The Early Music Show

Catherine Bott and Lucie Skeaping delve into the world of early music, exploring developments in the performance of early music both here and abroad.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
A tale of two printers20180701

Hannah French tells the tale of two printers: Roger in Amsterdam and Walsh in London.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Acis and Galatea20180812

Hannah French on the 300th anniversary of the premiere of Handel's Acis and Galatea.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Ariadne20180506

Lucie Skeaping presents a musical exploration of the Greek myth of Ariadne in early music.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Bach's Art of Fugue2014021620180916 (R3)

Lucie Skeaping focuses on JS Bach's last great masterpiece, The Art of Fugue

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Lucie Skeaping takes expert advice from Simon Heighes to explore the background, purpose and music of JS Bach's last great masterpiece - The Art of Fugue.

At the end of his life Johann Sebastian Bach set out to create a great summary of his thoughts and ideas about an intellectual musical form he'd made very much his own - the fugue. The result is the "Art of Fugue" which he left unfinished at his death - or did he? How should we regard this work? Was it intended for performance and if so, how? Who was it written for?

Lucie pulls together various recordings of the work and, in conversation with Bach expert Simon Heighes, unpicks some of the thinking behind this extraordinary composition.

Composer Profile: Philip Rosseter20181021

Countertenor Iestyn Davies marks the 450th anniversary of composer Philip Rosseter.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Composer Profile: Zelenka20180415

Lucie Skeaping profiles the neglected 18th-century Czech composer Jan Dismas Zelenka.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Lucie Skeaping profiles the life, times and music of the 18th-century Czech composer Jan Dismas Zelenka, who won the admiration of many distinguished contemporaries, among them Johann Sebastian Bach. One of the most neglected figures of the late baroque, Zelenka composed some of the most sumptuous and glorious church music ever written.

Couperin's keyboard20180429

Lucie Skeaping talks to harpsichordist Carole Cerasi about the keyboard music of Couperin.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Couperin's Lecons de Tenebres20181028

An exploration of Couperin's remarkable vocal music for Holy Week - his Lecons de Tenebres

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Cuban Discoveries20180729

Lucie Skeaping investigates the music of 18th- and early 19th-century Cuba.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

European Day of Early Music20180401

Lutenist Thomas Dunford performs a concert celebrating the European Day of Early Music.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Firework Music for Bonfire Night20181104

Musical fireworks from Handel, Corelli, Bach and Rameau.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Frick Collection - Forma Antiqva20180617

Hannah French presents a concert given by Spanish ensemble Forma Antiqva in New York.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Frick CollectionForma Antiqva20180617

Hannah French presents a concert given by Spanish ensemble Forma Antiqva in New York.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Il Transilvano20180826

The Prisma Consort with a concert of music linking Italy and Transylvania.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Live from the York Early Music Festival20180708

Lucie Skeaping presents a live edition from the York Early Music Festival.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

London Festival of Baroque Music: Le Poeme Harmonique20180520

Le Poeme Harmonique perform music reflecting the French court's fascination with the East.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Music in a cold climate20180603

Lucie Skeaping and guests discuss the musical tradition of the Hanseatic League.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Lucie Skeaping talks to cornett player Gawain Glenton about the history of the Hanseatic League - a trade route that developed across the Baltic Sea and beyond from our own shores right up to Estonia - which engendered its own musical tradition too. They are joined in the studio by Dr Bettina Varwig, lecturer in early modern music at Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge. Gawain has just released a disc of music from the Hanseatic cities with his ECHO Ensemble.

Roman Holiday2017042320180408 (R3)

Hannah French explores the life and music of Swedish composer Johan Helmich Roman.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Hannah French presents a programme dedicated to the Swedish composer Johan Helmich Roman. He was not only one of his country's most celebrated Baroque composers and leader of the Swedish opera through the Age of Liberty, but also something of a traveller. Roman spent time in London, where he performed for Handel and Geminiani, before setting off across Europe where he met some of the leading musicians of his day, including Pepusch and Johann Jacob Bach.

Roman Holiday20180408

Hannah French looks at the life and music of Swedish composer Johan Helmich Roman.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Hannah French presents a programme dedicated to the Swedish composer Johan Helmich Roman. He was not only one of his country's most celebrated Baroque composers and leader of the Swedish opera through the Age of Liberty, but also something of a traveller. Roman spent time in London, where he performed for Handel and Geminiani, before setting off across Europe where he met some of the leading musicians of his day, including Pepusch and Johann Jacob Bach.

The Bachs' Ascension20180513

Hannah French looks at JS and CPE Bach's works celebrating the Feast of the Ascension.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

The Western Wind20180909

Hannah French explores The Western Wind, a song that inspired many 16th-century masses.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Vox Luminis at Regensburg Early Music Days20181014

Vox Luminis sing Bach motets at the Regensburg Early Music Days festival in Germany.

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

York Early Music Festival - Revolting Women20180715

Music by four women composers who broke free from the strictures of a male-dominated world

An exploration of early developments in the musical world

Feisty, courageous, defiant. Four women break free from a world dominated by laws of conduct as dictated by men for women, calling for submission, compliancy, chastity, piety and modesty "which is so essential to your sex...will naturally dispose you to be rather silent....." (A Father's legacy to his Daughters, 1774). Music by child prodigy Elisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre (1665-1729), Ursuline nun Isabella Leonarda (1620-1704), Maddalena Sirmen (1745-1818) - a gifted Venetian violinist who studied with Tartini, and Mrs. Philarmonica - a woman hiding behind a pseudonym, whose Corelli-influenced trio Sonatas were published in London in 1715.

