David Attenborough's Life Stories

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
06Bower Birds20090712

20Collecting20091018

20 LASTCollecting20091018
0101Sloths2009060520090607
20091222 (BBC7)
20161002 (BBC7)
20091223 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20091223 (BBC7)
20120405 (BBC7)
20120406 (BBC7)
20150809 (BBC7)
20110211 (R4)

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

David muses on the natural history of the sloth - perhaps the most lethargic beast in the animal world, and one that he has admitted to wanting to be.

Musings on the natural history of perhaps the most lethargic beast in the animal world.

Musings on the natural history of perhaps the most lethargic beast in the animal world.

The naturalist and broadcaster muses on the natural history of perhaps the most lethargic beast in the animal world.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

David muses on the natural history of the sloth - perhaps the most lethargic beast in the animal world, and one that he has admitted to wanting to be.

David muses on the natural history of the sloth.

0102Monstrous Flowers2009061220090614
20091223 (BBC7)
20091224 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170423 (BBC7)
20091224 (BBC7)
20120406 (BBC7)
20120407 (BBC7)
20150816 (BBC7)

Musings on the world's largest blooms found deep in the steamy forests of Sumatra.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Deep in the steamy forests of Sumatra, the largest flowers in the world bloom, albeit for under a week. But why are they so big?

Musings on the world's largest blooms found deep in the steamy forests of Sumatra.

The naturalist and broadcaster muses on the world's largest blooms found deep in the steamy forests of Sumatra.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Deep in the steamy forests of Sumatra, the largest flowers in the world bloom, albeit for under a week.

But why are they so big?

Deep in the steamy forests of Sumatra, the largest flowers in the world bloom.

Deep in the steamy forests of Sumatra, the largest flowers in the world bloom, albeit for under a week. But why are they so big?

0103Platypus2009061920090621
20091225 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170724 (BBC7)
20091224 (BBC7)
20091225 (BBC7)
20120409 (BBC7)
20120410 (BBC7)
20150823 (BBC7)

Musings on the elusive female duck-billed platypus of New South Wales, Australia.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Along the soft, muddy river banks of New South Wales, the female duck-billed platypus makes a burrow to raise her family. Not only is this the strangest of creatures, it is also one of the most tricky to film.

Musings on the elusive female Duck-Billed Platypus of New South Wales, Australia.

The famous naturalist muses on the elusive, burrowing female Duck-Billed Platypus of New South Wales, Australia.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Along the soft, muddy river banks of New South Wales, the female duck-billed platypus makes a burrow to raise her family.

Not only is this the strangest of creatures, it is also one of the most tricky to film.

Along the river banks of New South Wales, the female duck-billed platypus makes a burrow.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Along the soft, muddy river banks of New South Wales, the female duck-billed platypus makes a burrow to raise her family. Not only is this the strangest of creatures, it is also one of the most tricky to film.

0104Giant Birds2009062620090628
20091226 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170725 (BBC7)
20091225 (BBC7)
20091226 (BBC7)
20120410 (BBC7)
20120411 (BBC7)
20150830 (BBC7)

The famous naturalist muses on the largest known egg laid by a giant bird on Madagascar.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Madagascar, off the eastern coast of Africa, is the largest continental island in the world. It is also the place where the largest egg known to have existed was laid, and the bird that laid it was also a giant.

The famous naturalist muses on the largest known egg laid by a giant bird on Madagascar.

The famous naturalist muses on the largest known egg laid by a giant bird on Madagascar, an island off Africa's eastern coast.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Madagascar, off the eastern coast of Africa, is the largest continental island in the world.

It is also the place where the largest egg known to have existed was laid, and the bird that laid it was also a giant.

The largest egg known to have existed was laid in Madagascar.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Madagascar, off the eastern coast of Africa, is the largest continental island in the world. It is also the place where the largest egg known to have existed was laid, and the bird that laid it was also a giant.

0105Songsters2009070320090705
20091229 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170726 (BBC7)
20091228 (BBC7)
20091229 (BBC7)
20120411 (BBC7)
20120412 (BBC7)
20150906 (BBC7)

The messages conveyed in the syllables, melodies and repeated phrases of singing birds.

The messages conveyed in the syllables, melodies and repeated phrases of singing birds.

The naturalist muses on the messages conveyed in the syllables, melodies and repeated phrases of singing birds.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

People are not the only species who sing.

Many birds do and even another ape.

What messages are conveyed in the syllables, melodies and repeated phrases, and who is listening?

0106Bower Birds2009071020090712
20091229 (BBC7)
20091230 (BBC7)

Musings on the structures built by New Guinea's Vogelkop bowerbirds to attract mates.

The famous naturalist muses on the extraordinary structures built by New Guinea's Vogelkop bowerbirds to attract mates.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

One of the most extraordinary structures in the animal world is constructed by a Bower Bird.

Sir David tells the life story of the Vogelkopf Bower Bird, the one that raises the bar higher than the rest.

David Attenborough tells the life story of the Vogelkopf Bower Bird.

0106Bowerbirds2009071020090712
20091229 (BBC7)
20091230 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20091230 (BBC7)
20120412 (BBC7)
20120413 (BBC7)
20150913 (BBC7)
20170727 (BBC7)

Musings on the structures built by New Guinea's Vogelkop bowerbirds to attract mates.

The famous naturalist muses on the extraordinary structures built by New Guinea's Vogelkop bowerbirds to attract mates.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

One of the most extraordinary structures in the animal world is constructed by a Bower Bird.

Sir David tells the life story of the Vogelkopf Bower Bird, the one that raises the bar higher than the rest.

David Attenborough tells the life story of the Vogelkopf Bower Bird.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

One of the most extraordinary structures in the animal world is constructed by a Bower Bird. Sir David tells the life story of the Vogelkopf Bower Bird, the one that raises the bar higher than the rest.

0107Dragons2009071720090719
20091230 (BBC7)
20091231 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20091231 (BBC7)
20111111 (BBC7)
20150920 (BBC7)
20170728 (BBC7)

The famous naturalist recalls meeting a ten-foot-long grey scaled reptile, with a long, yellow forked tongue - the Komodo dragon.

The famous naturalist recalls meeting the ten-foot-long Komodo dragon.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

What did Sir David do when he was confronted by a ten-foot-long grey-scaled reptile, with a long yellow forked tongue whipping in and out of its mouth? He didn't run and, in fact, was one of the first to film it: the Komodo dragon.

David Attenborough was one of the first people to film the Komodo dragon.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

What did Sir David do when he was confronted by a ten-foot-long grey-scaled reptile, with a long yellow forked tongue whipping in and out of its mouth? He didn't run and, in fact, was one of the first to film it: the Komodo dragon.

0107Dragons2009071920170728 (BBC7)

The famous naturalist recalls meeting the ten-foot-long Komodo dragon.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

What did Sir David do when he was confronted by a ten-foot-long grey-scaled reptile, with a long yellow forked tongue whipping in and out of its mouth? He didn't run and, in fact, was one of the first to film it: the Komodo dragon.

