Dancing In Dead Men's Shoes

A three-part World Tonight Special series about the struggle for power, the art of survival and the fight for a future in the developing world.

Simon Dring meets the leaders of three very different countries - Bangladesh, Georgia and Eritrea - born out of bloodshed and revolution and still grappling with the dangers and difficulties of independence and statehood.

Episodes

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Genome: [r4 Bd=19970529]A three-part World Tonight special series about the struggle for power, the art of survival and the fight for a future in the developing world. Simon Dring meets the leaders of three very different countries - Bangladesh, Georgia and Eritrea.

1: Bangladesh and the Struggle for Power. Dring talks to Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina. Written and produced by Simon Dring Editor Anne Koch

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970529] Unknown: Simon Dring

Produced By: Simon Dring

Editor: Anne Koch

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970605]A three-part World Tonight Special about the fight for a future in the developing world.

2: Simon Dring meets President Eduard Shevardnadze of Georgia. Editor Anne Koch

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970605] Unknown: Simon Dring

Unknown: Eduard Shevardnadze

Editor: Anne Koch

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970612]The final programme in this World Tonight special series.

Eritrea and the Fight for a Future

Simon Dring meets President Isiais Aferwerki of Eritrea and some of the people who fought for independence. Written and produced by Simon Dring Editor Anne Koch

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970612] Unknown: Simon Dring

Unknown: Isiais Aferwerki

Produced By: Simon Dring

Editor: Anne Koch

01Bangladesh And The Struggle For Power19970529
02Georgia And The Art Of Survival.19970605Simon Dring meets President Eduard Shevardnadze of Georgia and looks at a country where the issue is survival and the master of the game is the president himself.
03 LASTEritrea And The Fight For A Future19970612Simon Dring meets President Isiais Aferwerki of Eritrea and some of the people who fought for nearly thirty years for their independence.