Lucy Russell, Agata Daraskaite - violins
Rachel Gray - cello
Lynda Sayce - theorbo
Peter Seymour - harpsichord, organ.

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Catherine Bott talks to Adrian Chandler, violinist and director of the ensemble La Serenissima, about his recordings of some of Vivaldi's lesser-known concertos.

Vivaldi wrote more than 500 of them, including many for his own instrument, the violin, along with some for larger and grander ensembles.

Chandler has long been a champion of Vivaldi as a composer and is keen to demonstrate some of his less popular works in the concerto idiom.

The programme includes complete performances of the Concerto for violin, two oboes, bassoon, two horns and timpani, RV 562a, and the Violin Concerto in F, RV 292.

Catherine Bott talks to Adrian Chandler about some of the lesser known Vivaldi concertos.

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Lucie Skeaping presents a concert given by the New York-based ensemble Rebel at the 2003 Boston Early Music Festival.

The concert focuses on the music of Telemann, and in particular those works which are infused with the influence of Polish folk elements.

With interviews from the group's founders Karen Marie Marmer and Jörg-Michael Schwarz.

Telemann: Sonata Polonese à 3 in A, TWV42A8 Telemann: Sonata Discortato à 4 in A, TWV43A7 Telemann: Sonata Polonois à 4 in G, TWV43G7 Telemann: Sonata Polonois à 4 in B flat, TWV43B3 Telemann: Suite in E flat, TWV55Es2 Rebel Jörg-Michael Schwarz and Karen Marie Marmer (violins) Matthias Maute (traverso, recorder and flute pastorelle) Risa Browder (viola) John Moran (cello) Anne Trout (double bass) Dongsok Shin (harpsichord).

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Catherine Bott introduces motets and chansons by the 15th Century French composer, singer and poet Antoine Busnoys.

He was one of the most celebrated musicians of the age, who is claimed as having started the tradition of setting the Mass using the popular tune L'homme arme.

In this specially recorded sequence, the Orlando Consort feature some of his Latin motets with double text and a sequence of his French rondeaux and virelai.

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Andrew Manze introduces motets and madrigals by the 16th Century Flemish composer Philippe de Monte.

Overshadowed in recent times by his contemporaries Lassus and Palestrina, De Monte was their equal during his lifetime, especially as a writer of madrigals.

This sequence includes a number of specialy made recordings in which Bo Holten conducts the BBC Singers.

The musical connection between De Monte and William Byrd is also revealed in recordings from The Sixteen, conducted by Harry Christophers.

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The Benda Family Andrew Manze delves into the musical world of the Benda family, three members of which, in particular, still hold a valuable place in today's repertoire.

Active in the aristocratic courts of eighteenth century Prussia, these Bohemian brothers were perhaps best known for their flute works, all of which were commissioned by their flautist patron, Frederick the Great.

In today's programme, however, Andrew seeks to prove that there's more to the Bendas than flutes! Frantisek Benda - Sonata for violin and basso continuo in A minor Simon Standage (violin) Jane Coe (cello) Lars Ulrik Mortensen (harpsichord) Frantisek Benda - Sonata for flute, cello and harpsichord Andreas Kröper (flute) Thomas Fritzsch (cello) Bernhard Gillitzer (harpsichord) Jan Jiri Benda - 'Grave' from Concerto for violin and strings in G major (version for cello and strings) Christian Benda (cello and director) Prague Chamber Orchestra Jiri Antonin Benda - Concerto for harpsichord in G major Josef Hála (harpsichord) Ars Redeviva Ensemble.

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Ensemble Clement Janequin Catherine Bott introduces music from a concert given in Lucerne by the French group Ensemble Clement Janequin.

Meanwhile, Lucie Skeaping explores one of the musical treasures contained in the Augsburg Art Cabinet, which, together with its contents, was said to reflect the entire known world.

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The English Concert: Andrew Manze presents a concert from St George's, Bristol, given by his own group the English Concert.

Featuring music by Muffat and Schmelzer.

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Catherine Bott introduces a programme of music recorded at the National Centre for Early Music in York, performed by Concordia, interspersing instrumental pieces from the inner circle of court musicians to Charles I and II with Symphony Songs by Henry Purcell.

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Lucie Skeaping presents highlights from a concert recorded at the Regensburg Festival of Early Music, in which the US-based Terra Nova Ensemble perform music from 14th Century Spain.

Composers such as Alfonso Mudarra, Luis Milan and Juan del Encina nestle with traditional and anonymous songs from the Iberian peninsula, which display an obvious flavour of the Moorish occupation.

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Scotia Crescat Music from the Scottish Enlightenment by Sir John Clerk of Penicuik.

Lucie Skeaping talks to Ian McFarlane about this remarkable polymath and we hear three of his cantatas performed by Sonnerie with Mhairie Lawson and Lorna Anderson.

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Concerto Caledonia The Early Music Show today comes from Scotland, live and interactive, maybe even hyperactive, with Concerto Caledonia performing music from 18th century Scotland and a few pieces that you might not expect from a period instrument ensemble.

Catherine Bott will also be chatting to the group, so email your questions now.

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Catherine Bott talks to harpsichordist, flautist and conductor, Nicholas McGegan about his career in Baroque Music.

As musical director of the San Francisco-based Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra and the International Handel Festival, to name but two, Nicholas McGegan has carved a unique niche in the field of historically-informed performance, and has well over 70 recordings to his name.