0108Archaeopteryx2009072420090726
20091231 (BBC7)
20100101 (BBC7)
20120413 (BBC7)
20120414 (BBC7)
20150927 (BBC7)
20170731 (BBC7)

A 150-million-year-old feather from an animal that lived before birds had evolved.

The naturalist tells the remarkable story of a 150-million-year-old feather from an animal that lived before birds had evolved.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David recounts the remarkable story of a feather, like any other feather from a bird - only it was 150 million years old, and the animal that lost it lived when birds had not yet evolved.

David recounts the story of a feather from an animal that existed before birds had evolved

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David recounts the remarkable story of a feather, like any other feather from a bird - only it was 150 million years old, and the animal that lost it lived when birds had not yet evolved.

0108Archaeopteryx2009072620100101 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170731 (BBC7)

A 150-million-year-old feather from an animal that lived before birds had evolved.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David recounts the remarkable story of a feather, like any other feather from a bird - only it was 150 million years old, and the animal that lost it lived when birds had not yet evolved.

0109Salamander2009073120090802
20100101 (BBC7)
20100102 (BBC7)
20120416 (BBC7)
20120417 (BBC7)
20151011 (BBC7)
20170801 (BBC7)

The naturalist recalls his first pet - a fire salamander given to him by his father on his eighth birthday.

The naturalist recalls his first pet, a fire salamander given to him on his 8th birthday.

The naturalist recalls his first pet, a fire salamander given to him on his 80th birthday.

The naturalist recalls his first pet - a fire salamander given to him by his father on his eightieth birthday.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David's first pet was a fire salamander, given to him by his father on his eighth birthday.

He also gave his own son a salamander on his eighth birthday, the legacy of which is very much alive and kicking today.

Sir David's first pet was a fire salamander, given by his father on his eighth birthday.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David's first pet was a fire salamander, given to him by his father on his eighth birthday. He also gave his own son a salamander on his eighth birthday, the legacy of which is very much alive and kicking today.

0109Salamander2009080220100102 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170801 (BBC7)

The naturalist recalls his first pet, a fire salamander given to him on his 8th birthday.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David's first pet was a fire salamander, given to him by his father on his eighth birthday. He also gave his own son a salamander on his eighth birthday, the legacy of which is very much alive and kicking today.

The naturalist recalls his first pet, a fire salamander given to him on his 80th birthday.

0110Birds Of Paradise2009080720090809
20100104 (BBC7)
20100105 (BBC7)
20120401 (BBC7)
20120402 (BBC7)
20151018 (BBC7)
20170802 (BBC7)

Musings on the New Guinea residents, who fooled early explorers with their adornments.

The naturalist muses on the New Guinea residents, who fooled early explorers with their resplendent adornments and decorations.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David talks about the Birds of Paradise, a group of birds which evolved in the relative safety of New Guinea, allowing them to acquire adornments and feathered decorations so resplendent that they fooled the early explorers who discovered them.

Sir David talks about Birds of Paradise which evolved in the relative safety of New Guinea

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David talks about the Birds of Paradise, a group of birds which evolved in the relative safety of New Guinea, allowing them to acquire adornments and feathered decorations so resplendent that they fooled the early explorers who discovered them.

0110Birds Of Paradise2009080920100105 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170802 (BBC7)

Musings on the New Guinea residents, who fooled early explorers with their adornments.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David talks about the Birds of Paradise, a group of birds which evolved in the relative safety of New Guinea, allowing them to acquire adornments and feathered decorations so resplendent that they fooled the early explorers who discovered them.

0111The Serpent's Stare2009081420090816
20100105 (BBC7)
20100106 (BBC7)
20151025 (BBC7)
20170803 (BBC7)

Looking at why underground animals have evolved differently from those on the surface.

The famous naturalist looks at why underground animals have evolved in a very different way from those living on the surface.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Underground animals are very different to the animals that spend their life on the surface.

They are a different shape, their senses are tuned in a very different way and they manifestly come from a different world.

Does this explain the stare of the snake?

Underground animals come from a different world.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Underground animals are very different to the animals that spend their life on the surface. They are a different shape, their senses are tuned in a very different way and they manifestly come from a different world. Does this explain the stare of the snake?

0111The Serpent's Stare2009081620100106 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170803 (BBC7)

Looking at why underground animals have evolved differently from those on the surface.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Underground animals are very different to the animals that spend their life on the surface. They are a different shape, their senses are tuned in a very different way and they manifestly come from a different world. Does this explain the stare of the snake?

0112Faking Fossils2009082120090823
20100106 (BBC7)
20100107 (BBC7)
20151101 (BBC7)
20170804 (BBC7)

The naturalist recalls finding an ammonite inside limestone, sparking his love of fossils.

The naturalist recalls the key moment of finding an ammonite inside some limestone - sparking his love of collecting fossils.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David recalls a key moment in his life, when he broke open a piece of Leicestershire limestone and there in his hand was an ammonite.

Over the intervening years, fossils have fascinated him and he has become a great collector, even of the odd fake.

Fossils have fascinated Sir David and he has become a great collector.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David recalls a key moment in his life, when he broke open a piece of Leicestershire limestone and there in his hand was an ammonite. Over the intervening years, fossils have fascinated him and he has become a great collector, even of the odd fake.

0112Faking Fossils2009082320100107 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170804 (BBC7)

The naturalist recalls finding an ammonite inside limestone, sparking his love of fossils.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Sir David recalls a key moment in his life, when he broke open a piece of Leicestershire limestone and there in his hand was an ammonite. Over the intervening years, fossils have fascinated him and he has become a great collector, even of the odd fake.

0113Coelacanth2009082820090830
20100107 (BBC7)
20100108 (BBC7)
20151108 (BBC7)
20170807 (BBC7)

Was the first live specimen of the primitive bony fish shown on TV really a living fossil?

The naturalist showed the first live specimen of the primitive bony fish on TV.

But is it a living fossil, as first claimed?

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

The Coelacanth is a primitive bony fish thought to be an important ancestor to all back-boned animals that ventured onto land.

David Attenborough brought to television the first film of a living fish in Life on Earth.

But is it the living fossil it was claimed to be?

David Attenborough on the Coelacanth, an ancestor to all back-boned animals.

The naturalist showed the first live specimen of the primitive bony fish on TV. But is it a living fossil, as first claimed?

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

The Coelacanth is a primitive bony fish thought to be an important ancestor to all back-boned animals that ventured onto land. David Attenborough brought to television the first film of a living fish in Life on Earth. But is it the living fossil it was claimed to be?

0113Coelacanth2009083020100108 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170807 (BBC7)

Was the first live specimen of the primitive bony fish shown on TV really a living fossil?

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

The Coelacanth is a primitive bony fish thought to be an important ancestor to all back-boned animals that ventured onto land. David Attenborough brought to television the first film of a living fish in Life on Earth. But is it the living fossil it was claimed to be?

