatisation of OJ Simpson's 1994 trial is about to finish in America. Sports broadcaster Michael Carlson looks back on how the televised court proceedings changed American culture.

Chhavi Sachdev visits India's only jazz club and discovers a pocket of old time America in contemporary New Delhi.

(Photo: film director Luiz Puenso Credit: JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images)

How film, music, TV and books can provoke and sustain memory

The world seen through the eyes of artists

24Kiev's Cultural Frontline2016040920160410 (WS)With Tina Daheley.

Two years ago Kiev was at the centre of a violent struggle for the future of Ukraine, as pro-Europe demonstrators occupied the central Independence Square. Beyond the headlines, how have the city's artists, writers and musicians responded to what happened?

Tina meets the novelist Andrey Kurkov who published his diaries of the crisis. He describes how the Ukraine's literary scene has shifted as a result of the violence and the war still going on in the East of the country.

Arts group Izolyatsia hail from the Donbass region in Eastern Ukraine. When the war began their premises were commandeered by pro-Russian separatists, forcing them to flee to Kiev and start their work from scratch. Tina hears their story.

Last year the new government of Ukraine passed a 'de-communisation' law which outlawed Communist symbols. Art historian Tatiana Kochubinska and photographer Yevgen Nikiforov explain what they fear this might mean for Ukraine's iconic and intricate Soviet mosaics.

Jamala is Ukraine's entry for the Eurovision Song Contest this year, but her song 1944 has stirred up controversy in Russia. She explains the personal story behind the song and reflects on the importance of music in times of conflict.

(Photo: Kiev's Independence Square Credit: Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)

Tina visits Ukraine's capital city to take the cultural temperature.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

25Identity And Adversity2016041620160417 (WS)Lead characters in most mainstream comic books were created decades ago in the heyday of racism and sexism; the heroes are mostly straight, white men. South African graphic novelist Nas Hoosen has decided it is time to make a change for superheroes.

Yemen's civil war has led to great social disruption in the country, but even in difficult circumstances artists still feel the need to practise their art. We talk to street artist Murad Subay about why he continues to make controversial art in the capital Sana'a.

Skid Row in Los Angeles is a street and a name synonymous with poverty and vagrancy. But within the community a vibrant arts scene has emerged and begun to flourish. Carren Jao reports on artists and activists who have been making the voices of Skid Row heard for the last three decades.

Author Walter Mosley writes the Easy Rawlins novels. He is also a playwright, screenwriter and visual artist. He writes essays, poetry, articles and most recently, a memoir called The Graphomaniac's Primer. Tania Ketenjian has been finding out about his compulsion to write and write and write.

(Photo: Sector comic book. Credit: Ben Rausch)

How identity and adversity are inspiring literature, theatre, comic books and street art

The world seen through the eyes of artists

26Culture And Heritage2016042320160424 (WS)On the 400th anniversary of the death of Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes, Colombian novelist Juan Gabriel Vasquez considers the small twist of fate which led Cervantes away from a life in Colombia and enabled him to write Don Quixote, widely considered the first European novel.

Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge's visit to India caused a stir after they visited the Taj Mahal, the location where Prince Charles and Diana's marriage crisis first became apparent. Writer Sandip Roy considers why India maintains a cultural fascination for the Raj, nearly 70 years after Independence.

Poet Dean Atta reflects on St George's Day, celebrated in the UK on April 23rd, and imagines what the dragon that St George famously slayed might have thought of the tradition today.

Actress and playwright Carmen Aguirre moved from Chile to Canada as a child. She explains how despite the multicultural make-up of her home city of Vancouver, the city's theatre scene remains difficult to crack for non-white actors, something she documented in her book Mexican Hooker #1.

(Photo: Statue of Miguel de Cervantes near Madrid, Spain. Credit: Curto de la Torre/AFP/Getty Images)

How the past informs contemporary national cultures

The world seen through the eyes of artists

27Ben Okri2016043020160501 (WS)The Nigerian novelist and poet discusses his creative process.

