Essential, The [world Service]

Episodes

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20141117

Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing.

20141120

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

20141126

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

20141127

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

20141204

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

20141210

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

20150107

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

20160119

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

#Yamecanse in Mexico20141208

Outcry over 43 missing students taken by Mexican police

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Mexico

An online campaign around the hasthag #Yamecanse has been expressing the sentiment - “I have had enough.” Videos, messages and photos have been voicing frustration with authorities over the country’s problem with corruption, crime and the drug cartels. The campaign was a reaction to the disappearance of 43 students after clashing with police. It has been 10 weeks since the students went missing, but the campaign has broadened out to a general protest against the state of the country. It is aimed not just at those in Mexico, but also calls on the international community to take action.

(Photo: People hold posters during a march demanding justice in the case of the 43 missing students. Credit to: YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

\u2018Ayatollah Genitals\u2019: mocking Iran\u2019s religious leaders.20150209

Who would mock Iran\u2019s religious leaders? We meet the Persian parody account.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

\u201cFrom today I want to live and be known as a boy\u201d: the trending videos of transgender children20150302

Is it ok to share stories of young transgender children online?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Transgender Children
Social media is for sharing. Sharing news, stories, even what you’re eating. But is it ok to share personal details about your kids? BBC Trending asks whether its right for parents to post videos about young transgender children who want to live and be known as a different gender from the one they were born as. Whilst parents are eager to share their family’s story with friends online, what are the implications if those stories are viewed millions of times across the world? BBC Trending speaks to the mother of a young child who wants to live as a girl, and finds out what the transgender community makes of these videos.

(Photo: Colorful paper notes with gender symbols. Credit: Shutterstock)

11/10/2016 Gmt20161011

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

11/10/2016 Gmt20161011

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

19/01/2016 Gmt20160119
19/01/2016 GMT20160119

19/01/2016 GMT20160119

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

25/10/2016 Gmt20161025
25/10/2016 Gmt20161025

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

27/09/2016 Gmt20160927
27/09/2016 Gmt20160927

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Africa\u2019s answer to Band Aid20141124

Africa\u2019s answer to Band Aid and a fight for Justice in India

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

This week we find out about Africa’s own song to highlight Ebola. Bob Geldof brought together artists to re-record Band Aid to raise awareness and money to fight Ebola in West Africa. But it is not the only song. BBC Trending takes a look at other other songs by West African artists.

One of the biggest songs right now is Africa Stop Ebola, which famous West African artists including Tiken Jah Fakoly, Amadou & Mariam, Salif Keita, Oumou Sangare and others.

While in Guinea,'Un Geste Pour La Vie contre Ebola’ produced by Meurs Libre Production is popular.

BBC Trending20141117

Activists in Libya have been receiving threats online from people who do not like their views. Some have even been assassinated. The killing of 18-year-old prominent activist Tawfik Bensaud two months ago provoked anger online and there was an outpouring of support using the hashtag #IamTawfik. But more recently many activists have kept a low profile online after they were directly threatened on a number of Facebook pages.

Presenter Mukul Devichand speaks to Tawfik Bensaud’s cousin Huda El Khoja, and to one of the founders of Libyan Youth Movement on Facebook, Ayat Mneina. He is joined in the studio by Mohamed Madi of BBC World Online

Bbc Trending20141117

Activists in Libya have been receiving threats online from people who do not like their views. Some have even been assassinated. The killing of 18-year-old prominent activist Tawfik Bensaud two months ago provoked anger online and there was an outpouring of support using the hashtag #IamTawfik. But more recently many activists have kept a low profile online after they were directly threatened on a number of Facebook pages.

Presenter Mukul Devichand speaks to Tawfik Bensaud’s cousin Huda El Khoja, and to one of the founders of Libyan Youth Movement on Facebook, Ayat Mneina. He is joined in the studio by Mohamed Madi of BBC World Online

BBC Trending20141117

Explaining the stories the world is sharing.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Activists in Libya have been receiving threats online from people who do not like their views. Some have even been assassinated. The killing of 18-year-old prominent activist Tawfik Bensaud two months ago provoked anger online and there was an outpouring of support using the hashtag #IamTawfik. But more recently many activists have kept a low profile online after they were directly threatened on a number of Facebook pages.

Presenter Mukul Devichand speaks to Tawfik Bensaud’s cousin Huda El Khoja, and to one of the founders of Libyan Youth Movement on Facebook, Ayat Mneina. He is joined in the studio by Mohamed Madi of BBC World Online

BBC Trending - #Black Lives Matter20150413

After killing of Walter Scott we speak to the co-creator of the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In the US a video emerged last week of a white police officer in South Carolina shooting, and killing, a black man who was running away from him. The hashtag #BlackLivesMatter once again trended online and was used to highlight the issue of controversial black killings by US Police. Twitter users tell us their response to the killing of Walter Scott and BBC Trending speaks to co-creator of the hashtag, Opal Tometti who tells us why she felt compelled to create it. And we ask whether the global adaptation and appropriation of the hashtag has diluted its original message.

BBC Trending: Online Rape Stories \u2013 Truth or Fiction?20160118

Believing or blaming the victim - two rape stories test fiction and reality in SA.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

On this week’s programme,

Two stories about rape in South Africa; one about a woman who posted about her experience on Instagram to find people didn’t believe her and another which gripped the nation but was totally made up.

Presented by Anne-Marie Tomchak @AMTomchak - with Nkem Ifejika @Nkemifejika and Emma Wilson @EmmaWilson1.

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

Image credit: Shutterstock

BBC Trending: Online Rape Stories – Truth or Fiction?20160118

BBC Trending: Online Rape Stories – Truth or Fiction?20160118

On this week’s programme,

Two stories about rape in South Africa; one about a woman who posted about her experience on Instagram to find people didn’t believe her and another which gripped the nation but was totally made up.

Presented by Anne-Marie Tomchak @AMTomchak - with Nkem Ifejika @Nkemifejika and Emma Wilson @EmmaWilson1.

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

Image credit: Shutterstock

Bbc Trending: Online Rape Stories € Truth Or Fiction?20160118

On this week’s programme,

Two stories about rape in South Africa; one about a woman who posted about her experience on Instagram to find people didn’t believe her and another which gripped the nation but was totally made up.

Presented by Anne-Marie Tomchak @AMTomchak - with Nkem Ifejika @Nkemifejika and Emma Wilson @EmmaWilson1.

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

Image credit: Shutterstock

BBC Trending: A Proposal To Cull Stray Dogs in Kerala Leads to Online Campaign20150810

How stray dogs are leading to a boycott Kerala campaign

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Vikas Panday from BBC Monitoring tells The Trending team how a threat to cull stray dogs has led activists to call for a boycott of the State of Kerala in India. We speak to activists and ask will this damage the state’s vital tourism industry?

(Photo: Two dogs, one biting a lead. Credit: Getty Images)

BBC Trending: Are British Muslim Women \u2018Traditionally Submissive\u2019?20160201

Muslim women tweet using #traditionallysubmissive to prove how they are anything but

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

BBC Trending: Are British Muslim Women ‘Traditionally Submissive’?20160201

BBC Trending: Are British Muslim Women ‘Traditionally Submissive’?20160201

Are British Muslim women ‘traditionally submissive?’ Women respond with #traditionallysubmissive online following reported comments by the British prime minister. BBC Trending speaks to Shelina Janmohamed who started the hashtag.

(Photo: Shelina Janmohamed, courstesy of S. Janmohamed)

Bbc Trending: Are British Muslim Women €traditionally Submissive’?20160201

Are British Muslim women ‘traditionally submissive?’ Women respond with #traditionallysubmissive online following reported comments by the British prime minister. BBC Trending speaks to Shelina Janmohamed who started the hashtag.

(Photo: Shelina Janmohamed, courstesy of S. Janmohamed)

BBC Trending: Bangladesh\u2019s Murdered Bloggers20150803

Why were three bloggers murdered in Bangladesh?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

This year three atheist bloggers in Bangladesh were brutally attacked and murdered - seemingly for challenging religious belief. The suspects are Islamic extremists. It comes after a polarised online debate between secular and atheist bloggers, and Islamists.

This week, BBC Trending is on location in the capital Dhaka, meeting bloggers living in fear and discussing what is happening with a special panel.

(Photo Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

BBC Trending: Being \u2018Black on Campus\u201920151116

Students share their experience of being \u2018Black on Campus\u2019.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Black students protesting against racism in Missouri have attracted global attention all week. The head of the university has resigned. But there are now signs that the online campaign has spread to other campuses across the United States as students share their experiences of being ‘Black on Campus.’

(Image: Mizzou Legacy Circle, Image Credit: Michael B. Thomas / Getty)

BBC Trending: Being ‘Black on Campus’20151116

BBC Trending: Being ‘Black on Campus’20151116

Black students protesting against racism in Missouri have attracted global attention all week. The head of the university has resigned. But there are now signs that the online campaign has spread to other campuses across the United States as students share their experiences of being ‘Black on Campus.’

(Image: Mizzou Legacy Circle, Image Credit: Michael B. Thomas / Getty)

Bbc Trending: Being €black On Campus’20151116

Black students protesting against racism in Missouri have attracted global attention all week. The head of the university has resigned. But there are now signs that the online campaign has spread to other campuses across the United States as students share their experiences of being ‘Black on Campus.’

(Image: Mizzou Legacy Circle, Image Credit: Michael B. Thomas / Getty)

BBC Trending: Being White In Taiwan20151123

BBC Trending: Being White In Taiwan20151123

Smartphone footage of an Englishman being racially abused in Taiwan has been viewed more than two million times on YouTube. We ask what the video tells us about Taiwanese culture, and how ‘foreigners’ – and Westerners in particular – are perceived in the country.

(Photo: A Taiwanese man who racially abuses an Englishman. Credit: DreamLucid/YouTube)

Bbc Trending: Being White In Taiwan20151123

Smartphone footage of an Englishman being racially abused in Taiwan has been viewed more than two million times on YouTube. We ask what the video tells us about Taiwanese culture, and how ‘foreigners’ – and Westerners in particular – are perceived in the country.

(Photo: A Taiwanese man who racially abuses an Englishman. Credit: DreamLucid/YouTube)

BBC Trending: Being White In Taiwan20151123

What does a video of an Englishman being racially abused tell us about life in Taiwan?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Smartphone footage of an Englishman being racially abused in Taiwan has been viewed more than two million times on YouTube. We ask what the video tells us about Taiwanese culture, and how ‘foreigners’ – and Westerners in particular – are perceived in the country.

(Photo: A Taiwanese man who racially abuses an Englishman. Credit: DreamLucid/YouTube)

BBC Trending: Blessers\u2019 - South Africa\u2019s Sugar Daddy Problem20160523

The online backlash against relationships based on money and gifts

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In South Africa a 'blesser' is a man who showers gifts and money on women in exchange for a relationship or sex. An online backlash against these sugar daddies has been trending this week. Even the health minister has spoken out because of fears the blesser phenomenon is contributing to high rates of HIV among young women.

(Photo: Wine and roses. Credit: iStock)

BBC Trending: Blessers’ - South Africa’s Sugar Daddy Problem20160523

BBC Trending: Blessers’ - South Africa’s Sugar Daddy Problem20160523

In South Africa a 'blesser' is a man who showers gifts and money on women in exchange for a relationship or sex. An online backlash against these sugar daddies has been trending this week. Even the health minister has spoken out because of fears the blesser phenomenon is contributing to high rates of HIV among young women.

(Photo: Wine and roses. Credit: iStock)

Bbc Trending: Blessers’ - South Africa’s Sugar Daddy Problem20160523

In South Africa a 'blesser' is a man who showers gifts and money on women in exchange for a relationship or sex. An online backlash against these sugar daddies has been trending this week. Even the health minister has spoken out because of fears the blesser phenomenon is contributing to high rates of HIV among young women.

(Photo: Wine and roses. Credit: iStock)

BBC Trending: Body Image Trends20160104

BBC Trending: Body Image Trends20160104

Anne-Marie Tomchak discusses with Mukul Devichand the body image trends that got people talking in 2015.

(Image Credit: Ajay Rochester / Stefania Ferrario, YouTube)

Bbc Trending: Body Image Trends20160104

Anne-Marie Tomchak discusses with Mukul Devichand the body image trends that got people talking in 2015.

(Image Credit: Ajay Rochester / Stefania Ferrario, YouTube)

BBC Trending: Body Image Trends20160104

The social media conversations challenging how our bodies are perceived.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

BBC Trending: Calling Out the Trolls20151207

BBC Trending: Calling Out the Trolls20151207

A man has been fired after being called out for posting misogynistic abuse on Facebook.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

BBC Trending: Calling Out the Trolls20151207

Meet Clementine Ford, the Australian columnist who was bombarded by misogynistic abuse on Facebook. She reported one of her trolls to his employer, and it cost him his job.

Produced by Sam Judah.

(Image Credit: Shutterstock)

Bbc Trending: Calling Out The Trolls20151207

Meet Clementine Ford, the Australian columnist who was bombarded by misogynistic abuse on Facebook. She reported one of her trolls to his employer, and it cost him his job.

Produced by Sam Judah.

(Image Credit: Shutterstock)

BBC Trending: Can Rap be Halal?20150629

Deen Squad are two new Muslim rap stars who claim their music is halal

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Bbc Trending: Can Rap Incite Crime?20161003

Controversy has erupted in the US over a hip hop song that offers a step-by-step guide to committing burglary and contains lyrics suggesting criminals target Chinese homes. We talk to one of the protestors who is trying to get the track banned.

(Photo: Rapper YG attends the 10th Annual BMI Urban Awards. Credit: David Livingston/Getty Images)

BBC Trending: Can Rap Incite Crime?20161003

Controversy has erupted over a rap song that suggests burglars target Chinese homes.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Controversy has erupted in the US over a hip hop song that offers a step-by-step guide to committing burglary and contains lyrics suggesting criminals target Chinese homes. We talk to one of the protestors who is trying to get the track banned.

(Photo: Rapper YG attends the 10th Annual BMI Urban Awards. Credit: David Livingston/Getty Images)

BBC Trending: Can You Ever Stop a Meme?20160215

BBC Trending: Can You Ever Stop a Meme?20160215

Texan mother succeeds in having a cruel meme which mocked her son removed.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

What would you do if you saw a cruel meme mocking your son?

Alice-Ann Meyer decided to act when this happened to her son. Jameson is four years old and has Pfeiffer Syndrome which can affect cranial and facial features. A meme was created using his picture, comparing him to a dog.

Alice-Ann speaks to BBC Trending about how she successfully removed the meme with an army of fellow parents.

Image: Jameson with birthday cake
Image credit: Jameson's Journey

BBC Trending: Can You Ever Stop a Meme?20160215

What would you do if you saw a cruel meme mocking your son?

Alice-Ann Meyer decided to act when this happened to her son. Jameson is four years old and has Pfeiffer Syndrome which can affect cranial and facial features. A meme was created using his picture, comparing him to a dog.

Alice-Ann speaks to BBC Trending about how she successfully removed the meme with an army of fellow parents.

Image: Jameson with birthday cake

Image credit: Jameson's Journey

Bbc Trending: Can You Ever Stop A Meme?20160215

What would you do if you saw a cruel meme mocking your son?

Alice-Ann Meyer decided to act when this happened to her son. Jameson is four years old and has Pfeiffer Syndrome which can affect cranial and facial features. A meme was created using his picture, comparing him to a dog.

Alice-Ann speaks to BBC Trending about how she successfully removed the meme with an army of fellow parents.

Image: Jameson with birthday cake

Image credit: Jameson's Journey

BBC Trending: Cash For Catastrophes?20160829

BBC Trending: Cash For Catastrophes?20160829

Meet Kim O’Connor, the woman who filmed a boy fall into a gorilla enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo – moments before the animal was shot dead. Kim had no intention of making a profit at the time, but three months later she has made tens of thousands of dollars by licensing the clip to a specialist agency.

We delve into the world of viral video trading, speaking to the people who acquire and sell viral footage – some of it entertaining, some of it tragic – as well as the news organisations (the BBC included) that buy it.

Produced by Sam Judah.

Photo caption: Aftermath of the Shoreham Airshow Crash / Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid, Getty.

Bbc Trending: Cash For Catastrophes?20160829

Meet Kim O’Connor, the woman who filmed a boy fall into a gorilla enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo – moments before the animal was shot dead. Kim had no intention of making a profit at the time, but three months later she has made tens of thousands of dollars by licensing the clip to a specialist agency.

We delve into the world of viral video trading, speaking to the people who acquire and sell viral footage – some of it entertaining, some of it tragic – as well as the news organisations (the BBC included) that buy it.

Produced by Sam Judah.

Photo caption: Aftermath of the Shoreham Airshow Crash / Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid, Getty.

BBC Trending: Cash For Catastrophes?20160829

Meet the people who buy and sell viral videos of news events for thousands of dollars.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Meet Kim O’Connor, the woman who filmed a boy fall into a gorilla enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo – moments before the animal was shot dead. Kim had no intention of making a profit at the time, but three months later she has made tens of thousands of dollars by licensing the clip to a specialist agency.

We delve into the world of viral video trading, speaking to the people who acquire and sell viral footage – some of it entertaining, some of it tragic – as well as the news organisations (the BBC included) that buy it.

Produced by Sam Judah.

Photo caption: Aftermath of the Shoreham Airshow Crash / Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid, Getty.

BBC Trending: Cash For Catastrophes?20161010

Meet the people who buy and sell viral videos of news events for thousands of dollars.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Meet Kim O’Connor, the woman who filmed a boy fall into a gorilla enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo – moments before the animal was shot dead. Kim had no intention of making a profit at the time, but three months later she has made tens of thousands of dollars by licensing the clip to a specialist agency.

We delve into the world of viral video trading, speaking to the people who acquire and sell viral footage – some of it entertaining, some of it tragic – as well as the news organisations (the BBC included) that buy it.

Produced by Sam Judah.

Image caption: The aftermath of the Shoreham Airshow crash / Image credit: Getty Images

BBC Trending: China\u2019s Online Search For Stolen Children20160125

Chinese parents turn to social media and the web to hunt for abducted children

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

An image of a three-year-old girl being abducted has flooded social media in China. The girl has now been found, but the search sheds light on the country's huge digital campaigns trying to return tens of thousands of missing children to their parents.

Presented by Chris Foxx @thisisFoxx with Kerry Allen @kerrya11en, Anisa Subedar @OnlyAnisa and Nooshin Soluch.

(Photo: CCTV of child. Credit: Huaxi Metropolis Daily)

BBC Trending: China\u2019s Rush For Divorce.20160905

Happy couples in Shanghai are getting divorced to buy homes more cheaply.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

BBC Trending: China\u2019s Tampon Taboo20160822

Swimmer Fu Yuanhui got China talking by saying her performance was affected by her period

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

It’s not every day that you hear someone talking about their menstrual cycle live on TV. And it’s even more rare if that person is an Olympic athlete from China. But that’s what happened this week when swimmer Fu Yuanhui, admitted she wasn’t at her best because of period pains. It’s opened up a whole new conversation about tampons in China - a country where some have never even heard of them.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Sam Judah

Photo: Swimmer Fu Yuanhui / Photo credit: Gabriel Buoys / Getty

BBC Trending: China’s Online Search For Stolen Children20160125

BBC Trending: China’s Online Search For Stolen Children20160125

An image of a three-year-old girl being abducted has flooded social media in China. The girl has now been found, but the search sheds light on the country's huge digital campaigns trying to return tens of thousands of missing children to their parents.

Presented by Chris Foxx @thisisFoxx with Kerry Allen @kerrya11en, Anisa Subedar @OnlyAnisa and Nooshin Soluch.

(Photo: CCTV of child. Credit: Huaxi Metropolis Daily)

Bbc Trending: China’s Online Search For Stolen Children20160125

An image of a three-year-old girl being abducted has flooded social media in China. The girl has now been found, but the search sheds light on the country's huge digital campaigns trying to return tens of thousands of missing children to their parents.

Presented by Chris Foxx @thisisFoxx with Kerry Allen @kerrya11en, Anisa Subedar @OnlyAnisa and Nooshin Soluch.

(Photo: CCTV of child. Credit: Huaxi Metropolis Daily)

BBC Trending: China’s Rush For Divorce.20160905

BBC Trending: China’s Rush For Divorce.20160905

Happy couples in Shanghai have been rushing to divorce because of rumours of rules change that would make it more expensive for them to buy property.