0114The Dodo2009090420090906
20100108 (BBC7)
20100109 (BBC7)
20151115 (BBC7)
20170808 (BBC7)

Slaughtered into oblivion, the naturalist asks what lessons can be learned from the case of the most famous of extinct species.

Slaughtered into oblivion, the naturalist asks what lessons can be learned from the dodo.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

The dodo is the caricature of extinction.

This turkey-sized flightless pigeon lived on a remote island and was slaughtered by seafarers for its meat.

The same fate has met other flightless species.

Can we learn this lesson from history?

The turkey-sized flightless pigeon was slaughtered by seafarers for its meat.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

The dodo is the caricature of extinction. This turkey-sized flightless pigeon lived on a remote island and was slaughtered by seafarers for its meat. The same fate has met other flightless species. Can we learn this lesson from history?

0114The Dodo2009090620100109 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170808 (BBC7)

Slaughtered into oblivion, the naturalist asks what lessons can be learned from the dodo.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

The dodo is the caricature of extinction. This turkey-sized flightless pigeon lived on a remote island and was slaughtered by seafarers for its meat. The same fate has met other flightless species. Can we learn this lesson from history?

0115Tracks2009091120090913
20100111 (BBC7)
20100112 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20100112 (BBC7)
20151122 (BBC7)
20170809 (BBC7)

The naturalist examines the revelations found from following fossilised animal tracks.

The naturalist examines the extraordinary revelations found from following fossilised animal tracks.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Following the tracks left by animals is a great craft owned by many aboriginal people.

Doing the same with fossilised tracks is much the same skill, but with a whole new set of extraordinary revelations.

Following fossilised animal tracks presents a whole new set of extraordinary revelations.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Following the tracks left by animals is a great craft owned by many aboriginal people. Doing the same with fossilised tracks is much the same skill, but with a whole new set of extraordinary revelations.

0116Bird's Nest Soup2009091820090920
20100112 (BBC7)
20100113 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20100113 (BBC7)
20151129 (BBC7)
20170810 (BBC7)

The naturalist recalls the challenge of filming the birds of Borneo.

The naturalist recalls the challenge of filming the birds of Borneo, who make their nests of saliva so prized by Chinese chefs.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Filming the birds that make the nests of saliva so prized by Chinese gourmet chefs in the total darkness of a Borneo cave proved difficult, until a conical mound of bat guano provided a natural platform.

Filming the birds that make nests of saliva inside a dark Borneo cave proved difficult.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Filming the birds that make the nests of saliva so prized by Chinese gourmet chefs in the total darkness of a Borneo cave proved difficult, until a conical mound of bat guano provided a natural platform.

0116Bird's Nest Soup2009092020170810 (BBC7)

The naturalist recalls the challenge of filming the birds of Borneo.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Filming the birds that make the nests of saliva so prized by Chinese gourmet chefs in the total darkness of a Borneo cave proved difficult, until a conical mound of bat guano provided a natural platform.

0117Adam's Face2009092520090927
20100113 (BBC7)
20100114 (BBC7)
20151206 (BBC7)
20170811 (BBC7)

The broadcaster recalls the importance of human eyebrows for communication.

The broadcaster recalls the importance of human eyebrows for communication, when he met an aboriginal tribe in New Guinea.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

What are human eyebrows for? Possibly to allow communication without the use of words.

Testing the value of eyebrow communication came into its own when David Attenborough met the men of an aboriginal tribe in New Guinea where there was no other common language.

David met a tribe in New Guinea with whom he could only use eyebrow communication.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

What are human eyebrows for? Possibly to allow communication without the use of words. Testing the value of eyebrow communication came into its own when David Attenborough met the men of an aboriginal tribe in New Guinea where there was no other common language.

0117Adam's Face2009092720100114 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20170811 (BBC7)

The broadcaster recalls the importance of human eyebrows for communication.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

What are human eyebrows for? Possibly to allow communication without the use of words. Testing the value of eyebrow communication came into its own when David Attenborough met the men of an aboriginal tribe in New Guinea where there was no other common language.

0118Amber2009100220091004
20100114 (BBC7)
20100115 (BBC7)
20151213 (BBC7)

Is it possible to extract the DNA from a fly trapped in amber to recreate a dinosaur?

The naturalist wonders if it's possible to extract the DNA from a blood-sucking fly trapped in amber to recreate a dinosaur.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

As a boy, David Attenborough had a piece of amber in which lay a blood-sucking fly; he still has it today.

Would it be possible to extract the DNA from one of these insects caught in the resin and, maybe, recreate a dinosaur?

Would it be possible to extract the DNA from a blood-sucking fly and recreate a dinosaur?

The naturalist wonders if it is possible to extract the DNA from a blood-sucking fly trapped in amber to recreate a dinosaur.

0118Amber2009100420100115 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20171118 (BBC7)

Is it possible to extract the DNA from a fly trapped in amber to recreate a dinosaur?

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

As a boy, David Attenborough had a piece of amber in which lay a blood-sucking fly; he still has it today. Would it be possible to extract the DNA from one of these insects caught in the resin and, maybe, recreate a dinosaur?

0119Large Blue2009100920091011
20100115 (BBC7)
20100116 (BBC7)
20151220 (BBC7)

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

The Large Blue butterfly died out in Britain in 1979, but why? Investigations pointed to a complex life cycle linked to a single species of ant.

With this knowledge the Large Blue was re-introduced into the British countryside, but there is a sinister twist in the tale, in the form of a parasitic wasp.

The Large Blue butterfly died out in Britain in 1979, but why?

The naturalist asks why the Large Blue butterfly recently died out in the UK.

The naturalist asks why the Large Blue butterfly recently died out in the UK - and the challenge of its reintroduction.

0119Large Blue2009101120100116 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20171203 (BBC7)

The naturalist asks why the Large Blue butterfly recently died out in the UK.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

The Large Blue butterfly died out in Britain in 1979, but why? Investigations pointed to a complex life cycle linked to a single species of ant. With this knowledge the Large Blue was re-introduced into the British countryside, but there is a sinister twist in the tale, in the form of a parasitic wasp.

0120Collecting2009101620100118 (BBC7)
20151226 (BBC7)
20151227 (BBC7)
20180323 (BBC7)
20180324 (BBC7)

The naturalist comments on the decline in collecting by children.

The naturalist comments on the decline in collecting by children, which can lead to an early fascination with the natural world.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Why do we collect things? Is it a male response to ancient hunting instincts to provide food for the family? Today, collecting by children is in decline, and with it the development of an early fascination with the natural world around them.

0120 LASTCollecting2009101620091018
20100118 (BBC7)
20100119 BT=0400 (BBC7)
20100119 (BBC7)
20151226 (BBC7)
20151227 (BBC7)

The naturalist comments on the decline in collecting by children.