The music in today's programme comes from just a handful of those recordings, and includes repertoire by Rameau, Scarlatti, Telemann, Bach and Arne, as well as his award-winning première recording of Handel's opera, Susanna.

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Lawrence Cummings and Adrian Butterfield Lucie Skeaping presents a Live Early Music Show with chat and music from harpsichordist Laurence Cummings and violinist Adrian Butterfield, exploring the musical importance of the violin sonatas of C P E Bach.

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In the first of two programmes marking the tercentenary of the death of Marc-Antoine Charpentier, Catherine Bott chooses a selection of music recorded in February from all over Europe.

As part of the European Broadcasting Union's special Charpentier Day, the repertoire includes music by the great man himself, and by other composers who were active during the reign of Louis XIV of France.

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Musicians of the King's Chamber The second of two programmes commemorating the 300th anniversary of the death of Charpentier, today focussing on some of Charpentier's contemporaries.

Lucie Skeaping explores music by a generation of baroque composers employed by Louis XIV at Versailles as musicians of the King's Chamber, including Michel de La Barre, Robert de Visée, Jean-Henri D'Anglebert and Marin Marais.

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Cristofori's Florentine Piano

Around 1700 Bartolomeo Cristofori, Keeper of Instruments for the Medici family in Florence, had a brilliant idea - take a harpsichord, but instead of plucking the strings, hit them with a hammer instead.

Catherine Bott joins instrument-maker Denzil Wraight who has recreated one of Cristofi's early pianos, and fortepianist Ella Sevskaya who has recorded a recital on it, especially for the programme.

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Music from the Saxon Court

The Prince-Elector August the Strong of Saxony had two great passions: Music and Hunting. Reinhard Goebel with Musica Antiqua Köln perform music by Hasse, Albinoni, Heinichen, Fasch and Veracini all written for the court and with a strong hunting theme.

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Today's Early Music Show comes live from St George's in Belfast, as part of the BBC's Music Live festival.

The BBC Singers are joined by conductor Peter Phillips to perform music from renaissance England and Italy.

BBC Singers Peter Phillips (director) Tallis....Loquebantur variis linguis Tallis....Suscipe quaeso Byrd....Quomodo cantabimus de Monte....Super flumina Lassus....Te spectant Reginalde Poli Byrd....Tristitia et anxietas Lassus....Tui sunt caeli.

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Early Music in Ireland: Continuing the 'BBC Music Live' weekend in Belfast, Lucie Skeaping takes a look at music in Ireland from Medieval times onwards.

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Handel's London Catherine Bott talks to Handel expert Simon Heighes about Handel's impact on musical life in London at the beginning of the 18th Century, as they consider some of Handel's contemporaries including Croft and Eccles.

Laurence Cummings also provides an insight into Handel improvising at home in London's Brook Street.

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Medieval Dance

Lucie Skeaping talks to William Lyons from the Dufay Collective about the little known world of Medieval Dance, from the few surviving examples in this country, to the broader picture across Europe.

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Lucie Skeaping explores the background behind one of the Baroque's most popular pieces - Johann Pachelbel's four minute Canon in D. Who was Pachelbel? What else did he compose? And were he a wedding guest today, could he put his hand on his heart, point to the organist and say "I wrote that!"?

Lucie Skeaping explores the background behind one of the Baroque's most popular pieces - Johann Pachelbel's four minute Canon in D.

Who was Pachelbel? What else did he compose? And were he a wedding guest today, could he put his hand on his heart, point to the organist and say "I wrote that!"?

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A Hilliard Songbook

Andrew Manze presents a concert recorded at London's Wigmore Hall, which celebrates the 30th birthday of The Hilliard Ensemble. The group, which has gained an enormous reputation over the past thirty years for its musical integrity

and for its varied repertoire, perform a programme of works by J S Bach, including Der Geist Hilft, Jesu Meine Freude and Singet dem Herrn.

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Follow the Lieder

From its emergence in the 14th Century through the Reformation, Lucie Skeaping studies the early stages of the German Lied, and some of the composers who helped to develop this important genre. With music by Oswald von Wolkenstein, Adam vond Fulda, Heinrich Isaac and Ludwig Senfl.

Follow the Lieder From its emergence in the 14th Century through the Reformation, Lucie Skeaping studies the early stages of the German Lied, and some of the composers who helped to develop this important genre.

With music by Oswald von Wolkenstein, Adam vond Fulda, Heinrich Isaac and Ludwig Senfl.

From its emergence in the 14th Century through the Reformation, Lucie Skeaping studies the early stages of the German Lied, and some of the composers who helped to develop this important genre.

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Andrew Manze presents a concert given by the premiere Danish Ensemble, Concerto Copenhagen.

This all-Bach programme was recorded in Copenhagen's Garrison Church, and is directed by the group's founder, Lars-Ulrik Mortensen.

Bach: Sinfonia from Cantata No 42, BWV 42

Concerto Copenhagen

Lars Ulrik Mortensen (director)

Bach: Oboe d'amore concerto in A, BWV 1055

Frank de Bruine (oboe)

Bach: Triple concerto for flute, violin and harpsichord, BWV 1044

Maria Bania (flute)

Peter Spissky (violin)

Lars Ulrik Mortensen (harpsichord and director)

Bach: Sinfonia from Cantata No 209.

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Catherine Bott introduces this live and onteractive Early Music Show, and asks you to send in requests for your favouorite madrigal.

You can make your request right up to the last minute, by e-mailing the production team at the usual address, or:

Phone:

The Radio 3 Audience Line

08700 100300 [national rates]

Or write in to:

The Early Music Show

Room 1115 New Broadcasting House

Oxford Road

Manchester M60 1SJ.