(Photo Credit to Think Stock)

Bbc Trending: China’s Rush For Divorce.20160905

Happy couples in Shanghai have been rushing to divorce because of rumours of rules change that would make it more expensive for them to buy property.

(Photo Credit to Think Stock)

BBC Trending: China’s Tampon Taboo20160822

BBC Trending: China’s Tampon Taboo20160822

It’s not every day that you hear someone talking about their menstrual cycle live on TV. And it’s even more rare if that person is an Olympic athlete from China. But that’s what happened this week when swimmer Fu Yuanhui, admitted she wasn’t at her best because of period pains. It’s opened up a whole new conversation about tampons in China - a country where some have never even heard of them.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Sam Judah

Photo: Swimmer Fu Yuanhui / Photo credit: Gabriel Buoys / Getty

Bbc Trending: China’s Tampon Taboo20160822

It’s not every day that you hear someone talking about their menstrual cycle live on TV. And it’s even more rare if that person is an Olympic athlete from China. But that’s what happened this week when swimmer Fu Yuanhui, admitted she wasn’t at her best because of period pains. It’s opened up a whole new conversation about tampons in China - a country where some have never even heard of them.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Sam Judah

Photo: Swimmer Fu Yuanhui / Photo credit: Gabriel Buoys / Getty

BBC Trending: Defending the #A4waist Challenge20160328

BBC Trending: Defending the #A4waist Challenge20160328

One woman defends the #A4waist challenge and responds to critics who call it \u2018unhealthy\u2019.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Some Chinese women have been defending the #A4waist challenge, the latest social media craze where women compare the size of their waists to an A4 piece of paper.

Ruan is a 20 year old student living in Canada who took part in the challenge.

She explains why she did and responds to the critics who say it’s ‘unhealthy’.

Photo credit: Yuzhu Ruan Instagram @ryz.jr

BBC Trending: Defending the #A4waist Challenge20160328

Some Chinese women have been defending the #A4waist challenge, the latest social media craze where women compare the size of their waists to an A4 piece of paper.

Ruan is a 20 year old student living in Canada who took part in the challenge.

She explains why she did and responds to the critics who say it’s ‘unhealthy’.

Photo credit: Yuzhu Ruan Instagram @ryz.jr

Bbc Trending: Defending The #a4waist Challenge20160328

Some Chinese women have been defending the #A4waist challenge, the latest social media craze where women compare the size of their waists to an A4 piece of paper.

Ruan is a 20 year old student living in Canada who took part in the challenge.

She explains why she did and responds to the critics who say it’s ‘unhealthy’.

Photo credit: Yuzhu Ruan Instagram @ryz.jr

BBC Trending: Dinkan the Cartoon Mouse God20160411

BBC Trending: Dinkan the Cartoon Mouse God20160411

Dinkoism is an Indian religion whose followers worship a cartoon mouse with superpowers. More than 40,000 people like the group’s worldwide Facebook pages and this month they’re even marching to try and become recognised as a religious minority. But Dinkoism was really set up by atheists in the state of Kerala to parody organised religions and many people have found it offensive.

BBC Trending’s Kate Lamble talks to Anne-Marie Tomchak about the rise of Dinkan.

Produced by Anisa Subedar.

Photo credit: jith.in

Bbc Trending: Dinkan The Cartoon Mouse God20160411

Dinkoism is an Indian religion whose followers worship a cartoon mouse with superpowers. More than 40,000 people like the group’s worldwide Facebook pages and this month they’re even marching to try and become recognised as a religious minority. But Dinkoism was really set up by atheists in the state of Kerala to parody organised religions and many people have found it offensive.

BBC Trending’s Kate Lamble talks to Anne-Marie Tomchak about the rise of Dinkan.

Produced by Anisa Subedar.

Photo credit: jith.in

BBC Trending: Dinkan the Cartoon Mouse God20160411

How Indian atheists have created a new mouse worshipping religion.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Dinkoism is an Indian religion whose followers worship a cartoon mouse with superpowers. More than 40,000 people like the group’s worldwide Facebook pages and this month they’re even marching to try and become recognised as a religious minority. But Dinkoism was really set up by atheists in the state of Kerala to parody organised religions and many people have found it offensive.

BBC Trending’s Kate Lamble talks to Anne-Marie Tomchak about the rise of Dinkan.

Produced by Anisa Subedar.

Photo credit: jith.in

Bbc Trending: Disabled 'promposals'20160509

‘Promposals’ (that’s prom proposals for most of us) have been sweeping the internet recently. But some of the videos that have gained the most attention are those of students asking their disabled friends to the high school dance. They’ve gained a mixed reaction online, so is this recent trend inspirational or insulting to disabled people?

Produced by Emma Wilson

Photo credit: Amy Wright

BBC Trending: Disabled 'Promposals'20160509

Viral videos of disabled students being asked to prom - inspirational or insulting?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

‘Promposals’ (that’s prom proposals for most of us) have been sweeping the internet recently. But some of the videos that have gained the most attention are those of students asking their disabled friends to the high school dance. They’ve gained a mixed reaction online, so is this recent trend inspirational or insulting to disabled people?

Produced by Emma Wilson

Photo credit: Amy Wright

BBC Trending: Do Men Need \u2018Consent Lessons\u2019?20151026

Meet George Lawlor, the man who caused an uproar online when he said he didn\u2019t need them.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

We meet the man who caused an uproar online when he said he didn’t need ‘consent lessons’. The classes are on offer in a number of British universities to tackle both rape and sexual assault. We speak to the woman who designed one of the courses, and says they are absolutely necessary.

(Photo Credit: George Lawlor)

BBC Trending: Do Men Need ‘Consent Lessons’?20151026

BBC Trending: Do Men Need ‘Consent Lessons’?20151026

We meet the man who caused an uproar online when he said he didn’t need ‘consent lessons’. The classes are on offer in a number of British universities to tackle both rape and sexual assault. We speak to the woman who designed one of the courses, and says they are absolutely necessary.

(Photo Credit: George Lawlor)

Bbc Trending: Do Men Need €consent Lessons’?20151026

We meet the man who caused an uproar online when he said he didn’t need ‘consent lessons’. The classes are on offer in a number of British universities to tackle both rape and sexual assault. We speak to the woman who designed one of the courses, and says they are absolutely necessary.

(Photo Credit: George Lawlor)

BBC Trending: Does Airbnb Have a Race Problem?20160516

BBC Trending: Does Airbnb Have a Race Problem?20160516

The hashtag #Airbnbwhileblack has been trending after African American twitter users accused some homeowners on the room booking website of rejecting them because of their skin colour. Greg Selden from Virginia says when he used fake white profiles he was accepted at properties who had previously said the room was unavailable.

(Photo: A man opens the door to an African woman. Credit: Airbnb publicity video)

Bbc Trending: Does Airbnb Have A Race Problem?20160516

The hashtag #Airbnbwhileblack has been trending after African American twitter users accused some homeowners on the room booking website of rejecting them because of their skin colour. Greg Selden from Virginia says when he used fake white profiles he was accepted at properties who had previously said the room was unavailable.

(Photo: A man opens the door to an African woman. Credit: Airbnb publicity video)

BBC Trending: Does Airbnb Have a Race Problem?20160516

Twitter users have accused some hosts of rejecting their bookings because they are black

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The hashtag #Airbnbwhileblack has been trending after African American twitter users accused some homeowners on the room booking website of rejecting them because of their skin colour. Greg Selden from Virginia says when he used fake white profiles he was accepted at properties who had previously said the room was unavailable.

(Photo: A man opens the door to an African woman. Credit: Airbnb publicity video)

BBC Trending: Does College \u2018Party\u2019 App Yeti Encourage Criminal Behaviour?20151214

An alleged sexual assault has emerged on the Yeti app. But what is it, how does it work?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

An alleged sexual assault has surfaced through the controversial social network Yeti – Campus Stories, also dubbed a college ‘party’ app. How does it work, and why are so many students using it to upload illicit material?

Produced by Sam Judah.

Image: Students on bench / Image credit: Shutterstock)

BBC Trending: Does College ‘Party’ App Yeti Encourage Criminal Behaviour?20151214

BBC Trending: Does College ‘Party’ App Yeti Encourage Criminal Behaviour?20151214

An alleged sexual assault has surfaced through the controversial social network Yeti – Campus Stories, also dubbed a college ‘party’ app. How does it work, and why are so many students using it to upload illicit material?

Produced by Sam Judah.

Image: Students on bench / Image credit: Shutterstock)

Bbc Trending: Does College €party’ App Yeti Encourage Criminal Behaviour?20151214

An alleged sexual assault has surfaced through the controversial social network Yeti – Campus Stories, also dubbed a college ‘party’ app. How does it work, and why are so many students using it to upload illicit material?

Produced by Sam Judah.

Image: Students on bench / Image credit: Shutterstock)

BBC Trending: 'Don\u2019t Buy Death'20160502

The hashtag trying to stop young Somalis from migrating abroad.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Somalis have been using a hashtag to try and persuade young people to not to take the dangerous journey to Europe. #DhimashoHaGadan which translates as “Don’t buy death”, aims to counteract the positive pictures many emigrates post to social media, even though their new lives may not be as good as they seem.

Photo credit: Will Ross / BBC

BBC Trending: Don\u2019t Punch Me! It\u2019s A Prank20150824

BBC Trending explores viral comedy pranks at the Edinburgh Festival.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Over the past year online pranks have continued to spiral and go viral. Pranksters like Vitaly, Joey Salads, FouseyTube and Prank vs Prank get billions of views but some of the videos have been pushing the boundaries and causing controversy. Punches have been pulled, slaps dealt out, and the authorities have stepped in. Is all fair in love, war and pranking? Or are the boundaries of funny bound to be broken?

Mukul Devichand is joined at the Edinburgh Festival by three obliging comedians; wind-up critic Nish Kumar, cheeky prank lover Kai Humphries and hoax sceptic Anna Morris

With interviews and clips from Vitaly, and the Etayyim Brothers

Produced by India Rakusen.

(Photo Credit: BBC at Edinburgh)

BBC Trending: 'Don’t Buy Death'20160502

BBC Trending: 'Don’t Buy Death'20160502

Somalis have been using a hashtag to try and persuade young people to not to take the dangerous journey to Europe. #DhimashoHaGadan which translates as “Don’t buy death?, aims to counteract the positive pictures many emigrates post to social media, even though their new lives may not be as good as they seem.

Photo credit: Will Ross / BBC

Bbc Trending: 'don’t Buy Death'20160502

Somalis have been using a hashtag to try and persuade young people to not to take the dangerous journey to Europe. #DhimashoHaGadan which translates as “Don’t buy death?, aims to counteract the positive pictures many emigrates post to social media, even though their new lives may not be as good as they seem.

Photo credit: Will Ross / BBC

BBC Trending: Don’t Punch Me! It’s A Prank20150824

BBC Trending: Don’t Punch Me! It’s A Prank20150824

Over the past year online pranks have continued to spiral and go viral. Pranksters like Vitaly, Joey Salads, FouseyTube and Prank vs Prank get billions of views but some of the videos have been pushing the boundaries and causing controversy. Punches have been pulled, slaps dealt out, and the authorities have stepped in. Is all fair in love, war and pranking? Or are the boundaries of funny bound to be broken?

Mukul Devichand is joined at the Edinburgh Festival by three obliging comedians; wind-up critic Nish Kumar, cheeky prank lover Kai Humphries and hoax sceptic Anna Morris

With interviews and clips from Vitaly, and the Etayyim Brothers

Produced by India Rakusen.

(Photo Credit: BBC at Edinburgh)

Bbc Trending: Don’t Punch Me! It’s A Prank20150824

Over the past year online pranks have continued to spiral and go viral. Pranksters like Vitaly, Joey Salads, FouseyTube and Prank vs Prank get billions of views but some of the videos have been pushing the boundaries and causing controversy. Punches have been pulled, slaps dealt out, and the authorities have stepped in. Is all fair in love, war and pranking? Or are the boundaries of funny bound to be broken?

Mukul Devichand is joined at the Edinburgh Festival by three obliging comedians; wind-up critic Nish Kumar, cheeky prank lover Kai Humphries and hoax sceptic Anna Morris

With interviews and clips from Vitaly, and the Etayyim Brothers

Produced by India Rakusen.

(Photo Credit: BBC at Edinburgh)

BBC Trending: Facebook and Marijuana20160222

Facebook removes pages that advertise and promote the use and sale of marijuana.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Mukul Devichand and Deirdre Finnerty take a look at Facebook’s decision to remove pages that advertise and promote the use and sale of recreational marijuana and hear from one company whose page was taken down. The sale of marijuana is legal in four states in America; however it’s still illegal under federal law.

Produced by Emma Wilson and Anisa Subedar.

Image: Cannabis plant
Image credit: AP Photo/Jim Mone, File

Bbc Trending: Facebook And Marijuana20160222

Mukul Devichand and Deirdre Finnerty take a look at Facebook’s decision to remove pages that advertise and promote the use and sale of recreational marijuana and hear from one company whose page was taken down. The sale of marijuana is legal in four states in America; however it’s still illegal under federal law.

Produced by Emma Wilson and Anisa Subedar.

Image: Cannabis plant

Image credit: AP Photo/Jim Mone, File

Mukul Devichand and Deirdre Finnerty take a look at Facebook’s decision to remove pages that advertise and promote the use and sale of recreational marijuana and hear from one company whose page was taken down. The sale of marijuana is legal in four states in America; however it’s still illegal under federal law.

Produced by Emma Wilson and Anisa Subedar.

Image: Cannabis plant

Image credit: AP Photo/Jim Mone, File

BBC Trending: Faces of Prostitution20150406

Australian sex workers fight stigma.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The real face of prostitution?

Australian sex workers are taking selfies and putting them up on Twitter to challenge the stereotype that all prostitutes are victims.
Last week an article was published in a popular online Australian women’s magazine to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the prostitute-meets-prince-charming film Pretty Woman. Sex worker Tilly Lawless decided to post a picture of herself on her Instagram under the hashtag #facesofprostitution to object to the article, which she claimed generalised sex workers and depicted all prostitution as harmful.
And then it began: a mass movement of sex workers posting images showing their faces to the world.
This week on Trending radio we speak to Tilly Lawless and Laila Mickelwait, the author of the original blog that so many Australian sex workers objected to on social media.

BBC Trending: German YouTube star LeFloid20141201

The German celebrity vlogger Le Floid

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A German YouTube Star
In this week’s BBC Trending, Charlotte McDonald has been to Berlin to meet one of Germany’s biggest YouTube personalities, Le Floid. The 27-year-old vlogger is the man behind ‘LeNews’, a channel that takes an alternative look at current affairs in a bid to get people talking.

(Image: YouTube star LeFloid in Berlin. BBC Copyright)

BBC Trending: Hashtag of the Year - #thedress20151228

BBC Trending: Hashtag of the Year - #thedress20151228

Was discussing the colour of a dress a huge waste of time? Scientists think not.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

We revisit one of this year’s biggest talking point - #thedress. People around the world debated which colour it was - dark blue & black or white & gold.

For some, the debate suggested an existential crisis over the nature of sight and reality, which could go as far as harming interpersonal relationships. Others expressed their dismay at the triviality of the whole dispute.

Was discussing the dress a huge waste of time, or did we learn something in the process?

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

Image: Model in dress. Image credit: Roman Originals

BBC Trending: Hashtag of the Year - #thedress20151228

We revisit one of this year’s biggest talking point - #thedress. People around the world debated which colour it was - dark blue & black or white & gold.

For some, the debate suggested an existential crisis over the nature of sight and reality, which could go as far as harming interpersonal relationships. Others expressed their dismay at the triviality of the whole dispute.

Was discussing the dress a huge waste of time, or did we learn something in the process?

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

Image: Model in dress. Image credit: Roman Originals

Bbc Trending: Hashtag Of The Year - #thedress20151228

We revisit one of this year’s biggest talking point - #thedress. People around the world debated which colour it was - dark blue and black or white and gold.

For some, the debate suggested an existential crisis over the nature of sight and reality, which could go as far as harming interpersonal relationships. Others expressed their dismay at the triviality of the whole dispute.

Was discussing the dress a huge waste of time, or did we learn something in the process?

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

Image: Model in dress. Image credit: Roman Originals

BBC Trending: Hillary Clinton\u2019s \u2018Body Double\u201920160919

Meet Hillary Clinton\u2019s lookalike \u2013 the woman at the heart of a fake conspiracy.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Last week when Hillary Clinton almost collapsed at a 9/11 memorial, conspiracy theorists went into overdrive, falsely claiming the presidential candidate was using a body double to avoid questions about her health. We met the lookalike at the heart of the story.

(Photo: Teresa Barnwell dressed as Hillary Clinton. Credit: Teresa Barnwell)

Bbc Trending: Hillary Clinton’s €body Double’20160919

Last week when Hillary Clinton almost collapsed at a 9/11 memorial, conspiracy theorists went into overdrive, falsely claiming the presidential candidate was using a body double to avoid questions about her health. We met the lookalike at the heart of the story.

(Photo: Teresa Barnwell dressed as Hillary Clinton. Credit: Teresa Barnwell)

BBC Trending: How Did A Stolen Mobile Phone Trigger Violence In Malaysia?20150720

The alleged theft of a phone led to what some are calling a \u2018riot\u2019 in Kuala Lumpur.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

When two men from the ethnic Malay majority were arrested for allegedly stealing a mobile phone, it triggered what some are calling a ‘riot’ in Kuala Lumpur, fuelled by a furore on social media. Two journalists from the ethnic Chinese minority were beaten up, and a passing car with ethnically Chinese passengers was mobbed and smashed up. The Prime Minister took to Facebook in an attempt to calm the situation down.

Picture: Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak
Credit: Saeed Khan / Getty Images

BBC Trending: How effective is \u2018child-shaming\u2019 online?20150608

Meet the dad telling parents to stop \u2018shaming\u2019 their children on social media.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Why do parents ‘shame’ their children online? In the wake of a string of viral ‘shaming’ videos, we meet the dad who’s made a film of his own, telling parents to put a stop to the practice. It’s been watched more than 20 million times on Facebook.

Picture: Embarrassed child (Credit: Thinkstock)

BBC Trending: Iran\u2019s Sombre Soccer Victory20161017

How a ban on cheering led to a new way to support the Iranian football team

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

When an important football match for Iran’s national team fell on a day of public mourning, the country’s religious leaders imposed strict rules on how fans could show their support. Cheering was banned, and only religious chanting would be tolerated. In response, Iranian social media users found an innovative way to support their team.

(Photo: Fist against grey background. Credit: Shutterstock)

Bbc Trending: Iran’s Sombre Soccer Victory20161017

When an important football match for Iran’s national team fell on a day of public mourning, the country’s religious leaders imposed strict rules on how fans could show their support. Cheering was banned, and only religious chanting would be tolerated. In response, Iranian social media users found an innovative way to support their team.

(Photo: Fist against grey background. Credit: Shutterstock)

When an important football match for Iran’s national team fell on a day of public mourning, the country’s religious leaders imposed strict rules on how fans could show their support. Cheering was banned, and only religious chanting would be tolerated. In response, Iranian social media users found an innovative way to support their team.

(Photo: Fist against grey background. Credit: Shutterstock)

BBC Trending: 'Men' versus Mini-Skirts20150601

The clash of two online campaigns 'Be a man and veil your women' versus the mini-skirt

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

We hear from the campaigners who are wearing miniskirts as a protest in Tunisia, against the Facebook campaign 'Be a man and veil your women, which is spreading in the Arab world. Joining Mike Wendling in the studio Nader Ibrahim @nader_sm.

(Photo: The 2015 MTV Movie Awards arrivals. Credit: Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

BBC Trending: Nostalgia Drives \u2018Growing Up\u2019 Hashtags20150727

We explore themes of nostalgia which was at the root of the \u2018growing up\u2019 hashtags.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

We explore themes of nostalgia which was at the root of the ‘growing up’ hashtags. It began with #growingupblack which then spawned a host of copycat trends which included growing up Mexican, growing up Bengali and growing up African. We ask a comedian and a comedy writer why they thought the hashtags struck a chord with millions of people.

Joining us in the studio is comedy writer Yasmeen Khan.

