Documentary - The Museum Of Lost Objects, The [world Service]

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04Return to Aleppo20170610

One man’s extraordinary quest to find out what became of his home in Aleppo’s old town.

04Return to Aleppo20170610

One man’s extraordinary quest to find out what became of his home in Aleppo’s old town.

The story of one neighbourhood in Aleppo, and how it changed the lives of two Syrians caught up in the war.

Zahed Tajeddin is a sculptor and archaeologist whose family have lived in Aleppo for generations. He owned a beautiful medieval courtyard house in a neighbourhood called Judaydah, part of the city's historic centre. But Zahed was forced to abandon his house in 2012, when Judaydah became a battleground between government forces and rebel fighters. He makes the emotional and dangerous journey to see whether his home survived the conflict.

Abu Ahmed is a pharmacist who set up Judaydah's only medical centre. He stayed in Aleppo throughout the conflict, giving first aid, medicines and comfort to the local residents. He was one of the last people to flee rebel-held Aleppo after the government advance in December 2016.

Also, what is left of the ancient citadels of northern Iraq? Nimrud is a 3,000 year old site blown up by the so-called Islamic State. The Iraqi archaeologist Muzahim Hossein spent 30 years excavating there and he goes back for the first time to see what remains. And the story of one Iraqi family who grew up with the temples and talismans of the beautiful, fabled city of Hatra.

Image credit: Zahed Tajeddin

04Return To Aleppo20170610

One man’s extraordinary quest to find out what became of his home in Aleppo’s old town.

The story of one neighbourhood in Aleppo, and how it changed the lives of two Syrians caught up in the war.

Zahed Tajeddin is a sculptor and archaeologist whose family have lived in Aleppo for generations. He owned a beautiful medieval courtyard house in a neighbourhood called Judaydah, part of the city's historic centre. But Zahed was forced to abandon his house in 2012, when Judaydah became a battleground between government forces and rebel fighters. He makes the emotional and dangerous journey to see whether his home survived the conflict.

Abu Ahmed is a pharmacist who set up Judaydah's only medical centre. He stayed in Aleppo throughout the conflict, giving first aid, medicines and comfort to the local residents. He was one of the last people to flee rebel-held Aleppo after the government advance in December 2016.

Also, what is left of the ancient citadels of northern Iraq? Nimrud is a 3,000 year old site blown up by the so-called Islamic State. The Iraqi archaeologist Muzahim Hossein spent 30 years excavating there and he goes back for the first time to see what remains. And the story of one Iraqi family who grew up with the temples and talismans of the beautiful, fabled city of Hatra.

Image credit: Zahed Tajeddin

05India20170716

Kanishk Tharoor explores landmarks and precious artefacts that were caught up in the events around Indian partition in 1947.

Seventy years ago, India and Pakistan became independent nations - but at a cost. People and lands were partitioned, and a once shared heritage was broken apart. In episode one, Kanishk Tharoor explores artefacts and landmarks that were caught up in the events around 1947.

There’s the ancient jade necklace so precious to both India and Pakistan, that neither country could let the other have it whole. And the conflict in Kashmir told through the life and times of a burnt-out cinema hall.

Produced by Maryam Maruf

Image: Excavators hold aloft the Priest King, found in the Indus Valley city of Mohenjo Daro. Credit: Archaeological Survey of India

05India20170716

Kanishk Tharoor explores landmarks and precious artefacts that were caught up in the events around Indian partition in 1947.

Seventy years ago, India and Pakistan became independent nations - but at a cost. People and lands were partitioned, and a once shared heritage was broken apart. In episode one, Kanishk Tharoor explores artefacts and landmarks that were caught up in the events around 1947.

There’s the ancient jade necklace so precious to both India and Pakistan, that neither country could let the other have it whole. And the conflict in Kashmir told through the life and times of a burnt-out cinema hall.