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Double Dutch - The Age of the Netherlanders By the early 16th Century, virtually every major musical centre in Europe was run by a musician from the Low Countries.

In the first of the Early music Show's two Double Dutch programmes this weekend, Lucie Skeaping explores the incredible and unexplained golden age of Netherlanders.

Music includes examples by such composers as Dufay, Binchois, Ockeghem and Josquin.

Jacques Maassen, director of the Netherlands Carillon School in Amersfoort also guides us through the age-old tradition of carillon playing in the Low Countries.

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Double Dutch: The Age of the Netherlanders In the second of this weekend's programmes devoted to the music of The Low Countries, Lucie Skeaping explores the continuing tradition of Dutch and Flemish musical excellence through the late 16th and early 17th Centuries.

With music from Tielman Susato, Orlando de Lassus, Philippe de Monte and the great organ master Jan Pieterzoon Sweelinck.

Dr Haspels, of Utrecht's Speelklok Museum also takes us on a journey through the tradition of Dutch street and barrel organs.

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Michael Praetorius's Musical Encyclopaedia

In the early 17th century the German composer, organist and music theorist Michael Praetorius compiled an encyclopaedia cataloguing every aspect of music in his time.

Andrew Manze dips into the book to create a picture of late renaissance music-making illustrated with works by Praetorius and his contemporaries.

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Catherine Bott introduces motets and chansons by the 15th Century French composer, singer and poet Antoine Busnoys.

He was one of the most celebrated musicians of the age, who is claimed to have started the tradition of setting the Mass using the popular tune L'homme arme.

In this specially recorded sequence, the Orlando Consort feature some of his Latin motets with double text and a sequence of his French rondeaux and virelai.

Catherine Bott introduces motets and chansons by the 15th Century French composer, singer and poet Antoine Busnoys. He was one of the most celebrated musicians of the age, who is claimed to have started the tradition of setting the Mass using the popular tune L'homme arme.

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Lufthansa Festival

Lucie Skeaping presents a concert recorded at the Lufthansa Festival of Baroque Music earlier this month, given by the Akademie fur Alte Musik Berlin directed by Georg Kallweit.

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Lufthansa Festival

Lucie Skeaping presents a concert recorded earlier this month from the Lufthansa Festival given by Le Poeme Harmonique, which includes traditional carnival songs and commedia from Italy in the 17th century.

Most of the works in the concert are attributed to a certain 'Il Fasolo' - 'The Bean' - whose identity remains shrouded in mystery, but who certainly played an important part in the emergence of a new genre that was opera.

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Medea

Lucie Skeaping studies the story of Medea in all its horrific glory, and illustrates the tale with musical examples from Baroque and Classical opera, cantata and melodrama.

Jiri Antonin Benda: Medea (extract)

Medea....Hertha Schell

Prague Chamber Orchestra

Christian Benda (conductor)

Clérambault: Médée (extract)

Julianne Baird (soprano)

American Baroque

Stephen Schultz (director)

Caldara: Medea in Corinto

Gérard Lesne (countertenor)

Il Seminario musicale

Charpentier: Medea Acts IV and V (extracts)

Medea....Lorraine Hunt

Jason....Mark Padmore

Creusa....Monique Zanetti

Cléone....Isabelle Desrochers

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Biber and the forgotten virtuosi

Catherine Bott presents a live edition from the National Centre for Early Music, featuring the ensemble Ricordo with members of Het Caecilia Concert.

The programmes celebrates the 300th anniversary of the death of the violin virtuoso and composer Heinrich Biber, with music by Biber and his contemporaries.

Johan Schmelzer: La Carolietta

Johann Jacob Froberger: Fantasia for harpsichord, FbWV 205

Buonaventura Viviani: Sonata in A minor for violin

Schmelzer: Sonata for Violin and dulcian

Biber: Passacaglia in C minor for lute

Biber: Sonata No 3 in F for violin

Matthias Weckmann: Sonata 2 in four parts.

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In today's programme Lucie Skeaping charts the development of the forte piano-piano during Beethoven's life-time - a period when the instrument went through some of its biggest changes.

What did the "piano" mean to the composer between 1770 and 1827?

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Catherine Bott is joined today by fellow soprano Emma Kirkby to explore the intimate and expressive repertoire of the English lute song, which reached its peak in the first half of the seventeenth century with composers like Dowland, Ferrabosco and the Lawes brothers, Henry and William.

Emma Kirkby (soprano)

With Jacob Lindberg (lute)

Alfonso Ferrabosco: So, so leave off this last lamenting kiss; Gentle Knights

Robert Johnson: As I walked forth

John Dowland: Go crystal tears; Lend your ears to my sorrow; Shall I sue, shall I seek for grace?

Dowland: Prelude and Fantasia for lute

Robert Jones: Ite, caldi sospiri

Henry Lawes: Tavola: Or you or I Nature did wrong: Slide soft, you silver floods

William Lawes: Why so pale and wan, fond lover

Daniel Bachelor: Prelude - La Jeune Fillette for lute

Alfonso Bales: Cloris sigh'd, and sang, and wept

George Jeffreys: Have pity, grief, I cannot pay

John Hilton: Hymne to God the Father.

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Catherine Bott is joined today by fellow soprano Emma Kirkby to explore the intimate and expressive repertoire of the English lute song, which reached its peak in the first half of the seventeenth century with composers like Dowland, Ferrabosco and the Lawes brothers, Henry and William.

