Dora Peja\u010devi\u0107 (1885-1923)

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01Pejacevic's First Croatian Piano Concerto20181022

Donald Macleod surveys a series of Croatian firsts by Dora Pejacevic

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

Dora Pejacevic was born in Budapest in 1885. Her musical legacy of nearly sixty opus numbers, can also claim a quantity of Croatian firsts. There are a number of sources which claim that her Symphony in F sharp minor, was the first symphony ever to be composed in Croatia. This is in fact not true, however it can be considered the first Croatian Symphony in the modern style of the Twentieth Century. When it was first premiered in Vienna in 1918, the conductor at the last minute chose only to perform two of the four movements. The full premiere had to wait two years, which took place in Dresden. After hearing the symphony, one critic compared the sound-world of Pejacevic to that of Tchaikovsky.

Another Croatian first Pejacvic can boast without contradiction, is that she composed the first ever Croatian Piano Concerto. This was the beginning of her ventures into writing for the orchestra, and it was combined with her own instrument, the piano. The work was premiered during World War One, in 1916, and the critics at the time thought it was something of a sensation. The premiere marked the start of Dora’s career as a composer.

Romance, Op 22
Andrej Bielow, violin
Oliver Triendl, piano

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op 41 (Scherzo)
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Zwei Nocturnes, Op 50 No 2
Natasa Veljkovic, piano

Piano Concerto in G minor, Op 33
Oliver Triendl, piano
Brandenburg State Orchestra of Frankfurt
Howard Griffiths, conductor

Zwei Lieder, Op 27 No 1 (I creep along my way)
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores Croatian firsts by Dora Pejacevic

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod explores Croatian firsts by Dora Pejacevic

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod explores Croatian firsts by Dora Pejacevic

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod surveys a series of Croatian firsts by Dora Pejacevic

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

Dora Pejacevic was born in Budapest in 1885. Her musical legacy of nearly sixty opus numbers, can also claim a quantity of Croatian firsts. There are a number of sources which claim that her Symphony in F sharp minor, was the first symphony ever to be composed in Croatia. This is in fact not true, however it can be considered the first Croatian Symphony in the modern style of the Twentieth Century. When it was first premiered in Vienna in 1918, the conductor at the last minute chose only to perform two of the four movements. The full premiere had to wait two years, which took place in Dresden. After hearing the symphony, one critic compared the sound-world of Pejacevic to that of Tchaikovsky.

Another Croatian first Pejacvic can boast without contradiction, is that she composed the first ever Croatian Piano Concerto. This was the beginning of her ventures into writing for the orchestra, and it was combined with her own instrument, the piano. The work was premiered during World War One, in 1916, and the critics at the time thought it was something of a sensation. The premiere marked the start of Dora’s career as a composer.

Romance, Op 22
Andrej Bielow, violin
Oliver Triendl, piano

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op 41 (Scherzo)
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Zwei Nocturnes, Op 50 No 2
Natasa Veljkovic, piano

Piano Concerto in G minor, Op 33
Oliver Triendl, piano
Brandenburg State Orchestra of Frankfurt
Howard Griffiths, conductor

Zwei Lieder, Op 27 No 1 (I creep along my way)
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

02Pejacevic's Individual Voice20181023

Donald Macleod surveys the development of Pejacevic’s individual voice

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

The musical gifts of Dora Pejacevic were recognised early on and encouraged by her mother, Baroness Lilli Vay de Vaya, who was herself a trained singer and pianist. Pejacevic's early works show the influence of Schumann, Mendelssohn, Grieg and Tchaikovsky. Around 1903 when the family moved to Zagreb, Dora started to receive tuition from professors at the Croatian Music Institute. Then from 1907 she made repeated trips to Munich and Dresden where she had lessons with Henri Petri and Percy Sherwood. It was during this time that Pejacevic was also performing chamber music with fellow students and professors in Germany. With such musical stimulus, her music began to change and develop its own unique voice. Her Fantasiestucke Op 17 is considered to be from her middle period, whereas the String Quartet Dora composed the year before she died, not only demonstrates her truly individual voice, but also foreshadowed her own death.

