Dispersing The Immigrants

Episodes

First
Broadcast
Comments
20180430Sushma Puri examines the controversial policy introduced in the 1960s to transport immigrant children miles from their homes and families to predominantly white schools.

In December 1963 the Conservative minister of education, Sir Edward Boyle, attended a meeting of 400 white parents in Southall, west London who were complaining that the arrival of large numbers of immigrant children was damaging their children's education. His conclusion, that schools were at risk of becoming "irretrievably immigrant", led to the introduction of a government policy aimed at dispersing Asian and African-Caribbean children.

A total of eleven education authorities, including Ealing, Bradford, Leicester and Luton, began what would becoming known as bussing - transporting children to schools in predominantly white areas of their boroughs.

The policy was initially accepted as a way of dealing with large numbers of non-English speaking children and encouraging integration, but it came to be seen as discriminatory and racist. As Sushma Puri finds out, no one proposed bussing white children to mainly immigrant schools.

Sushma talks to people who were bussed to schools many miles from their homes and families, becoming alienated and subjected to verbal and even violent abuse. Priya Sehgal was greeted with Nazi salutes from the eight year old skinheads in her new class, Yash Balggan attempted to scrub his face white to be more like the other children, and Tariq Mehmood says, "I don't understand how you can send a black child into a white only school and think they will come out un-scarred."

Sushma also meets the Ealing Education chief who oversaw bussing for many years but who now says he was never in favour of the policy. She talks to the former head of a prestigious London independent school who is calling for a return to bussing on a voluntary basis and seeks a response from school leaders with large numbers of ethnic minority pupils.

A Tigereye production for BBC Radio 4.

Exploring the bussing of immigrant children to predominantly white schools in the 1960s.

A Tigereye production for BBC Radio 4.

Sushma talks to people who were bussed to schools many miles from their homes and families, becoming alienated and subjected to verbal and even violent abuse. Priya Seghal was greeted with Nazi salutes from the eight year old skinheads in her new class, Yash Balggan attempted to scrub his face white to be more like the other children, and Tariq Mehmood says, "I don't understand how you can send a black child into a white only school and think they will come out un-scarred."

Sushma also meets the Ealing Education chief who oversaw bussing for many years but who now says he was never in favour of the policy. She talks to the former head of a prestigious London independent school who is calling for a return to bussing on a voluntarDispersing The Immigrants

30 minutes

20180430

Factual

R4

Displaced Person, The

Programme Catalogue - Details: 21 July 1990

19900721

Producer: A. CLIFF

Description

Elsie's husband has been missing at sea for months and she can't accept it. Than a sudden disaster sets her and her family on a journey of self- discovery. Written by Christopher DENYS and produced by Tony CLIFF.

Subject Categories

drama programmes (genre)

Broadcast history

21 Jul 1990 19:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

23 Jul 1990 15:02-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Judy Bennett (Actor)

Elizabeth Proud (Actor)

Keith Clifford (Actor)

Paula Tilbrook (Actor)

Malcolm Raeburn (Actor)

Judith Barker (Actor)

John Jardine (Actor)

John Branwell (Actor)

Rosalie Williams (Actor)

Jenny Luckraft (Actor)

Anna Casey (Actor)

Julie Corrigan (Actor)

Laurence Kenny (Actor)

Clare Kinsale (Actor)

Christopher Denys (Author)

Tony Cliff (Producer)

Recorded on 1990-04-06

BBC Programme Number: 87DA3009

19900723

First broadcast on 1990-07-21

programme catalogue - station

SNT

1990a7a21

By: Christopher Denys

Starring: Clare Kinsale/Elizabeth Proud

1994a10a8

By: Julia Kearsley

Starring: Sheila Steafel/Victoria Darling.

Disposable Brides [Radio Scotland]

b00zt4b4

20110719

1/3

From St Kilda, no-one can hear you scream.

That was the fate of Rachel, Lady Grange, who crossed her husband once too often and was snatched away from her children to the remote island.

Amelia Murray, didn't cross her husband, she crossed her family, by desperately trying to hang on to normality in the aftermath of a rape.

Her family kidnapped her and shut her away.

Little Margaret Duff got no say at all, she was married at eleven years old to her twenty-something cousin, a lawyer on the make.

Susan Morrison searches for their stories in Disposable Brides.

Bad romance 18th century-style with Susan Morrison."