(Photo Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

BBC Trending: Parodies of Islamic State20150309

Is it ok to laugh at Islamic State?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

This week a video of an Egyptian wedding went viral when the groom staged a mock Islamic State kidnapping. It was meant to surprise the guests and make people laugh at the terrorist group. Surprising, yes, but it’s not the first video of this kind to trend. As the internet fills with more and more comic parodies of Islamic State’s propaganda videos, we ask: do they dilute the danger or are they a defence against fear? We speak to Neil Durkin from Amnesty International, and Egyptian tweeter Mona El Ashry.

(Image: Facebook video of IS parody posted by Ahmed Shehata. Copyright: Ahmed Shehata)

BBC Trending: Patrolling Valentine\u2019s day in India20150216

The love letter Facebook movement opposing on the spot marriages for couples

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

It’s Valentine’s Day and love is in the air, or not if some right-wing Hindu groups in India have their way. The groups are planning to patrol social media and the streets looking for young couples in the throes of love. Their intention is to marry the couples on the spot, in an attempt to protect Indian traditions and culture.

But will they succeed? We speak to the National General Secretary of the Hindu Mahasabha – one of the groups planning to ask young couples to marry.

(Photo: Kiss of Love's Love Letter campaign graphic. Credit: Rahul Pasupalan/Kiss of Love)

BBC Trending: Sexuality and sexual harassment in China and Turkey20150223

Sexual harassment and sexuality, debates on social media in China and Turkey this week.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

On Wednesday 11th February a 20 year old Turkish woman, Ozgecan Aslan, was brutally murdered by a man who was attempting to rape her. Women – and men – showed their outrage by pouring onto the streets of Turkey’s cities, dressed in black and protesting about the rise in violence against women in their country. Many aimed their anger and frustration at the Turkish Government.

The response on social media has been equally huge and just as angry, with over 6.5 million people tweeting about Ozgecan, and Turkish women sharing their stories online about their everyday experiences of sexual harassment. We speak to the BBC’s Selin Girit about the swelling anger and a volunteer member of the ruling AKP party defends the government’s records on women’s rights.

(Photo: Coming Home, used with permission. Credit to: Ah Qiang/ PFLAG)

BBC Trending: Should You Ask When Someone Plans To Have A Baby?20151005

BBC Trending: Should You Ask When Someone Plans To Have A Baby?20151005

Emily Bingham posted a short Facebook message saying we should all stop asking about other people’s reproductive plans. Her note struck a chord online and has been shared more than 70,000 times, mostly by people applauding her message.

(Photo: Sonogram, Photo Credit: Science Photo Library)

Bbc Trending: Should You Ask When Someone Plans To Have A Baby?20151005

Emily Bingham posted a short Facebook message saying we should all stop asking about other people’s reproductive plans. Her note struck a chord online and has been shared more than 70,000 times, mostly by people applauding her message.

(Photo: Sonogram, Photo Credit: Science Photo Library)

BBC Trending: Should You Ask When Someone Plans To Have A Baby?20151005

The woman applauded for saying other people\u2019s baby plans are \u2018none of your business\u2019.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

BBC Trending: Should you go online with allegations of domestic violence?20150713

'You have to walk away': one woman's dramatic domestic violence plea.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

This week millions of Facebook users watched an emotional video by an Irish woman, in which she spoke out about alleged abuse at the hands of her partner.
But is it necessarily a good idea to take to social media to highlight domestic violence?
We talk to a woman whose story of abuse at the hands of her father went viral in 2011. Hillary Adams tells BBC Trending that while she had second thoughts at the time, she now has no regrets.

(Photo Credit: AP)

BBC Trending: South Carolina\u2019s Clown Scare20160912

Sightings of sinister clowns have left a US community in fear.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

BBC Trending: South Carolina’s Clown Scare20160912

BBC Trending: South Carolina’s Clown Scare20160912

Sightings of suspicious clowns have left a US community in fear. We investigate the eerie goings to see whether the town could be the victim of an viral elaborate prank, or witnessing an outbreak of mass hysteria.

Produced by Kate Lamble.

Photo: Grunge clown / Credit: Shutterstock

Bbc Trending: South Carolina’s Clown Scare20160912

Sightings of suspicious clowns have left a US community in fear. We investigate the eerie goings to see whether the town could be the victim of an viral elaborate prank, or witnessing an outbreak of mass hysteria.

Produced by Kate Lamble.

Photo: Grunge clown / Credit: Shutterstock

BBC Trending: The #100 Sareepact20150420

Founders of #100sareepact explain how they inadvertently created a worldwide movement.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Anju Kadam and Ally Matthan made a pact to wear the traditional sari for 100 days during 2015. Posting their intentions on Facebook within days other women pledged their desire to wear their own saris and started to share photos from across the world. The #100sareepact has now had thousands of likes on Facebook. Both men and women continue to send detailed and emotional stories of their memories of saris.

BBC Trending: The \u2018Bride Price\u2019 Story That Got China Talking20160307

A story shared on Weibo has shed light on the practice of \u2018Bride Price\u2019 payments in China

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

BBC Trending: The \u2018Fat Ibo Lady\u2019 Instagram Agony Aunt20151221

Ziya'atulhaqq Usman Tahir runs an Instagram account that helps solve people\u2019s problems.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Ziya'atulhaqq Usman Tahir runs an Instagram account called ‘Fat Ibo Lady’ from Nigeria. People email her their problems and she posts them online. As well as offering advice herself, her Instagram followers pitch in to offer help and wisdom to the senders.

Image credit: Instagram / Ziya'atulhaqq Usman Tahir

BBC Trending: The ‘Bride Price’ Story That Got China Talking20160307

BBC Trending: The ‘Bride Price’ Story That Got China Talking20160307

A story shared on Weibo – about a girl forced to have an abortion when her boyfriend couldn’t pay her family to marry her - has raised the issue of ‘bride price’ payments in China.

Image credit: Wang Zhao / Getty Images

Bbc Trending: The €bride Price’ Story That Got China Talking20160307

A story shared on Weibo – about a girl forced to have an abortion when her boyfriend couldn’t pay her family to marry her - has raised the issue of ‘bride price’ payments in China.

Image credit: Wang Zhao / Getty Images

BBC Trending: The ‘Fat Ibo Lady’ Instagram Agony Aunt20151221

BBC Trending: The ‘Fat Ibo Lady’ Instagram Agony Aunt20151221

Ziya'atulhaqq Usman Tahir runs an Instagram account called ‘Fat Ibo Lady’ from Nigeria. People email her their problems and she posts them online. As well as offering advice herself, her Instagram followers pitch in to offer help and wisdom to the senders.

Image credit: Instagram / Ziya'atulhaqq Usman Tahir

Bbc Trending: The €fat Ibo Lady’ Instagram Agony Aunt20151221

Ziya'atulhaqq Usman Tahir runs an Instagram account called ‘Fat Ibo Lady’ from Nigeria. People email her their problems and she posts them online. As well as offering advice herself, her Instagram followers pitch in to offer help and wisdom to the senders.

Image credit: Instagram / Ziya'atulhaqq Usman Tahir

BBC Trending: The Battle Between Anonymous and The KKK20151109

BBC Trending: The Battle Between Anonymous and The KKK20151109

The hackers group Anonymous released the names of hundreds of people they say are members of the white supremacist Ku Klux Klan. It comes after a public relations campaign by Anonymous conducted mostly on social media. But what happens when hackers get it wrong? BBC Trending speaks to a woman who got caught up in the online war who says she was falsely labelled as a KKK sympathiser.

(Photo: KKK annual gathering in Tennessee. Credit: Getty Images)

Bbc Trending: The Battle Between Anonymous And The Kkk20151109

The hackers group Anonymous released the names of hundreds of people they say are members of the white supremacist Ku Klux Klan. It comes after a public relations campaign by Anonymous conducted mostly on social media. But what happens when hackers get it wrong? BBC Trending speaks to a woman who got caught up in the online war who says she was falsely labelled as a KKK sympathiser.

(Photo: KKK annual gathering in Tennessee. Credit: Getty Images)

BBC Trending: The Battle Between Anonymous and The KKK20151109

What happened when hacker group Anonymous declared war on the Ku Klux Klan.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The hackers group Anonymous released the names of hundreds of people they say are members of the white supremacist Ku Klux Klan. It comes after a public relations campaign by Anonymous conducted mostly on social media. But what happens when hackers get it wrong? BBC Trending speaks to a woman who got caught up in the online war who says she was falsely labelled as a KKK sympathiser.

(Photo: KKK annual gathering in Tennessee. Credit: Getty Images)

BBC Trending: The Boy who Lived and was Commemorated on YouTube20151012

BBC Trending: The Boy who Lived and was Commemorated on YouTube20151012

How the internet mourned a teenager from one of YouTube\u2019s most famous families

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

When teenager Caleb Bratayley passed away this week, there was an outpouring of grief online. His was a member of one of YouTube’s most famous families, who became well known for simply uploading vast swathes of their day to day lives. Why did Bratayley become so popular, and why is there such a big audience for ‘family vlog’ channels?

(Photo: Caleb Bratayley. Credit: Bratayley/YouTube)

BBC Trending: The Boy who Lived and was Commemorated on YouTube20151012

When teenager Caleb Bratayley passed away this week, there was an outpouring of grief online. His was a member of one of YouTube’s most famous families, who became well known for simply uploading vast swathes of their day to day lives. Why did Bratayley become so popular, and why is there such a big audience for ‘family vlog’ channels?

(Photo: Caleb Bratayley. Credit: Bratayley/YouTube)

Bbc Trending: The Boy Who Lived And Was Commemorated On Youtube20151012

When teenager Caleb Bratayley passed away this week, there was an outpouring of grief online. His was a member of one of YouTube’s most famous families, who became well known for simply uploading vast swathes of their day to day lives. Why did Bratayley become so popular, and why is there such a big audience for ‘family vlog’ channels?

(Photo: Caleb Bratayley. Credit: Bratayley/YouTube)

BBC Trending: The Dutch Teenager Mapping The Syrian War From His Bedroom20150831

BBC Trending: The Dutch Teenager Mapping The Syrian War From His Bedroom20150831

Meet Thomas van Linge, the 19-year-old who draws up maps of the conflict in Syria using social media. They are so detailed, they’ve been featured by CNN and the New York Times.

Photo Caption: Thomas van Linge

Photo Credit: Alvaro Alvarez

Bbc Trending: The Dutch Teenager Mapping The Syrian War From His Bedroom20150831

Meet Thomas van Linge, the 19-year-old who draws up maps of the conflict in Syria using social media. They are so detailed, they’ve been featured by CNN and the New York Times.

Photo Caption: Thomas van Linge

Photo Credit: Alvaro Alvarez

BBC Trending: The Dutch Teenager Mapping The Syrian War From His Bedroom20150831

Meet Thomas van Linge, who draws up maps of the conflict in Syria using social media.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

BBC Trending: The Fake Iraqi Battle That Got \u2018Hijacked\u2019 Online20150615

Meet the man who made up a battle on social media, and fooled fans of Islamic State.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

What happens when you make up war stories and publish them on Twitter? We meet the man who invented ‘the battle of the cheese bladder’ in Iraq, and fooled fans of Islamic State and the Shia militia alike.

Photo: Fake Stamp (Credit: Totallypic/Shutterstock) and Iraq-Conflict (Credit: Ahmad Al-Rubaye/GettyImages)

BBC Trending: The Fake Policeman Causing a Stink in Sweden20150518

Meet \u2018B\u00e4ngan Lagerblad\u2019, the fake cop on a mission to reform Sweden\u2019s police force

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

This week on Trending

Why does Abdishakour Mohamed Ali dress up in a Swedish police uniform from the 1970s?
When he dons the outfit the satirist transforms into ‘Bängan Lagerblad’, a fake policeman on a mission to call out racism in the country’s police force. Presenter Anne-Marie Tomchak finds out why his latest YouTube video is trying to embarrass the authorities.
Ninja Crow
A viral video of a sneaky crow creeping up on a young man got us thinking…. Why are crows so, well, creepy? India Rakusen speaks to crow expert Kevin McGowan.

(Photo: ‘Bängan Lagerblad’ at a neo-Nazi march in Stockholm. Credit: youtube.com/critical)

BBC Trending: The Feminist Who Exposes Rapists on YouTube20150622

Meet the Indian campaigner who set out to \u2018shame\u2019 rapists online.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

BBC Trending: The Filipino Prisoners Who Want To Stay In Jail20160815

BBC Trending: The Filipino Prisoners Who Want To Stay In Jail20160815

Photos of a crowded jail have gone viral, but some prisoners feel \u2018lucky\u2019 to be there.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Photos of an overcrowded jail in the Philippines – taken by photographer Noel Celis – have gone viral, but remarkably some prisoners told him they felt ‘lucky’ to be there. They say many have met with a much worse fate as the new president Rodrigo Duterte cracks down on the country’s illegal drug trade.

Image caption: Prisoners in an overcrowded jail in the Philippines / Image credit: Noel Celis, Getty Images

BBC Trending: The Filipino Prisoners Who Want To Stay In Jail20160815

Photos of an overcrowded jail in the Philippines – taken by photographer Noel Celis – have gone viral, but remarkably some prisoners told him they felt ‘lucky’ to be there. They say many have met with a much worse fate as the new president Rodrigo Duterte cracks down on the country’s illegal drug trade.

Image caption: Prisoners in an overcrowded jail in the Philippines / Image credit: Noel Celis, Getty Images

Bbc Trending: The Filipino Prisoners Who Want To Stay In Jail20160815

Photos of an overcrowded jail in the Philippines – taken by photographer Noel Celis – have gone viral, but remarkably some prisoners told him they felt ‘lucky’ to be there. They say many have met with a much worse fate as the new president Rodrigo Duterte cracks down on the country’s illegal drug trade.

Image caption: Prisoners in an overcrowded jail in the Philippines / Image credit: Noel Celis, Getty Images

Bbc Trending: The Hip Hop Doc20160926

A viral Justin Bieber parody is highlighting problems with painkiller addiction in the US. ZZ Dogg MD is a real doctor who uses a rap alter ego to discuss medical issues.

BBC Trending: The man who \u2018abducted\u2019 children as part of a \u2018social experiment\u201920150511

YouTuber Joey Salads \u2018picked up\u2019 children to make a point, but did his idea backfire?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

This week on Trending… the man who ‘abducted’ children as part of a ‘social experiment, Jordan’s efforts to combat Islamic State online, and the mysterious button that’s been pressed by nearly a million people.

Why did Joey Salads pretend to abduct children at a local park? The YouTuber says he was conducting a social experiment as a warning to parents about the dangers posed to their children. But was he right to publish such an inflammatory video?

We’re joined by the BBC’s Dominic Casciani who reports from Jordan’s e-Mufti. The country’s government has launched an online offensive against IS, but how effective is the project proving?

And finally, we press ‘The Button’, Reddit’s April fool’s joke that has taken on a life of its own. The seemingly pointless game has spawned an entire mythology complete with warring clans, and now a major American think-tank has waded into the debate.

(Photo: Almost a million people have pressed Reddit's button. Credit: Thinkstock)

BBC Trending: The Men Recovering From \u2018Porn Addiction\u201920160229

Thousands of men identify as reformed \u2018porn addicts\u2019, but is it a real condition?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

American actor – Terry Crews – has posted several videos to Facebook about fighting his addiction to pornography. It sparked a wave of support in online communities dedicated to abstaining from porn. We hear from a self-confessed porn addict, and a doctor who says pornography isn’t addictive in the same way as alcohol or gambling.

Image credit: Shutterstock

BBC Trending: The Men Recovering From ‘Porn Addiction’20160229

BBC Trending: The Men Recovering From ‘Porn Addiction’20160229

American actor – Terry Crews – has posted several videos to Facebook about fighting his addiction to pornography. It sparked a wave of support in online communities dedicated to abstaining from porn. We hear from a self-confessed porn addict, and a doctor who says pornography isn’t addictive in the same way as alcohol or gambling.

Image credit: Shutterstock

Bbc Trending: The Men Recovering From €porn Addiction’20160229

American actor – Terry Crews – has posted several videos to Facebook about fighting his addiction to pornography. It sparked a wave of support in online communities dedicated to abstaining from porn. We hear from a self-confessed porn addict, and a doctor who says pornography isn’t addictive in the same way as alcohol or gambling.

Image credit: Shutterstock

BBC Trending: The Mexican Kings of Social Media20150330

The 'Mirrey' phenomenon - how rich Mexican kids love to show off on social media

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Trending reports on the 'Mirrey' (My King) phenomenon - a tumblr page showing young men photographed with shirts open and in nonchalant poses, the sons of the rich and powerful. The man behind the page Pepe Cebollas, explains how it is attracting ironic comments and millions of views. But what do the real 'Mirreyes' make of it? Mukul Devichan meets a real life Mirrey to find out.

BBC Trending: The Movies Hidden in Wikipedia20160530

BBC Trending: The Movies Hidden in Wikipedia20160530

In Bangladesh, Wikipedia is fighting online pirates who are using its site to allow people to secretly download bootlegged Hollywood films for free. The pirates are hiding movie files on websites which poorer people can access for free in Bangladesh, as part of a scheme to encourage internet use. The practice is illegal, but some say it poses difficult questions about internet access in the developing world.

Produced by Sam Judah

Photo credit: Shutterstock

Bbc Trending: The Movies Hidden In Wikipedia20160530

In Bangladesh, Wikipedia is fighting online pirates who are using its site to allow people to secretly download bootlegged Hollywood films for free. The pirates are hiding movie files on websites which poorer people can access for free in Bangladesh, as part of a scheme to encourage internet use. The practice is illegal, but some say it poses difficult questions about internet access in the developing world.

Produced by Sam Judah

Photo credit: Shutterstock

BBC Trending: The Movies Hidden in Wikipedia20160530

Why Bangladeshi pirates are hiding Hollywood films in the internet\u2019s encyclopaedia.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In Bangladesh, Wikipedia is fighting online pirates who are using its site to allow people to secretly download bootlegged Hollywood films for free. The pirates are hiding movie files on websites which poorer people can access for free in Bangladesh, as part of a scheme to encourage internet use. The practice is illegal, but some say it poses difficult questions about internet access in the developing world.

Produced by Sam Judah
Photo credit: Shutterstock

BBC Trending: The On-Air Groping That Got Mexico Talking20151102

BBC Trending: The On-Air Groping That Got Mexico Talking20151102

A female presenter in Mexico was groped live on television sparking a national debate.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

When presenter Tania Reza was groped live on air by her co-host, Enrique Tovar, the clip went viral. As the saga unfolded, she and her co-host were both fired after making a video brushing it off as a social media stunt. Tania then claimed that she was pressured into making the video with Enrique. So what does the incident – and the huge reaction online - tell us about women’s rights in Mexico?

(Photo: Tania Reza / Photo Credit: Televisa Prensa)

BBC Trending: The On-Air Groping That Got Mexico Talking20151102

When presenter Tania Reza was groped live on air by her co-host, Enrique Tovar, the clip went viral. As the saga unfolded, she and her co-host were both fired after making a video brushing it off as a social media stunt. Tania then claimed that she was pressured into making the video with Enrique. So what does the incident – and the huge reaction online - tell us about women’s rights in Mexico?

(Photo: Tania Reza / Photo Credit: Televisa Prensa)

Bbc Trending: The On-air Groping That Got Mexico Talking20151102

When presenter Tania Reza was groped live on air by her co-host, Enrique Tovar, the clip went viral. As the saga unfolded, she and her co-host were both fired after making a video brushing it off as a social media stunt. Tania then claimed that she was pressured into making the video with Enrique. So what does the incident – and the huge reaction online - tell us about women’s rights in Mexico?

(Photo: Tania Reza / Photo Credit: Televisa Prensa)

BBC Trending: The Photo That Gripped Brazil20160321

BBC Trending: The Photo That Gripped Brazil20160321

A seemingly innocuous photo has been held up as emblematic of inequality in the country.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A seemingly innocuous photo taken during anti-government protests – showing a white couple walking their dog, while their toddlers are pushed in a stroller by their black nanny - has been held up online as emblematic of the country's economic and racial divides.

Photo credit: Joao Valadares / Correio Brazilienze

BBC Trending: The Photo That Gripped Brazil20160321

A seemingly innocuous photo taken during anti-government protests – showing a white couple walking their dog, while their toddlers are pushed in a stroller by their black nanny - has been held up online as emblematic of the country's economic and racial divides.

