Eat The Buddha By Barbara Demick

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0120200914Acclaimed journalist Barbara Demick's new book tells the story of modern Tibet's troubled history through the eyes of the people of one town. The reader is Laurel Lefkow.

In 1950, China claimed sovereignty over Tibet, leading to decades of unrest and resistance. In her new book, Barbara Demick tells the story of Tibet's struggles through the stories of the townspeople of Ngaba. A defiant town on the eastern edge of the Tibetan plateau, Ngaba made international headlines in 2009 when the first of dozens of Tibetans shocked the world by self-immolating.

Barbara Demick tells Tibet's modern history through the lives of Ngaba's inhabitants, from the last princess of the region, to ordinary townspeople and its monks, creating an illuminating portrait of what life is like for today's Tibetans who struggle to maintain their identity in the face of one of the most powerful countries in the world.

Barbara Demick won the Samuel Johnson Prize for Nothing to Envy (Granta, 2010), her seminal book on North Korea. She is also the author of Besieged (Granta, 2012), her account of the war in Sarajevo, which won the George Polk Award, the Robert F Kennedy Award and was shortlisted for a Pulitzer Prize. She lives in New York.

Abridged by Penny Leicester.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard

The story of modern Tibet's troubled history through the eyes of the people of one town.

0220200915The award winning journalist Barbara Demick's new and illuminating book tells the story of modern Tibet. Today, the region's last princess is exiled to a remote part of China during the Cultural Revolution. The reader is Laurel Lefkow.

Eat the Buddha tells modern Tibet's troubled history through the eyes the people of one town, starting in the 1950s when China claimed sovereignty over Tibet, leading to decades of unrest and resistance, and bringing us up to the present day. Barbara Demick's account is an evocative portrait of what life is like for today's Tibetans who struggle to maintain their identity in the face of one of the most powerful countries in the world.

Barbara Demick won the Samuel Johnson Prize for Nothing to Envy (Granta, 2010), her seminal book on North Korea. She is also the author of Besieged (Granta, 2012), her account of the war in Sarajevo, which won the George Polk Award, the Robert F Kennedy Award and was shortlisted for a Pulitzer Prize. She lives in New York.

Abridged by Penny Leicester.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard

In Barbara Demick 's story of modern Tibet the region's last princess is exiled.

The story of modern Tibet's troubled history through the eyes of the people of one town.

0320200916The acclaimed journalist Barbara Demick's new book is an evocative account of modern Tibet. Today, it's the year 2000 and, in the village of Meruma, a boy is drawn to life in nearby Kirti monastery. The reader is Laurel Lefkow.

Eat the Buddha tells Tibet's troubled history through the eyes the people of one town, starting in the 1950s when China claimed sovereignty over Tibet, leading to decades of unrest and resistance, and bringing us up to the present day. Barbara Demick's account is an evocative portrait of what life is like for today's Tibetans who struggle to maintain their identity in the face of one of the most powerful countries in the world.

Barbara Demick won the Samuel Johnson Prize for Nothing to Envy (Granta, 2010), her seminal book on North Korea. She is also the author of Besieged (Granta, 2012), her account of the war in Sarajevo, which won the George Polk Award, the Robert F Kennedy Award and was shortlisted for a Pulitzer Prize. She lives in New York.

Abridged by Penny Leicester.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard

Barbara Demick's account of modern Tibet takes up the story of a novice monk.

The story of modern Tibet's troubled history through the eyes of the people of one town.

0420200917The acclaimed journalist Barbara Demick's new book is an evocative account of modern Tibet. Today, the stories of Ngaba's women lead to heartbreak following protests and calls for Tibet's independence.

Eat the Buddha tells Tibet's troubled history through the eyes the people of one town, starting in the 1950s when China claimed sovereignty over Tibet, leading to decades of unrest and resistance, and bringing us up to the present day. Barbara Demick's account is an evocative portrait of what life is like for today's Tibetans who struggle to maintain their identity in the face of one of the most powerful countries in the world.

Barbara Demick won the Samuel Johnson Prize for Nothing to Envy (Granta, 2010), her seminal book on North Korea. She is also the author of Besieged (Granta, 2012), her account of the war in Sarajevo, which won the George Polk Award, the Robert F Kennedy Award and was shortlisted for a Pulitzer Prize. She lives in New York.

Abridged by Penny Leicester.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard

In Barbara Demick's evocative account of modern Tibet, Ngaba's women take up the story.

The story of modern Tibet's troubled history through the eyes of the people of one town.

0520200918The acclaimed journalist Barbara Demick's new book is an illuminating account of modern Tibet. Today, we catch up with the townspeople of Ngaba, and their new lives in India where the Dalai Lama resides. Laurel Lefkow is the reader.

Eat the Buddha tells Tibet's troubled history through the eyes the people of one town, starting in the 1950s when China claimed sovereignty over Tibet, leading to decades of unrest and resistance, and bringing us up to the present day. Barbara Demick's account is an evocative portrait of what life is like for today's Tibetans who struggle to maintain their identity in the face of one of the most powerful countries in the world.

Barbara Demick won the Samuel Johnson Prize for Nothing to Envy (Granta, 2010), her seminal book on North Korea. She is also the author of Besieged (Granta, 2012), her account of the war in Sarajevo, which won the George Polk Award, the Robert F Kennedy Award and was shortlisted for a Pulitzer Prize. She lives in New York.

Abridged by Penny Leicester.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard

In Barbara Demick's illuminating account of modern Tibet, new lives are made in India.

The story of modern Tibet's troubled history through the eyes of the people of one town.