Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20171008

Your favourite hymns with Rod Whiting.

20171015
20171022
20171029

Maria Richmond sits in with your favourite hymns.

20171105

Your favourite hymns with Rod Whiting.

07/05/201720170507

A unique international broadcast tracking the dawn chorus across from India to Ireland.

Pop star and bird lover Will Young joins Brett Westwood and a gang of unexpected bird lovers as Radio 4 throws an all-nighter in search of the Dawn Chorus. Going on air just after midnight and staying up till 7am Brett will host a night of conversation, story-telling, argument and explanation culminating in the live broadcast of the Dawn Chorus from Ham Wall Nature reserve in Somerset.

Other guests include, Jimi Goodwin, lead singer of Doves; Birds Brittania author Mark Cocker, Bird acoustics expert Dr. Jenny York, Natural Navigator Tristan Gooley and Singer Hanna Tuulikki.

Radio 4 is doing this as part of International Dawn Chorus day - a unique broadcast event hosted by Derek Mooney from RTE radio in Ireland - in which radio stations across Europe join together to track the rising sun across the continent from Moscow to Dublin. You'll hear capercaillies in from Norway, bitterns in Somerset, bluethroats in Holland - it's like the Eurovision Song contest, but with much better singing.

In our increasingly digital world Dawn Chorus provides a genuine encounter with the natural world on unmediated terms. There's a lovely sense of anticipation as you hunt and you wait and you feel the sense of being really there - of the sudden excitement of a Tawny Owl at midnight, the joy of a cuckoo at 4am. And as we wait and we listen we take the opportunity to have a series of interesting conversations about wildlife and literature, music, evolution and conservation.

A unique international broadcast tracking the dawn chorus across from India to Ireland.

A unique international broadcast tracking the dawn chorus across from India to Ireland.

Pop star and bird lover Will Young joins Brett Westwood and a gang of unexpected bird lovers as Radio 4 throws an all-nighter in search of the Dawn Chorus. Going on air just after midnight and staying up till 7am Brett will host a night of conversation, story-telling, argument and explanation culminating in the live broadcast of the Dawn Chorus from Ham Wall Nature reserve in Somerset.

Other guests include, Jimi Goodwin, lead singer of Doves; Birds Brittania author Mark Cocker, Bird acoustics expert Dr. Jenny York, Natural Navigator Tristan Gooley and Singer Hanna Tuulikki.

Radio 4 is doing this as part of International Dawn Chorus day - a unique broadcast event hosted by Derek Mooney from RTE radio in Ireland - in which radio stations across Europe join together to track the rising sun across the continent from Moscow to Dublin. You'll hear capercaillies in from Norway, bitterns in Somerset, bluethroats in Holland - it's like the Eurovision Song contest, but with much better singing.

In our increasingly digital world Dawn Chorus provides a genuine encounter with the natural world on unmediated terms. There's a lovely sense of anticipation as you hunt and you wait and you feel the sense of being really there - of the sudden excitement of a Tawny Owl at midnight, the joy of a cuckoo at 4am. And as we wait and we listen we take the opportunity to have a series of interesting conversations about wildlife and literature, music, evolution and conservation.

A unique international broadcast tracking the dawn chorus across from India to Ireland.

Pop star and bird lover Will Young joins Brett Westwood and a gang of unexpected bird lovers as Radio 4 throws an all-nighter in search of the Dawn Chorus. Going on air just after midnight and staying up till 7am Brett will host a night of conversation, story-telling, argument and explanation culminating in the live broadcast of the Dawn Chorus from Ham Wall Nature reserve in Somerset.

Other guests include, Jimi Goodwin, lead singer of Doves; Birds Brittania author Mark Cocker, Bird acoustics expert Dr. Jenny York, Natural Navigator Tristan Gooley and Singer Hanna Tuulikki.

Radio 4 is doing this as part of International Dawn Chorus day - a unique broadcast event hosted by Derek Mooney from RTE radio in Ireland - in which radio stations across Europe join together to track the rising sun across the continent from Moscow to Dublin. You'll hear capercaillies in from Norway, bitterns in Somerset, bluethroats in Holland - it's like the Eurovision Song contest, but with much better singing.

In our increasingly digital world Dawn Chorus provides a genuine encounter with the natural world on unmediated terms. There's a lovely sense of anticipation as you hunt and you wait and you feel the sense of being really there - of the sudden excitement of a Tawny Owl at midnight, the joy of a cuckoo at 4am. And as we wait and we listen we take the opportunity to have a series of interesting conversations about wildlife and literature, music, evolution and conservation.

A unique international broadcast tracking the dawn chorus across from India to Ireland.

Highlights20170507

The dawn chorus from across the globe distilled into half an hour of listening pleasure.

The best bits of International Dawn Chorus day when radio stations across the globe come together and broadcast the dawn chorus in real time.

Pop star and bird lover Will Young joins Brett Westwood and a gang of unexpected bird lovers as Radio 4 throws an all-nighter in search of the Dawn Chorus. Going on air just after midnight and staying up till 7am Brett and Will host a night of conversation, story-telling, argument and explanation culminating in the live broadcast of the Dawn Chorus from Ham Wall Nature reserve in Somerset.

Other guests include Birds Brittania author Mark Cocker, Bird acoustics expert Dr. Jenny York and singer Hanna Tuulikki.