Photo credit: Joao Valadares / Correio Brazilienze

Bbc Trending: The Photo That Gripped Brazil20160321

A seemingly innocuous photo taken during anti-government protests – showing a white couple walking their dog, while their toddlers are pushed in a stroller by their black nanny - has been held up online as emblematic of the country's economic and racial divides.

Photo credit: Joao Valadares / Correio Brazilienze

BBC Trending: The Police Who Ran Away Moments Before An Assassination20160208

BBC Trending: The Police Who Ran Away Moments Before An Assassination20160208

A video showing an assassination in Mexico has shocked many in the country, because it shows armed police running away from the scene just beforehand. Why did the police run away? And will the video change anything?

Presented by Mukul Devichand

Produced by Sam Judah and Emma Wilson

Image: Armed policemen

Image credit: Reporteros Asociados de Sinaloa / Facebook

Bbc Trending: The Police Who Ran Away Moments Before An Assassination20160208

A video showing an assassination in Mexico has shocked many in the country, because it shows armed police running away from the scene just beforehand. Why did the police run away? And will the video change anything?

Presented by Mukul Devichand

Produced by Sam Judah and Emma Wilson

Image: Armed policemen

Image credit: Reporteros Asociados de Sinaloa / Facebook

BBC Trending: The Police Who Ran Away Moments Before An Assassination20160208

Footage of a shooting in Mexico shows armed police fleeing the scene just beforehand.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A video showing an assassination in Mexico has shocked many in the country, because it shows armed police running away from the scene just beforehand. Why did the police run away? And will the video change anything?

Presented by Mukul Devichand
Produced by Sam Judah and Emma Wilson

Image: Armed policemen
Image credit: Reporteros Asociados de Sinaloa / Facebook

BBC Trending: The Politician \u2018Trolled by Police\u201920160418

Did Australian police officers troll a politician over her comments about sniffer dogs?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Trending often covers trolling online, but it isn’t often that the police are the ones accused of sending abusive messages.

That’s just what’s happened in Australia this week where police officers in New South Wales are being investigated over the alleged trolling of an Australian politician. Jenny Leong was sent racist and sexist messages after she opposed the state’s sniffer dog policy.

The BBC’s Australia correspondent Jon Donnison talks to Anne-Marie Tomchak about how an argument about drug detection got out of hand.

Picture credit: Jenny Leong

BBC Trending: The Politician ‘Trolled by Police’20160418

BBC Trending: The Politician ‘Trolled by Police’20160418

Trending often covers trolling online, but it isn’t often that the police are the ones accused of sending abusive messages.

That’s just what’s happened in Australia this week where police officers in New South Wales are being investigated over the alleged trolling of an Australian politician. Jenny Leong was sent racist and sexist messages after she opposed the state’s sniffer dog policy.

The BBC’s Australia correspondent Jon Donnison talks to Anne-Marie Tomchak about how an argument about drug detection got out of hand.

Picture credit: Jenny Leong

Bbc Trending: The Politician €trolled By Police’20160418

Trending often covers trolling online, but it isn’t often that the police are the ones accused of sending abusive messages.

That’s just what’s happened in Australia this week where police officers in New South Wales are being investigated over the alleged trolling of an Australian politician. Jenny Leong was sent racist and sexist messages after she opposed the state’s sniffer dog policy.

The BBC’s Australia correspondent Jon Donnison talks to Anne-Marie Tomchak about how an argument about drug detection got out of hand.

Picture credit: Jenny Leong

BBC Trending: The Porn Star Who Went To Iran For A Nose Job20160808

BBC Trending: The Porn Star Who Went To Iran For A Nose Job20160808

Candy Charms has put a spotlight on the Islamic republic as a destination for rhinoplasty

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The British-American porn star Candy Charms has become the talk of social media in Iran. The adult entertainer raised some eyebrows because she travelled to the Islamic republic to get a nose job. Her story has put the spotlight on Iran as a top destination for rhinoplasty and it has re-ignited a campaign to save the Iranian nose.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Sam Judah.

(Photo: Candy Charms. Credit: Instagram)

BBC Trending: The Porn Star Who Went To Iran For A Nose Job20160808

The British-American porn star Candy Charms has become the talk of social media in Iran. The adult entertainer raised some eyebrows because she travelled to the Islamic republic to get a nose job. Her story has put the spotlight on Iran as a top destination for rhinoplasty and it has re-ignited a campaign to save the Iranian nose.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Sam Judah.

(Photo: Candy Charms. Credit: Instagram)

Bbc Trending: The Porn Star Who Went To Iran For A Nose Job20160808

The British-American porn star Candy Charms has become the talk of social media in Iran. The adult entertainer raised some eyebrows because she travelled to the Islamic republic to get a nose job. Her story has put the spotlight on Iran as a top destination for rhinoplasty and it has re-ignited a campaign to save the Iranian nose.

Produced by Kate Lamble and Sam Judah.

(Photo: Candy Charms. Credit: Instagram)

BBC Trending: The Scientists Encouraging Online Piracy20151019

BBC Trending: The Scientists Encouraging Online Piracy20151019

Across the internet, scientists are swapping academic papers in secret - most of the time illegally – using a Twitter hashtag ‘#ICanHazPDF’. We ask the scientist who came up with the idea why thousands of people are using it, and how they justify their actions.

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

(Photo: Scientist at computer / Photo Credit: Shutterstock)

Bbc Trending: The Scientists Encouraging Online Piracy20151019

Across the internet, scientists are swapping academic papers in secret - most of the time illegally – using a Twitter hashtag ‘#ICanHazPDF’. We ask the scientist who came up with the idea why thousands of people are using it, and how they justify their actions.

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

(Photo: Scientist at computer / Photo Credit: Shutterstock)

BBC Trending: The Scientists Encouraging Online Piracy20151019

Meet the scientist who set up a \u2018Pirate Bay for academics\u2019 to swap research online.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Across the internet, scientists are swapping academic papers in secret - most of the time illegally – using a Twitter hashtag ‘#ICanHazPDF’. We ask the scientist who came up with the idea why thousands of people are using it, and how they justify their actions.

Produced by Estelle Doyle.

(Photo: Scientist at computer / Photo Credit: Shutterstock)

BBC Trending: The Star Pupil Who Scored Zero In Every Exam20150907

BBC Trending: The Star Pupil Who Scored Zero In Every Exam20150907

Maryam Malak, considered one of Egypt\u2019s top students, scored zero in her exams. Why?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

BBC Trending: The Star Pupil Who Scored Zero In Every Exam20150907

Meet Maryam Malak, considered one of Egypt’s top performing students before she scored zero in all seven of her exams. The incident caused outcry in the country, and many believe corrupt officials are to blame.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

Bbc Trending: The Star Pupil Who Scored Zero In Every Exam20150907

Meet Maryam Malak, considered one of Egypt’s top performing students before she scored zero in all seven of her exams. The incident caused outcry in the country, and many believe corrupt officials are to blame.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

BBC Trending: The Taxi Driver\u2019s Rant That Went Viral20161024

A taxi driver\u2019s rant - bemoaning the state of the nation - has gone viral in Egypt.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A taxi driver’s political rant has gone viral in Egypt, prompting a debate about the state of the nation. Soon after it became popular, the video started disappearing online, leading to claims of censorship – and inspiring others to post similar videos of their own.

(Photo: Taxi driver through window. Credit: Al Hayat TV)

BBC Trending: The vagaries of learning English20150504

Why people on Chinese social media reacted to a techexec speaking English at a conference

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Tse Yin Lee joins us from BBC Monitoring to discuss the vagaries of learning English when you’re Chinese. Last week hundreds of thousands of Chinese took to social media to comment on the attempts of chief exec of Chinese telecoms giant company Xiaomi, to address a conference in English. Some comments were positive others thought he had embarrassed the Chinese. We discuss whether this shame is a sign of the uncomfortable process of globalisation, and BBC Trending’s old friend Lawrence Lo gives us lesson on how Chinese can excel in Business English.

Photo: Xiaomi Corp. Chief Executive Officer Lei Jun News Conference (Credit: Bloomberg/Getty Images)

BBC Trending: This Comment Has Been Removed\u202620150817

Is this the end of online comments?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Is it time to get rid of the comments section? This month the Daily Dot decided it wasn’t worth the trouble and closed theirs down. They follow technology site The Verge, Slate and several other online publishers who are reassessing the need for online comment. But how do you foster engagement and dialogue without inadvertently feeding the trolls in the process? Anne-Marie Tomchak is joined by Nicholas White, the editor of the Daily Dot and Riese, the editor of Autostraddle, an online community for LGBT people.
Comments are also crucial to the appeal of a new live streaming application, Periscope. But we hear how some of the most followed women on the app feel it is leaving them exposed to sexist trolling; and some tips for handling this.

(Photo Credit: Shutterstock)

BBC Trending: This Comment Has Been Removed…20150817

BBC Trending: This Comment Has Been Removed…20150817

Is it time to get rid of the comments section? This month the Daily Dot decided it wasn’t worth the trouble and closed theirs down. They follow technology site The Verge, Slate and several other online publishers who are reassessing the need for online comment. But how do you foster engagement and dialogue without inadvertently feeding the trolls in the process? Anne-Marie Tomchak is joined by Nicholas White, the editor of the Daily Dot and Riese, the editor of Autostraddle, an online community for LGBT people.

Comments are also crucial to the appeal of a new live streaming application, Periscope. But we hear how some of the most followed women on the app feel it is leaving them exposed to sexist trolling; and some tips for handling this.

(Photo Credit: Shutterstock)

Bbc Trending: This Comment Has Been Removed…20150817

Is it time to get rid of the comments section? This month the Daily Dot decided it wasn’t worth the trouble and closed theirs down. They follow technology site The Verge, Slate and several other online publishers who are reassessing the need for online comment. But how do you foster engagement and dialogue without inadvertently feeding the trolls in the process? Anne-Marie Tomchak is joined by Nicholas White, the editor of the Daily Dot and Riese, the editor of Autostraddle, an online community for LGBT people.

Comments are also crucial to the appeal of a new live streaming application, Periscope. But we hear how some of the most followed women on the app feel it is leaving them exposed to sexist trolling; and some tips for handling this.

(Photo Credit: Shutterstock)

BBC Trending: Tipsters on Trial20160620

BBC Trending: Tipsters on Trial20160620

We investigate the social media betting tipsters who make money when you lose.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Will you be betting on Euro 2016? Most people will probably rely on national allegiances if they decide to gamble, but thousands of social media users, particularly in Britain, are now taking advice on where to place their money from strangers. Twitter and Facebook accounts that claim to be able to more accurately predict the outcome of games.

But while this new breed of tipsters might offer free advice, many are actually in league with the bookies. They’re offered around 30% of all the money their followers lose. So how much faith should people have in these new gambling gurus?

Produced by Kate Lamble

Photo credit: Shutterstock

BBC Trending: Tipsters on Trial20160620

Will you be betting on Euro 2016? Most people will probably rely on national allegiances if they decide to gamble, but thousands of social media users, particularly in Britain, are now taking advice on where to place their money from strangers. Twitter and Facebook accounts that claim to be able to more accurately predict the outcome of games.

But while this new breed of tipsters might offer free advice, many are actually in league with the bookies. They’re offered around 30% of all the money their followers lose. So how much faith should people have in these new gambling gurus?

Produced by Kate Lamble

Photo credit: Shutterstock

Bbc Trending: Tipsters On Trial20160620

Will you be betting on Euro 2016? Most people will probably rely on national allegiances if they decide to gamble, but thousands of social media users, particularly in Britain, are now taking advice on where to place their money from strangers. Twitter and Facebook accounts that claim to be able to more accurately predict the outcome of games.

But while this new breed of tipsters might offer free advice, many are actually in league with the bookies. They’re offered around 30% of all the money their followers lose. So how much faith should people have in these new gambling gurus?

Produced by Kate Lamble

Photo credit: Shutterstock

BBC Trending: Try Beating Me Lightly20160606

BBC Trending: Try Beating Me Lightly20160606

In Pakistan, the Council of Islamic Ideology (who act as an advisory body to the government on religious matters) has recently suggested that men should be allowed to beat their wives - as long as it is done ‘lightly’. The BBC’s Pakistan correspondent Shaimaa Khalil tells Kate Lamble how the ruling provoked a social media storm.

(Photo: One of the women who reacted to the suggestion in Pakistan. Credit: Fahhad Rajper)

Bbc Trending: Try Beating Me Lightly20160606

In Pakistan, the Council of Islamic Ideology (who act as an advisory body to the government on religious matters) has recently suggested that men should be allowed to beat their wives - as long as it is done ‘lightly’. The BBC’s Pakistan correspondent Shaimaa Khalil tells Kate Lamble how the ruling provoked a social media storm.

(Photo: One of the women who reacted to the suggestion in Pakistan. Credit: Fahhad Rajper)

BBC Trending: Try Beating Me Lightly20160606

Pakistani women have reacted to a suggestion that men can beat their wives 'lightly'

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In Pakistan, the Council of Islamic Ideology (who act as an advisory body to the government on religious matters) has recently suggested that men should be allowed to beat their wives - as long as it is done ‘lightly’. The BBC’s Pakistan correspondent Shaimaa Khalil tells Kate Lamble how the ruling provoked a social media storm.

(Photo: One of the women who reacted to the suggestion in Pakistan. Credit: Fahhad Rajper)

BBC Trending: What is it Like to be a Woman in Nigeria?20150706

Meet the members of a book club who sparked a global conversation about everyday sexism

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

BBC Trending: White People and Dreadlocks20160404

BBC Trending: White People and Dreadlocks20160404

Millions of people watched a video of a confrontation between two American students, one of whom was a white student with his hair in dreadlocks. What’s wrong with white people having dreadlocks?

One student had a problem with Cory Goldstein’s dreadlocks, because he is white and she believed he is “appropriating? her culture.

Yesha Callahan talks to BBC Trending about ‘cultural appropriation’.

Photo credit: Golden Gate Express

Bbc Trending: White People And Dreadlocks20160404

Millions of people watched a video of a confrontation between two American students, one of whom was a white student with his hair in dreadlocks. What’s wrong with white people having dreadlocks?

One student had a problem with Cory Goldstein’s dreadlocks, because he is white and she believed he is “appropriating? her culture.

Yesha Callahan talks to BBC Trending about ‘cultural appropriation’.

Photo credit: Golden Gate Express

BBC Trending: White People and Dreadlocks20160404

Millions watch video of white student being harassed over his dreadlocks.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Millions of people watched a video of a confrontation between two American students, one of whom was a white student with his hair in dreadlocks. What’s wrong with white people having dreadlocks?

One student had a problem with Cory Goldstein’s dreadlocks, because he is white and she believed he is “appropriating” her culture.

Yesha Callahan talks to BBC Trending about ‘cultural appropriation’.

Photo credit: Golden Gate Express

BBC Trending: Will Russians Stop Holidaying in Turkey?20151130

BBC Trending: Will Russians Stop Holidaying in Turkey?20151130

We hear about the outcry on Russian social media, calling on citizens not to holiday in Turkey following the shooting down of a Russian plane. But what lay behind the conversation? Was it started by Russian citizens, or led by government controlled accounts?

Image: Anti-Turkish memes circulated on Twitter, Image Credit: @TaniaTania2007, @zvezdanews, @virus_am71 (Twitter)

Bbc Trending: Will Russians Stop Holidaying In Turkey?20151130

We hear about the outcry on Russian social media, calling on citizens not to holiday in Turkey following the shooting down of a Russian plane. But what lay behind the conversation? Was it started by Russian citizens, or led by government controlled accounts?

Image: Anti-Turkish memes circulated on Twitter, Image Credit: @TaniaTania2007, @zvezdanews, @virus_am71 (Twitter)

BBC Trending: Will Russians Stop Holidaying in Turkey?20151130

What\u2019s behind the outcry on Russian social media, calling citizens not to visit Turkey?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

We hear about the outcry on Russian social media, calling on citizens not to holiday in Turkey following the shooting down of a Russian plane. But what lay behind the conversation? Was it started by Russian citizens, or led by government controlled accounts?

Image: Anti-Turkish memes circulated on Twitter, Image Credit: @TaniaTania2007, @zvezdanews, @virus_am71 (Twitter)

Beethoven and Brown Coal20150820

Beethoven and Brown Coal20150820

A special essay from Prague correspondent Rob Cameron on the Czech hillsides which first heard the "Eroica" - but now echo to the noise of opencast mining. Opencast extraction of brown coal turns this picturesque landscape into a moonscape - but it's profitable, and politically convenient. Could the country's energy demands end up flattening a whole small town?

(Picture: the baroque Jerezi Castle, once home to Bohemian aristocrat and music patron Prince Joseph Franz von Lobkowitz, looks straight out over the scene of opencast mining around the town of Horni Jiretin, Czech Republic. Credit: Rob Cameron BBC)

Beethoven And Brown Coal20150820

A special essay from Prague correspondent Rob Cameron on the Czech hillsides which first heard the "Eroica" - but now echo to the noise of opencast mining. Opencast extraction of brown coal turns this picturesque landscape into a moonscape - but it's profitable, and politically convenient. Could the country's energy demands end up flattening a whole small town?

(Picture: the baroque Jerezi Castle, once home to Bohemian aristocrat and music patron Prince Joseph Franz von Lobkowitz, looks straight out over the scene of opencast mining around the town of Horni Jiretin, Czech Republic. Credit: Rob Cameron BBC)

Beethoven and Brown Coal20150820

Could opencast mining flatten a whole small town in the Czech Republic?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Prague correspondent Rob Cameron on the Czech hillsides which first heard the "Eroica" - but now echo to the noise of opencast mining. Opencast extraction of brown coal turns this picturesque landscape into a moonscape - but it's profitable, and politically convenient. Could the country's energy demands end up flattening a whole small town?

(Picture: the baroque Jerezi Castle, once home to Bohemian aristocrat and music patron Prince Joseph Franz von Lobkowitz, looks straight out over the scene of opencast mining around the town of Horni Jiretin, Czech Republic. Credit: Rob Cameron BBC)

Bravery in Baku20150910

Bravery in Baku20150910

Azerbaijan is a country flush with oil wealth, yet plagued by repeated reports of corruption, bribery and extortion. Journalist Khadija Ismayilova investigated allegations of graft and influence-trafficking - and wound up in jail. The BBC's Damien McGuinness shares his experience of meeting her and analyses why she has been given a seven-year sentence for her reporting. Is it because she got too close to details of the business dealings of President Aliyev's own family?

(Photo: Khadija Ismayilova. Credit: AP)

Bravery In Baku20150910

Azerbaijan is a country flush with oil wealth, yet plagued by repeated reports of corruption, bribery and extortion. Journalist Khadija Ismayilova investigated allegations of graft and influence-trafficking - and wound up in jail. The BBC's Damien McGuinness shares his experience of meeting her and analyses why she has been given a seven-year sentence for her reporting. Is it because she got too close to details of the business dealings of President Aliyev's own family?

(Photo: Khadija Ismayilova. Credit: AP)

Bravery in Baku20150910

Why Khadija Ismayilova's work exposing corruption in Azerbaijan led to a jail sentence

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Azerbaijan is a country flush with oil wealth, yet plagued by repeated reports of corruption, bribery and extortion. Journalist Khadija Ismayilova investigated allegations of graft and influence-trafficking - and wound up in jail. The BBC's Damien McGuinness shares his experience of meeting her and analyses why she has been given a seven-year sentence for her reporting. Is it because she got too close to details of the business dealings of President Aliyev's own family?

(Photo: Khadija Ismayilova. Credit: AP)

Can Fat Shaming be Defended?20150914

Can Fat Shaming be Defended?20150914

The comedian who enraged the Internet with her Dear Fat People video

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

We hear from the woman who enraged the internet when she made a video called Dear Fat People. It was viewed over 20 million times and led to an online backlash from people saying it was offensive and hurtful. A comedian from Canada, Nicole Arbour talks to BBC Trending’s Mukul Devichand and tells him why she feels her critics are missing the point of satire.

(Photo: Nicole Arbour. Credit: Getty Images)

Can Fat Shaming be Defended?20150914

We hear from the woman who enraged the internet when she made a video called Dear Fat People. It was viewed over 20 million times and led to an online backlash from people saying it was offensive and hurtful. A comedian from Canada, Nicole Arbour talks to BBC Trending’s Mukul Devichand and tells him why she feels her critics are missing the point of satire.

