Days Of Reckoning

Stories about dramatic turning points in people's lives.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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20060911Five short stories about dramatic turning points in people's lives.

1/5. Casting On

By Ruth Thomas, read by Emma Currie.

A young woman tries to come to terms with her unplanned pregnancy.

20060912Five short stories about dramatic turning points in people's lives.

2/5. The Gap

By Robert Douglas, read by Tony Roper.

A policeman on the verge of retirement pays his childhood 'crush' a surprise visit.

20060913Five short stories about dramatic turning points in people's lives.

3/5. The Christmas Chair

By Jules Horne, read by Julie Austin.

An old man with Alzheimer's is brought home to spend the festive season with his family.

20060914Five short stories about dramatic turning points in people's lives.

4/5. When Stevie was Married

By John Heraghty, read by Simon Tait.

Moving from the city into a small seaside town, a man decides to invent an imaginary wife for himself. But one day, she turns up.

20060915Five short stories about dramatic turning points in people's lives.

5/5. Bruised Fruit

By Sue Rulliere, read by Michael Mackenzie.

'Monsieur Cadet thought life was pointless. Pointless since he had crushed his left leg under a ton of concrete'.

AR01Casting On2005040420060911by Ruth Thomas: A young woman tries to come to terms with her unplanned pregnancy.

Read by Emma Currie

AR02The Gap2005040520060912By Robert Douglas, read by Tony Roper.

A policeman on the verge of retirement pays his childhood 'crush' a surprise visit.

AR03The Christmas Chair2005040620060913By Jules Horne, read by Julie Austin.

An old man with Alzheimer's is brought home to spend the festive season with his family.

AR04When Stevie Was Married2005040720060914By John Heraghty, read by Simon Tait.

Moving from the city into a small seaside town, a man decides to invent an imaginary wife for himself.

But one day, she turns up.

AR05 LASTBruised Fruit2005040820060915By Sue Rulliere, read by Michael Mackenzie.

'Monsieur Cadet thought life was pointless.

Pointless since he had crushed his left leg under a ton of concrete'.