England's Golden Age

Episodes

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201901Oriana's Triumphs20190603

The composers of 16th-century England flourished under the rule of Elizabeth I, rapidly developing a diverse musical culture unparalleled anywhere on the continent, a truly Golden Age for English music. In this week of programmes Donald Macleod explores six composers who were key to this ascent - Thomas Morley, John Bull, Peter Philips, Thomas Weelkes, Orlando Gibbons and Thomas Tomkins. These composers were all active at around the same time as the “Father of British Musick” William Byrd and John Dowland, and all either studied or worked with Byrd, but they don’t often receive the same attention as those more famous names. In Monday’s programme, Donald explores the circumstances which allowed the six composers to flourish under Elizabeth I's rule.

Morley: It was a Lover and his lass
Ian Bostridge, tenor
Elizabeth Kenny, lute

Tomkins: Fantasia a 6 no. 18
Phantasm

Tomkins: Too Much I Once Lamented (for Byrd)
Le Cris de Paris
Geoffroy Jourdain, director

Bull: Chromatic Pavan and Galliard MB 87a/b
Sophie Yates, virginals

Philips: Hodie beata Virgo Maria; Surgens Jesus; Ave Verum Corpus (Cantiones Sacrae 1612, Vol I)
Choir of Trinity College, Cambridge
Richard Marlow, conductor

Gibbons: Prelude in D minor
Laurence Cummings, organ

Gibbons: See, See the World is Incarnate
Robin Blaze, countertenor
Oxford Camerata
Laurence Cummings, organ
Jeremy Summerly, conductor

Weelkes: As Vesta was from Latmos Hill Descending
I Fagiolini
Robert Hollingworth, conductor

Morley: Hard by a Crystal Fountain
I Fagiolini
Robert Hollingworth, conductor

Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

Exploring the conditions which led to music flourishing under Elizabeth I's rule.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201902The Italian Influence20190604

The composers of 16th-century England flourished under the rule of Elizabeth I, rapidly developing a diverse musical culture unparalleled anywhere on the continent, a truly Golden Age for English music. In this week of programmes Donald Macleod explores six composers who were key to this ascent - Thomas Morley, John Bull, Peter Philips, Thomas Weelkes, Orlando Gibbons and Thomas Tomkins. These composers were all active at around the same time as the “Father of British Musick” William Byrd and John Dowland, and all either studied or worked with Byrd, but they don’t often receive the same attention as those more famous names. One of the major factors in this English explosion of cultural maturity was the influence of the Italian renaissance. In Tuesday’s programme, Donald examines the impact of Italy on England’s Golden Age and the role of Thomas Morley and his monopoly of printing in the promotion of Italianate styles.

Alfonso Ferrabosco the Elder: Questi ch'indizio fan del mio tormento (Madrigal from Musica transalpina I, 1588)
La Compagnia del Madrigale

Morley: Now is the month of maying; Sing we and chant it; On a fair morning
Madrigal;
The King’s Singers
Robert Spencer, lute

Morley: Canzonets or Litle Short Aers to Five and Six Voices: No. 12 Cruel, Wilt Thou Persever
King’s Singers

Morley/Philips: Pavan & Galliard (arr. Philips based on Morley’s originals)
Rose Consort of Viols

Philips: Lasso, non e morir
Cappella Mediterranea
Leonardo Garcia Alarcon, director

Philips: Amarilli (after G. Caccini)
Christopher Hogwood, virginals

Philips: Gaude Maria virgo
Stile Antico

Weelkes: O Care Thou Wilt Dispatch Me (Parts 1 and 2)
Hilliard Ensemble
Paul Hillier, conductor

Weelkes: Come, Sirrah Jack, ho!
The King’s Singers

Weelkes: Thule, the period of cosmology – The Andalusian merchant
The Queen's Six

Gibbons: The Silver Swan (c.1611)
The Sixteen
Harry Christophers, conductor

Tomkins: Oft did I marle (c.1622)
I Fagiolini
Robert Hollingworth, conductor

Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod examines the impact of Italy on England's Golden Age.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201903Composers In Exile20190605

The composers of 16th-century England flourished under the rule of Elizabeth I, rapidly developing a diverse musical culture unparalleled anywhere on the continent, a truly Golden Age for English music. In this week of programmes Donald Macleod explores six composers who were key to this ascent - Thomas Morley, John Bull, Peter Philips, Thomas Weelkes, Orlando Gibbons and Thomas Tomkins. These composers were all active at around the same time as the “Father of British Musick” William Byrd and John Dowland, and all either studied or worked with Byrd, but they don’t often receive the same attention as those more famous names. In Wednesday’s programme, Donald explores the lives of the composers who lived and worked in exile during this period including Peter Philips – after Byrd the most published English composer of the age.