(Photo: Nicole Arbour. Credit: Getty Images)

Can Fat Shaming Be Defended?20150914

We hear from the woman who enraged the internet when she made a video called Dear Fat People. It was viewed over 20 million times and led to an online backlash from people saying it was offensive and hurtful. A comedian from Canada, Nicole Arbour talks to BBC Trending’s Mukul Devichand and tells him why she feels her critics are missing the point of satire.

(Photo: Nicole Arbour. Credit: Getty Images)

China\u2019s New Online Drinking Challenge20150112

How downing the drink Baijiu went viral in China

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Thousands of videos have sprung up across China showing people sipping, drinking and downing the traditional Chinese spirit Baijiu. It’s called The Baijiu Challenge.

The trend really got going when a man known as Three Litre Brother drank, you guessed it, three litres in under ten minutes. With some people consuming dangerous amounts state media and the police have stepped in with their own warnings. We find out how the Confucian theory of ‘face’ is driving competitive social drinking in China.

(Image: Chinese Model Gabby takes the Baijiu challenge. Copyright: 梦妮Gabby on Weibo)

Could Europe Stop Migrants Dying In The Mediterranean?20150224

Criminologist Andrea di Nicola on \u201cthe most ruthless travel agents on the planet\u201d.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Criminologist Andrea di Nicola on meeting the people smugglers he calls “the most ruthless travel agents on the planet”.

(Image: The coffins of immigrants who died trying to reach the Italian coast arrive from Lampedusa to Porto Empedocle, 11 February 2015. Credit: MARCELLO PATERNOSTRO/AFP/Getty Images)

Designer Fever - In Rural Oxfordshire20141218

Global luxury-label hunters at the UK's Bicester Village

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Christine Finn joins shoppers from all over the world who are looking for bargain designer goods at Bicester Village. Once a traditional, low-profile Cotswold retreat, Bicester is now a name familiar to label-hunters all over the EU and Asia - in fact the majority of the customers in its retail outlets come from outside the UK, and so do most of the staff. In a special essay for From Our Own Correspondent, we learn what an armful of brand-name carrier bags can do for your image - and why people flock here for the prestige, as well as the discounts.

(Photo: A Christmas shopper in London, Dec 2014. Credit: Getty Images)

Ebola's scars in Guinea20150205

Grainne Harrington in Guinea on how Ebola is affecting the lives of volunteer helpers

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Egyptian Spiderman20141215

What happens when a superhero finds himself in Cairo?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

What happens when a superhero finds himself in Cairo? A 20-year-old photographer filmed his friend dressed as Spiderman, performing everyday tasks around the Egyptian capital, one of the busiest in the World. In Cairo, says the photographer, Spiderman has met his match because life is so impossible that not even a superhero could function.

(Photo: Hossam Atef)

Exposing Racists and Getting Them Fired20150119

From policing to trolling, can online vigilantes go too far?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

We meet the man in Texas whose racist Facebook posts inspired a whole community to get him fired. Racists Getting Fired and Getting Racists Fired! is the name of a blog that does exactly what it says on the tin. People are encouraged to find and share incidents of racism online - from memes to tweets to quotes - and expose the apparent racists. The community are then encouraged to call, and email the racists employer until they are fired. It is online vigilantism, or digilantism, that dares to impact the real world, and it is not the first.

The complexity of regulating the online world has left a vacuum for people to take moral policing into their own hands. But if just one comment on a public platform can result in harassment and losing your job, have digilantes gone too far? We speak to Chris Rincon, who lost his job when his Facebook status was aired on the blog. We also hear from the man behind the retweeting moral policing machine @YesYoureRacist.

(Photo: An office worker gets fired by his senior manager. Credit to: Shutterstock)

FOOC: The Colonial Troops of World War One20150312

Commemorating the contribution of Indian and African troops during WWI

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

World War I was, by definition, a global conflict - and it involved combatants and support staff all around the world. It wasn't simply a fight between European powers: individuals across Africa and Asia volunteered, struggled and fought, sometimes at home, sometimes half a world away. A special essay from Reeta Chakrabarti, in France and Kenya, commemorates the contribution and the sacrifices of Indian and East African troops who served on the British side during the conflict.

(Photo: The Neuve Chapelle Indian Memorial in France commemorates the 4,700 Indian soldiers and labourers of WW1 whose bodies were never found. India sent 140,000 to the Western Front through Belgium and northern France. Credit: Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Forum20150130

Why has the internet not given us a more realistic picture of foreign countries?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Forum: Capturing Light20150327

How air pollution obscures even bright sunshine in Chinese cities

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Forum: Codes and ciphers20150213

Will a cryptocurrency like Bitcoin open up banking to the world\u2019s poorest?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Forum: Deep Learning20150306

Can Deep Learning make computers think and behave more like us?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Forum: Dissent20150227

Can a fierce argument with your best friend strengthen your relationship?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Forum: Handwriting20150206

Calligrapher Paul Antonio demonstrates his art in a Forum about writing by hand

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Forum: Hierarchy20141219

Using political satire to undermine the establishment

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Political satirist Martin Rowson in conversation with Bridget Kendall about the power of caricature to undermine hierarchies. He explains why some politicians hang the originals of his cartoons, which they’d purchased at some expense, in their toilets, and why there seems to be an inverse relationship between tolerance for visual satire and revolutions.

Image: Building (Suspension of Disbelief) Bridges by cartoonist Martin Rowson

Forum: Interruptions20150116

In conversation, do you interrupt or are you the one who is usually interrupted?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Forum: Lines20141121

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Our world seems to be bound and criss-crossed by lines: except that when you look closely, many of them do not exist in reality, only in your mind. So what are we to make of lines? Joining Bridget Kendall are distinguished South African artist William Kentridge, poet and graphic artist Imtiaz Dharker and social anthropology professor Timothy Ingold. (Photo: Lines of pebbles on the beach with Timothy Ingold)

Forum: Mutations20141128

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Could synthetic biology help save nature? If we created organisms based on new, say, 6-base DNA, we might be able to use them to help preserve existing environments without the danger of cross-breeding with ‘natural’ flora and fauna, says designer Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg. With contributions from plant geneticist Zachary Lippman and evolutionary biologist Andreas Wagner. (Photo: Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg, Tommaso Lanza, Tom Mawby)

Forum: Possessions and Collections20141226

Why people collect things that they have no intent of using

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Forum: Rhythm20150220

How to model 'Rhythms of the Universe' in sound

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Forum: Self-control20150102

The celebrated Marshmallow Test revisited

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Over the last half a century, American psychologist Walter Mischel has been following the subjects of his ground-breaking study of delayed gratification known as the Marshmallow Test. He tells Quentin Cooper that childhood 'high delayers' achieved greater academic success and better relationships later in life but also that just about everybody can improve their self-control. With Mitu Khandaker-Kokoris and Lesley Fellows. (Photo: Getty Images)

Forum: Temperament20141205

The impact of temperament on personality, in sport and on musical tuning

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

What is the key to success in sport - or in music: your temperament, your talent, your self-confidence or something completely different?

We all have personality traits but how much stays the same and how much can you change? Bridget Kendall explores temperament with sports and business performance expert Rasmus Ankersen, lute player Elizabeth Kenny and psychologist Brian R Little.

Forum: Unintended Consequences20141212

How seemingly insignificant decisions can lead to dramatic outcomes

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Why do so many of our actions end up having unintended consequences? Italian philosopher Professor Lisa Bortolotti says this is because our imagination can lead us to create a false memory of ourselves and makes us act on irrational impulses. With contributions from poet Peter Anderson and novelist James Friel.

(Photo: From left to right, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, a Xhosa warrior, Nelson Mandela. Credit: Getty Images)

Forum: Wood20150123

Is wood the engineering material of the future?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In Canada, architect Michael Green is designing wooden high rise buildings but in Africa it's still the basic, everyday fuel. With timber researcher Dan Ridley-Ellis, geographer Reginald Cline-Cole and cellist Steven Isserlis, who also plays some beautiful music.

(Photo: A cut tree log. Credit: Gleb Fedorov/BBC)

From Our Own Correspondent20150604

Maria Margaronis in Istanbul on a Kurdish neighbourhood's hopes for Sunday's elections.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Maria Margaronis visits Istanbul's neighbourhood of Tarlabasi. It used to be a Greek and Armenian community, but now many of its residents are impoverished Kurds, or refugees. There are elections in Turkey on Sunday, and in Tarlabasi hopes are high for the Kurdish HDP party. Locals are in celebratory and proud mood as they think the HDP may take the ten-percent-of-the-vote hurdle and make it into parliament for the first time. That would enable it to help block President Erdogan's plans to change the constitution to give himself more powers, and to turn Turkey into a more authoritarian Islamic state.

Photo of Kurdish people in Tarlabasi neighbourhood by Mustafa Ozer/AFP/Getty Images.

From Our Own Correspondent20150611

Iona Craig reports from the frontline of the Yemeni war in the port city of Aden.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

From Our Own Correspondent20150618

How tough life can be for farmers in the US Midwest when crop prices change

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Peter Day remembers how tough life can be for farmers in the American Midwest when crop prices fluctuate. And he marks the end of the trading pits at the Chicago Board of Trade, where those crops are bought and sold. In their heyday, the pits were so packed and frantically busy, that when one broker died of a heart attack there, he was held upright by the bodily pressure of the others around him, until the bell went for the end of the session. Only then, when the shouting stopped and the traders walked away, did anybody notice.

(Photo: Trading pit at Chicago Board of Trade. Credit: Peter Thompson, Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent20151008

Is it back to the bad old days of war between the Turkish state and the Kurdish guerrilla organisation the PKK? Mark Lowen recently witnessed signs of renewed conflict in the south-eastern city of Cizre, where barricades, live fire and traumatised children are all to be seen on the streets again. But what lies behind Istanbul's latest offensive, and what does it mean for the planned elections in November?

(Photo: Women grieve with one holding a photo of a man killed during clashes between Turkish forces and militants of the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) in Cizre, September 2015. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent20151008

Is it back to the bad old days of war between the Turkish state and the Kurdish guerrilla organisation the PKK? Mark Lowen recently witnessed signs of renewed conflict in the south-eastern city of Cizre, where barricades, live fire and traumatised children are all to be seen on the streets again. But what lies behind Istanbul's latest offensive, and what does it mean for the planned elections in November?

(Photo: Women grieve with one holding a photo of a man killed during clashes between Turkish forces and militants of the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) in Cizre, September 2015. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent20151008

Signs of renewed conflict between the Turkish state and the PKK in Cizre

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Is it back to the bad old days of war between the Turkish state and the Kurdish guerrilla organisation the PKK? Mark Lowen recently witnessed signs of renewed conflict in the south-eastern city of Cizre, where barricades, live fire and traumatised children are all to be seen on the streets again. But what lies behind Istanbul's latest offensive, and what does it mean for the planned elections in November?

(Photo: Women grieve with one holding a photo of a man killed during clashes between Turkish forces and militants of the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) in Cizre, September 2015. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent20151022
From Our Own Correspondent20151022

"Keeping Portland Weird": Portland, Oregon, in the Pacific Northwest, is one of the USA's youngest yet most distinctive cities. Anthony Denselow traces its frontier history and examines what makes its character so special. From radical chic to naked bike-riding, innovative coffee shops to artisanal entrepreneurs, its particular flavour has sometimes been satirised - but is often envied elsewhere. How does the place manage to stay so different to much of the rest of the country?

Photo: a cyclist passes a branch of one of Portland's best-known businesses, October 2015. (Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent20151022

Keeping Portland Weird: Anthony Denselow on what makes the city's character so special

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

"Keeping Portland Weird": Portland, Oregon, in the Pacific Northwest, is one of the USA's youngest yet most distinctive cities. Anthony Denselow traces its frontier history and examines what makes its character so special. From radical chic to naked bike-riding, innovative coffee shops to artisanal entrepreneurs, its particular flavour has sometimes been satirised - but is often envied elsewhere. How does the place manage to stay so different to much of the rest of the country?

Photo: a cyclist passes a branch of one of Portland's best-known businesses, October 2015. (Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent20160929
From Our Own Correspondent20161006
From Our Own Correspondent20161006

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

From Our Own Correspondent20161027
From Our Own Correspondent - Belarus20160204

Alex Kirby is pleasantly surprised by Belarus - not the bleak oppressed place he thought.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Alex Kirby is pleasantly surprised by Belarus. He finds it's not the bleak, run-down or oppressed place he had imagined. Restaurants have to turn people away, and the opera is thronged with the well-dressed. The capital Minsk is positively gleaming. Challenging official thinking still risky, but journalism students at the university are able to give the annual Golden Duck of Belarus award - an apparently oversized bath toy fixed to a square box - given by the students to the speaker they think made the most outrageous and improbable claim in a lecture.

Photo of "Golden Ducks of Belarus" awards by Alex Kirby, BBC

From Our Own Correspondent - Belarus20160204

Alex Kirby is pleasantly surprised by Belarus. He finds it's not the bleak, run-down or oppressed place he had imagined. Restaurants have to turn people away, and the opera is thronged with the well-dressed. The capital Minsk is positively gleaming. Challenging official thinking still risky, but journalism students at the university are able to give the annual Golden Duck of Belarus award - an apparently oversized bath toy fixed to a square box - given by the students to the speaker they think made the most outrageous and improbable claim in a lecture.

Photo of "Golden Ducks of Belarus" awards by Alex Kirby, BBC

From Our Own Correspondent - Jonah Fisher in Myanmar20150305

Jonah Fisher on the conflict between the Burmese army and ethnic Chinese rebels.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Jonah Fisher in Myanmar reports on the renewed fighting between the Burmese army and ethnic Chinese rebels in Kokang, a lawless area near the Chinese border.
Things had calmed down after a deal had been struck between the military junta and the rebel leader, Phone Kya-Shin, who established Burma's first heroin factory. He ended up having to leave for exile in China and now aged 84 many thought he had died. Not so. He has returned to Burma, made a comeback, and the armed conflict has flared up again, with civilians coming under fire, too.

Photo of a woman refugee who fled the fighting in Kokang by REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR)

From Our Own Correspondent - Venezuela20160218

Venezuela's economy is struggling due to the low oil prices, but Grace Livingstone hears that in the countryside many farmers are still grateful to the Socialist government, and former ruler Hugo Chavez in particular, for the land they now own. Though others find that they cannot make a living anymore with the low prices that the government sets.

Photo of Venezuelan farm that in 2011 was at risk of being expropriated by the late Hugo Chavez's government: MIGUEL GUTIERREZ, AFP/Getty Images

From Our Own Correspondent - Venezuela20160218

Venezuela's economy is struggling, but Grace Livingstone hears farmers still like Chavez.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Venezuela's economy is struggling due to the low oil prices, but Grace Livingstone hears that in the countryside many farmers are still grateful to the Socialist government, and former ruler Hugo Chavez in particular, for the land they now own. Though others find that they cannot make a living anymore with the low prices that the government sets.

Photo of Venezuelan farm that in 2011 was at risk of being expropriated by the late Hugo Chavez's government: MIGUEL GUTIERREZ, AFP/Getty Images

From Our Own Correspondent: A Ghost Of Saudi's Future?20160623

Long before the oil price slump, many analysts were arguing that Saudi Arabia's economy was distorted and urgently needed to modernise. The huge King Abdullah Economic City project, still under construction, was designed and intended to take the Kingdom straight into a modern economic setting and infrastructure. While the scale and ambition of the project are hugely impressive, and much has already been built, on a recent visit to the site, Stephen Sackur was driven to ask some awkward questions about how realistic the blueprint for success really is.

Photo: The entrance of King Abdullah Economic City (Omar Salem/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: A Ghost of Saudi's Future?20160623

Stephen Sackur ponders the aims (and reality) of the vast KAEC project in Saudi Arabia

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Long before the oil price slump, many analysts were arguing that Saudi Arabia's economy was distorted and urgently needed to modernise. The huge King Abdullah Economic City project, still under construction, was designed and intended to take the Kingdom straight into a modern economic setting and infrastructure. While the scale and ambition of the project are hugely impressive, and much has already been built, on a recent visit to the site, Stephen Sackur was driven to ask some awkward questions about how realistic the blueprint for success really is.

Photo: The entrance of King Abdullah Economic City (Omar Salem/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: A Grandmother's Loss20141211

Fergal Keane recounts the story of one grandmother's loss in the conflict in Ukraine

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special dispatch from Fergal Keane tells the story of one grandmother's terrible loss in the Ukraine conflict. The small settlement of Lebindinskoya, by the Sea of Azov, has been "hammered by history" - even in recent times - and Lubovna Vasilievna has survived one of its most brutal episodes. How can the damage to her life be measured?

Picture: Lubovna Vasilievna recuperates in hospital, December 2014 (c) BBC News

From Our Own Correspondent: A New Age of Empires?20150723

What is Iran's role in the historical tides shaping the Middle East?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Kevin Connolly reflects on the historical tides which have shaped the Middle East - and which of today's great powers is gaining ground. Does the recent nuclear deal announced in Vienna mean that Iran will be playing a greater role as a regional power?

(Photo: British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (2nd R), US Secretary of State John Kerry (R) and European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini (L), Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (2nd L) Credit: AFP)

From Our Own Correspondent: A Russian-Chinese Life20150430

Inna's experiences have mirrored every twist and turn of the Sino-Soviet relationship

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In Beijing, Carrie Gracie traces the life of one woman whose experiences have mirrored every twist and turn of the Sino-Soviet relationship. Inna's father was a famous Chinese Communist and revolutionary, her mother a Russian intellectual, and she grew up in Beijing amid revolutionary ferment. She has survived the high points and lowest ebb of the Russian-Chinese relationship, that axis of the 'big brother' and 'little brother' of world socialism - and she is still very picky about how to serve borscht properly.

(Photo: The exterior of Beijing's Moscow Restaurant, a showcase for Russian-Chinese relations for decades (c) BBC)

From Our Own Correspondent: A Targeted Profession20160818

As a BBC correspondent in Pakistan, Shaimaa Khalil's grown accustomed to terror alerts and the aftermaths of bomb and gun attacks. But the 8 August bombing of a hospital in Quetta was far outside the national norm - and it specifically targeted lawyers who'd gathered there to mourn the assassination of a colleague. Quetta is the main city of Baluchistan, a restive region in Pakistan's southwest with its own separatist movement - and a recurrent source of concern for the country's central government. It's also afflicted by criminal cartels and several religiously-inspired armed groups. So what is really going on?

Photo: Pakistani lawyers shout slogans against the killing of their colleagues a day after suicide bombing at the Civil Hospital in Quetta, during a protest in Islamabad on August 9, 2016. / AFP / AAMIR QURESHI (Photo credit should read AAMIR QURESHI/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: A Targeted Profession20160818

Why are lawyers being killed in Pakistan - and particularly in the Baluchistan region?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

As a BBC correspondent in Pakistan, Shaimaa Khalil's grown accustomed to terror alerts and the aftermaths of bomb and gun attacks. But the 8 August bombing of a hospital in Quetta was far outside the national norm - and it specifically targeted lawyers who'd gathered there to mourn the assassination of a colleague. Quetta is the main city of Baluchistan, a restive region in Pakistan's southwest with its own separatist movement - and a recurrent source of concern for the country's central government. It's also afflicted by criminal cartels and several religiously-inspired armed groups. So what is really going on?

Photo: Pakistani lawyers shout slogans against the killing of their colleagues a day after suicide bombing at the Civil Hospital in Quetta, during a protest in Islamabad on August 9, 2016. / AFP / AAMIR QURESHI (Photo credit should read AAMIR QURESHI/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Beirut Feels Like Home20161027

James Longman reflects on the life in the Lebanese capital, past and present

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

James Longman's family have deep roots in the Lebanese capital, and he's returned there throughout his life - from the days of student partying, to covering more serious events as he became the BBC's Beirut Correspondent. This is an exhilarating yet infuriating city, and there are signs today that its inhabitants' legendary pride in their hometown is eroding under the strains of everyday life. So - as many people as James - "why are you here?". He considers some answers.