Produced by Maryam Maruf

Image: Excavators hold aloft the Priest King, found in the Indus Valley city of Mohenjo Daro. Credit: Archaeological Survey of India

05The Necklace That Divided Two Nations20170719

India and Pakistan's tussle for Indus Valley antiquities after partition

Seventy years ago, India and Pakistan became independent nations - but at a cost. People and lands were partitioned, and a once shared heritage was broken apart. Kanishk Tharoor explores artefacts and landmarks that were caught up in the events around 1947.

Part one looks at the tussle for ancient history, including the prized artefacts of the Indus Valley civilization. There was a bureaucratic saga over the fates of the priest-king, the dancing girl, and the jade necklace so precious to both India and Pakistan that neither country could let the other have it whole. And in part two, the conflict in Kashmir told through the life and times of a burnt-out movie theatre - Srinagar’s Palladium cinema.

Produced by Maryam Maruf

Contributors: Maruf Khwaja; Saroj Mukherji; Vazira Fazila-Yacoubali Zamindar, Brown University; Sudeshna Guha, Shiv Nadar University; Krishna Mishri; Imtiyaz; and Neerja Mattoo

With thanks to Anwesha Sengupta, Institute of Development Studies Kolkata; and Andrew Whitehead

Image: The Mohenjo Daro jade necklace that was cut in two. India's share on the left, Pakistan's share on the right. Credit: Archaeological Survey of India and Getty Images

06Delhi's Stolen Seat of Power20170726

The creation and capture of Mughal India’s coveted Peacock Throne

Seventy years ago, India and Pakistan became independent nations - but at a cost. People and lands were partitioned, and a once shared heritage was broken apart.

In part one, Kanishk Tharoor stretches back to stories of empire well before British rule, and looks at how narratives of conquest and loss still have a powerful hold over South Asians. There’s the spectacular creation - and destruction - of the famed Peacock Throne of the Mughal emperors. It took seven years to make, and seven elephants to cart it away forever. And the forgotten world of the Kushan empire in Pakistan, ruled over by the magnificent King Kanishka. We explore the mystery of what happened to his little bronze box that was said to hold the remains of the Buddha himself.

Part two delves into the histories of artefacts and landmarks linked to two of the greatest figures in modern South Asian history – Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, and Rabindranath Tagore, the celebrated Bengali writer. Ziarat Residency, the beautiful sanatorium where Jinnah spent the last three months of his life. Four years ago, it was fire-bombed and burnt to the ground by Balochi insurgents. And Tagore’s Nobel Prize Medal. In 1913, Tagore made history by becoming the first non-westerner to win a Nobel award. But just over 10 years ago, the medal was stolen – and still hasn’t been found.

(Image: Persian ruler Nadir Shah on the Peacock Throne after his victory over the Mughals Credit: Alamy)

06Delhi's Stolen Seat Of Power20170726

The creation and capture of Mughal India’s coveted Peacock Throne

Seventy years ago, India and Pakistan became independent nations - but at a cost. People and lands were partitioned, and a once shared heritage was broken apart.

In part one, Kanishk Tharoor stretches back to stories of empire well before British rule, and looks at how narratives of conquest and loss still have a powerful hold over South Asians. There’s the spectacular creation - and destruction - of the famed Peacock Throne of the Mughal emperors. It took seven years to make, and seven elephants to cart it away forever. And the forgotten world of the Kushan empire in Pakistan, ruled over by the magnificent King Kanishka. We explore the mystery of what happened to his little bronze box that was said to hold the remains of the Buddha himself.

Part two delves into the histories of artefacts and landmarks linked to two of the greatest figures in modern South Asian history – Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, and Rabindranath Tagore, the celebrated Bengali writer. Ziarat Residency, the beautiful sanatorium where Jinnah spent the last three months of his life. Four years ago, it was fire-bombed and burnt to the ground by Balochi insurgents. And Tagore’s Nobel Prize Medal. In 1913, Tagore made history by becoming the first non-westerner to win a Nobel award. But just over 10 years ago, the medal was stolen – and still hasn’t been found.

(Image: Persian ruler Nadir Shah on the Peacock Throne after his victory over the Mughals Credit: Alamy)

06The Peacock Throne20170723

The spectacular creation and destruction of this symbol of Mughal power