Philips: Salve Regina
Capella Mediteranea
Leonardo Garcia Alarcon, conductor

Philips: Pavan & Galliard in memory of Lord Paget
Rose Consort of Viols

Morley: Magnificat and Nunc Dimitis from First Service
Bristol Cathedral Choir
Ian Ball, organ
Christopher Brayne, conductor

Bull: Pavan No 2 (from Parthenia)
Catalina Vicens, double virginal

Bull: Almighty God, Which by the leading of a Star
Studio de Musique Ancienne de Montréal
Christopher Jackson, conductor

Bull: Fantasia on a fugue of Sweelinck
Robin Walker, organ

Philips: Pavan and Galliard Dolorosa
Ton Koopman, harpsichord

Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores the composers who lived in exile during England's Golden Age

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201904James I's Chapel Royal And The Short Life Of Orlando Gibbons20190606

The composers of 16th-century England flourished under the rule of Elizabeth I, rapidly developing a diverse musical culture unparalleled anywhere on the continent, a truly Golden Age for English music. In this week of programmes Donald Macleod explores six composers who were key to this ascent - Thomas Morley, John Bull, Peter Philips, Thomas Weelkes, Orlando Gibbons and Thomas Tomkins. These composers were all active at around the same time as the “Father of British Musick” William Byrd and John Dowland, and all either studied or worked with Byrd, but they don’t often receive the same attention as those more famous names. The Chapel Royal played an important role in musical life under James I. In Thursday’s programme, Donald explores the Chapel Royal and the increasing importance of Orlando Gibbons in James I’s court.

Bull: Coranto - Alarm
The Canadian Brass

Weelkes: O Lord, Grand the King a Long Life
The Choir of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge
Fretwork
David Skinner, conductor

Gibbons: Fantasia No 5 in G minor
Robert Wooley, organ

Gibbons: O Clap your hands
The Clerkes of Oxenford
David Wulstan, conductor

Gibbons: Lord Salisbury’s Pavan and Galliard from Parthenia
Alina Rotaru, virginals

Bull: Pavan & Galliard “St Thomas Wake”
Alina Rotaru, virginals

Gibbons: Nay Let me weep (Part 1)
The Consort of Musicke
Anthony Rooley, conductor

Tomkins: Know You Not
The Sixteen
Harry Christophers, conductor

Gibbons: O Lord in thy Wrath, Rebuke me Not
Oxford Camerata
Jeremy Summerly, conductor

Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores the Chapel Royal under James I.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201905 LASTThomas Tomkins - A Last Flowering Of The Golden Age20190607

The composers of 16th-century England flourished under the rule of Elizabeth I, rapidly developing a diverse musical culture unparalleled anywhere on the continent, a truly Golden Age for English music. In this week of programmes Donald Macleod explores six composers who were key to this ascent - Thomas Morley, John Bull, Peter Philips, Thomas Weelkes, Orlando Gibbons and Thomas Tomkins. These composers were all active at around the same time as the “Father of British Musick” William Byrd and John Dowland, and all either studied or worked with Byrd, but they don’t often receive the same attention as those more famous names. In Friday’s programme, Donald surveys the later life and work of the composers, especially Thomas Tomkins- the last surviving member of the group as England girded its loins for revolution.

Weelkes: Death hath deprived me of my dearest friend
The Queen’s Six

Tomkins: Cloris When As I Woo
The Queen’s Six

Tomkins: O Let Me Live for True Love
I Fagiolini
Robert Hollingworth, conductor

Tomkins: Be Strong and of good courage
The Sixteen
Harry Christophers, conductor

Tomkins: Offertory
Bernard Cuillier, virginals

Tomkins: Thou Art My King
Choir of Magdalen College, Oxford
Phantasm
Daniel Hyde, conductor

Tomkins: Pavan “for these distracted times”
Guy Penson, virginals

Tomkins: The Lady Folliot’s Galliard
Edward Parmentier, harpsichord

Tomkins: Burial Sentences
Vox Luminis

Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod surveys the later life of the last surviving composer of the Golden Age.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.