Warum? Op 13
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Berceuse, Op 2
Papillon, Op 6
Natasa Velijkovic, piano

Sechs Fantasiestucke, Op 17 No 4 (Klage)
Sechs Fantasiestucke, Op 17 No 5 (Bitte)
Sechs Fantasiestucke, Op 17 No 6 (Wahn)
Natasa Velijkovic, piano

String Quartet in C major, Op 58
Quatuor Sine Nomine

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod journeys through Pejacevic's emerging voice

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

Donald Macleod journeys through Pejacevic's emerging voice

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod journeys through Pejacevic's emerging voice

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod surveys the development of Pejacevic’s individual voice

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

The musical gifts of Dora Pejacevic were recognised early on and encouraged by her mother, Baroness Lilli Vay de Vaya, who was herself a trained singer and pianist. Pejacevic's early works show the influence of Schumann, Mendelssohn, Grieg and Tchaikovsky. Around 1903 when the family moved to Zagreb, Dora started to receive tuition from professors at the Croatian Music Institute. Then from 1907 she made repeated trips to Munich and Dresden where she had lessons with Henri Petri and Percy Sherwood. It was during this time that Pejacevic was also performing chamber music with fellow students and professors in Germany. With such musical stimulus, her music began to change and develop its own unique voice. Her Fantasiestucke Op 17 is considered to be from her middle period, whereas the String Quartet Dora composed the year before she died, not only demonstrates her truly individual voice, but also foreshadowed her own death.

Warum? Op 13
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Berceuse, Op 2
Papillon, Op 6
Natasa Velijkovic, piano

Sechs Fantasiestucke, Op 17 No 4 (Klage)
Sechs Fantasiestucke, Op 17 No 5 (Bitte)
Sechs Fantasiestucke, Op 17 No 6 (Wahn)
Natasa Velijkovic, piano

String Quartet in C major, Op 58
Quatuor Sine Nomine

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

03Pejacevic's Dedicatees And Performers20181024

Donald Macleod explores those artists to whom Dora Pejacevic dedicated works

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

Dora Pejacevic had the opportunity to work with some of the finest musicians of her day, as well as dedicating a number of her works to such luminaries. It was Bela Bartok who hailed the violinist Stefi Geyer as one of the greatest violinists of her generation, but Pejacevic also had a number of her own works premiered by Geyer. Other notable artists and organisations performed music by Pejacevic, including the Dresden Philharmonic premiering the complete Symphony, conducted by Edwin Lindner. Pejacevic also dedicated her Phantasie Concertante to the famous pianist Alice Ripper, although this work received its premiere seven years after the composers death. Her music although largely forgotten today, enjoyed an international platform, with works such as the Slavic Violin Sonata being performed in London during the 1920s.

Canzonetta, Op 8
Andrej Below, violin
Oliver Triendl, piano

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op 41 (Andante maestoso – Allegro con moto)
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Violin Sonata, Op 43 (Adagio)
Andrej Bielow, violin
Oliver Triendl, piano

Phantasie Concertante, Op 48
Volker Banfield, piano
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Verwandlung, Op 37
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Brandenburg State Orchestra of Frankfurt
Howard Griffiths, conductor

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores Pejacevic's dedicatees and performers

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod explores Pejacevic's dedicatees and performers

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod explores those artists to whom Dora Pejacevic dedicated works

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

Dora Pejacevic had the opportunity to work with some of the finest musicians of her day, as well as dedicating a number of her works to such luminaries. It was Bela Bartok who hailed the violinist Stefi Geyer as one of the greatest violinists of her generation, but Pejacevic also had a number of her own works premiered by Geyer. Other notable artists and organisations performed music by Pejacevic, including the Dresden Philharmonic premiering the complete Symphony, conducted by Edwin Lindner. Pejacevic also dedicated her Phantasie Concertante to the famous pianist Alice Ripper, although this work received its premiere seven years after the composers death. Her music although largely forgotten today, enjoyed an international platform, with works such as the Slavic Violin Sonata being performed in London during the 1920s.