The naturalist comments on the decline in collecting by children, which can lead to an early fascination with the natural world.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Why do we collect things? Is it a male response to ancient hunting instincts to provide food for the family? Today, collecting by children is in decline, and with it the development of an early fascination with the natural world around them.

Collecting by children is in decline, and with it their fascination with the natural world

02Elsa20180512

David Attenborough gives his perspective on the story of the famous lioness, Elsa.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants

20/20. David Attenborough tells us how, whilst en route to Madagascar, his bosses in the BBC asked him to break his journey in Kenya to visit the Adamsons. Joy and George Adamson were famous for hand rearing a Lioness whom they called Elsa. Elsa was the central character in the book written by the couple "Born Free". In this Life Story Sir David cleverly takes us from the romanticism of Born Free and being close to habituated lions, to the harsh reality of befriending a big cat.

Written and presented by David Attenborough
Produced by Polly Procter.

02Elsa20180513
0201Canopy2011021820110220
0201Canopy2011021820110220
20110220 (R4)

1/20.

If you walk into a rainforest you are immediately met by quite literally a forest of trees.

All the tree trunks look like cathedral pillars, smooth and wet from the rain.

Not a single branch emerges from the trunk for tens of metres - and when they do you see a breath-taking interlocking jungle of branches and leaves, ferns and flowers and all number of creatures great and small.

The canopy is a bonanza of tropical forest life, in the bright light and gentle breeze - a far cry from the dark and humid underworld of the forest floor.

Not surprising then that David Attenborough knew this would be a perfect place to film wildlife.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

Talks by Sir David Attenborough on the histories of creatures and plants.

1/20. If you walk into a rainforest you are immediately met by quite literally a forest of trees. All the tree trunks look like cathedral pillars, smooth and wet from the rain. Not a single branch emerges from the trunk for tens of metres - and when they do you see a breath-taking interlocking jungle of branches and leaves, ferns and flowers and all number of creatures great and small. The canopy is a bonanza of tropical forest life, in the bright light and gentle breeze - a far cry from the dark and humid underworld of the forest floor. Not surprising then that David Attenborough knew this would be a perfect place to film wildlife.

0201Canopy2011021820130219
20160103 (BBC7)

David Attenborough talks about filming in one of nature's most inaccessible places.

1/20. If you walk into a rainforest you are immediately met by quite literally a forest of trees. All the tree trunks look like cathedral pillars, smooth and wet from the rain. Not a single branch emerges from the trunk for tens of metres - and when they do you see a breath-taking interlocking jungle of branches and leaves, ferns and flowers and all number of creatures great and small. The canopy is a bonanza of tropical forest life, in the bright light and gentle breeze - a far cry from the dark and humid underworld of the forest floor. Not surprising then that David Attenborough knew this would be a perfect place to film wildlife.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

Talks by Sir David Attenborough on the histories of creatures and plants.

0201Canopy2011021820130219

1/20. If you walk into a rainforest you are immediately met by quite literally a forest of trees. All the tree trunks look like cathedral pillars, smooth and wet from the rain. Not a single branch emerges from the trunk for tens of metres - and when they do you see a breath-taking interlocking jungle of branches and leaves, ferns and flowers and all number of creatures great and small. The canopy is a bonanza of tropical forest life, in the bright light and gentle breeze - a far cry from the dark and humid underworld of the forest floor. Not surprising then that David Attenborough knew this would be a perfect place to film wildlife.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

Talks by Sir David Attenborough on the histories of creatures and plants.

0201Canopy20110220

1/20. If you walk into a rainforest you are immediately met by quite literally a forest of trees. All the tree trunks look like cathedral pillars, smooth and wet from the rain. Not a single branch emerges from the trunk for tens of metres - and when they do you see a breath-taking interlocking jungle of branches and leaves, ferns and flowers and all number of creatures great and small. The canopy is a bonanza of tropical forest life, in the bright light and gentle breeze - a far cry from the dark and humid underworld of the forest floor. Not surprising then that David Attenborough knew this would be a perfect place to film wildlife.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

Talks by Sir David Attenborough on the histories of creatures and plants.

0202Kiwi2011022520110227

2/20.

David Attenborough tells us New Zealand had several species of flightless bird living across the islands, all of which are now extinct, bar one.

The Kiwi has become one of those species iconic of the country, like the Koala to Australia, the Giraffe to Africa and the Alpaca to South America.

Historically, New Zealand didn't have ground predators such as wild cats and stoats - which allowed birds to exploit living on the ground.

Being flightless in New Zealand was a good way to be a bird.

David Attenborough filmed Kiwis and in this Life Story he muses on the niche the Kiwi occupies on the ground.

He argues the Kiwi behaves more like a mammal than a bird, but what mammal do you think, in Attenborough's view, the Kiwi most resembles?

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough muses over the peculiar Kiwi, a bird more mammal-like in its habits.

0202Kiwi2011022520110227
20160110 (BBC7)

David Attenborough muses over the peculiar Kiwi, a bird more mammal-like in its habits.

2/20. David Attenborough tells us New Zealand had several species of flightless bird living across the islands, all of which are now extinct, bar one. The Kiwi has become one of those species iconic of the country, like the Koala to Australia, the Giraffe to Africa and the Alpaca to South America. Historically, New Zealand didn't have ground predators such as wild cats and stoats - which allowed birds to exploit living on the ground. Being flightless in New Zealand was a good way to be a bird. David Attenborough filmed Kiwis and in this Life Story he muses on the niche the Kiwi occupies on the ground. He argues the Kiwi behaves more like a mammal than a bird, but what mammal do you think, in Attenborough's view, the Kiwi most resembles?

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

0202Kiwi2011022520110801
20160110 (BBC7)

David Attenborough muses over the peculiar Kiwi, a bird more mammal-like in its habits.

2/20. David Attenborough tells us New Zealand had several species of flightless bird living across the islands, all of which are now extinct, bar one. The Kiwi has become one of those species iconic of the country, like the Koala to Australia, the Giraffe to Africa and the Alpaca to South America. Historically, New Zealand didn't have ground predators such as wild cats and stoats - which allowed birds to exploit living on the ground. Being flightless in New Zealand was a good way to be a bird. David Attenborough filmed Kiwis and in this Life Story he muses on the niche the Kiwi occupies on the ground. He argues the Kiwi behaves more like a mammal than a bird, but what mammal do you think, in Attenborough's view, the Kiwi most resembles?

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

0202Kiwi2011022520110801
20110227 (R4)

2/20. David Attenborough tells us New Zealand had several species of flightless bird living across the islands, all of which are now extinct, bar one. The Kiwi has become one of those species iconic of the country, like the Koala to Australia, the Giraffe to Africa and the Alpaca to South America. Historically, New Zealand didn't have ground predators such as wild cats and stoats - which allowed birds to exploit living on the ground. Being flightless in New Zealand was a good way to be a bird. David Attenborough filmed Kiwis and in this Life Story he muses on the niche the Kiwi occupies on the ground. He argues the Kiwi behaves more like a mammal than a bird, but what mammal do you think, in Attenborough's view, the Kiwi most resembles?