Emma Kirkby (soprano)

With Jacob Lindberg (lute)

Alfonso Ferrabosco: So, so leave off this last lamenting kiss; Gentle Knights

Robert Johnson: As I walked forth

John Dowland: Go crystal tears; Lend your ears to my sorrow; Shall I sue, shall I seek for grace?

Dowland: Prelude and Fantasia for lute

Robert Jones: Ite, caldi sospiri

Henry Lawes: Tavola: Or you or I Nature did wrong: Slide soft, you silver floods

William Lawes: Why so pale and wan, fond lover

Daniel Bachelor: Prelude - La Jeune Fillette for lute

Alfonso Bales: Cloris sigh'd, and sang, and wept

George Jeffreys: Have pity, grief, I cannot pay

John Hilton: Hymne to God the Father.

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Lucie Skeaping's guest on today's live programme is the acclaimed recorder player Pamela Thorby, who talks about life in the Palladian Ensemble and as a solo artist, with music from her new CD.

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The Madrigal Comedy

At the end of the 16th century, the Madrigal Comedy became the most advanced form of musical theatre.

These madrigals, like opera that was to follow, were available to those few rich or grand enough to afford this kind of entertainment.

Lucie Skeaping presents a programme which explores the Madrigal Comedies written by composers such as Vecchi and Banchieri, performed by Ensemble Clement Janequin.

At the end of the 16th century, the Madrigal Comedy became the most advanced form of musical theatre. These madrigals, like opera that was to follow, were available to those few rich or grand enough to afford this kind of entertainment. Lucie Skeaping presents a programme which explores the Madrigal Comedies written by composers such as Vecchi and Banchieri, performed by Ensemble Clement Janequin.

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Sacro-Profanum: Music for the altar and for the table

Catherine Bott presents a concert recorded earlier this month at the York Early Music Festival, given by the Swiss-based Ensemble 415 (directed by Chiara Banchieri).

The programme celebrates the tercentenary of the death of Heinrich Biber with a sequence of sacred and secular pieces composed for Archbishop Gandolph in Salzburg, by Biber and his contemporaries Schmelzer and Johann Meder.

Catherine Bott presents a concert recorded earlier this month at the York Early Music Festival, given by the Swiss-based Ensemble 415 (directed by Chiara Banchieri). The programme celebrates the tercentenary of the death of Heinrich Biber with a sequence of sacred and secular pieces composed for Archbishop Gandolph in Salzburg, by Biber and his contemporaries Schmelzer and Johann Meder.

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How Opera arrived in the New World

In the first of this weekend's two programme's about Opera's arrival in Latin America, Lucie Skeaping explores the development of music in the New World from before the Spanish colonisation of c.1514 until 1701, when the first opera was premiered in Peru.

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The First New World Opera

Catherine Bott looks at Tomas de Torrejon y Velasco's La Purpura de la rosa (The Blood of the Rose), the first opera ever to be performed in the New World, which received its premiere in 1701 in Lima, Peru.

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Lucy Skeaping presents a concert recorded in York Minster during this summer's York Early Music Festival.

The Dufay Collective perform dansas and estampies from the 13th-century troubadour tradition.

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Catherine Bott joins the pilgrims in northwest Spain as she visits the cathedral in Santiago de Compostela.

Spanish hymns and cantigas form the musical basis of the programme as we travel the way of St James.

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The Benda Family

Andrew Manze delves into the music of the 18th century Bohemian dynasty, the Benda family.

F Benda: Sonata for violin and basso continuo in A minor

Michaela Comberti (violin)

Jane Coe (cello)

Lars Ulrik Mortensen (harpsichord)

F Benda: Sonata for flute, cello an harpsichord

Andreas Kröper (flute)

Thomas Fritzsch (cello)

Bernhard Gillitzer (harpsichord)

J Benda: Grave from Concerto for violin and strings in G major (version for cello and strings)

Christian Benda (cello and director)

Prague Chamber Orchestra

G Benda: Concerto for harpsichord in G major

Josef Hála (harpsichord)

Antonin Novák, Vojtech Jouza (violins)

Karel Spelina (viola)

Frantisek Sláma (cello)

Frantisek Posta (violone)

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The Great Fire of London

The Great Fire of 1666 destroyed four fifths of England's capital, laying waste to 87 churches and 13,200 houses along with countless books and manuscripts. Lucie Skeaping looks at the music of the city from composers who were living in London at the time of the catastrophe.

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Andrew Manze introduces motets and madrigals by the 16th Century Flemish composer Philippe de Monte.

Overshadowed in recent times by his contemporaries Lassus and Palestrina, De Monte was their equal during his lifetime, especially as

a writer of madrigals.

This sequence includes a number of specially made recordings in which Bo Holten conducts the BBC Singers.

The musical connection between De Monte and William Byrd is also revealed in recordings from The Sixteen, conducted by Harry Christophers.

Andrew Manze introduces motets and madrigals by the 16th Century Flemish composer Philippe de Monte. Overshadowed in recent times by his contemporaries Lassus and Palestrina, De Monte was their equal during his lifetime, especially as

a writer of madrigals. This sequence includes a number of specially made recordings in which Bo Holten conducts the BBC Singers. The musical connection between De Monte and William Byrd is also revealed in recordings from The Sixteen, conducted by Harry Christophers.

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Andreas Scholl

From humble beginnings in his father's greengrocer's store near Wiesbaden, Andreas Scholl has become one of the most successful musicians of his generation.

Blessed with a unique clarity of tone and an undeniable warmth, Scholl certainly deserves the accolades he has earned as one of the best countertenors on the early music circuit.