Photo: A Syrian man sells traditional sweets on the southern outskirts of eirut, on April 5, 2016. (ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Big Divides in the Big Apple20151231

As income inequality rises, both rich and poor face housing dilemmas in New York City

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Golda Arthur takes a journey to the extreme ends of the property market in New York City. Homelessness and income inequality have both risen in recent years here - as in the rest of the United States - and the contrast between high-end penthouses and patchily-funded public shelters is more acute than ever. Just how hard is it to find the right place to live? And where can we expect to go from here?

(Photo: Housing activists march from Zuccotti Park to New York City's City Hall to demand more affordable housing options for the homeless and poor. Credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Big Divides In The Big Apple20151231

Golda Arthur takes a journey to the extreme ends of the property market in New York City. Homelessness and income inequality have both risen in recent years here - as in the rest of the United States - and the contrast between high-end penthouses and patchily-funded public shelters is more acute than ever. Just how hard is it to find the right place to live? And where can we expect to go from here?

(Photo: Housing activists march from Zuccotti Park to New York City's City Hall to demand more affordable housing options for the homeless and poor. Credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Bleak In Berlin20151203

A special report from Chris Haslam in a hostel for new arrivals to Germany, in the Kopernick district of eastern Berlin. He meets one Syrian family who have just arrived there after "40 days in the European wilderness", fleeing war at home and making their way riskily - and expensively - via the Mediterranean Sea and the Balkans. They've made it to safety - yet Chris finds they have the look of people who've only just realised their journey is by no means over. Without family connections, cash or social status, is it likely that their aspirations for their children will be realised? And in the short term, how will they make it through this winter?

(Photo: Asylum seekers line up for their registration in front of the State Office of Health and Social Affairs in Berlin. Credit: Kay Nietfeld/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Bleak in Berlin20151203

Chris Haslam sizes up the prospects for one Syrian refugee family who made it to Germany

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special report from Chris Haslam in a hostel for new arrivals to Germany, in the Kopernick district of eastern Berlin. He meets one Syrian family who have just arrived there after "40 days in the European wilderness", fleeing war at home and making their way riskily - and expensively - via the Mediterranean Sea and the Balkans. They've made it to safety - yet Chris finds they have the look of people who've only just realised their journey is by no means over. Without family connections, cash or social status, is it likely that their aspirations for their children will be realised? And in the short term, how will they make it through this winter?

(Photo: Asylum seekers line up for their registration in front of the State Office of Health and Social Affairs in Berlin. Credit: Kay Nietfeld/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Breaking the Mould in Albania20160519

Andrew Hosken considers Albania's past, present and future - and its once-feared Segurimi

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Andrew Hosken in Tirana considers the past fears, present concerns and future aspirations of Albania - and meets a man who once led its feared security state. Many relics of its isolated, Communist era under dictator Enver Hoxha have now been turned into tourist attractions, and the country aspires to join the EU - but past habits of surveillance and mistrust still cast long shadows, and there are battles ahead to reform its power structure.

(Photo: Opposition protesters destroy a bunker installed as an artwork during a rally demanding the resignation of the government, in Tirana, 8 December, 2015. Credit: Gent Shkullaku/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Breaking The Mould In Albania20160519

Andrew Hosken in Tirana considers the past fears, present concerns and future aspirations of Albania - and meets a man who once led its feared security state. Many relics of its isolated, Communist era under dictator Enver Hoxha have now been turned into tourist attractions, and the country aspires to join the EU - but past habits of surveillance and mistrust still cast long shadows, and there are battles ahead to reform its power structure.

(Photo: Opposition protesters destroy a bunker installed as an artwork during a rally demanding the resignation of the government, in Tirana, 8 December, 2015. Credit: Gent Shkullaku/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: California's Thirsty Peaches20150806

How drought is affecting California's Central Valley and its famous fruit

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

How drought is affecting California's agricultural goldmine - the fertile Central Valley. Mas Masumoto has been growing peaches here for decades, sticking to traditional varieties and ways to grow them - but as the drought hitting California drags on and on, he is having to cut back on irrigation and sell smaller fruit. Peter Day hears how these petite peaches found their niche in the market - and gets his fingers sticky trying some!

(Photo: Mas Masumoto pictured under a peach tree on his farm in the Central Valley, California, summer 2015)

From Our Own Correspondent: Can Myanmar 'move Forward'?20151105

Ahead of Sunday's election, Jonah Fisher analyses the electoral tactics of Myanmar's power elite - and its opposition. All parties are now appealing to the public's thirst for change; even the ruling, military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party is running with a slogan proclaiming that the country needs to "Move Forward". But how can it do so if the same figures who've presided over 25 years of repression have a chance of staying in charge? And what chance does Aung San Suu Kyi's NLD movement of gaining real power?

Photo: USDP party supporters participate in an election campaign rally in Pyu township of Bago region, Myanmar on November 5, 2015. (Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Can Myanmar 'Move Forward'?20151105

Jonah Fisher on the electoral tactics of Myanmar's military - and political opposition

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Ahead of Sunday's election, Jonah Fisher analyses the electoral tactics of Myanmar's power elite - and its opposition. All parties are now appealing to the public's thirst for change; even the ruling, military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party is running with a slogan proclaiming that the country needs to "Move Forward". But how can it do so if the same figures who've presided over 25 years of repression have a chance of staying in charge? And what chance does Aung San Suu Kyi's NLD movement of gaining real power?

Photo: USDP party supporters participate in an election campaign rally in Pyu township of Bago region, Myanmar on November 5, 2015. (Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Departed Friends20160602

Jeremy Bowen reflects on war reporting and remembers three friends killed 16 years ago

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Sixteen years ago, Jeremy Bowen lost three friends, all involved in the business of war reporting. He remembers them still, and in this dispatch, considers the inherent risks of the job and the way they've changed in recent decades.

Photo: The Israeli-Lebanon border at Ghajar, May 27, 2000. (Jean-Pierre REY/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Departed Friends20160602

Sixteen years ago, Jeremy Bowen lost three friends, all involved in the business of war reporting. He remembers them still, and in this dispatch, considers the inherent risks of the job and the way they've changed in recent decades.

Photo: The Israeli-Lebanon border at Ghajar, May 27, 2000. (Jean-Pierre REY/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Disenchanted Egypt20160303

Egypt's President Sisi still has some passionate supporters - but are the masses drifting away from him? Amid a worsening economy and growing claims of human-rights abuses, political humour is getting rather pointed these days. The BBC's Orla Guerin reports from Cairo on the word on the street.

Photo: Egypt's President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi speaking to the press in Athens on December 8, 2015. (LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Disenchanted Egypt20160303

Orla Guerin reads the mood (and the jokes) of a nation now less confident in Pres Sisi

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Egypt's President Sisi still has some passionate supporters - but are the masses drifting away from him? Amid a worsening economy and growing claims of human-rights abuses, political humour is getting rather pointed these days. The BBC's Orla Guerin reports from Cairo on the word on the street.

Photo: Egypt's President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi speaking to the press in Athens on December 8, 2015. (LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Ethiopia's Omo Valley20150108

Traditional ways of life in the Omo Valley under threat from plans to farm the area

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Matthew Newsome relates how traditional ways of life in the Omo Valley are threatened by the Ethiopian government's plans to turn a "backward" region into a new breadbasket for cash crops. Local people aren't sure the change will do them or their herds any good - and the long arm of the state is working to keep journalists well away from the story.

(Photo: Local people from the Mursi group, Omo Valley, 2014. Credit: Matthew Newsome)

From Our Own Correspondent: Fergal Keane in Ukraine20150528

The fighting and dying goes on in eastern Ukraine despite the February truce

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Fergal Keane returns to eastern Ukraine, and finds that the fighting and the dying goes on, despite the February truce. The country is in a mess, corruption is rampant and there is no sign of an end to the war. The world's attention, however, has turned elsewhere.

(Photo: Ukrainian soldiers. Credit: Genya Savilov/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Finland's Reactor Blues20160609

David Shukman goes inside the site of the vast French-designed Olkiluoto reactor

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The vast Olkiluoto reactor was planned as the world's largest - and it was meant to start supplying Finland with energy years ago. But the project's completion is now long overdue and way over budget. On a recent visit to the site, David Shukman had some awkward questions for Areva, the French firm which designed the facility - and he also observed two very different business cultures at work.

Photo: Olkiluoto Nuclear Power Plant unit OL3 and the reactor hall in Eurajoki, western Finland.(MARTTI KAINULAINEN/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Finland's Reactor Blues20160609

The vast Olkiluoto reactor was planned as the world's largest - and it was meant to start supplying Finland with energy years ago. But the project's completion is now long overdue and way over budget. On a recent visit to the site, David Shukman had some awkward questions for Areva, the French firm which designed the facility - and he also observed two very different business cultures at work.

Photo: Olkiluoto Nuclear Power Plant unit OL3 and the reactor hall in Eurajoki, western Finland.(MARTTI KAINULAINEN/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: France's Charlie Hebdo attacks20150115

Hugh Schofield in Paris on the murders of cartoonists at Charlie Hebdo magazine.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Hugh Schofield in Paris on the murders of 12 people, many of them famous cartoonists, at the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. He argues that what the magazine wanted to point out to Islamists in France is that there is a difference between mockery and persecution; that words and pictures are only just that; and that part of the deal is that we rise above offence - yes, even when its towards our religion.

And he misses the world of the anarchic 70s when the worst that could happen when you showed a perhaps offensive cartoon was a letter in Le Figaro newspaper from "outraged" from Aix-les-Bains. Now you die.

From Our Own Correspondent: Gathering Seashells on the Sea Shore20161006

Jane Labous joins the seasonal shellfish-seekers on the beaches of Normandy

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Jane Labous has family roots in Normandy - her beloved 'grandmere' was a local and knew just where to find the finest shellfish on its beaches, between the sand dunes and the galloping tides. Tiny crabs, clams, mussels and winkles can all be found and dug out by hand for dinner - although there's now a legal limit on how much each beach-comber can collect. Jane joins today's 'pecheurs a pieds' - the fisherfolk on foot - to see what's in their baskets.

Photo: Alex Basnard and his daughter search for mussels along the beach in Vierville, France. (Photo Win McNamee/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Getting the Needle20150416

Lucy Ash examines the Russian approach to drug use and harm prevention

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In a special essay, Lucy Ash investigates how Russia and Ukraine tackle drug abuse - and what their different approaches mean for HIV rates and the number of drug injectors. In Russia today, the heroin substitute methadone, often used to try and get drug users' regimes under control, is banned and needle exchanges are hard to find, while many organisations trying to work with addicts have had their funds frozen, or are stigmatised for being tools of foreign influence. The Ukrainian approach has been more conciliatory until now, but can it survive amid the diplomatic and military crisis?

Photo: Bottles of the synthetic opioid Methadone are burnt during an operation by Russian Federal Drug Control Service officers in Simferopol on December 23, 2014 which destroyed nearly 30 kgs of the drug. (YURI LASHOV/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Gibraltar's Neanderthal Traces20160825

Melissa Hogenboom visits a site where some of the earliest humanoids in Europe once lived

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

From Our Own Correspondent: Gibraltar's Neanderthal Traces20160825

What could modern Europeans have inherited from hidden Neanderthal ancestors? Melissa Hogenboom considers their legacy at one of the sites on Gibraltar full of their remains.

Picture: Reconstruction of a Neanderthal, Credit: Science Photo Library

From Our Own Correspondent: Gloom and Grandeur in Naples20141225

Alan Johnston peels back the layers of history in one of Italy's most ancient cities

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Alan Johnston picks through the many layers of history on show in the streets of one of Italy's most ancient cities. Naples has seen ancient Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Norman and Spanish rulers come and go over the centuries - and outlived them all. But is its heritage now being lost, not just to the ravages of time, but to apathy and disinterest from central government and even local people?

Photo: Visitors look at volcanic stone formations in an ancient crater in the center of Naples, October 2012 (CARLO HERMANN/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Goodbye to Mark Doyle20150402

Andrew Harding pays tribute to one of the BBC's most stalwart reporters on west Africa

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In a special essay, the BBC Africa correspondent Andrew Harding pays tribute to Mark Doyle - one of the corporation's most recognised broadcasters, whose name and voice are famous not just across this continent but across the world thanks to his years of reporting.

Photo: Mark Doyle and Umaru Fofana, BBC correspondents, at work in Sierra Leone during 2014 (c) BBC

From Our Own Correspondent: Greek Election Tensions20150122

Theopi Skarlatos finds feelings are running high ahead of the Greek elections.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Theopi Skarlatos finds feelings are running high ahead of the Greek elections, so much so, a man near a newspaper kiosk even punches her in the face for speaking English. Political opinions are more polarised than they have been in decades, pitting the supporters of the leftist Syriza against those of the far-right Golden Dawn, as many voters are disillusioned with the mainstream parties.

From Our Own Correspondent: Healing Romania's Hospitals20160908

How can the much-criticised Romanian health care system be upgraded?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Romanian healthcare system isn't much reported - except as a source of horror stories. Abroad, the rest of the world has been appalled by images of near-derelict care institutions for children and the disabled, while within Romania itself, the media circulate dire tales of corruption and incompetence. Yet Caroline Juler explores one provincial hospital which has become a byword for constant improvement. A long-term project exchanging staff and expertise between Britain and the Zalau facility has helped to reform attitudes and improve care. Patients and nurses seem delighted by the changes - but what do the doctors make of it if they're no longer "treated like gods"?

Photo: Women wear surgical masks reading 'Corruption kills' in Romanian during a protest in Bucharest on May 6, 2016 following an expose of corruption in the Romanian health system. There have been accusations of a scam where the state purchased inadequate disinfectants with public funds. (DANIEL MIHAILESCU/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Healing Romania's Hospitals20160908

The Romanian healthcare system isn't much reported - except as a source of horror stories. Abroad, the rest of the world has been appalled by images of near-derelict care institutions for children and the disabled, while within Romania itself, the media circulate dire tales of corruption and incompetence. Yet Caroline Juler explores one provincial hospital which has become a byword for constant improvement. A long-term project exchanging staff and expertise between Britain and the Zalau facility has helped to reform attitudes and improve care. Patients and nurses seem delighted by the changes - but what do the doctors make of it if they're no longer "treated like gods"?

Photo: Women wear surgical masks reading 'Corruption kills' in Romanian during a protest in Bucharest on May 6, 2016 following an expose of corruption in the Romanian health system. There have been accusations of a scam where the state purchased inadequate disinfectants with public funds. (DANIEL MIHAILESCU/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Hiroshima's Paper Cranes20160526

As US President Barack Obama prepares for his visit to Hiroshima, Juliet Rix reflects on her own impressions of the city's approach to its past. The site of the world's first nuclear attack in war has made peace its watchword, and there are memorials to the dead and exhortations for harmony all over the landscape. But what do today's residents feel about the relationship between Japan and the US should be?

Photo: Juliet Rix brought back one of the symbolic paper cranes often folded and left at Hiroshima memorials to the BBC London, as a wish for peace ((c) Juliet Rix)

From Our Own Correspondent: Hiroshima's Paper Cranes20160526

Juliet Rix reflects on the legacy of the A-bomb for the city - and for America and Japan

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

As US President Barack Obama prepares for his visit to Hiroshima, Juliet Rix reflects on her own impressions of the city's approach to its past. The site of the world's first nuclear attack in war has made peace its watchword, and there are memorials to the dead and exhortations for harmony all over the landscape. But what do today's residents feel about the relationship between Japan and the US should be?

Photo: Juliet Rix brought back one of the symbolic paper cranes often folded and left at Hiroshima memorials to the BBC London, as a wish for peace ((c) Juliet Rix)

From Our Own Correspondent: Hungary's Migrant Trail20150813

A special essay from Nick Thorpe, on the path which many migrants take across Hungary and Serbia as they try to enter the EU. Are local people growing tired of the traffic? In Szeged and Horgos, the streets are full of stories of hope, despair and escape.

(Picture: Migrants from Africa are stopped by the roadide near Szeged, Hungary, July 2015. Credit: Nick Thorpe)

From Our Own Correspondent: Hungary's Migrant Trail20150813

Nick Thorpe sees how Hungary and Serbia are dealing with people trying to enter the EU.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Nick Thorpe, on the path which many migrants take across Hungary and Serbia as they try to enter the EU. Are local people growing tired of the traffic? In Szeged and Horgos, the streets are full of stories of hope, despair and escape.

(Picture: Migrants from Africa are stopped by the roadide near Szeged, Hungary, July 2015. Credit: Nick Thorpe)

From Our Own Correspondent: In Bujumbura20150521

Andrew Harding reflects on the roots of recent events in Burundi's capital

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Andrew Harding reflects on the roots of recent events in the capital of Burundi. Following President Nkurunziza's bid for a third term, there have been mass protests, deaths in the streets and tens of thousands fleeing the country. Can its current leaders hold on to power? And for how long?

Photo: Policemen hold a position on May 20, 2015 in the Musaga neighborhood of Bujumbura during a demonstration against the Burundian President's third term. (CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Ireland's Holy Mountain20151029

Croagh Patrick is a pilgrimage site which may have become too popular for its own good

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Kieran Cooke considers the future of Croagh Patrick - a sacred crag and time-honoured pilgrimage site, which may have become too popular for its own good. The sheer number of visitors - and their activities, which aren't always religious - might be damaging the mountain itself.

Photo: Pilgrims walk up Croagh Patrick: traditionally, some might make the journey barefoot, or even on their knees (AFP)

From Our Own Correspondent: Ireland's Holy Mountain20151029

Croagh Patrick is a pilgrimage site which may have become too popular for its own good

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Kieran Cooke considers the future of Croagh Patrick - a sacred crag and time-honoured pilgrimage site, which may have become too popular for its own good. The sheer number of visitors - and their activities, which aren't always religious - might be damaging the mountain itself.

Photo: Pilgrims walk up Croagh Patrick: traditionally, some might make the journey barefoot, or even on their knees (AFP)

Kieran Cooke considers the future of Croagh Patrick - a sacred crag and time-honoured pilgrimage site, which may have become too popular for its own good. The sheer number of visitors - and their activities, which aren't always religious - might be damaging the mountain itself.

Photo: Pilgrims walk up Croagh Patrick: traditionally, some might make the journey barefoot, or even on their knees (AFP)

From Our Own Correspondent: Lesotho's 'green Drought'20160630

A serious drought is affecting farmers and herders across southeastern Africa - and it spells disaster for many people in Lesotho, one of the world's most rural and agricultural societies. Garry Owen reports from the Mafetang region on what he saw - and, crucially, didn't see - amid the breathtaking landscape. For many people here, the cupboard is bare, the orchards are empty, and their crops for next year have already shrivelled and died.

Photo: Despite recent, erratic rains which have greened the hillsides with grass, many maize fields in Lesotho are now withered and will produce no food for next year. (c) BBC - Garry Owen

From Our Own Correspondent: Lesotho's 'Green Drought'20160630

Starving in slow motion as southeast Africa's crops shrivel

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A serious drought is affecting farmers and herders across southeastern Africa - and it spells disaster for many people in Lesotho, one of the world's most rural and agricultural societies. Garry Owen reports from the Mafetang region on what he saw - and, crucially, didn't see - amid the breathtaking landscape. For many people here, the cupboard is bare, the orchards are empty, and their crops for next year have already shrivelled and died.

Photo: Despite recent, erratic rains which have greened the hillsides with grass, many maize fields in Lesotho are now withered and will produce no food for next year. (c) BBC - Garry Owen

From Our Own Correspondent: Life In The Tunnel Of Stories20151015

A special essay from Nick Thorpe, the BBC correspondent in Budapest, reflecting on what it's been like for reporters covering a summer of migration. He recalls a kaleidoscope of experiences along Europe's southeastern border, the people he's met, and the responsibility of a journalist's role in feeding information back and forth along the route of a great exodus.

Photo: Osama Abdul Mohsen, the Syrian refugee who made world headlines when a Hungarian journalist tripped him over as he fled, arrives at Atocha train station in Madrid, on September 17, 2015 with his sons Zaid and Mohammad, and two others. (JAVIER SORIANO/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Life in the Tunnel of Stories20151015

Nick Thorpe reflects on what it's been like for reporters covering a summer of migration

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Nick Thorpe, the BBC correspondent in Budapest, reflecting on what it's been like for reporters covering a summer of migration. He recalls a kaleidoscope of experiences along Europe's southeastern border, the people he's met, and the responsibility of a journalist's role in feeding information back and forth along the route of a great exodus.