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough muses over the peculiar Kiwi, a bird more mammal-like in its habits.

0202Kiwi20110227
0203Charnia2011030420110306
20160117 (BBC7)

3/20. David Attenborough has always been fascinated by fossils; even as a boy he'd spend many hours exploring the local quarry near his home in Leicestershire. And near his family home was a forest which he visited frequently, but didn't hunt for fossils there because he knew the rocks we too old to have any post cards of early life embedded in their layers. But he was wrong - those rocks harboured a wonderful secret - a secret that would rattle the cages of the big thinkers of the time and would change the story of life on earth for ever.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough's fascination with the fossilised evidence of the beginning of life.

3/20.

David Attenborough has always been fascinated by fossils; even as a boy he'd spend many hours exploring the local quarry near his home in Leicestershire.

And near his family home was a forest which he visited frequently, but didn't hunt for fossils there because he knew the rocks we too old to have any post cards of early life embedded in their layers.

But he was wrong - those rocks harboured a wonderful secret - a secret that would rattle the cages of the big thinkers of the time and would change the story of life on earth for ever.

3/20. David Attenborough has always been fascinated by fossils; even as a boy he'd spend many hours exploring the local quarry near his home in Leicestershire. And near his family home was a forest which he visited frequently, but didn't hunt for fossils there because he knew the rocks were too old to have any post cards of early life embedded in their layers. But he was wrong - those rocks harboured a wonderful secret - a secret that would rattle the cages of the big thinkers of the time and would change the story of life on earth for ever.

0203Charnia20110306

David Attenborough's fascination with the fossilised evidence of the beginning of life.

0204Foreign Fare2011031120110313
20160124 (BBC7)

4/20. We sometimes forget that vegetables that we see as common-place today in all their varieties have wild origins. The potato for example is a name given to a tuber that both comes from Africa and South America - And the history of their discovery and export into our European markets can be traced by examining how those first explorers named the plants. In Foreign Fare, David Attenborough traces the discovery of some common vegetables to their wild beginnings - and the fascinating natural history of their use as food.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough explores the natural history of potatoes, peppers and artichokes.

4/20.

We sometimes forget that vegetables that we see as common-place today in all their varieties have wild origins.

The potato for example is a name given to a tuber that both comes from Africa and South America - And the history of their discovery and export into our European markets can be traced by examining how those first explorers named the plants.

In Foreign Fare, David Attenborough traces the discovery of some common vegetables to their wild beginnings - and the fascinating natural history of their use as food.

0204Foreign Fare20110313

David Attenborough explores the natural history of potatoes, peppers and artichokes.

0205Cicada2011031820110320
20160131 (BBC7)

5/20. One of the great wild sounds of North America is the purring of insects in the evening, especially that of Cicadas, one of the great stridulating sounds in the wild. This is the tale of one Cicada; the 17-year periodic Cicada that stunned the community in New England thirteen years after the Pilgrim Fathers had landed. There was a plague of insects, all with red eyes on stalks - and all emerging continuously out of the soil. When the plague subsided a few weeks later the people of Plymouth Rock were braced for another onslaught, but nothing happened until 17 years later. David Attenborough recalls a filming trip to New England to film this species of Cicada with both fascinating natural history and a hilarious twist.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough reveals the life of insects that emerge from the earth every 17 years.

5/20.

One of the great wild sounds of North America is the purring of insects in the evening, especially that of Cicadas, one of the great stridulating sounds in the wild.

This is the tale of one Cicada; the 17-year periodic Cicada that stunned the community in New England thirteen years after the Pilgrim Fathers had landed.

There was a plague of insects, all with red eyes on stalks - and all emerging continuously out of the soil.

When the plague subsided a few weeks later the people of Plymouth Rock were braced for another onslaught, but nothing happened until 17 years later.

David Attenborough recalls a filming trip to New England to film this species of Cicada with both fascinating natural history and a hilarious twist.

0205Cicada20110320

5/20. One of the great wild sounds of North America is the purring of insects in the evening, especially that of Cicadas, one of the great stridulating sounds in the wild. This is the tale of one Cicada; the 17-year periodic Cicada that stunned the community in New England thirteen years after the Pilgrim Fathers had landed. There was a plague of insects, all with red eyes on stalks - and all emerging continuously out of the soil. When the plague subsided a few weeks later the people of Plymouth Rock were braced for another onslaught, but nothing happened until 17 years later. David Attenborough recalls a filming trip to New England to film this species of Cicada with both fascinating natural history and a hilarious twist.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough reveals the life of insects that emerge from the earth every 17 years.

0206Earthworms2011032520110327
20160306 (BBC7)

6/20. Although Charles Darwin is especially well known for his work on the Theory of Evolution through his seminal work "On the Origin of Species", he also published a lot of his research on earthworms. Earthworms fascinated Darwin, so much so that his observations led him to believe that they showed marked intelligence. And earthworms fascinate David Attenborough too. He recalls a visit to Australia to film the giant earthworm and intriguingly used his ears more than any other sense to find them. What did they sound like and what did they look like? He reveals all.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough recalls visiting Australia to find the giant earthworm - using his ears

6/20.

Although Charles Darwin is especially well known for his work on the Theory of Evolution through his seminal work "On the Origin of Species", he also published a lot of his research on earthworms.

Earthworms fascinated Darwin, so much so that his observations led him to believe that they showed marked intelligence.

And earthworms fascinate David Attenborough too.

He recalls a visit to Australia to film the giant earthworm and intriguingly used his ears more than any other sense to find them.

What did they sound like and what did they look like? He reveals all.

6/20. Although Charles Darwin is especially well known for his work on the Theory of Evolution through his seminal work "On the Origin of Species", he also published a lot of his research on earthworms. Earthworms fascinated Darwin, so much so that his observations led him to believe that they showed marked intelligence. And earthworms fascinate David Attenborough too. He recalls a visit to Australia to film the giant earthworm and intriguingly used his ears more than any other sense to find them. What did they sound like and what did they look like? He reveals all.

0206Earthworms20110327

David Attenborough recalls visiting Australia to find the giant earthworm - using his ears

0207Wallace2011040120110403
20160313 (BBC7)

7/20.

It was the great travel books written in the 19th century by Alfred Russell Wallace that inspired David Attenborough himself to achieve great things in the realm of natural history.

But Attenborough tells us that Wallace was more than just a great travel writer.

His power of meticulous observation and recording as he explored many parts of the world were in the highest league imaginable, even for Victorian standards - and his power of analysis very much akin with Darwin, his great contemporary.

Wallace independently came up with a theory of evolution that was in parallel to Darwin's thinking - two field naturalists breaking huge conventions of the time and coming up with the single most important theory in Biology.

How did they resolve the conflict between themselves?

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough speaks of the achievements of scientist Alfred Russell Wallace.