In 1991, at the age of 32, Ben Okri became the youngest ever winner of the prestigious Booker Prize for Fiction, for his novel The Famished Road. Twenty-five years later, Ben Okri looks back at the impact the prize had on his life and career, the roller-coaster experience of writing a book that required him to inhabit the real and spirit worlds simultaneously and how it felt to have a Radiohead song written in response to his novel.

(Photo: Tina Daheley and Ben Okri Credit: Ellie Bury)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

29Culture And Commerce2016050720160508 (WS)With Tina Daheley.

The city of Detroit in America was once known for its industry and vibrant music scene. In 2013 Detroit filed for bankruptcy and images of run-down and abandoned buildings, known to residents as 'ruin porn', came to define the city's reputation. But as writer John Patrick Leary explains, a new visual cliché is coming to dominate, making him nostalgic for 'ruin porn'.

Buenos Aires in Argentina has more bookshops per resident than any other city in the world. As the Buenos Aires Book Fair continues, Irene Caselli considers why residents are such avid book buyers, and what the titles they choose to read can tell us about their concerns.

Artist Maria Eichhorn discusses taking inspiration from the way work impacts our sense of time for her new exhibition 5 weeks, 25 days, 175 hours. Visitors to the exhibition will find a closed gallery with staff signed off for five weeks of leisure time.

Bosnian writer Faruk Šehić takes a train into Zurich to look at the city's luxury watches on display in Bahnhofstrasse, and reflects on why watches have been an eternal source of fascination for him, and inspiration for his writing.

(Photo: ruins at the abandoned Packard Automotive Plant Credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

How culture represents, and draws inspiration from, what we buy, sell and produce.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

30Reviving And Reclaiming Culture2016051420160515 (WS)With Tina Daheley.

To mark 6 months of the new government in Argentina, writer Pola Oloixarac considers the Mauricio Macri administration's attitude towards the arts. She finds that, not for the first time, the Argentine government is championing the art of the past, in order to influence the future.

In Iran a new, independent online drama has been transporting viewers back to the 1950s. Set in the time of the military coup that overthrew Prime Minister Mosaddeq and bolstered the rule of the Shah, it depicts scenes that might be considered shocking by Iranian standards. Cultural critic and BBC Persian producer Maghsood Salehi tells us what sets Shahrzad apart from the competition, amid a fashion for nostalgia on Iran's TV- and computer- screens.

In a new commission for the Royal Shakespeare Company, British Nigerian poet and playwright Inua Ellams has written a prequel to the Shakespeare's The Tempest. For The Cultural Frontline, Inua sets out his case for righting- and re-writing- the wrongs of the original play and describes how his version reinvents the character of Caliban.

The possum skin cloak in Aboriginal culture was both a garment and a canvas, on which the stories of the land and its people were inscribed. In an interview produced for The Cultural Frontline by Jarni Blakkarly, the Aboriginal artist Tiriki Onus shares his determination to revive the custom and the craft of traditional possum skin cloak-making in Australia.

(Photo: The Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires Credit: Juan Mabromata/ AFP/ Getty)

How culture from Shakespeare to the Swinging Sixties is being revisited and remixed.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

31Speaking Up And Uncovering Secrets2016052120160522 (WS)Jamala won the Eurovision Song Contest for Ukraine with her song 1944, about the mass deportation of Crimean Tatars. She reveals why it was important to her to tell this little known story in Ukraine, and the reason she cannot visit her parents in Crimea.

Another musical act speaking up about the issues facing their home country is Pakistani band Laal. They do not shy away from discussing topics like extremism and women's rights in their music. Two band members discuss the reaction their performances receive at home and abroad.

And, how does culture help communities deal with their secrets? Writer Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock reports from Alaska and novelist Ravinder Randhawa gives her view on secrets in the British Asian community.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Jamala at the Eurovision celebrations Credit: Michael Campanella/Getty Images)

Culture that keeps secrets and culture that speaks out in Alaska, Pakistan, Ukraine, UK

The world seen through the eyes of artists

32Cultural Revolution And Gardening As Art2016052820160529 (WS)Looking back fifty years to China's Cultural Revolution, visiting Angola's newest museum.

It's fifty years since the beginning of the Cultural Revolution in China, but how is this dark period of national history remembered through art and culture? Journalist Vivienne Chow reports from Hong Kong.

