Die Klassen [world Service]

Episodes

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Die Klassen: Health and Family - The Documentary2016051420160515 (WS)

The Syrian refugees who arrived in Berlin in 2015 and their attempts to settle in

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

As the political atmosphere grows more hostile to the refugees who Angela Merkel famously welcomed in autumn 2015, five families continue with their attempts to settle in Berlin. Presenter Amy Zayed, follows their struggles with German bureaucracy, their attempts to find a home, to arrange for families still in the Middle East to join them and in two cases to get essential medical treatment. Meanwhile, they also continue with Die Klassen – Government provided language and culture lessons designed to ease them into the German way of life.

(Photo: Nour in school learning German. Credit: Laura Graen)

Die Klassen: Health and Family - The Documentary2016051420160518 (WS)

The Syrian refugees who arrived in Berlin in 2015 and their attempts to settle in

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

As the political atmosphere grows more hostile to the refugees who Angela Merkel famously welcomed in autumn 2015, five families continue with their attempts to settle in Berlin. Presenter Amy Zayed, follows their struggles with German bureaucracy, their attempts to find a home, to arrange for families still in the Middle East to join them and in two cases to get essential medical treatment. Meanwhile, they also continue with Die Klassen – Government provided language and culture lessons designed to ease them into the German way of life.

(Photo: Nour in school learning German. Credit: Laura Graen)

Die Klassen: How Syrians Adapt to Life in Germany - The Documentary2016022020160221 (WS)

Germany offers language classes to new arrivals from Syria to help with integration

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

In September Syrian refugees were applauded and cheered as they arrived at Munich Railway Station, shortly after Angela Merkel extended an invitation for them to come to Germany. Tens of thousands of new arrivals have headed for Germany – only to find a country which has vastly different weather and culture to their home and a seemingly impenetrable bureaucracy. Even that initial warm welcome has cooled. Amy Zayed, follows the lives of five Syrians as they attempt to settle into their new home. While many are keen to learn their new language, they are quickly diverted by preoccupations about access to money, securing permanent residency status and health.

(Photo: Students attend an intermediate German language class for migrants and refugees. Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Die Klassen: How Syrians Adapt to Life in Germany - The Documentary2016022020160224 (WS)

Germany offers language classes to new arrivals from Syria to help with integration

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

In September Syrian refugees were applauded and cheered as they arrived at Munich Railway Station, shortly after Angela Merkel extended an invitation for them to come to Germany. Tens of thousands of new arrivals have headed for Germany – only to find a country which has vastly different weather and culture to their home and a seemingly impenetrable bureaucracy. Even that initial warm welcome has cooled. Amy Zayed, follows the lives of five Syrians as they attempt to settle into their new home. While many are keen to learn their new language, they are quickly diverted by preoccupations about access to money, securing permanent residency status and health.

(Photo: Students attend an intermediate German language class for migrants and refugees. Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Die Klassen: Waiting and Hoping - The Documentary2016101520161016 (WS)

Five Syrian refugees talk about their struggle to settle into new lives in Germany

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

It is now a year since the German Chancellor Angela Merkel threw Germany’s borders open to thousands of stranded Syrian refugees and told the German people: “Wir schaffen das” - we’ll manage this.

The last year has been tough for the refugees. We follow five of them and for most it has been a year of uncertainty, a year of unending bureaucratic hurdles, a year of struggle with German grammar. But it has been a good year for Ahmed, because in April his wife and two-year-old son were able to make the journey from Aleppo to be reunited with him in Germany. The family is about to move into a flat in a small village three hours’ drive from Berlin.

But as political pressure has increased on the German government, new laws have been passed that make family reunification less likely.

Mohamed and his 17-year-old daughter are still waiting to hear if their application to stay in Germany will be approved. Mohamed’s 10-year-old son is in Damascus and he has lost a leg. Mohamed is frightened that even if he is able to stay he won’t be able to bring his son to Germany.

Noor, meanwhile, has become engaged to be married. Ebtesam, a woman in her 40s, and Ahmed, a man in his 50s are also waiting for the letter that tells them they can stay in Germany. Ahmed is now talking about leaving anyway. “I don’t care where it is,” he says, “as long as I’m with my family. Nicaragua will do.”

(Photo: Ahmed grinning as he cuddles his two-year-old son Omar)

Die Klassen: Waiting and Hoping - The Documentary20161015

Five Syrian refugees talk about their struggle to settle into new lives in Germany

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

It is now a year since the German Chancellor Angela Merkel threw Germany’s borders open to thousands of stranded Syrian refugees and told the German people: “Wir schaffen das” - we’ll manage this.

The last year has been tough for the refugees. We follow five of them and for most it has been a year of uncertainty, a year of unending bureaucratic hurdles, a year of struggle with German grammar. But it has been a good year for Ahmed, because in April his wife and two-year-old son were able to make the journey from Aleppo to be reunited with him in Germany. The family is about to move into a flat in a small village three hours’ drive from Berlin.