Photo: Osama Abdul Mohsen, the Syrian refugee who made world headlines when a Hungarian journalist tripped him over as he fled, arrives at Atocha train station in Madrid, on September 17, 2015 with his sons Zaid and Mohammad, and two others. (JAVIER SORIANO/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Llivia, A Historical Oddity20160421

Chris Bockman visits a little-known enclave in the Pyrenees where France and Spain have battled for supremacy over the centuries. These days Llivia is governed from Madrid, though its people increasingly express feelings of Catalan identity - and they're still entirely surrounded by French territory. Everything depends on the "free road" to Spain...

Picture: a historic stone crest depicting the settlement of Llivia (Owen Franken/GettyImages)

From Our Own Correspondent: Llivia, a historical oddity20160421

The Spanish enclave that's surrounded by France - but increasingly feels it's Catalan

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Chris Bockman visits a little-known enclave in the Pyrenees where France and Spain have battled for supremacy over the centuries. These days Llivia is governed from Madrid, though its people increasingly express feelings of Catalan identity - and they're still entirely surrounded by French territory. Everything depends on the "free road" to Spain...

Picture: a historic stone crest depicting the settlement of Llivia (Owen Franken/GettyImages)

From Our Own Correspondent: Malawi's Floods20150129

Rosie Blunt visits victims of Malawi's recent floods.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Rosie Blunt in Malawi reports from Malawi's Phalombe district, where hundreds have died in the floods caused by cyclone Bansi. She visits two villages that have been reduced to mud. The local people have been displaced and now live in refugee camps. They have lost everything, from their homes to their crops and money.
Floods don't just kill by drowning she says, but by destroying crops, causing famine, and disease.

Photo of children on mud amidst ruined huts in Malawi village devastated by floods by Rosie Blunt

From Our Own Correspondent: Merkel's Standing Firm20160811

After a string of bomb and gun attacks in Germany, some international media outlets ran fevered speculation that there would be a huge public backlash against migrants - and Chancellor Merkel's policy on refugees. But did the appeal of a strong story run away with these journalists? Damien McGuinness in Berlin argues that on the ground, things look very much calmer - and Mrs Merkel very much more in control - than the reportage might lead you to think.

Photo: German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives at a press conference on domestic and foreign policy in Berlin on July 28, 2016 (TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Merkel's Standing Firm20160811

Damien McGuinness argues international media have overdone reports of panic in Germany

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

After a string of bomb and gun attacks in Germany, some international media outlets ran fevered speculation that there would be a huge public backlash against migrants - and Chancellor Merkel's policy on refugees. But did the appeal of a strong story run away with these journalists? Damien McGuinness in Berlin argues that on the ground, things look very much calmer - and Mrs Merkel very much more in control - than the reportage might lead you to think.

Photo: German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives at a press conference on domestic and foreign policy in Berlin on July 28, 2016 (TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Myanmar's Malaise20150917

On a potholed road in Rakhine State, Tim Butcher witnesses a near-accident - and learns a great deal about tensions with the country's Rohingya minority. He's shocked by the anti-Rohingya sentiments vented by his guide, a usually gentle and cultured man - and wonders whether Myanmar can really pull all of its peoples together.

Photo: A Rakhine boy sits at a refugee camp in Mrauk U, in Rakhine state on October 28, 2012. (Soe Than WIN/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Myanmar's Malaise20150917

Tim Butcher explores Burmese attitudes to the Rohingya minority

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

On a potholed road in Rakhine State, Tim Butcher witnesses a near-accident - and learns a great deal about tensions with the country's Rohingya minority. He's shocked by the anti-Rohingya sentiments vented by his guide, a usually gentle and cultured man - and wonders whether Myanmar can really pull all of its peoples together.

Photo: A Rakhine boy sits at a refugee camp in Mrauk U, in Rakhine state on October 28, 2012. (Soe Than WIN/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Mysteries Of Mali20151112

Alastair Leithead reports from north of Timbuktu on the challenges for the UN mission in Mali. How will its troops tell bandits from terrorists, and identify jihadi leaders? Amid the sands of the Sahara there are flourishing markets in drugs, arms and people smuggling - and there are still suicide bombers and militant groups moving around the area. The UN force in Mali (MINUSMA) has its work cut out. By some workings this is the deadliest peacekeeping mission in the world at the moment. While negotiations go on in Bamako to hammer out a workable peace, some factions are still launching attacks in the interior even as their representatives sit down for talks in the capital.

(Photo: Members of the UN peacekeeping force in Mali prepare to go out on patrol)

From Our Own Correspondent: Mysteries of Mali20151112

How can a UN mission tell bandit from terrorist in the Sahara and defeat Mali's jihadis?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Alastair Leithead reports from north of Timbuktu on the challenges for the UN mission in Mali. How will its troops tell bandits from terrorists, and identify jihadi leaders? Amid the sands of the Sahara there are flourishing markets in drugs, arms and people smuggling - and there are still suicide bombers and militant groups moving around the area. The UN force in Mali (MINUSMA) has its work cut out. By some workings this is the deadliest peacekeeping mission in the world at the moment. While negotiations go on in Bamako to hammer out a workable peace, some factions are still launching attacks in the interior even as their representatives sit down for talks in the capital.

(Photo: Members of the UN peacekeeping force in Mali prepare to go out on patrol)

From Our Own Correspondent: New Pastures For Democracy20160707

For years Mark Doyle reported for the BBC from countries across Africa and beyond - often covering wars, coups and disasters. But he also had the chance to see new democracies, and even new nations, come to maturity. He recently visited South Sudan to help train up a new generation of radio journalists - a task which entailed going deep into rural areas to catch up with cattle herders - and was moved to consider how the reporters' work might help spread democratic values.

(Photo: A young girl stands among head of cattle at a cattle camp near Nyal, Unity state, South Sudan on 25 February, 2015. Credit: Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: New Pastures for Democracy20160707

How journalism can help democracy in South Sudan and across Africa

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

For years Mark Doyle reported for the BBC from countries across Africa and beyond - often covering wars, coups and disasters. But he also had the chance to see new democracies, and even new nations, come to maturity. He recently visited South Sudan to help train up a new generation of radio journalists - a task which entailed going deep into rural areas to catch up with cattle herders - and was moved to consider how the reporters' work might help spread democratic values.

(Photo: A young girl stands among head of cattle at a cattle camp near Nyal, Unity state, South Sudan on 25 February, 2015. Credit: Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: New Year, Old Shadows in Vienna20150101

The chequered past of an Austrian tradition: the Vienna Philharmonic's New Year concert

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Petroc Trelawny examines the chequered past of an Austrian tradition. The Vienna Philharmonic orchestra's New Year's Day concert is watched all over the world - and it's renowned for its glamour and professionalism, with the smooth, polished style of the music (mostly Strauss) reflected in the lavish gilt setting of the city's Goldener Musikvereinsaal.

Yet behind the glitz lies a measure of guilt - for this is no centuries-old tradition, but a relatively recent event, first established during the Nazi era and with many 20th Century associations which some find uncomfortable. From its invention to its invitees, it turns out, almost nothing about the history of this event is straightforward.

Photo: Detail of the ornate ceiling and balcony of Vienna's 'Goldener Musikvereinsaal', 2008. (DIETER NAGL/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: No Deal in the Niger Delta20160728

In Gbaramatu, Nigeria, a palace and university lie in ruins, symbols of dashed hope

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Once the Niger Delta region was a byword for militancy, kidnapping and rebel groups - but some years back a deal with central government seemed to address local discontent. Violence ebbed and there were signs more oil revenue would benefit small communities directly. Yet many of the facilities built, and the promises made, now look decidedly empty. Martin Patience visits the Gbaramatu kingdom to find a palace and a 'delta university' in ruins and public opinion growing increasingly restive.

(Photo: The deserted lecture hall of an abandoned training facility for oil workers)

From Our Own Correspondent: No Deal In The Niger Delta20160728

Once the Niger Delta region was a byword for militancy, kidnapping and rebel groups - but some years back a deal with central government seemed to address local discontent. Violence ebbed and there were signs more oil revenue would benefit small communities directly. Yet many of the facilities built, and the promises made, now look decidedly empty. Martin Patience visits the Gbaramatu kingdom to find a palace and a 'delta university' in ruins and public opinion growing increasingly restive.

(Photo: The deserted lecture hall of an abandoned training facility for oil workers)

From Our Own Correspondent: Old Enemies Unite20160915

Nick Thorpe reports from Szigetvar, Hungary - burial site of Suleiman the Magnificent

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Suleiman the Magnificent was one of the Ottoman empire's most renowned sultans - and led several of its military expansions. In Szigetvar, Hungary, Nick Thorpe recently witnessed a commemoration of the great siege and battle between Ottoman and European forces which took place there 450 years ago. The ceremony revealed much - not just about history, but also about current alliances and tensions in the region, as Hungarian, Croatian and Turkish delegations all showed up. But whose military band shone brightest?

Photo: Statues of the rival military leaders of the 16th century Ottoman Sultan Suleiman (R) and his opponent Miklos Zrinyi (L) at the Hungarian-Turkish friendship park in Szigetvar, Hungary, September 2, 2016. (ATTILA KISBENEDEK/AFP/GettyImages)

From Our Own Correspondent: Old Enemies Unite20160915

Suleiman the Magnificent was one of the Ottoman empire's most renowned sultans - and led several of its military expansions. In Szigetvar, Hungary, Nick Thorpe recently witnessed a commemoration of the great siege and battle between Ottoman and European forces which took place there 450 years ago. The ceremony revealed much - not just about history, but also about current alliances and tensions in the region, as Hungarian, Croatian and Turkish delegations all showed up. But whose military band shone brightest?

Photo: Statues of the rival military leaders of the 16th century Ottoman Sultan Suleiman (R) and his opponent Miklos Zrinyi (L) at the Hungarian-Turkish friendship park in Szigetvar, Hungary, September 2, 2016. (ATTILA KISBENEDEK/AFP/GettyImages)

From Our Own Correspondent: Paris Bandstands20150730

The social and musical riches to be found around the bandstands of the French capital

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Joanna Robertson revels in the social and musical riches to be found around the bandstands of Paris - particularly in the summer months.

Photo: Amateur dancers dressed in period costumes take part in a 19th Century Ball at the bandstand of the Luxembourg Gardens on August 23, 2012, in Paris. (KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/GettyImages)

From Our Own Correspondent: Paris, Left and Right20160714

Hugh Schofield looks at the social and political divides of through the French capital

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Paris is an intensely political city, with a storied history of activism and gesture - and it's also a place where neighbourhood pride and identity are strong. Longtime resident Hugh Schofield explores its social and ideological frontlines - and explains why he still feels a frisson every time he crosses over to the 'other side'.

Photo: The French elite acrobatic flying team Patrouille de France (PAF) release smoke in the colours of the French flag during the annual Bastille Day military parade in Paris on July 14, 2016. (DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Paris, Left And Right20160714

Paris is an intensely political city, with a storied history of activism and gesture - and it's also a place where neighbourhood pride and identity are strong. Longtime resident Hugh Schofield explores its social and ideological frontlines - and explains why he still feels a frisson every time he crosses over to the 'other side'.

Photo: The French elite acrobatic flying team Patrouille de France (PAF) release smoke in the colours of the French flag during the annual Bastille Day military parade in Paris on July 14, 2016. (DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Partisan Politics In Bangladesh20161013

Justin Rowlatt and his BBC team were the first journalists readmitted to the scene of the Holey Bakery attack in Dhaka - and found it still covered with signs of the horror of that assault. The state hunted down many of those involved, but now there are concerns about how the government is prosecuting its security policies. Is the fight against terrorism being compromised by the country's extremely polarised party politics - and what's to be done next?

Photo: Supporters of the Bangladesh Awami League form a human chain in Dhaka on December 10, 2013. (MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Partisan Politics in Bangladesh20161013

Justin Rowlatt revisits the Holey Bakery and evaluates today's security measures

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Justin Rowlatt and his BBC team were the first journalists readmitted to the scene of the Holey Bakery attack in Dhaka - and found it still covered with signs of the horror of that assault. The state hunted down many of those involved, but now there are concerns about how the government is prosecuting its security policies. Is the fight against terrorism being compromised by the country's extremely polarised party politics - and what's to be done next?

Photo: Supporters of the Bangladesh Awami League form a human chain in Dhaka on December 10, 2013. (MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Pesto Made Perfectly20160414

Dany Mitzman reveals one man's work to revive the traditional method of making pesto - the garlicky, basil-based sauce which is now eaten around the world. In former times it was pounded in a pestle and mortar, but many Italians now make it in a blender - while some "pesto" sold outside Italy doesn't even contain any basil at all! But Roberto Panizza is bringing back the handmade product, and inviting contestants from around the world to Genoa for a competition this weekend, to see if they can do any better.

Photo: Pesto as it should be - photographed by Dany Mitzman

From Our Own Correspondent: Pesto Made Perfectly20160414

One man's work to revive the traditional method for a sauce which has won the world over

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Dany Mitzman reveals one man's work to revive the traditional method of making pesto - the garlicky, basil-based sauce which is now eaten around the world. In former times it was pounded in a pestle and mortar, but many Italians now make it in a blender - while some "pesto" sold outside Italy doesn't even contain any basil at all! But Roberto Panizza is bringing back the handmade product, and inviting contestants from around the world to Genoa for a competition this weekend, to see if they can do any better.

Photo: Pesto as it should be - photographed by Dany Mitzman

From Our Own Correspondent: Plane Crazy In Perpignan20161020

Five years ago today, Colonel Gaddafi was killed by a mob, as Libya threw off his decades-long rule and entered a chaotic period of revolution. Since then, questions of authority and ownership of state assets have only become more complex. One item which symbolises the problem is the former leader's private plane - which has somehow ended up grounded on the tarmac of a French airstrip. Chris Bockman traces the legal battles which have left this expensive white elephant immobile - and in dispute.

Photo: Gaddafi's Airbus A340 plane on the premises of the maintenance company EAS Industries, a subsidiary of Air France, in Rivesaltes (RAYMOND ROIG/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Plane Crazy in Perpignan20161020

The legal battles over Colonel Gaddafi's private jet

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Five years ago today, Colonel Gaddafi was killed by a mob, as Libya threw off his decades-long rule and entered a chaotic period of revolution. Since then, questions of authority and ownership of state assets have only become more complex. One item which symbolises the problem is the former leader's private plane - which has somehow ended up grounded on the tarmac of a French airstrip. Chris Bockman traces the legal battles which have left this expensive white elephant immobile - and in dispute.

Photo: Gaddafi's Airbus A340 plane on the premises of the maintenance company EAS Industries, a subsidiary of Air France, in Rivesaltes (RAYMOND ROIG/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Rescuing Dogs to Rescue People20150709

Zeb Soanes meets a driven woman who's saving dogs so they can learn to save human lives.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Zeb Soanes in California. Wilma Melville is a former physical-education teacher who was moved to try and help in the search for survivors of the Oklahoma City bombing of 1995. Since then she's raised millions of thousands of dollars to fund the National Disaster Search Dog Foundation, which trains dogs to find and rescue people amid the wreckage of natural disasters and terror attacks. They've worked in the ruins of the World Trade Centre after 9/11 and the shattered cities of Nepal this year. What has driven her along this extraordinary journey?

Photo: One of the dogs Wilma Melville has trained working with a handler to seek out survivors of the earthquakes in Nepal, April 2015. (c) National Disaster Search Dog Foundation

From Our Own Correspondent: Retaking Ramadi20160107

A special essay from BBC correspondent Thomas Fessy on the process of driving so-called Islamic State fighters out of one central Iraqi city - and the risks which still lurk there. Retaking Ramadi might strengthen the self-esteem of Iraq's armed forces (who abandoned it last year), but at what cost? And could this advance really be scaled up and re-run in other areas of the state?

Photo: Members of Iraq's counter-terrorism service flash the victory sign on December 29, 2015 in the city of Ramadi, the capital of Iraq's Anbar province, after Iraqi forces recaptured it from the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group. (AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Retaking Ramadi20160107

Thomas Fessy was with the Iraqi forces driving Islamic State out of a central Iraqi city

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from BBC correspondent Thomas Fessy on the process of driving so-called Islamic State fighters out of one central Iraqi city - and the risks which still lurk there. Retaking Ramadi might strengthen the self-esteem of Iraq's armed forces (who abandoned it last year), but at what cost? And could this advance really be scaled up and re-run in other areas of the state?

Photo: Members of Iraq's counter-terrorism service flash the victory sign on December 29, 2015 in the city of Ramadi, the capital of Iraq's Anbar province, after Iraqi forces recaptured it from the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group. (AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Seeds of Destruction20150514

Mark Tully traces the roots of Indian farmers' despair - and explores one way out

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Mark Tully traces the roots of Indian farmers' despair - and some possible tactics for defeating it. Making a living from the land is never easy, even when the weather is kind. People in rural India are often also at the mercy of slow, complex or corrupt banking systems as they try to raise credit for seeds, fertilisers and equipment. Much-publicised suicides have repeatedly drawn attention to their problems - yet one initiative after another from central government seems to have tried and failed to alleviate these hurdles. Could a network of "barefoot professionals", from dentists to bankers to solar-panel installers, do any better in addressing Indian villagers' needs?

Photo: Boys in Tilonia, Rajasthan, help to process a harvest of mustard seed. (c) Getty Images/Dario Mitidieri

From Our Own Correspondent: Set a Soldier to Stop a Poacher20160929

Why some South African game reserves are turning to military tactics to protect wildlife

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

As the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) meets in Johannesburg, Chris Terrill travels to a more rural corner of South Africa to see what saving wildlife can mean on the ground. In the KwaZulu Natal region, the privately-owned game reserve Thula Thula now feels its rhinos are under such a great threat from poachers that it's turned to military tactics (and advice from a former British Royal Marine commando) to keep these animals safe. But will this kind of training also help the game wardens stay alive?

Photo: ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images

From Our Own Correspondent: Sexual Equality Class for Refugees in Finland20160128

Emma Jane Kirby visits a Finnish sexual equality class for refugees from Muslim countries

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

From Our Own Correspondent: Sexual Equality Class For Refugees In Finland20160128

Emma Jane Kirby visits a sexual equality class in Finland for refugees from mainly Muslim countries with different attitudes to women.

(Photo: Refugees taking Finnish sexual equality class being taught by a Red Cross worker)

From Our Own Correspondent: Sing a Song of Sami Pride20160121

Petroc Trelawny sees - and hears - indigenous identity gaining a new energy in Norway

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

With a nomadic culture oriented around reindeer-herding and fishing, Scandinavia's indigenous Sami people were once marginalised and derided. The Christian Church rejected their artforms; national governments denied them self-rule; and their children were often carted off to residential boarding schools to enforce their assimilation into the majority culture. But in recent decades their identity has gained new energy in Nordic countries and their heritage is being actively promoted. In the far north of Norway, in Tromso, Petroc Trelawny met some adults - and even more children - keeping Sami language and song alive, especially the unique "joik" vocal style.

Photo: Petroc Trelawny and Sami singer Biret Álhttá Mienna by the shore near Tromso, winter 2015. (c) BBC

From Our Own Correspondent: Sing A Song Of Sami Pride20160121

With a nomadic culture oriented around reindeer-herding and fishing, Scandinavia's indigenous Sami people were once marginalised and derided. The Christian Church rejected their artforms; national governments denied them self-rule; and their children were often carted off to residential boarding schools to enforce their assimilation into the majority culture. But in recent decades their identity has gained new energy in Nordic countries and their heritage is being actively promoted. In the far north of Norway, in Tromso, Petroc Trelawny met some adults - and even more children - keeping Sami language and song alive, especially the unique "joik" vocal style.

Photo: Petroc Trelawny and Sami singer Biret ?lhttá Mienna by the shore near Tromso, winter 2015. (c) BBC

From Our Own Correspondent: Slow Train to Melbourne20160804

Petroc Trelawny lets the train take the strain on a multi-stop journey from Sydney

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

You might think that a vast, mostly empty country with huge distances between its major cities would be a natural home for rail travel. Australia's industries have certainly relied heavily on trains for years - but for passengers it is a different story. Petroc Trelawny was recently told that "everyone" flies between Sydney and Melbourne - and it is certainly one of the world's busiest air routes. But in fact there are still train services between the two cities, and he found a recent journey along the route illuminated plenty about today's Australia.