Canzonetta, Op 8
Andrej Below, violin
Oliver Triendl, piano

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op 41 (Andante maestoso – Allegro con moto)
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Violin Sonata, Op 43 (Adagio)
Andrej Bielow, violin
Oliver Triendl, piano

Phantasie Concertante, Op 48
Volker Banfield, piano
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Verwandlung, Op 37
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Brandenburg State Orchestra of Frankfurt
Howard Griffiths, conductor

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores Pejacevic's dedicatees and performers

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

Donald Macleod explores Pejacevic's dedicatees and performers

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod explores those artists to whom Dora Pejacevic dedicated works

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

Dora Pejacevic had the opportunity to work with some of the finest musicians of her day, as well as dedicating a number of her works to such luminaries. It was Bela Bartok who hailed the violinist Stefi Geyer as one of the greatest violinists of her generation, but Pejacevic also had a number of her own works premiered by Geyer. Other notable artists and organisations performed music by Pejacevic, including the Dresden Philharmonic premiering the complete Symphony, conducted by Edwin Lindner. Pejacevic also dedicated her Phantasie Concertante to the famous pianist Alice Ripper, although this work received its premiere seven years after the composers death. Her music although largely forgotten today, enjoyed an international platform, with works such as the Slavic Violin Sonata being performed in London during the 1920s.

Canzonetta, Op 8
Andrej Below, violin
Oliver Triendl, piano

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op 41 (Andante maestoso – Allegro con moto)
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Violin Sonata, Op 43 (Adagio)
Andrej Bielow, violin
Oliver Triendl, piano

Phantasie Concertante, Op 48
Volker Banfield, piano
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Verwandlung, Op 37
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Brandenburg State Orchestra of Frankfurt
Howard Griffiths, conductor

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

04Pejacevic And The Literary Elite20181025

Donald Macleod surveys Pejacevic's literary connections

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod delves into the literary world associated with Dora Pejacevic

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

Dora Pejacevic through her aristocratic connections, had the opportunity to mix with a number of the literary giants of her day. Through occasions organised by her good friend Countess Sidonia Nadherny von Borutin, she socialised with the likes of the Austrian writer and journalist Karl Kraus. Pejacevic set a number of writings by Kraus to music, including her work Verwandlung. It was Arnold Schoenberg who praised this work when he saw the score, but added his reservations that it was by a woman composer.

Another Bohemian-Austrian poet Pejacevic set to music, was Rainer Maria Rilke. Composer and poet only met once or twice, for Rilke was something of a recluse. Countess Sidonie also asked Rilke to look for a good opera subject for Dora to compose, but this didn’t come to anything. Later in Pejacevic’s life, another literary giant she set to music was Nietzsche. Dora was widely read, from the great classics and philosophy, to more revolutionary writings and works calling for women’s equality.

Blumenleben, Op 19 No 3 (Maiglockchen)
Blumenleben, Op 19 No 7 (Lilien)
Natasa Veljkovic, piano

Verwandlung, Op 37
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Peter Stein, violin
Cord Garben, piano

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op 41 (Andante sostenuto)
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Madchengestalten, Op 42 No 2 (Viel Fahren sind auf den Flussen)
Madchengestalten, Op 42 No 4 (Ich war ein Kind und traumte viel)
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Drei Gesange, Op 53
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Piano Quintet in B minor, Op 40 (Poco sostenuto)
Oliver Triendl, piano
Quatuor Sine Nomine

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod surveys Pejacevic's literary connections

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod delves into the literary world associated with Dora Pejacevic

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

Dora Pejacevic through her aristocratic connections, had the opportunity to mix with a number of the literary giants of her day. Through occasions organised by her good friend Countess Sidonia Nadherny von Borutin, she socialised with the likes of the Austrian writer and journalist Karl Kraus. Pejacevic set a number of writings by Kraus to music, including her work Verwandlung. It was Arnold Schoenberg who praised this work when he saw the score, but added his reservations that it was by a woman composer.