But as political pressure has increased on the German government, new laws have been passed that make family reunification less likely.

Mohamed and his 17-year-old daughter are still waiting to hear if their application to stay in Germany will be approved. Mohamed’s 10-year-old son is in Damascus and he has lost a leg. Mohamed is frightened that even if he is able to stay he won’t be able to bring his son to Germany.

Noor, meanwhile, has become engaged to be married. Ebtesam, a woman in her 40s, and Ahmed, a man in his 50s are also waiting for the letter that tells them they can stay in Germany. Ahmed is now talking about leaving anyway. “I don’t care where it is,” he says, “as long as I’m with my family. Nicaragua will do.”

(Photo: Ahmed grinning as he cuddles his two-year-old son Omar)

The Documentary20160221

The Documentary20160221

Germany offers language classes to new arrivals from Syria to help with integration

The Documentary2016022120160224 (WS)

Germany offers language classes to new arrivals from Syria to help with integration

The Documentary20160221

In September Syrian refugees were applauded and cheered as they arrived at Munich Railway Station, shortly after Angela Merkel extended an invitation for them to come to Germany. Tens of thousands of new arrivals have headed for Germany – only to find a country which has vastly different weather and culture to their home and a seemingly impenetrable bureaucracy. Even that initial warm welcome has cooled. Amy Zayed, follows the lives of five Syrians as they attempt to settle into their new home. While many are keen to learn their new language, they are quickly diverted by preoccupations about access to money, securing permanent residency status and health.

(Photo: Students attend an intermediate German language class for migrants and refugees. Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

The Documentary2016022120160224 (WS)

In September Syrian refugees were applauded and cheered as they arrived at Munich Railway Station, shortly after Angela Merkel extended an invitation for them to come to Germany. Tens of thousands of new arrivals have headed for Germany – only to find a country which has vastly different weather and culture to their home and a seemingly impenetrable bureaucracy. Even that initial warm welcome has cooled. Amy Zayed, follows the lives of five Syrians as they attempt to settle into their new home. While many are keen to learn their new language, they are quickly diverted by preoccupations about access to money, securing permanent residency status and health.

(Photo: Students attend an intermediate German language class for migrants and refugees. Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Germany offers language classes to new arrivals from Syria to help with integration

Germany offers language classes to new arrivals from Syria to help with integration

The Documentary20160515

The Documentary20160515

As the political atmosphere grows more hostile to the refugees who Angela Merkel famously welcomed in autumn 2015, five families continue with their attempts to settle in Berlin. Presenter Amy Zayed, follows their struggles with German bureaucracy, their attempts to find a home, to arrange for families still in the Middle East to join them and in two cases to get essential medical treatment. Meanwhile, they also continue with Die Klassen – Government provided language and culture lessons designed to ease them into the German way of life.

(Photo: Nour in school learning German. Credit: Laura Graen)

The Documentary20160515

The Syrian refugees who arrived in Berlin in 2015 and their attempts to settle in

The Documentary2016051520160518 (WS)

The Syrian refugees who arrived in Berlin in 2015 and their attempts to settle in

The Documentary2016051520160519 (WS)

The Syrian refugees who arrived in Berlin in 2015 and their attempts to settle in

The Documentary2016051520160519 (WS)
20160518 (WS)

The Syrian refugees who arrived in Berlin in 2015 and their attempts to settle in

The Syrian refugees who arrived in Berlin in 2015 and their attempts to settle in

The Syrian refugees who arrived in Berlin in 2015 and their attempts to settle in

As the political atmosphere grows more hostile to the refugees who Angela Merkel famously welcomed in autumn 2015, five families continue with their attempts to settle in Berlin. Presenter Amy Zayed, follows their struggles with German bureaucracy, their attempts to find a home, to arrange for families still in the Middle East to join them and in two cases to get essential medical treatment. Meanwhile, they also continue with Die Klassen – Government provided language and culture lessons designed to ease them into the German way of life.

(Photo: Nour in school learning German. Credit: Laura Graen)

The Documentary20161015
The Documentary20161015

It is now a year since the German Chancellor Angela Merkel threw Germany’s borders open to thousands of stranded Syrian refugees and told the German people: “Wir schaffen das? - we’ll manage this.

The last year has been tough for the refugees. We follow five of them and for most it has been a year of uncertainty, a year of unending bureaucratic hurdles, a year of struggle with German grammar. But it has been a good year for Ahmed, because in April his wife and two-year-old son were able to make the journey from Aleppo to be reunited with him in Germany. The family is about to move into a flat in a small village three hours’ drive from Berlin.

But as political pressure has increased on the German government, new laws have been passed that make family reunification less likely.