Catherine Bott looks at his extraordinary career and chooses music from his recordings, including performances of lutesongs by John Dowland and Thomas Campion, as recorded at this year's Bath International Festival.

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The Anna Magdalena Notebook

A look at the life of Johann Sebastian Bach's second wife, Anna Magdalena Wilcke. She married Bach when she was 20 and the following year Bach compiled his celebrated Anna Magdalena Notebook for her. So, wonders Lucie Skeaping, what was it like to be Anna Magdalena?

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Lucie Skeaping presents a concert from York Minster as part of The Sixteen's annual choral pilgrimage. This year, the choir's director Harry Christophers has chosen a programme of Portuguese and Italian music, including Lotti's divine Crucifixus and Scarlatti's Stabat Mater.

Lucie Skeaping presents a concert from York Minster as part of The Sixteen's annual choral pilgrimage.

This year, the choir's director Harry Christophers has chosen a programme of Portuguese and Italian music, including Lotti's divine Crucifixus and Scarlatti's Stabat Mater.

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Music for St Anthony Abbot

Catherine Bott introduces two rarities from fifteenth century Burgundy, performed by the Binchois Consort, director Andrew Kirkman, in the majestic acoustic of the Chapter House of York Minster. The ten movement Missa Sancti Anthonii Viennensis is ascribed to the Burgundian master Guillauem Dufay. The only surviving isorythmic motet by his great contemporary Gilles Binchois was also written for St.Anthony of Vienne. This work, Nove cantum melodie has been reconstructed from surviving manuscript fragments by Philip Weller.

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In this month's live and interactive Early Music Show, Catherine Bott's guest is baroque violinist Monica Huggett.

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Catherine Bott presents the Italian ensemble Accordone with the remarkable singer Marco Beasley performing Frotolle from 16th-century Italy and instrumental dances of the period.

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Early Music in Ireland

Lucie Skeaping explores music in Ireland from medieval times onwards.

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Rappresentatione di Anima, et di Corpo

Emilio de' Cavalieri's sacred opera the Rappresentatione di Anima, et di Corpo, was the first ever to be published, and is the earliest opera for which all the music survives.

Lucie Skeaping presents highlights of a performance recorded at the Utrecht Early Music Festival last month, featuring the ensemble L'Arpeggiata, directed by Christina Pluhar.

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Catherine Bott and friends perform a seductive selection of Spanish pieces from Ferdinand and Isabella's own musical collection, The Cancionas por los Reyes'.

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Orfeo and Arianna

Andrew Manze examines Claudio Monteverdi's first two Operas, which defined the genre, and ensured its survival. The programme also visits a performance of I Fagiolini's new production, The Full Monteverdi.

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The Empress of Magnificent Taste and Pleasure

Teresa Cornelys arrived penniless in England in the autumn of 1759.

Yet, little more than a year later, she was an international Opera star, and owned London's most successful entertainment business.

Judith Summers, author of a biography of this incredible woman, talks to Lucie Skeaping about Teresa, who had a rumoured love affair with Gluck and was mother to Casanova's child.

Featuring music by Gluck, Handel, Thomas Arne and JC Bach.

Teresa Cornelys arrived penniless in England in the autumn of 1759. Yet, little more than a year later, she was an international Opera star, and owned London's most successful entertainment business.

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Lucie Skeaping presents the second of two programmes from this year's Brighton Early Music Festival. Musica Secreta perform erotic madrigals from Monteverdi's 4th book, which were miraculously transformed into sacred pieces by the substitution of Latin texts, for performances by nuns. These will be combined with music actually composed by and for nuns of Lombardy including the recently discovered music of Chiara Margarita Cozzolani.

Lucie Skeaping presents the second of two programmes from this year's Brighton Early Music Festival.

Musica Secreta perform erotic madrigals from Monteverdi's 4th book, which were miraculously transformed into sacred pieces by the substitution of Latin texts, for performances by nuns.

These will be combined with music actually composed by and for nuns of Lombardy including the recently discovered music of Chiara Margarita Cozzolani.

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Black Mozart

On Christmas Day 1739 in Guadeloupe, a child was born to a rich colonist and his negress slave mistress. This child was Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint George, who rose through Eighteenth-century aristocratic circles to become one

of the most fascinating and respected figures in the Paris musical scene.

Lucie Skeaping looks at some of the music written by this mixed-race misfit, who came to become one of the most remarkable figures in the Age of Enlightenment.

EMS20041017

Biber's Rosary Sonatas

Andrew Manze introduces a selection from Biber's unique collection of fifteen violin sonatas.

He explores the different ways in which they can be realised, and considers the symbolism behind the music.

Biber:

Sonata No 1 - The Annunciation

Sonata No 4 - The Presentation in the Temple

Andrew Manze (violin)

Richard Eggar (organ)

Sonata No 6 - The Agony in the Garden

Sonata No 9 - The Carrying of the Cross

Sonata No 10 - The Crucifixion

Monica Huggett (violin)

Emilia Benjamin (viola da gamba)

Matthew Halls (organ)

Richard Sweeney (theorbo)

Sonata No 11 - The Resurrection

Pavlo Besnoziuk (violin)

David Roblou(organ)

Paula Chateauneuf (theorbo)

Richard Tunnicliffe (violone).

Andrew Manze introduces a selection from Biber's unique collection of fifteen violin sonatas. He explores the different ways in which they can be realised, and considers the symbolism behind the music.