Another Bohemian-Austrian poet Pejacevic set to music, was Rainer Maria Rilke. Composer and poet only met once or twice, for Rilke was something of a recluse. Countess Sidonie also asked Rilke to look for a good opera subject for Dora to compose, but this didn’t come to anything. Later in Pejacevic’s life, another literary giant she set to music was Nietzsche. Dora was widely read, from the great classics and philosophy, to more revolutionary writings and works calling for women’s equality.

Blumenleben, Op 19 No 3 (Maiglockchen)
Blumenleben, Op 19 No 7 (Lilien)
Natasa Veljkovic, piano

Verwandlung, Op 37
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Peter Stein, violin
Cord Garben, piano

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op 41 (Andante sostenuto)
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Madchengestalten, Op 42 No 2 (Viel Fahren sind auf den Flussen)
Madchengestalten, Op 42 No 4 (Ich war ein Kind und traumte viel)
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Drei Gesange, Op 53
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Piano Quintet in B minor, Op 40 (Poco sostenuto)
Oliver Triendl, piano
Quatuor Sine Nomine

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod surveys Pejacevic's literary connections

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

Donald Macleod delves into the literary world associated with Dora Pejacevic

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

Dora Pejacevic through her aristocratic connections, had the opportunity to mix with a number of the literary giants of her day. Through occasions organised by her good friend Countess Sidonia Nadherny von Borutin, she socialised with the likes of the Austrian writer and journalist Karl Kraus. Pejacevic set a number of writings by Kraus to music, including her work Verwandlung. It was Arnold Schoenberg who praised this work when he saw the score, but added his reservations that it was by a woman composer.

Another Bohemian-Austrian poet Pejacevic set to music, was Rainer Maria Rilke. Composer and poet only met once or twice, for Rilke was something of a recluse. Countess Sidonie also asked Rilke to look for a good opera subject for Dora to compose, but this didn’t come to anything. Later in Pejacevic’s life, another literary giant she set to music was Nietzsche. Dora was widely read, from the great classics and philosophy, to more revolutionary writings and works calling for women’s equality.

Blumenleben, Op 19 No 3 (Maiglockchen)
Blumenleben, Op 19 No 7 (Lilien)
Natasa Veljkovic, piano

Verwandlung, Op 37
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Peter Stein, violin
Cord Garben, piano

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op 41 (Andante sostenuto)
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Madchengestalten, Op 42 No 2 (Viel Fahren sind auf den Flussen)
Madchengestalten, Op 42 No 4 (Ich war ein Kind und traumte viel)
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Drei Gesange, Op 53
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Piano Quintet in B minor, Op 40 (Poco sostenuto)
Oliver Triendl, piano
Quatuor Sine Nomine

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod surveys Pejacevic's literary connections

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

05Pejacevic The Reluctant Countess20181026

Donald Macleod explores Pejacevic's final days

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod surveys Dora Pejacevic’s final act of rebellion after her death

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

Countess Dora Pejacevic was not at ease with her aristocratic background. Her artistic career and far ranging interests also meant that she began to question the role of the aristocracy, and she also sought equality for women. She did however dedicate a number of her works to her aristocratic family, including the Symphony to her mother, and Libeslied to her sister. However, late in her life in 1921 Pejacevic married an army officer, and moved to Germany away from her family. As if she had a premonition of her future death, Dora wrote a letter to her husband which stated that regardless of their future child’s gender, it should be allowed to be free and encouraged in whatever it wanted to do. Their son Theo was born in January 1923, and Dora died just a few months later aged just 37. Her final act of rebellion was to ask that she be buried not inside the Pejacevic family crypt, but outside of it. Written on the front is simply her first name, Dora.