David Attenborough on the achievements of scientist Alfred Russell Wallace.

7/20. It was the great travel books written in the 19th century by Alfred Russell Wallace that inspired David Attenborough himself to achieve great things in the realm of natural history. But Attenborough tells us that Wallace was more than just a great travel writer. His power of meticulous observation and recording as he explored many parts of the world were in the highest league imaginable, even for Victorian standards - and his power of analysis very much akin with Darwin, his great contemporary. Wallace independently came up with a theory of evolution that was in parallel to Darwin's thinking - two field naturalists breaking huge conventions of the time and coming up with the single most important theory in Biology. How did they resolve the conflict between themselves?

0207Wallace20110403

7/20. It was the great travel books written in the 19th century by Alfred Russell Wallace that inspired David Attenborough himself to achieve great things in the realm of natural history. But Attenborough tells us that Wallace was more than just a great travel writer. His power of meticulous observation and recording as he explored many parts of the world were in the highest league imaginable, even for Victorian standards - and his power of analysis very much akin with Darwin, his great contemporary. Wallace independently came up with a theory of evolution that was in parallel to Darwin's thinking - two field naturalists breaking huge conventions of the time and coming up with the single most important theory in Biology. How did they resolve the conflict between themselves?

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough speaks of the achievements of scientist Alfred Russell Wallace.

0208Hummers2011040820110410
20160320 (BBC7)

8/20. Hummingbirds are given spectacular names motivated by their striking colours, patterns and shimmering metallic iridescence; their names are beautiful as are the birds. David Attenborough has filmed them on several occasions and is fascinated by their agility and flying skills to drink nectar from flowers inaccessible to any other animal. And propelled by this rocket fuel of nature they are capable of flying great distances and living life in the fast lane. Enchanting in this story is how moved David Attenborough is when recalling a story of their conservation; a rare piece of good news he comments.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

Hummingbirds are brilliantly coloured with aeronautical skills that defy the imagination.

8/20.

Hummingbirds are given spectacular names motivated by their striking colours, patterns and shimmering metallic iridescence; their names are beautiful as are the birds.

David Attenborough has filmed them on several occasions and is fascinated by their agility and flying skills to drink nectar from flowers inaccessible to any other animal.

And propelled by this rocket fuel of nature they are capable of flying great distances and living life in the fast lane.

Enchanting in this story is how moved David Attenborough is when recalling a story of their conservation; a rare piece of good news he comments.

0208Hummers20110410

Hummingbirds are brilliantly coloured with aeronautical skills that defy the imagination.

0209Identities2011041520110417
20160606 (BBC7)
20160607 (BBC7)

David Attenborough tells of the importance of identifying individual animals in a crowd.

9/20.

You get a very different insight into the natural world when you have the opportunity to study the behaviour of individual animals.

David Attenborough recalls with sumptuous delight spotting a blackbird in his garden with a white feather - "whitey" - giving him a window into the life of blackbirds and what's more, that individual.

And, he says, he saw what blackbirds get up to! In this story Attenborough remembers filming spiders and filming chimpanzees, both of which benefited from someone knowing about the individuals - and whether you're a spider or a chimpanzee, you have a personality all of your own.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David reflects on seeing 'whitey' - a blackbird with a white feather - in his garden.

You get a very different insight into the natural world when you have the opportunity to study the behaviour of individual animals. David Attenborough recalls with sumptuous delight spotting a blackbird in his garden with a white feather - "whitey" - giving him a window into the life of blackbirds and what's more, that individual. And, he says, he saw what blackbirds get up to! In this story Attenborough remembers filming spiders and filming chimpanzees, both of which benefited from someone knowing about the individuals - and whether you're a spider or a chimpanzee, you have a personality all of your own.

0209Identities20110417

9/20. You get a very different insight into the natural world when you have the opportunity to study the behaviour of individual animals. David Attenborough recalls with sumptuous delight spotting a blackbird in his garden with a white feather - "whitey" - giving him a window into the life of blackbirds and what's more, that individual. And, he says, he saw what blackbirds get up to! In this story Attenborough remembers filming spiders and filming chimpanzees, both of which benefited from someone knowing about the individuals - and whether you're a spider or a chimpanzee, you have a personality all of your own.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough tells of the importance of identifying individual animals in a crowd.

0210Rats2011042220110424
20160607 (BBC7)
20160608 (BBC7)

10/20. It might be surprising to hear, but David Attenborough has made it known over the years that rats are not his favourite animal. In this piece, dedicated to his nemesis, Attenborough with great wit and skill tells us of the living nightmare he endured whilst on location in a place infested with them. If that wasn't enough, whilst making Life of Mammals, he devoted a whole programme to them - and to balance his own personal view went to an Indian temple where the rat is revered and even encouraged to swarm in vast numbers. But in a clever twist of the story, as is the hallmark of David Attenborough, in no uncertain way he tells us why they should be respected.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough hates rats, but in a personal way explains why they should be respected

10/20.

It might be surprising to hear, but David Attenborough has made it known over the years that rats are not his favourite animal.

In this piece, dedicated to his nemesis, Attenborough with great wit and skill tells us of the living nightmare he endured whilst on location in a place infested with them.

If that wasn't enough, whilst making Life of Mammals, he devoted a whole programme to them - and to balance his own personal view went to an Indian temple where the rat is revered and even encouraged to swarm in vast numbers.

But in a clever twist of the story, as is the hallmark of David Attenborough, in no uncertain way he tells us why they should be respected.

It might be surprising to hear, but David Attenborough has made it known over the years that rats are not his favourite animal. In this piece, dedicated to his nemesis, Attenborough with great wit and skill tells us of the living nightmare he endured whilst on location in a place infested with them. If that wasn't enough, whilst making Life of Mammals, he devoted a whole programme to them - and to balance his own personal view went to an Indian temple where the rat is revered and even encouraged to swarm in vast numbers. But in a clever twist of the story, as is the hallmark of David Attenborough, in no uncertain way he tells us why they should be respected.

0210Rats20110424

David Attenborough hates rats, but in a personal way explains why they should be respected

0211Monsters2011042920110501
20160608 (BBC7)
20160609 (BBC7)

11/20. Fire breathing dragons are clearly something from legend, but what about a monster that lives in an ancient deep lake? In this edition of David Attenborough's Life Stories, Sir David reflects on a time when pre-eminent conservationist and naturalist Peter Scott was immersed in acquiring evidence of the existence of the Loch Ness Monster. No such giant creature has ever been found or concrete evidence it ever existed, but this is an intriguing tale of discovery. David Attenborough moves his story on to beyond the highlands of Scotland and into the Himalayas - and it's here that Sir David reveals something very surprising.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough remembers puzzling over the Loch Ness Monster with Sir Peter Scott.

11/20.

Fire breathing dragons are clearly something from legend, but what about a monster that lives in an ancient deep lake? In this edition of David Attenborough's Life Stories, Sir David reflects on a time when pre-eminent conservationist and naturalist Peter Scott was immersed in acquiring evidence of the existence of the Loch Ness Monster.