Also in the programme, Tina heads to the Chelsea Flower Show in London to meet Juliet Sargeant, the first black landscape designer to exhibit in the show. She discusses her gold medal winning garden, based on the theme of modern slavery. We'll also hear from Angola, where a new currency museum has opened – just as the Kwanza plummets in value. Writer Claudio Silva visits the museum and reports back, plus how one Cameroonian singer is raising awareness about his country's problem with terrorism through music.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Mao souvenirs on sale in Beijing Credit: FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

33Leaving Home And Finding Inspiration2016060420160605 (WS)Mary Shelley's Frankenstein continues to be a source of fascination for readers, with its macabre exploration of what it means to be alive. The seeds of the story were first sown two hundred years ago when the poet Lord Byron initiated a ghost story competition during a group summer holiday in Europe. Novelist Benjamin Markovits celebrates the anniversary by uncovering some of the less well known literary products of the contest.

Also in the programme; Vietnamese rapper Suboi challenged President Obama to beatbox last week, she describes the hip hop scene in Vietnam, and Liberian writer Hawa Jande Golakai considers her uneasy relationship with her hometown of Monrovia. It's also two hundred years since the British government bought the Elgin Marbles – a collection of classical Greek marble sculptures, which had been acquired by the Earl of Elgin from the Parthenon in Athens. They now reside in the British Museum but are a source of ongoing controversy and restitution claims from the Greek government. The British historian Professor Paul Cartledge remembers his first visit to their original home on the Athenian Acropolis.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: statue of Frankenstein in Switzerland Credit: FABRICE COFFRINIAFPGetty Images)

How journeys and travel can expose and inspire culture in Greece, Liberia and Vietnam.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

34New Words And Changing Forms2016061120160612 (WS)How language is making waves in Sweden, Kenya, London and Spain

From Sweden, the writer Elin Unnes discusses the new word which has caused conversation and controversy, and explains why she cannot wait to use it in her writing.

Also, Kenyan spoken word artist Dan Mwangi reveals how he uses his platform to spread important social messages, and we meet poetry collective Octavia and hear a poem on the theme of language and the female body. Plus, Argentinian novelist Andrés Neuman considers the writer's experience of being translated. Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: Microphone resting on a stool Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images))

The world seen through the eyes of artists

35Sacred Places And Sounds2016061820160619 (WS)How music, art and sculpture can provide sanctuary and convey spirituality

From India, novelist Anuradha Roy considers what the ancient sculptures at Khajuraho temple in central India can tell us about how the experience of being Hindu in the country has changed.

Journalist Ha-young Choi reports from South Korea on the ways that outside organisations are trying to spread religious and cultural messages into North Korea.

Also, Swedish writer Jonas Hassen Khemiri remembers his childhood visits to his family's sacred space - the local library, and Indian poet and producer Vandana Arimardan explains how she wrote a song to commemorate this year's International Yoga Day. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Khajuraho temple)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

36Finding Calm In Public Spaces2016062520160626 (WS)Wolfgang Buttress is the artist behind a giant interactive beehive which has landed at London's Kew Gardens. He explains why he is using his work to highlight the situation of the world's bees.

Also, Turkish writer Burhan Sonmez considers the ways that his home city of Istanbul has changed and British poet Dean Atta presents a brand new poem, written after the massacre at Orlando's gay nightclub, Pulse. Finally, we hear from musical therapist and singer Wanny Angerer about how art can change lives on a local level, at a Nairobi cancer centre. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: The Hive in London's Kew Gardens Credit: Jeff Eden)

Why public space matters for culture in London, Istanbul and Nairobi

The world seen through the eyes of artists

37Caine Prize Short Stories2016070220160703 (WS)The Caine Prize for African Writing is awarded annually to an African writer of a short story published in English. Ahead of the announcement of this year's winner, we've invited each of the 5 shortlisted authors to share their work, insights into their writing processes and their global perspectives on what it means to be an African writer in 2016.

Tope Folarin won the Caine Prize for African Writing in 2013 and has been nominated for a second time for his story, ‘Genesis.' In a new essay for The Cultural Frontline, he addresses how his obsession with creation stories prompted him to write a creation story of his own.

