Economic Tectonics [The Compass] [World Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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01Politics20170309

Ten years ago a Harvard economist suggested that it might not be possible to combine democracy, national sovereignty and economic integration forever. Something would have to give. 2016 might just have proved him right. In this edition of Economic Tectonics, Martin Sandbu from The Financial Times explores how –in his view – today’s fractious politics might change the global economy of the future.
Producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Image: Child at Protest holding placard, Credit: Shutterstock)

How the global economy is being shaped by political backlash

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

01Politics2017030920170312 (WS)

Ten years ago a Harvard economist suggested that it might not be possible to combine democracy, national sovereignty and economic integration forever. Something would have to give. 2016 might just have proved him right. In this edition of Economic Tectonics, Martin Sandbu from The Financial Times explores how –in his view – today’s fractious politics might change the global economy of the future.
Producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Image: Child at Protest holding placard, Credit: Shutterstock)

How the global economy is being shaped by political backlash

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

02Demographics20170316

Who we are, how many of us there are and where we live will change the economies of the future. Africa’s population will boom spectacularly, creating a huge new workforce in countries like Nigeria. That’s a great opportunity, but one with serious risks attached. Europe will shrink. Asia is ageing. In this edition of Economic Tectonics, Ruth Alexander looks at the near future – a future we can already see, thanks to accurate statistical modelling – to find out how economic power will shift as the world’s population changes.

Producer: Ben Carter

(Image: People gathered as an arrow, Credit: Arthimedes/Shutterstock)

How economic power will shift as the world\u2019s population changes

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

02Demographics2017031620170319 (WS)

Who we are, how many of us there are and where we live will change the economies of the future. Africa’s population will boom spectacularly, creating a huge new workforce in countries like Nigeria. That’s a great opportunity, but one with serious risks attached. Europe will shrink. Asia is ageing. In this edition of Economic Tectonics, Ruth Alexander looks at the near future – a future we can already see, thanks to accurate statistical modelling – to find out how economic power will shift as the world’s population changes.

Producer: Ben Carter

(Image: People gathered as an arrow, Credit: Arthimedes/Shutterstock)

How economic power will shift as the world\u2019s population changes

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

03Finance20170323

Trillions of dollars flow through the global economic system every day and intermediaries in the finance sector take a cut on every dollar, euro and yen. But financial technology – “fintech ? – is fast-changing how the system works. Philip Coggan of The Economist explores how the coming technical revolution in finance will create new winners and losers – and perhaps a rebalancing of global financial power.

Producer: Ben Carter

(Photo: Tech Globe on hand. Credit: Shutterstock)

How the coming technical revolution in finance will create new winners and losers

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

03Finance2017032320170326 (WS)

Trillions of dollars flow through the global economic system every day and intermediaries in the finance sector take a cut on every dollar, euro and yen. But financial technology – “fintech ? – is fast-changing how the system works. Philip Coggan of The Economist explores how the coming technical revolution in finance will create new winners and losers – and perhaps a rebalancing of global financial power.

Producer: Ben Carter

(Photo: Tech Globe on hand. Credit: Shutterstock)

How the coming technical revolution in finance will create new winners and losers

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

04Resources20170329

Without the most basic resources – water, food and energy – the global economy could not function. Much of the world has grown used the ready supply of all three. But that might be changing. Demographics and climate change are likely to transform how we value and use essential resources. In this edition of Economic Tectonics, Joanna Haigh – a professor at London’s Grantham Institute at Imperial College – explores how, in her view, such changes could have profound consequences for the future economy.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Image: Map made of food, Credit: Shutterstock)

How access to critical resources might change the way our economies work

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

04Resources2017032920170402 (WS)

Without the most basic resources – water, food and energy – the global economy could not function. Much of the world has grown used the ready supply of all three. But that might be changing. Demographics and climate change are likely to transform how we value and use essential resources. In this edition of Economic Tectonics, Joanna Haigh – a professor at London’s Grantham Institute at Imperial College – explores how, in her view, such changes could have profound consequences for the future economy.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Image: Map made of food, Credit: Shutterstock)

How access to critical resources might change the way our economies work

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

05Technology20170405

The future of employment is certain to change – and change fast – as robotics and artificial intelligence replace human workers. For many, it’s a future to be feared. But the global economy has continually been revolutionised by technological innovation; innovation which has led to disruption but also further economic progress. In this edition of Economic Tectonics, Andrew McAfee from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology – and a tech optimist – explores how he thinks technology could change our economic futures for the better.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Image: Child fixing robot, Credit: Shutterstock)

How technology might change our economic futures for the better

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

05Technology2017040520170409 (WS)

The future of employment is certain to change – and change fast – as robotics and artificial intelligence replace human workers. For many, it’s a future to be feared. But the global economy has continually been revolutionised by technological innovation; innovation which has led to disruption but also further economic progress. In this edition of Economic Tectonics, Andrew McAfee from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology – and a tech optimist – explores how he thinks technology could change our economic futures for the better.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Image: Child fixing robot, Credit: Shutterstock)

How technology might change our economic futures for the better

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society