EMS20041023

A Lute Evening at the Orangerie

Andrew Manze introduces a concert of German and Spanish lute and guitar music given in the Orangerie of Schwetzinger Castle, Germany by Xavier Diaz-Latorre (theorbo and baroque guitar) and Pedro Estevan (percussion).

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Barthold Kuijken Plays CPE Bach

Barthold Kuijken, famous for his dedication to the rediscovery of the baroque flute, plays sonatas by CPE Bach with harpsichordist Ewald Demeyere.

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Andrew Manze presents a performer portrait of David Munrow, of one of the most influential early music pioneers this country has ever seen.

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When Handel met Scarlatti

The year is 1709. The place is Rome. Two musical heavyweights are pitted against one another in a trial of skill...

Andrew Manze explores the extraordinary contest which took place between two of the greatest Baroque musicians in the world: George Friderich Handel and Domenico Scarlatti.

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In connection with last night's festivities, Catherine Bott and Andrew Carwood of the Cardinall's Musick today take the Early Music Show back to 1605 and look at the music which was written about the infamous plot of 1605. Featuring a short concert programme from the Cardinall's Musick from the Early Music Network Showcase in Warwick.

In connection with last night's festivities, Catherine Bott and Andrew Carwood of the Cardinall's Musick today take the Early Music Show back to 1605 and look at the music which was written about the infamous plot of 1605.

Featuring a short concert programme from the Cardinall's Musick from the Early Music Network Showcase in Warwick.

EMS20041113

Live From the Greenwich International Festival of Early Music

The Early Music Show comes live from our stand amidst the glorious cacophony of Greenwich International Festival of Early Music in the Painted Hall of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich.

Instrument makers and performers will be talking to Lucie Skeaping and demonstrating their wares, from viols to bagpipes.

The Early Music Show comes live from our stand amidst the glorious cacophony of Greenwich International Festival of Early Music in the Painted Hall of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich. Instrument makers and performers will be talking to Lucie Skeaping and demonstrating their wares, from viols to bagpipes.

EMS20041114

Les Haulz et les Bas

Lucie Skeaping presents a concert of 13th Century music for shawms and sackbuts recorded at Chethams School of Music in Manchester by Germany-based group, Les Haulz et les Bas.

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Philippe de Vitry was a groundbreaking and innovative musician of his time.

Lucie Skeaping takes a look at his works in the light of a new opera which uses his music.

Philippe de Vitry was a groundbreaking and innovative musician of his time. Lucie Skeaping takes a look at his works in the light of a new opera which uses his music.

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In a special live and interactive edition, the much acclaimed ensemble London Baroque join Catherine Bott in the studio for performance and chat.

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Catherine Bott presents the first of two programs about Boccherini's life and work in Madrid, and the secret behind all those cello quintets!

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Catherine Bott presents the second of two programs about Boccherini's sojourn in Madrid, and his unexpected connection with the King of Prussia.

EMS20041204

The Burning Bush

Traditional Jewish music presented and performed by Lucie Skeaping with her band The Burning Bush. Music from the Judeo-Spanish tradition rubs shoulders with Eastern European Klesmer in this lively concert from The Snape Maltings in Suffolk.

EMS20041205

The Great Fire of London

The Great Fire of 1666 destroyed 80 percent of England's capital, laying waste to 87 churches and 13,200 houses along with countless books and manuscripts. Lucie Skeaping looks at the music of the city from composers who were living in London at the time of the catastrophe.

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Catherine Bott explores eighteenth century Lisbon, the city that welcomed Domenico Scarlatti to its Royal Palace in 1719.

King Joao V of Portugal had poached Scarlatti from the comfort and security of Rome to bring a little glamour and instruction to his court.

For Scarlatti, this was an opportunity not to be missed, and one that diverted the course of his entire career.

It was in Lisbon that Scarlatti began to compose his keyboard sonatas - 555 of them in total - many of which are dedicated to, or inspired by, the Princess Maria Barbara.

EMS20041212

My Favourite Scarlatti!

In a Live and Interactive show from Studio 3 in Manchester, Catherine Bott introduces the world to the joys of 'Scar-lotto' and offers listeners the opportunity to request a performance of their favourite piece of music by one of the Scarlatti Dynasty.

EMS20041225

Lucie Skeaping presents a festive concert from London's Wigmore Hall.

Florilegium with soprano Lorna Anderson perform a range of Baroque music from Germany and Italy, including Handel's Gloria, Vivaldi's Concerto for flute and organ, RV 541, and Scarlatti's cantata O di Betlemme altera poverta.

EMS20050108

The Cantigas de Santa Maria

Catherine Bott presents a programme from Santiago de Compostela, in northwest Spain. She follows the annual pilgrimage to the cathedral of St James and delves into the wonderful music from the Cantigas de Santa Maria.

EMS20050109

Andrew Manze is joined live in Manchester by the members of The Het Caecilia Concert, one of the most intriguing and exciting young ensembles on the current Early Music scene.

EMS20050116

Birds in Medieval Music

The medieval world was laden with symbolism in both religious and secular life, with much being made of the significance of nature. Lucie Skeaping takes a look at the ways that birds were symbolised and represented in medieval music.

EMS20050122

Catherine Bott visits the bustling city of Lisbon to delve into the wealth of music written in Portugal in the 15th and 16th centuries. With music by Manuel Cardoso, Duarte Lobo, and Filipe de Magalhaes.

Catherine Bott visits the bustling city of Lisbon to delve into the wealth of music written in Portugal in the 15th and 16th centuries.

With music by Manuel Cardoso, Duarte Lobo, and Filipe de Magalhaes.