Somali-born Abdul Adan grew up in Kenya and has lived in America, the setting of his entry ‘The Lifebloom Gift.' He takes us on a journey into the world of his story, where touching, not seeing, is believing. Lesley Nneka Arimah, a Nigerian writer living in Minneapolis, USA, talks to Tina about the imaginative and intellectual leap that led her to set ‘What it Means When a Man Falls From the Sky' in the distant, dystopian future of ‘what was now the United Countries but had once been Africa.' Bongani Kona, author of ‘At Your Requiem' and Lidudumalingani, author of ‘Memories We Lost' discuss common themes, shared experiences and the significance of deciding to write in English.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Tope Folarin, 2016 Caine Prize shortlisted author and 2013 Caine Prize winner. Credit: Tope Folarin)

The 5 shortlisted authors in the running for The Caine Prize for African Writing.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

38Uncovering Hidden Perspectives2016070920160710 (WS)Malaysian artist Fahmi Reza has been charged with violating Malaysian media laws for depicting Prime Minister Najib Razak as a clown on social media. He explains why he thinks artists have a duty to tackle controversial subjects.

Also in the programme; Kurdish poet Choman Hardi discusses her Forward Prize-nominated collection which tackles migration, displacement and love, South African writer Mark Gevisser reflects on how culture is changing attitudes to gay and transgender people in Africa, and Mexican novelist Laia Jufresa considers a French literary prize with readers at its heart.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Fahmi Reza holding his cartoon of Prime Minister Najib Razak Credit: Jarni Blakkarly)

Art, poetry and literature voicing hidden perspectives in Iraq, South Africa and Malaysia

The world seen through the eyes of artists

39Culture As Catharsis2016071620160717 (WS)How music and literature can provide catharsis in America, South Africa, Spain and the UK

American singer Jayanthi Kyle discusses the song Hand in Hand, a protest song she co-wrote with Wes Burdine about the high profile killings of African American men by police in America. The song has become an anthem sung at Black Lives Matter rallies in Minneapolis. Jayanthi reflects on what artists can do to advance racial equality and justice.

Also in the programme; London based Greek novelist Panos Karnezis considers whether Britain's decision to leave the EU should have been anticipated by artists, writer Yewande Omotoso asks how literature is engaging the with legacy of Truth and Reconciliation in South Africa 20 years on, and 80 years after the Spanish Civil War began, flamenco artist Paco Peña discusses how music and art can help a country wrestle with its past.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Jayathi Kyle: Credit: Tony Webster)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

40Cultural Inclusion And Exclusion2016072320160724 (WS)Pokémon Go goes to the museum… With the release of the location-based smart phone game, many museums and galleries across the world have found themselves drawn into the game and attracting new visitors- players in pursuit of virtual Pokémon creatures. So could it be a game-changer for our cultural spaces? Tina is joined by Blaire Moskowitz, a New York based blogger and academic, who also works for a company that makes digital apps and audio guides for museums.

Côte d´Ivoire author Veronique Tadjo gives an insight into her rich multi-cultural influences and her determination to portray stronger female role models in children's literature. Five years on from the earthquake and tsunami that triggered the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, a Japanese Manga artist has documented his time working inside the Fukushima nuclear plant. The artist, who works under the pen name Kazuto Tatsuta, was interviewed for The Cultural Frontline by producer Abby Leonard. Jamaican poet Kei Miller meditates on the significance of flags as symbols and the controversy that ensued when the American Embassy in Jamaica flew the rainbow flag at half mast, in the wake of the Orlando nightclub shooting in June.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Playing Pokémon Go at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany Credit: Sophia Kembowski/ AFP/ Getty Images)

- institutional, virtual and symbolic.

Cultural Inclusion and Exclusion- institutional, virtual and symbolic.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

41Who Tells The Story?2016073020160731 (WS)Reclaiming national narratives in the UK and Jamaica.

Artists, writers and musicians are taking back control of the narratives of their home countries.

British actor and director Simon McBurney asks what artists can - and should - do to unify the UK now that it has voted to leave the European Union.