Humoreske and Caprice, Op 54
Natasa Veljkovic, piano

Trio in C major, Op 29 (Scherzo: Allegro and Lento)
Andrej Bielow, violin
Christian Poltera, cello
Oliver Triendl, piano

Liebeslied, Op 39
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Piano Sonata in A flat major, Op 57
Natasa Veljkovic, piano

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op 41 (Allegro appassionato)
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores Pejacevic's final days

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.

Donald Macleod surveys Dora Pejacevic’s final act of rebellion after her death

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

Countess Dora Pejacevic was not at ease with her aristocratic background. Her artistic career and far ranging interests also meant that she began to question the role of the aristocracy, and she also sought equality for women. She did however dedicate a number of her works to her aristocratic family, including the Symphony to her mother, and Libeslied to her sister. However, late in her life in 1921 Pejacevic married an army officer, and moved to Germany away from her family. As if she had a premonition of her future death, Dora wrote a letter to her husband which stated that regardless of their future child’s gender, it should be allowed to be free and encouraged in whatever it wanted to do. Their son Theo was born in January 1923, and Dora died just a few months later aged just 37. Her final act of rebellion was to ask that she be buried not inside the Pejacevic family crypt, but outside of it. Written on the front is simply her first name, Dora.

Humoreske and Caprice, Op 54
Natasa Veljkovic, piano

Trio in C major, Op 29 (Scherzo: Allegro & Lento)
Andrej Bielow, violin
Christian Poltera, cello
Oliver Triendl, piano

Liebeslied, Op 39
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Piano Sonata in A flat major, Op 57
Natasa Veljkovic, piano

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op 41 (Allegro appassionato)
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores Pejacevic's final days

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

Donald Macleod surveys Dora Pejacevic’s final act of rebellion after her death

In Composer of the Week, Donald Macleod introduces a first for the series in its history of over seventy years, the Croatian Countess Dora Pejacevic. The life of Pejacevic has been fictionalised into film, and also told in a romanticised biography. In this week of programmes, Donald is joined by Professor Koraljka Koss and Professor Iskra Iveljic, to explore the known facts about the life and music of this Countess and her family. Although Pejacevic was born into one of the most influential aristocratic families in Croatia, she became rather critical of her own class in later life. Through her position she did have the opportunity to study in Germany with noted music teachers of the day, and met and collaborated with some of the literary giants of the early twentieth century. Upon her death at the age of only 37, she left a catalogue of over one hundred compositions displaying a unique voice now largely forgotten.

Countess Dora Pejacevic was not at ease with her aristocratic background. Her artistic career and far ranging interests also meant that she began to question the role of the aristocracy, and she also sought equality for women. She did however dedicate a number of her works to her aristocratic family, including the Symphony to her mother, and Libeslied to her sister. However, late in her life in 1921 Pejacevic married an army officer, and moved to Germany away from her family. As if she had a premonition of her future death, Dora wrote a letter to her husband which stated that regardless of their future child’s gender, it should be allowed to be free and encouraged in whatever it wanted to do. Their son Theo was born in January 1923, and Dora died just a few months later aged just 37. Her final act of rebellion was to ask that she be buried not inside the Pejacevic family crypt, but outside of it. Written on the front is simply her first name, Dora.

Humoreske and Caprice, Op 54
Natasa Veljkovic, piano

Trio in C major, Op 29 (Scherzo: Allegro & Lento)
Andrej Bielow, violin
Christian Poltera, cello
Oliver Triendl, piano

Liebeslied, Op 39
Ingeborg Danz, alto
Cord Garben, piano

Piano Sonata in A flat major, Op 57
Natasa Veljkovic, piano

Symphony in F sharp minor, Op 41 (Allegro appassionato)
The German State Philharmonic Orchestra of the Rhineland-Palatinate
Ari Rasilainen, conductor

Produced by Luke Whitlock for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores Pejacevic's final days

Donald Macleod explores composers' lives, with great recordings of their best works.