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Catherine Bott presents the second of her two programmes devoted to the early music of Portugal.

With music by the great keyboard master Carlos de Seixas, and contemporaries such as Antonio Teixeira and Joao de Sousa Carvalho, this programme highlights the patronage of the Braganca family in the lead-up to the great earthquake of 1755.

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Andrew Manze introduces a concert he gave with the European Union Baroque Orchestra as part of the Spitalfields Festival in December.

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Lucie Skeaping introduces a live and interactive request programme to celebrate the generally agreed 500th anniversary of the birth of Thomas Tallis.

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Rameau and the Harpsichord: Lucie Skeaping looks at the background to some of the greatest keyboard music from 18th-century France - Jean-Phillipe Rameau's Pieces de Clavecin.

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Another chance to hear a concert from last year's Lufthansa Festival given by Le Poeme Harmonique, which includes traditional carnival songs and commedia from Italy in the 17th century.

Most of the works in the concert are attributed to a certain 'Il Fasolo' - 'The Bean' - whose identity remains shrouded in mystery, but who certainly played an important part in the emergence of a new genre that was opera.

Presented by Lucie Skeaping

Another chance to hear a concert from last year's Lufthansa Festival given by Le Poeme Harmonique, which includes traditional carnival songs and commedia from Italy in the 17th century. Most of the works in the concert are attributed to a certain 'Il Fasolo' - 'The Bean' - whose identity remains shrouded in mystery, but who certainly played an important part in the emergence of a new genre that was opera. Presented by Lucie Skeaping.

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The Evolution of Theatre Music - Precursors of Opera

Lucie Skeaping looks back at the early secular and sacred theatre works - some of the earliest precursors of Opera, from Ancient Greek reconstructions to Hildegard of Bingen and the 12th century Play of Daniel, a complete performance of which you can hear in tomorrow's Early Music Show.

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The Play of Daniel

Andrew Manze introduces a rare performance of the 13th Century Ludus Danielis, The Play of Daniel, recorded last year in Liverpool Cathedral.

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Lully - The Bohemian Connection

Lucie Skeaping and Emma Murphy explore Lully's profound influence on music in Bohemia and composers such as George Muffat and Johann Caspar Gerdinand Fischer. We'll hear suites by both composers as well as music by Lully himself, all performed by Ensemble Tourbillon, directed by Petr Wagner.

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Another chance to hear a programme broadcast from the Music Live Festival in Belfast last year.

The BBC Singers are joined by conductor Peter Phillips to perform music from Renaissance England and Italy.

Tallis: Loquebantur variis linguis; Suscipe quaeso

Byrd: Quomodo cantabimus

de Monte: Super flumina

Lassus: Te spectant Reginalde Poli

Byrd: Tristitia et anxietas

Lassus: Tui sunt caeli

BBC Singers

Peter Phillips (director).

Another chance to hear a programme broadcast from the Music Live Festival in Belfast last year. The BBC Singers are joined by conductor Peter Phillips to perform music from Renaissance England and Italy.

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The Anna Magdalena Notebook

Another chance to hear this programme that looks at the life of Johann Sebastian Bach's second wife, Anna Magdalena Wilcke. She married Bach when she was 20, and the following year Bach compiled his celebrated "Anna Magdalena Notebook" for her. So, wonders Lucie Skeaping, what was it like to be Anna Magdalena?

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Catherine Bott presents a live and interactive edition featuring early music ensemble Badinage, who perform wind sonatas by Bach, Handel and Telemann.

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The Catherine the Great Orchestra

A concert of music by Russia's pioneering early music ensemble, presented by Catherine Bott in conversation with director Andrey Reshetin and the director of the Russian Early Music Foundation, Marc de Mauny

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The Lives and Loves of Henry's Six Wives

Henry VIII is one of Britain's most famous monarchs. Virtually every schoolchild in England has been taught the Divorced-Beheaded-Died, Divorced-Beheaded-Survived rhyme for remembering what fate eventually befell each of Henry's wives. In today's programme, Andrew Manze traces their lives through the music which was written about them or which each of them would have heard.

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Andrew Manze presents the first of two programmes which focus on the music of The Mannheim School.

Founded in the early 18th century by Joseph Stamitz, the Mannheim orchestra quickly became one of the most successful in Europe.

Music literally poured from the castle walls and made household names of Stamitz, Christian Cannabich and Franz Xaver Richter.

Founded in the early 18th century by Joseph Stamitz, the Mannheim orchestra quickly became one of the most successful in Europe. Music literally poured from the castle walls and made household names of Stamitz, Christian Cannabich and Franz Xaver Richter.

EMS20050319

John Dowland: The Man and the Myth

John Dowland was one of the greatest musicians of the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras, and information about his life is quite plentiful.

Why then, do so many inconsistencies about the man remain? Why is the truth about his life shrouded in mystery? Lucie Skeaping explores the life of the enigmatic composer.

Meanwhile, Catherine Bott talks to Dr Helen Hackett about the life and poetry of one of the ladies of the time, Lady Mary Wroth.

Dowland: Flow my tears

Tell me true love

Weep you no more, sad fountains

O sweet words, the delight of solitarienesse

Unquiet Thoughts

I saw my lady weep

Sweet Stay Awhile

Go Crystal Tears.

John Dowland was one of the greatest musicians of the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras, and information about his life is quite plentiful. Why then, do so many inconsistencies about the man remain? Why is the truth about his life shrouded in mystery? Lucie Skeaping explores the life of the enigmatic composer. Meanwhile, Catherin