No such giant creature has ever been found or concrete evidence it ever existed, but this is an intriguing tale of discovery.

David Attenborough moves his story on to beyond the highlands of Scotland and into the Himalayas - and it's here that Sir David reveals something very surprising.

Fire breathing dragons are clearly something from legend, but what about a monster that lives in an ancient deep lake? In this edition of David Attenborough's Life Stories, Sir David reflects on a time when pre-eminent conservationist and naturalist Peter Scott was immersed in acquiring evidence of the existence of the Loch Ness Monster. No such giant creature has ever been found or concrete evidence it ever existed, but this is an intriguing tale of discovery. David Attenborough moves his story on to beyond the highlands of Scotland and into the Himalayas - and it's here that Sir David reveals something very surprising.

0211Monsters20110501

David Attenborough remembers puzzling over the Loch Ness Monster with Sir Peter Scott.

021220110508

David Attenborough celebrates butterflies' migration with a twist of evolutionary thinking

0212Butterflies2011050620110508
20160609 (BBC7)
20160610 (BBC7)

12/20.

When massing for their winter torpor in Mexico, the pine trees laden with Monarch Butterflies are one of the most mystical and magical places to be.

David Attenborough is one of many naturalists, writers and broadcasters to marvel at this species migration feat and the spectacle of their over wintering - one of the natural wonders of the world.

In this Life Story David Attenborough guides us through the butterfly's migration to Canada from Mexico - and back again - gently unpacking their natural history and wonder.

And he immerses us in other butterfly congregations during filming trips over the years - but in a clever twist brings us back to his garden with an intriguing thought about the evolution of butterfly behaviour.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough celebrates butterflies' migration with a twist of evolutionary thinking

When massing for their winter torpor in Mexico, the pine trees laden with Monarch Butterflies are one of the most mystical and magical places to be. David Attenborough is one of many naturalists, writers and broadcasters to marvel at this species migration feat and the spectacle of their over wintering - one of the natural wonders of the world. In this Life Story David Attenborough guides us through the butterfly's migration to Canada from Mexico - and back again - gently unpacking their natural history and wonder. And he immerses us in other butterfly congregations during filming trips over the years - but in a clever twist brings us back to his garden with an intriguing thought about the evolution of butterfly behaviour.

12/20. When massing for their winter torpor in Mexico, the pine trees laden with Monarch Butterflies are one of the most mystical and magical places to be. David Attenborough is one of many naturalists, writers and broadcasters to marvel at this species migration feat and the spectacle of their over wintering - one of the natural wonders of the world. In this Life Story David Attenborough guides us through the butterfly's migration to Canada from Mexico - and back again - gently unpacking their natural history and wonder. And he immerses us in other butterfly congregations during filming trips over the years - but in a clever twist brings us back to his garden with an intriguing thought about the evolution of butterfly behaviour.

0213Chimps2011051320110515
20160610 (BBC7)
20160611 (BBC7)

13/20. They say, David Attenborough reports, that we share more of our genes with chimpanzees than any other species alive today. And this proximity of Homo Sapiens to the chimpanzee motivated Sir David even more to film behaviour never before seen. It had been known for some time that chimps hunt monkeys for meat, but it would be a first to film it for television audiences. To film such a hunt required days of waiting and tracking a troop through the Equatorial African forest - and when the hunt came and was over it changed Attenborough's view of chimps and their importance to us, forever.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough recalls a memorable filming trip, following chimpanzees hunting monkeys

13/20.

They say, David Attenborough reports, that we share more of our genes with chimpanzees than any other species alive today.

And this proximity of Homo Sapiens to the chimpanzee motivated Sir David even more to film behaviour never before seen.

It had been known for some time that chimps hunt monkeys for meat, but it would be a first to film it for television audiences.

To film such a hunt required days of waiting and tracking a troop through the Equatorial African forest - and when the hunt came and was over it changed Attenborough's view of chimps and their importance to us, forever.

They say, David Attenborough reports, that we share more of our genes with chimpanzees than any other species alive today. And this proximity of Homo Sapiens to the chimpanzee motivated Sir David even more to film behaviour never before seen. It had been known for some time that chimps hunt monkeys for meat, but it would be a first to film it for television audiences. To film such a hunt required days of waiting and tracking a troop through the Equatorial African forest - and when the hunt came and was over it changed Attenborough's view of chimps and their importance to us, forever.

0213Chimps20110515

David Attenborough recalls a memorable filming trip, following chimpanzees hunting monkeys

0214Cuckoo2011052020110522
20160613 (BBC7)
20160614 (BBC7)

14/20. The Cuckoo is one of the iconic brood parasites of the world - the bird that cons another species into taking its egg as its own and rears the chick to fledging. In the single frame of the Cuckoo you have a long distance migrant, travelling from Africa to breeding grounds in the temperate north, and back again. The Cuckoo does not raise its own chick and across a range of Cuckoo individuals, they parasitise several species of bird - all much smaller than they are. David Attenborough explores the world of the Cuckoo and not only marvels at their natural history but tells the story of how a wildlife cameraman resolved a scientific mystery - and how the Cuckoo itself harbours yet more secrets to science and natural history.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough tells us how cuckoos get their eggs into the nests of other species.

14/20.

The Cuckoo is one of the iconic brood parasites of the world - the bird that cons another species into taking its egg as its own and rears the chick to fledging.

In the single frame of the Cuckoo you have a long distance migrant, travelling from Africa to breeding grounds in the temperate north, and back again.

The Cuckoo does not raise its own chick and across a range of Cuckoo individuals, they parasitise several species of bird - all much smaller than they are.

David Attenborough explores the world of the Cuckoo and not only marvels at their natural history but tells the story of how a wildlife cameraman resolved a scientific mystery - and how the Cuckoo itself harbours yet more secrets to science and natural history.

0215Quetzalcoatlus2011052720110529
20160614 (BBC7)
20160615 (BBC7)

15/20. As David Attenborough explains, ".the biggest animal to fly was not a bird, but a reptile." - it was a Quetzalcoatlus, a pterosaur with at least a forty foot wingspan. David Attenborough, a huge fan of palaeontology, is skilled in bringing the past natural histories to life through stories about the discovery of key fossils. What a creature this "terrible lizard" must have been - big enough to scavenge the bodies of dead Tyrannosaurus and yet able to fly, probably in large numbers. And with a twist so typical of Sir David's writing, he brings this pterosaur to life at the very end.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough introduces the Quetzalcoatlus: the largest flying animal ever to exist.

15/20.

As David Attenborough explains, ".the biggest animal to fly was not a bird, but a reptile." - it was a Quetzalcoatlus, a pterosaur with at least a forty foot wingspan.

David Attenborough, a huge fan of palaeontology, is skilled in bringing the past natural histories to life through stories about the discovery of key fossils.