Also on the programme, Jamaican writer Nicole Dennis Benn explains why she wanted to give prominence to often unheard voices in her debut novel Here Comes the Sun, Ghanaian singer Wiyaala reveals how she went from a TV talent show to singing songs about forced marriage, and from Texas, Miroslav Penkov explains what he thinks a new campus gun law will do to the culture of his university.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Wiyaala Credit: Borkowski)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

42Understanding The Refugee Crisis Via Virtual Reality2016080620160807 (WS)Tina visits London's Somerset House to take part in The Machine to Be Another, a virtual reality experience which simulates life in the Jungle refugee camp in Calais. She speaks to the founders of Good Chance, a theatre company which aims to encourage dialogue about the refugee crisis.

Also, as America reacts to the news that no charges will be brought against police over the death of Baltimore man Freddie Gray, Baltimore based crime novelist Laura Lippman reflects on her decision not to reference his case in her fiction, and Ken Nishikawa reports from a visit to the first ever exhibition dedicated to novelist Haruki Murakami. Finally, we hear about the cultural significance of the Jewish Ghetto, from the site of one of the original ghettos in Venice. Presented by Tina Daheley.

Technology which simulates a refugee camp and using real crime as inspiration for fiction

The world seen through the eyes of artists

43Challenging Racism Through Sculpture2016081320160814 (WS)The Wolves are Back is a series of giant wolf-man sculptures by German artist Rainer Opolka. His bronze and cast iron creations are currently on display in Berlin, after been shown in Dresden and Potsdam. The pack of 66 creatures, each striking a threatening pose, is accompanied by the inscription ‘don't feed the wolves.' Tina is joined by the artist to discuss how his work intends to confront what he sees as the rise of racism and neo-Nazism in his home country.

Irish-Canadian author Anakana Schofield responds to the changing cityscape of Vancouver and considers how the current property boom is affecting both its artistic community and her own writing.

In a feature from producer Yael Even Or, artist Luciana Kaplun discusses her dramatization of an urban myth claiming Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was born in Sudan. Kaplun explains how her new film raises questions about the relationship between Africa and Israel, ahead of its screening at The Tel Aviv Museum of Art in November.

Finally, writer Elin Unnes sketches a history of the Swedish dance licence - a law prohibiting dancing in unlicensed public places in Sweden- which has recently been abolished by the Swedish Parliament.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Wolf sculptures outside Berlin central station. Credit: Rainer Opolka)

Public art confronts racism in Berlin, plus wandering and writing in Vancouver

The world seen through the eyes of artists

44Empathising Across Cultural Divides2016082020160821 (WS)Tina interviews the Lebanese author, Nada Awar Jarrar, author of An Unsafe Haven, a new novel exploring the experience and impact of Syrian refugees in Lebanon. Also in the programme: an essay from the Nigerian author Leye Adenle, on making the genre of crime fiction his own. Plus, the founder and members of the Heartbeat music project, which brings young Israeli and Palestinian musicians together, talk to Tina and perform in the studio. Finally, The Atlas of Emotions is a new online tool that visualises and describes feelings, inspired by the teachings of the Dalai Lama. Producer Tania Ketenjian spoke to the San Francisco psychologist and designer behind the project, about how they realised the Dalai Lama's ambition to map the mind.

Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: A Syrian refugee hangs washing in Lebanon Credit: Anwar Amro/ AFP/ Getty Images)

Connecting through art and design in Lebanon, Nigeria, the Middle East and San Francisco.

The world seen through the eyes of artists

45Fighting Cultural Destruction2016082720160828 (WS)With Sahar Zand.

Maamoun Abdulkarim, the man in charge of trying to protect Syria's precious artefacts from being destroyed by ISIS, explains why his job is crucial for Syria's future.

Also in the programme, we visit the street artist based in Manchester, England who's using her art to challenge our ideas of how men and women should behave, Afghan designer Nawed Elias discusses his work combining Pashtun traditional costume with high fashion, and from Kuwait, writer Mai Al-Nakib relates a curious case of life imitating art.