Radio 4 is doing this as part of International Dawn Chorus day - a unique broadcast event hosted by RTE in Ireland - in which radio stations in India and Europe join together to track the rising sun across the continent from Delhi to Dublin. You'll hear capercaillies in from Norway, bitterns in Somerset, bluethroats in Holland - it's like the Eurovision Song contest, but with much better singing.

In our increasingly digital world Dawn Chorus provides a genuine encounter with the natural world on unmediated terms. There's a lovely sense of anticipation as you hunt and you wait and you feel the sense of being really there - of the sudden excitement of a Tawny Owl at midnight, the joy of a cuckoo at 4am. And as we wait and we listen we take the opportunity to have a series of interesting conversations about wildlife and literature, music, evolution and conservation.

The dawn chorus from across the globe distilled into half an hour of listening pleasure.

The dawn chorus from across the globe distilled into half an hour of listening pleasure.

The best bits of International Dawn Chorus day when radio stations across the globe come together and broadcast the dawn chorus in real time.

Pop star and bird lover Will Young joins Brett Westwood and a gang of unexpected bird lovers as Radio 4 throws an all-nighter in search of the Dawn Chorus. Going on air just after midnight and staying up till 7am Brett and Will host a night of conversation, story-telling, argument and explanation culminating in the live broadcast of the Dawn Chorus from Ham Wall Nature reserve in Somerset.

Other guests include Birds Brittania author Mark Cocker, Bird acoustics expert Dr. Jenny York and singer Hanna Tuulikki.

Radio 4 is doing this as part of International Dawn Chorus day - a unique broadcast event hosted by RTE in Ireland - in which radio stations in India and Europe join together to track the rising sun across the continent from Delhi to Dublin. You'll hear capercaillies in from Norway, bitterns in Somerset, bluethroats in Holland - it's like the Eurovision Song contest, but with much better singing.

In our increasingly digital world Dawn Chorus provides a genuine encounter with the natural world on unmediated terms. There's a lovely sense of anticipation as you hunt and you wait and you feel the sense of being really there - of the sudden excitement of a Tawny Owl at midnight, the joy of a cuckoo at 4am. And as we wait and we listen we take the opportunity to have a series of interesting conversations about wildlife and literature, music, evolution and conservation.

012018050620180505 (RU)

Darryl Grimason links up with RTE to listen to the Dawn Chorus.

Annie-Marie McAleese and expert ornithologists mark International Dawn Chorus Day

0220180506

Darryl Grimason links up with RTE to listen to the Dawn Chorus.

Annie-Marie McAleese and expert ornithologists mark International Dawn Chorus Day

052015032720150914 (R4)

As a wildlife sound recordist, Chris Watson has been lucky enough to travel around the world listening to bird song, and is convinced that the very best dawn chorus in the world is here in Britain. From late March until mid-June, between 3am and 6am, there is a tremendous outpouring of song in woodlands between latitudes 50 to 55 degrees north. Resident birds are joined by migrant birds from Africa and Eastern Europe whose voices coalesce into an international chorus which fills our woodlands well before sunrise. Chris decided to try and capture a dawn chorus in a landscape he knew well as he would have to set up microphones in the dark, so he chose Suffolk. It was early May when he set out one evening down the old railway path which links Aldeburgh with Thorpeness. He arranged his microphones by a likely looking area of birch and alder trees, although the first sounds he heard were not birds but the bells of Aldeburgh parish church nearly two miles to the south. The bells faded under the sounds rooks, jackdaws and pheasants returning to their roost. There then followed the sounds of the night; owls, deer and foxes. At 2.30am Chris heard the first bird song, when a nightingale began to sing. This was a beautiful solo voice in the darkness. Soon other birds joined the Nightingale; Robin, Song thrush, Blackbird and Wren, until at 4am the chorus had developed to the extent that it was difficult to pick out any individual. With the first rays of daylight, the chorus began to subside and the pattern of song was changed by the late arrivals. As Chris returned back along the footpath, he was accompanied by the cries of curlew rising off the marshes and heading inland - a perfect end to a wonderful dawn chorus. Producer Sarah Blunt.

As a wildlife sound recordist, Chris Watson has been lucky enough to travel around the world listening to bird song, and is convinced that the very best dawn chorus in the world is here in Britain. From late March until mid-June, between 3am and 6am, there is a tremendous outpouring of song in woodlands between latitudes 50 to 55 degrees north. Resident birds are joined by migrant birds from Africa and Eastern Europe whose voices coalesce into an international chorus which fills our woodlands well before sunrise. Chris decided to try and capture a dawn chorus in a landscape he knew well as he would have to set up microphones in the dark, so he chose Suffolk. It was early May when he set out one evening down the old railway path which links Aldeburgh with Thorpeness. He arranged his microphones by a likely looking area of birch and alder trees, although the first sounds he heard were not birds but the bells of Aldeburgh parish church nearly two miles to the south. The bells faded under the sounds rooks, jackdaws and pheasants returning to their roost. There then followed the sounds of the night; owls, deer and foxes. At 2.30am Chris heard the first bird song, when a nightingale began to sing. This was a beautiful solo voice in the darkness. Soon other birds joined the Nightingale; Robin, Song thrush, Blackbird and Wren, until at 4am the chorus had developed to the extent that it was difficult to pick out any individual. With the first rays of daylight, the chorus began to subside and the pattern of song was changed by the late arrivals. As Chris returned back along the footpath, he was accompanied by the cries of curlew rising off the marshes and heading inland - a perfect end to a wonderful dawn chorus. Producer Sarah Blunt.