Mohamed and his 17-year-old daughter are still waiting to hear if their application to stay in Germany will be approved. Mohamed’s 10-year-old son is in Damascus and he has lost a leg. Mohamed is frightened that even if he is able to stay he won’t be able to bring his son to Germany.

Noor, meanwhile, has become engaged to be married. Ebtesam, a woman in her 40s, and Ahmed, a man in his 50s are also waiting for the letter that tells them they can stay in Germany. Ahmed is now talking about leaving anyway. “I don’t care where it is,? he says, “as long as I’m with my family. Nicaragua will do.?

(Photo: Ahmed grinning as he cuddles his two-year-old son Omar)

The Documentary2016101520161016 (WS)

It is now a year since the German Chancellor Angela Merkel threw Germany’s borders open to thousands of stranded Syrian refugees and told the German people: “Wir schaffen das? - we’ll manage this.

The last year has been tough for the refugees. We follow five of them and for most it has been a year of uncertainty, a year of unending bureaucratic hurdles, a year of struggle with German grammar. But it has been a good year for Ahmed, because in April his wife and two-year-old son were able to make the journey from Aleppo to be reunited with him in Germany. The family is about to move into a flat in a small village three hours’ drive from Berlin.

But as political pressure has increased on the German government, new laws have been passed that make family reunification less likely.

Mohamed and his 17-year-old daughter are still waiting to hear if their application to stay in Germany will be approved. Mohamed’s 10-year-old son is in Damascus and he has lost a leg. Mohamed is frightened that even if he is able to stay he won’t be able to bring his son to Germany.

Noor, meanwhile, has become engaged to be married. Ebtesam, a woman in her 40s, and Ahmed, a man in his 50s are also waiting for the letter that tells them they can stay in Germany. Ahmed is now talking about leaving anyway. “I don’t care where it is,? he says, “as long as I’m with my family. Nicaragua will do.?

(Photo: Ahmed grinning as he cuddles his two-year-old son Omar)

Five Syrian refugees talk about their struggle to settle into new lives in Germany

04Die Klassen: Die Trennung - The Documentary2017090520170906 (WS)

A Syrian father and daughter in Berlin and their struggle to reunite with family

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

In the summer of 2015 tens of thousands of Syrians left their war torn homeland and put their lives in the hands of the smugglers who would help them navigate the hazardous route to Europe. Many of these bedraggled travellers ended up in Germany, where Angela Merkel famously told the German people “We will cope”.

Among the new arrivals were Mohammed Dallal, a man in his late 40s and his 16-year-old daughter Noor. They found themselves in Berlin, exhausted by their journey, bewildered by their new surroundings and overwhelmed by the tasks ahead of them: finding a place to live, working out how to support themselves and seeking out a place to learn a new and difficult language.

Mohamed and Noor had other concerns. They’d left half the family behind in Damascus. Mohamed had been reluctant to leave at all but after a bomb attack earlier that year had left his ten-year-old son with only one leg he thought he had no option. Germany, he was told, was the place that made the best prosthetic limbs, so Germany was where he would go. Mohamed and his wife, Abeer, agreed that leaving her with three children would be too much of a burden. So he agreed to take Noor with him, leaving 10-year-old Saif and three-year-old Lilas with his wife in Damascus.

Amy Zayed and Laura Graen have accompanied Mohamed and Noor for nearly two years through the emotional and bureaucratic vagaries of the refugee life. In this programme, we hear whether the family is, at last, together again.

(Photo: Mohamed holds up a picture of his son. Credit: Laura Green)

04Die Klassen: Die Trennung - The Documentary20170905

A Syrian father and daughter in Berlin and their struggle to reunite with family

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

In the summer of 2015 tens of thousands of Syrians left their war torn homeland and put their lives in the hands of the smugglers who would help them navigate the hazardous route to Europe. Many of these bedraggled travellers ended up in Germany, where Angela Merkel famously told the German people “We will cope”.

Among the new arrivals were Mohammed Dallal, a man in his late 40s and his 16-year-old daughter Noor. They found themselves in Berlin, exhausted by their journey, bewildered by their new surroundings and overwhelmed by the tasks ahead of them: finding a place to live, working out how to support themselves and seeking out a place to learn a new and difficult language.

Mohamed and Noor had other concerns. They’d left half the family behind in Damascus. Mohamed had been reluctant to leave at all but after a bomb attack earlier that year had left his ten-year-old son with only one leg he thought he had no option. Germany, he was told, was the place that made the best prosthetic limbs, so Germany was where he would go. Mohamed and his wife, Abeer, agreed that leaving her with three children would be too much of a burden. So he agreed to take Noor with him, leaving 10-year-old Saif and three-year-old Lilas with his wife in Damascus.

Amy Zayed and Laura Graen have accompanied Mohamed and Noor for nearly two years through the emotional and bureaucratic vagaries of the refugee life. In this programme, we hear whether the family is, at last, together again.

(Photo: Mohamed holds up a picture of his son. Credit: Laura Green)