(Photo: artefacts from Tell Halaf in Northern Syria on display in Germany Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Protecting Syria's antiquities, street art with a message, Pashtun fashion

The world seen through the eyes of artists

46Watching And Being Watched2016090320160904 (WS)Playwright Adura Onashile discusses her play, Expensive Sh*t. Set in a pair of women's toilets in Lagos and Glasgow, the play explores the experience of Tolu, who begins as a dancer at Fela Kuti's club, The Shrine, and ends up as a toilet attendant at a seedy Glasgow nightclub.

Sandip Roy reports on the cultural significance of Mother Teresa in his home town of Calcutta, India, on the eve of her canonisation in St Peter's Square in Rome.

Also, artist Virginia Wagner discusses her series of portraits of people who ‘walk the gender line' and explains why she is interested in documenting the transgender community in her work.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: An image from Expensive Sh*t Credit: Sally Jubb)

Fela's Shrine on stage; Mother Teresa's cultural legacy; art that walks the gender line

The world seen through the eyes of artists

47Artistic Freedom In Russia And Saudi Arabia2016091020160911 (WS)How Russian and Saudi artists tackle censorship, and art evoking sounds of the Gulf War

Former Pussy Riot member Maria Alyokhina is starring in Burning Doors, a new stage production by Belarus Free Theatre, which examines artistic freedom in Russia. Maria and co-director Natalia Kaliada discuss what they wanted to communicate with the production.

Also, Iraqi artist Hayv Kahraman describes why the air raid siren used during the first Gulf War is at the centre of her new art installation in San Francisco, Ayelet Gundar-Goshen, whose most recent novel is Waking Lions, reflects on a hot debate concerning archaeology in Israel and sisters Noura and Bazma Bouzo explain what it is like to run Saudi Arabia's first art and culture magazine.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Maria Alyokhina, formerly of Pussy Riot Credit: Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/GettyImages)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

48Capturing Aleppo's Destruction On Film2016091720160918 (WS)The film capturing the war in Aleppo; Berlin's iconic nightclub; Hong Kong's culture hub

Syrian Armenian film-maker Avo Kaprielian discusses Houses Without Doors, his film capturing the bombardment of Aleppo from his parents' balcony in the city.

Also, Vivienne Chow reports from Hong Kong where the first venue in the $3 billion West Kowloon Cultural District has just opened, but does it live up to the hype? From Berlin, Lisa Ludwig reflects on the decision to classify iconic nightclub Berghain as 'high culture' and artist Spencer Tunick explains why he has returned to the Dead Sea, the scene of one of his most iconic mass naked photographs. Presented by Tina Daheley.

(Photo: Still from Houses Without Doors Credit: Avo Kaprielian)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

49Can Art Change The World?2016092420160925 (WS)The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

As this year's Turner Prize exhibition prepares to open its doors, The Cultural Frontline considers how international artists are using their work to provoke discussion and challenge existing ideas.

Activist artists Tania Bruguera and Maria Alyokhina reflect on how actions and performance can make an impact where work in a gallery can't.

Also in the programme, Ghanaian artist Serge Attukwei Clottey discusses his work highlighting the detrimental impact of the yellow cans used to store water all over Africa, curator Cheryl Haines explains the impact of Ai Wei Wei's installation At Large which occupied Alcatraz last year and Palestinian artists Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme reveal how their work replaces clichéd images of their region with complex film and sound tapestries.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: works by Ai Wei Wei displayed on Alcatraz Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The world seen through the eyes of artists

5001/10/2016 Gmt2016100120161002 (WS)The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.

50The First National Museum Of African American History2016100120161002 (WS)Visiting a landmark museum, using art to explore the past, what makes a 'good' immigrant?

The world seen through the eyes of artists

has opened in Washington, more than 100 years after it was first proposed. Writer Tope Folarin visits the museum and reflects on its impact.

Also, what makes a 'good' immigrant? Writers Nikesh Shukla and Sabrina Mahfouz discuss an anthology of writing by British black, Asian and minority ethnic writers, Chilean artist Voluspa Jarpa explains the ideas behind her art exhibition made out of thousands of declassified CIA documents and Israeli director Elite Zexer discusses Sand Storm, her film which will be Israel's entry into this year's Oscars.

With Tina Daheley.

(Photo: View of the new museum Credit: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

5108/10/2016 Gmt2016100820161009 (WS)The Cultural Frontline: where arts and news collide.