What a creature this "terrible lizard" must have been - big enough to scavenge the bodies of dead Tyrannosaurus and yet able to fly, probably in large numbers.

And with a twist so typical of Sir David's writing, he brings this pterosaur to life at the very end.

15/20. As David Attenborough explains, ".the biggest animal to fly was not a bird, but a reptile." - it was a Quetzalcoatlus, a pterosaur with at least a forty foot wingspan. David Attenborough, a huge fan of palaeontology, is skilled in bringing the past natural histories to life through stories about the discovery of key fossils. What a creature this "terrible lizard" must have been - big enough to scavenge the bodies of dead Tyrannosaurus and yet able to fly, probably in large numbers. And with a twist so typical of Sir David's writing, he brings this pterosaur to life at the very end.

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20160815 (BBC7)

16/20. Many of the world's chameleons live on the huge continental island of Madagascar off the Eastern coast of Africa. Some are tiny, as small as a finger nail - others in comparison are giants. Sir David Attenborough gives us a personal insight into the natural history of chameleons through one very special individual - a chameleon he had as a pet, called Rommel. In this life story you will feel as if you've met Rommel personally and with the delightful embrace with which Sir David writes, you smile all the way through.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

In this Life Story of Sir David Attenborough you are introduced to Rommel the Chameleon.

16/20.

Many of the world's chameleons live on the huge continental island of Madagascar off the Eastern coast of Africa.

Some are tiny, as small as a finger nail - others in comparison are giants.

Sir David Attenborough gives us a personal insight into the natural history of chameleons through one very special individual - a chameleon he had as a pet, called Rommel.

In this life story you will feel as if you've met Rommel personally and with the delightful embrace with which Sir David writes, you smile all the way through.

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17/20. The beautiful thick, sweet and luscious tasting delicacy of honey is one of the world's natural goodies. Indigenous peoples from all over the world will go to great lengths to get the honey from wild bees - and for most of us less connected to the natural world, we love this product of bees bought from the shop. Honey is nectar and David Attenborough poignantly points out this "was the first bribe in nature..." - it evolved one hundred million years ago with the flowering plants and drove the evolutionary relationship between animals and plants.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

David Attenborough tells of nature's first bribe, that evolved a hundred million years ago

17/20.

The beautiful thick, sweet and luscious tasting delicacy of honey is one of the world's natural goodies.

Indigenous peoples from all over the world will go to great lengths to get the honey from wild bees - and for most of us less connected to the natural world, we love this product of bees bought from the shop.

Honey is nectar and David Attenborough poignantly points out this "was the first bribe in nature..." - it evolved one hundred million years ago with the flowering plants and drove the evolutionary relationship between animals and plants.

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20160925 (BBC7)

18/20. Squire Waterton of Walton Hall was an eccentric Englishman and gentleman who made many visits to South America and wrote about his travels. His travel books are "amongst the oddest I know" David Attenborough tells us, written in an odd, almost biblical style. But nevertheless, these books are accounts of natural history two hundred years ago. Attenborough argues that Waterton shouldn't be just remembered for his writing. He should be credited with establishing the first nature reserve in this country. Appalled by the ravages of the industrial revolution's impact on the landscape, he built a wall around his estate to protect the wildlife - and free of charge allowed people to visit, which they did in their masses.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

This is the story of an eccentric 19th-century nobleman and his passion for wildlife.

18/20.

Squire Waterton of Walton Hall was an eccentric Englishman and gentleman who made many visits to South America and wrote about his travels.

His travel books are "amongst the oddest I know" David Attenborough tells us, written in an odd, almost biblical style.

But nevertheless, these books are accounts of natural history two hundred years ago.

Attenborough argues that Waterton shouldn't be just remembered for his writing.

He should be credited with establishing the first nature reserve in this country.

Appalled by the ravages of the industrial revolution's impact on the landscape, he built a wall around his estate to protect the wildlife - and free of charge allowed people to visit, which they did in their masses.

David Attenborough explores the life of Squire Waterton, a 19th-century taxidermist.

18/20. Squire Waterton of Walton Hall was an eccentric Englishman and gentleman who made many visits to South America and wrote about his travels. His travel books are "amongst the oddest I know" David Attenborough tells us, written in an odd, almost biblical style. But nevertheless, these books are accounts of natural history two hundred years ago. Attenborough argues that Waterton shouldn't be just remembered for his writing. He should be credited with establishing the first nature reserve in this country. Appalled by the ravages of the industrial revolution's impact on the landscape, he built a wall around his estate to protect the wildlife - and free of charge allowed people to visit, which they did in their masses.

0218Waterton20110619

This is the story of an eccentric 19th-century nobleman and his passion for wildlife.

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20160918 (BBC7)

19/20. The chemistry that allows the combustion of natural chemicals to generate light without heat is wonderfully harnessed by the firefly. Fireflies are insects with several species in the group; each with its own species specific code and signalling regime. In this life story David Attenborough tells of his personal experience filming the antics of fireflies and the insight this gave him into this secret world of messaging.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Julian Hector.

Fireflies generate light by themselves and they do this with style.

19/20.

The chemistry that allows the combustion of natural chemicals to generate light without heat is wonderfully harnessed by the firefly.

Fireflies are insects with several species in the group; each with its own species specific code and signalling regime.

In this life story David Attenborough tells of his personal experience filming the antics of fireflies and the insight this gave him into this secret world of messaging.

generate light by themselves and they do this with style.

0219Fireflies20110626
0220 LASTElsa2011070120110703
20160904 (BBC7)

20/20. David Attenborough tells us how, whilst en route to Madagascar, his bosses in the BBC asked him to break his journey in Kenya to visit the Adamsons. Joy and George Adamson were famous for hand rearing a Lioness whom they called Elsa. Elsa was the central character in the book written by the couple "Born Free". In this Life Story Sir David cleverly takes us from the romanticism of Born Free and being close to habituated lions, to the harsh reality of befriending a big cat.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Produced by Polly Procter.

David Attenborough gives his perspective on the story of the famous lioness, Elsa.

20/20.

David Attenborough tells us how, whilst en route to Madagascar, his bosses in the BBC asked him to break his journey in Kenya to visit the Adamsons.

Joy and George Adamson were famous for hand rearing a Lioness whom they called Elsa.

Elsa was the central character in the book written by the couple "Born Free".

In this Life Story Sir David cleverly takes us from the romanticism of Born Free and being close to habituated lions, to the harsh reality of befriending a big cat.

20/20. David Attenborough tells us how, whilst en route to Madagascar, his bosses in the BBC asked him to break his journey in Kenya to visit the Adamsons. Joy and George Adamson were famous for hand rearing a Lioness whom they called Elsa. Elsa was the central character in the book written by the couple "Born Free". In this Life Story Sir David cleverly takes us from the romanticism of Born Free and being close to habituated lions, to the harsh reality of befriending a big cat.

0220 LASTElsa20110703

David Attenborough gives his perspective on the story of the famous lioness, Elsa.