(Photo: View from the window of a train service (c) Petroc Trelawny 2016)

From Our Own Correspondent: Slow Train To Melbourne20160804

You might think that a vast, mostly empty country with huge distances between its major cities would be a natural home for rail travel. Australia's industries have certainly relied heavily on trains for years - but for passengers it is a different story. Petroc Trelawny was recently told that "everyone" flies between Sydney and Melbourne - and it is certainly one of the world's busiest air routes. But in fact there are still train services between the two cities, and he found a recent journey along the route illuminated plenty about today's Australia.

(Photo: View from the window of a train service (c) Petroc Trelawny 2016)

From Our Own Correspondent: Solomon Islands20160331

The UK once ruled the Solomon Islands as a British Protectorate - but the world is a very different place now and Australia and New Zealand are the major regional powers in the Pacific. But as Patrick Gregory finds in Honiara, this nation's Parliament still follows the Westminster model - even 11 time zones and half a world away from London. Still, are the British as aware of the Solomons as the Solomon Islands are of Great Britain?

Photo: Local children wait to greet Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge as they visit Tuvanipupu Island in September 2012, near the Solomon Islands capital Honiara on Guadalcanal Island. (Chris Jackson /Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Solomon Islands20160331

What traces remain of the long relationship between the Solomon Islands and the UK?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The UK once ruled the Solomon Islands as a British Protectorate - but the world is a very different place now and Australia and New Zealand are the major regional powers in the Pacific. But as Patrick Gregory finds in Honiara, this nation's Parliament still follows the Westminster model - even 11 time zones and half a world away from London. Still, are the British as aware of the Solomons as the Solomon Islands are of Great Britain?

Photo: Local children wait to greet Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge as they visit Tuvanipupu Island in September 2012, near the Solomon Islands capital Honiara on Guadalcanal Island. (Chris Jackson /Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Something's changed in South Africa20150219

Andrew Harding fears democracy is in decline in President Zuma's South Africa

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Andrew Harding fears democracy is in decline in South Africa, as President Zuma gets the police to remove opposition MPs from the Opening of parliament and State of the Nation speech, rather than answer their question about when he'll comply with an order to pay back public money he spent on his private residence.

(Photo: President Zuma at the opening of parliament and state of the nation address in Cape Town. Credit: Reuters/Nic Bothma/Pool)

From Our Own Correspondent: South Korea's Changing Tastes20160225

Some of the finest bakers in France were recently humiliated as the Coupe du Monde du Boulangerie in Paris - the most prestigious competition in the world of patisserie - declared that the best baguettes had been made by a team from South Korea. BBC Seoul correspondent Steve Evans reflects on how food has changed there over the past four decades - not just what people eat, as the nation's diet moves from rice to wheat, but also who does the cooking and where they are eating. It turns out that image is ever more important - and part of the reason the nation is feeling sophisticated and globalised lies in enjoying an increasingly varied menu.

(Photo: South Korea's team celebrate with their trophy after winning the first place during the Bakery world cup, as part of the Europain fair 2016, in Villepinte near Paris. Credit: Francois Guillot/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: South Korea's Changing Tastes20160225

Why the world's best baguettes are no longer made by French, but South Korean bakers

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Some of the finest bakers in France were recently humiliated as the Coupe du Monde du Boulangerie in Paris - the most prestigious competition in the world of patisserie - declared that the best baguettes had been made by a team from South Korea. BBC Seoul correspondent Steve Evans reflects on how food has changed there over the past four decades - not just what people eat, as the nation's diet moves from rice to wheat, but also who does the cooking and where they are eating. It turns out that image is ever more important - and part of the reason the nation is feeling sophisticated and globalised lies in enjoying an increasingly varied menu.

(Photo: South Korea's team celebrate with their trophy after winning the first place during the Bakery world cup, as part of the Europain fair 2016, in Villepinte near Paris. Credit: Francois Guillot/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Sweden Considers Joining Nato20160211

Paul Adams visits an old military fort on the strategic Baltic island of Gotland as Sweden is considering joining Nato, after staying neutral throughout the Cold War.

(Photo: Visby's defence tower, part of the city wall. Credit: Paul Adams)

From Our Own Correspondent: Sweden Considers Joining Nato20160211

Paul Adams visits the Baltic island of Gotland as Sweden is considering joining Nato

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

From Our Own Correspondent: Talking Shop With Poland's Grocers20151119

A special essay from Alex Duval Smith weighs up the economic and political future in Warsaw. Polish voters surprised the rest of the EU recently by rejecting the "Civil Platform" government of the last eight years to elect the more traditionalist and inward-looking Law and Justice Party. Over the past decade, Poland has welcomed foreign businesses, brands and lifestyle, but will that last? We take a view from a family-owned small business.

Photo: Janina Zurowska-Filipek, pictured in her grocery in Warsaw. (c) Alex Duval Smith

From Our Own Correspondent: Talking Shop with Poland's Grocers20151119

Alex Duval Smith weighs up the economic and political future in Warsaw

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Alex Duval Smith weighs up the economic and political future in Warsaw. Polish voters surprised the rest of the EU recently by rejecting the "Civil Platform" government of the last eight years to elect the more traditionalist and inward-looking Law & Justice Party. Over the past decade, Poland has welcomed foreign businesses, brands and lifestyle, but will that last? We take a view from a family-owned small business.

Photo: Janina Zurowska-Filipek, pictured in her grocery in Warsaw. (c) Alex Duval Smith

From Our Own Correspondent: Tarara - from communism to kitesurfing20160114

One Cuban seaside town has hosted Che Guevara, Chernobyl survivors, and now kitesurfers

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The BBC's Will Grant traces the history of the seaside retreat of Tarara, outside Havana - which over the decades has been a haven for revolutionary Che Guevara, child survivors of the Chernobyl disaster, and now a growing number of kitesurfers.

Photo: Matteo Gatti has been at the forefront of Tarara's growing kitesurfing scene (c) Will Grant BBC

From Our Own Correspondent: Tarara - From Communism To Kitesurfing20160114

The BBC's Will Grant traces the history of the seaside retreat of Tarara, outside Havana - which over the decades has been a haven for revolutionary Che Guevara, child survivors of the Chernobyl disaster, and now a growing number of kitesurfers.

Photo: Matteo Gatti has been at the forefront of Tarara's growing kitesurfing scene (c) Will Grant BBC

From Our Own Correspondent: Tea And Tv With A Tibetan Monk20160324

In a monastery in eastern Tibet, Horatio Clare hears what a lifetime's devotion to Buddhism demands. While many older monks have spent decades chanting, working and helping their communities, new technology is now challenging the culture and distracting younger novices.

Photo: A young Buddhist monk carries tea for elder monks during morning prayers at the Thikse Monastery on October 5, 2012 near Leh in Ladakh, India. (Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Tea and TV with a Tibetan Monk20160324

Over yak-butter tea, Horatio Clare learns about lifetime's devotion to Tibetan Buddhism

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In a monastery in eastern Tibet, Horatio Clare hears what a lifetime's devotion to Buddhism demands. While many older monks have spent decades chanting, working and helping their communities, new technology is now challenging the culture and distracting younger novices.

Photo: A young Buddhist monk carries tea for elder monks during morning prayers at the Thikse Monastery on October 5, 2012 near Leh in Ladakh, India. (Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Thai surrogate mothers20150226

As Thailand bans surrogacy, Jonathan Head meets some women who had babies for others.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Thai government has banned commercial surrogacy for foreigners as babies had become commodities. Jonathan Head meets some Thai women who had babies for others, and finds they would do it again despite the heartache of handing over the newborn, as it is a way of earning a lot of money relatively easily.
But another surrogate, who has yet to give birth, now wants to keep the baby when it is born, and is having to hide from the agents who brokered the deal with the Chinese biological parents.

Photo of surrogate wearing a balaclava to protect her identity at a press conference by BBC

From Our Own Correspondent: The Anti-Semite's Secret20150507

Csanad Szegedi was a far-right Hungarian nationalist. Then he found out he was Jewish

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from our Budapest correspondent Nick Thorpe: the extraordinary story of Csanad Szegedi. Once he was a far-right Hungarian nationalist - the deputy leader of the Jobbik party. He shared its views and its anti-minority rhetoric. But three years ago he uncovered some family secrets, delved into the past and found out he was, in fact, Jewish himself. Where has this left his political thinking - and his approach to life? Nick Thorpe accompanies him on a school speaking tour to find out.

(Photo: Csanad Szegedi (c) BBC)

From Our Own Correspondent: The Coffee of a Lifetime20150409

The worldwide coffee industry and where to get the best cupful on Earth

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Peter Day has criss-crossed the world reporting on the global coffee industry. It is big news in business terms - coffee is said to be the developing world's most valuable freely-traded commodity, second in value only to oil. It's a sector which often tries out new marketing tricks and capitalises on buzzwords - from 'organic' to 'artisan'. But in the end it revolves around human satisfaction, and what the drinker likes best. From Indonesia's 'kopi luwak' (previously eaten and excreted by civet cats) to the market-busting beans of Vietnam, Peter recalls some of his hottest tips - and reveals where to get the best cupful he's ever tasted anywhere.

From Our Own Correspondent: The Count And The Corncrake20150903

A special essay from Transylvania, looking at how one Romanian nobleman is working to save rural species and tradition. This corner of the world still preserves some agricultural ways which have died out elsewhere in Europe - from bare-necked pedigree chickens to hand-scything the fields. It is a slower pace of life, but Count Tibor Kalnoky is passionate about preserving the environment, including some much-loved flower meadows and that charismatic bird the corncrake.

(Photo: A corncrake, Crex crex. Credit: Charlotte Smith)

From Our Own Correspondent: The Count and the Corncrake20150903

The Romanian nobleman saving rural species and traditions

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Transylvania, looking at how one Romanian nobleman is working to save rural species and tradition. This corner of the world still preserves some agricultural ways which have died out elsewhere in Europe - from bare-necked pedigree chickens to hand-scything the fields. It is a slower pace of life, but Count Tibor Kalnoky is passionate about preserving the environment, including some much-loved flower meadows and that charismatic bird the corncrake.

(Photo: A corncrake, Crex crex. Credit: Charlotte Smith)

From Our Own Correspondent: The Fellowship of the Ring20151217

How Tim Butcher recovered a buried family treasure from a South African beach

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

From Our Own Correspondent: The Fellowship Of The Ring20151217

The tale of a family heirloom lost on a South African beach - and its near-miraculous recovery. When Tim Butcher realised he couldn't find his father's gold ring, panic struck - but a generous "detectionist" saved the day.

Photo: Tim Butcher and sons, with the recovered ring

From Our Own Correspondent: The FN's recipe for France20151210

A Front National mayor beautifies his town - but what are his real views on the nation?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

As the Front National makes gains in France's regional elections, Gabriel Gatehouse meets one of the party's mayors in the small town of Cogolin, near the Cote d'Azur. Marc-Etienne Lansade explains why he wants more police and pot plants (and fewer foreign food stalls) on his patch - and some constituents seem to like what he's done so far. But what are his real views on the state of the nation?

Photo: Marc-Etienne Lansade pictured in his tricolor sash after winning the post of Mayor of Cogolin in April 2014 (JEAN-CHRISTOPHE MAGNENET/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: The Fn's Recipe For France20151210

As the Front National makes gains in France's regional elections, Gabriel Gatehouse meets one of the party's mayors in the small town of Cogolin, near the Cote d'Azur. Marc-Etienne Lansade explains why he wants more police and pot plants (and fewer foreign food stalls) on his patch - and some constituents seem to like what he's done so far. But what are his real views on the state of the nation?

Photo: Marc-Etienne Lansade pictured in his tricolor sash after winning the post of Mayor of Cogolin in April 2014 (JEAN-CHRISTOPHE MAGNENET/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: The Power of the Piston20160505

How the right personal connections in France can cut through the red tape of bureaucracy

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Hugh Schofield has lived in Paris for a long time - but until recently he felt like a complete outsider to the game of getting things done. In negotiating complex bureaucracy, local politics or diplomatic challenges, it felt as though everyone else was playing by different rules - and possibly using their personal connections to get on an inside track. But more recently he has learned how to use his own personal network, and get wheels turning...

(Photo: A view of the National Assembly, the lower house of the French Parliament. Credit: Franck Prevel/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: The Power Of The Piston20160505

Hugh Schofield has lived in Paris for a long time - but until recently he felt like a complete outsider to the game of getting things done. In negotiating complex bureaucracy, local politics or diplomatic challenges, it felt as though everyone else was playing by different rules - and possibly using their personal connections to get on an inside track. But more recently he has learned how to use his own personal network, and get wheels turning...

(Photo: A view of the National Assembly, the lower house of the French Parliament. Credit: Franck Prevel/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: The 'Tiger' of the Danube20150326

Reintroducing a regal fish, Hucho Hucho aka the 'Danube salmon', to the Sava River

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Despite decades of ecological damage, the great River Danube is still home to all sorts of Europe's most exciting species - birds, mammals, and fish. But some of them often seem to be swimming against the tide - or the current - as they try to survive. Nick Thorpe joins the anglers and biologists working to reintroduce a regal fish, Hucho Hucho, also know as the 'Danube salmon', once a common sight to the waters of the Sava River. It is a magnificent creature, beloved by anglers and admired by environmentalists, who all want to see its numbers along the watercourse increase. But can this species - which one campaigner compares to the endangered wild tiger - still find places to spawn in peace?

(Photo: a bucket of captive-bred young Danube salmon (Hucho hucho) about to be released into the Sava River. (c) Nick Thorpe/BBC)

From Our Own Correspondent: the UAE's paradoxical religious freedom20150716

Matthew Teller explores how non-Muslims live and worship in Dubai

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Matthew Teller explores the status of non-Muslim faiths in the UAE. Many of the Gulf states are known for hard-line prohibition of the symbols and rites of religions other than Islam. But in Dubai, with its huge and globalised population of migrant workers from around the world, things are rather different. While proselytising and public displays of Christianity are banned, the city is home to many churches and temples - from Sikh gurdwaras to Catholic, Protestant and Coptic cathedrals. And some of the congregants there believe there's more religious freedom in the UAE than they enjoy in their home countries.

Photo: Exterior of a Greek Orthodox church in Dubai.

From Our Own Correspondent: The View from Oryol20150423

Bridget Kendall visits Oryol, a Russian provincial town with a rich literary heritage

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Bridget Kendall visits Oryol, a Russian provincial town with a rich literary heritage, and reflects on what the future holds for people and places far from Moscow. This place is associated with a long list of famous writers - Ivan Turgenev, Ivan Bunin, Nikolai Leskov, the poets Tyutchev and Fet, the short story writer Leonid Andreev - but feels increasingly adrift from the rest of the country. Is it really trapped in time - and do other regional towns share this fate?

(Photo: A woman outside her dilapidated home in Oryol. (c) BBC 2015)

From Our Own Correspondent: Time of the Mayfly20160721

Diarmaid Fleming joins the anglers flocking to fish trout in Western Ireland's loughs

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The mayfly is a butterfly-sized insect which hatches in the lakes of Western Ireland during early summer. As Diarmaid Fleming explains, the swarms make a favoured meal for brown trout - and that means a minor stampede of keen anglers hoping to reel in some delicious fish. In County Galway, the mayfly's habits and appearance are the stuff of local gossip and great excitement.

Photo: a mayfly of the order Ephemeroptera (c) BBC

From Our Own Correspondent: Time Of The Mayfly20160721

The mayfly is a butterfly-sized insect which hatches in the lakes of Western Ireland during early summer. As Diarmaid Fleming explains, the swarms make a favoured meal for brown trout - and that means a minor stampede of keen anglers hoping to reel in some delicious fish. In County Galway, the mayfly's habits and appearance are the stuff of local gossip and great excitement.

Photo: a mayfly of the order Ephemeroptera (c) BBC

From Our Own Correspondent: Trouble in Paradise?20160901

Political intrigue simmers in the Maldives and Justin Rowlatt reports on rumours of a coup

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Maldives are best known around the world as a string of paradise islands in the Indian Ocean, home to some of the world's most expensive and luxurious resorts. But this nation is very much embroiled in politics - both local and regional - and rumours recently circulated about a possible change of government. Justin Rowlatt recently tried to see through the murk and report on what was really happening. Could he dodge the government restrictions - and the loitering eavesdroppers to find the truth?

(Photo: Hotel accommodation on an ocean atoll - the classic image of the Maldives abroad. Credit: iStock)

From Our Own Correspondent: Trouble In Paradise?20160901

The Maldives are best known around the world as a string of paradise islands in the Indian Ocean, home to some of the world's most expensive and luxurious resorts. But this nation is very much embroiled in politics - both local and regional - and rumours recently circulated about a possible change of government. Justin Rowlatt recently tried to see through the murk and report on what was really happening. Could he dodge the government restrictions - and the loitering eavesdroppers to find the truth?

(Photo: Hotel accommodation on an ocean atoll - the classic image of the Maldives abroad. Credit: iStock)

From Our Own Correspondent: Tunisia's Sad Fishmongers20160512

In Tunis Central Market, fish stalls can reveal much of the country's frustrated hopes

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

When people complain of a seemingly irrelevant problem, English speakers often reply: "What's that got to do with the price of fish"? Well, in a dispatch from Tunisia's central market, Ed Lewis reveals the answer is - everything. In Tunis, strikes, unemployment, terror attacks and political uncertainty have all had a direct effect on the lives of fishmongers and their customers.

(Photo: Women buy fish at Tunis central market during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Credot: Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Tunisia's Sad Fishmongers20160512

When people complain of a seemingly irrelevant problem, English speakers often reply: "What's that got to do with the price of fish"? Well, in a dispatch from Tunisia's central market, Ed Lewis reveals the answer is - everything. In Tunis, strikes, unemployment, terror attacks and political uncertainty have all had a direct effect on the lives of fishmongers and their customers.

(Photo: Women buy fish at Tunis central market during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Credot: Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

From Our Own Correspondent: Via Egnatia, the road that lost its way20160317

Elizabeth Gowing takes a roadtrip - or tries to - along a route which once linked empires

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In a special essay, Elizabeth Gowing recounts the experience of taking a road trip - or at least trying to - in northern Greece along a route which once linked empires. The Via Egnatia of antiquity let people travel between Roman territory, Greece and Byzantium, and in recent years the EU has paid out generously to fund a partial rebuild. Along the way, Elizabeth notes the quality and comfort of the new surfacing, as well as the sheer number of new bridges and crossings - but she isn't entirely convinced that this new road recaptures all the grandeur and adventure of the ancient one.

Photo: a surviving section of the ancient Via Egnatia, seen near Radozhda, Macedonia. (c) Marion Golsteijn, 2013, wikicommons

From Our Own Correspondent: Via Egnatia, The Road That Lost Its Way20160317

In a special essay, Elizabeth Gowing recounts the experience of taking a road trip - or at least trying to - in northern Greece along a route which once linked empires. The Via Egnatia of antiquity let people travel between Roman territory, Greece and Byzantium, and in recent years the EU has paid out generously to fund a partial rebuild. Along the way, Elizabeth notes the quality and comfort of the new surfacing, as well as the sheer number of new bridges and crossings - but she isn't entirely convinced that this new road recaptures all the grandeur and adventure of the ancient one.

Photo: a surviving section of the ancient Via Egnatia, seen near Radozhda, Macedonia. (c) Marion Golsteijn, 2013, wikicommons

From Our Own Correspondent: War Graves in South Korea20160407

BBC Seoul correspondent Steve Evans reflects on the remains of the 1950s Korean War

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In a recent ceremony (pictured above), South Korea and China honoured the remains of Chinese soldiers who fought and died in the Korean War of the 1950s. These bodies are to be taken back to China and buried there. Yet relations with North Korea, just over the border, are more fractious - and Pyongyang, too, left tens of thousands of dead in the South. The remains of those men are very unlikely to be repatriated any time soon. BBC Seoul correspondent Steve Evans reflects on the political and human remains left by the Korean war - and why attitudes to it are so different in China and North Korea today.

Photo: Chinese honor guards salute caskets containing the remains of Chinese soldiers with Chinese national flags during a handing over ceremony of the remains at the Incheon International Airport, March 31, 2016. The coffins carry the remains of 36 soldiers - excavated by South Korea's Defence Ministry from March to November last year - which were flown to the northeastern city of Shenyang, where China has a state cemetery for its war dead. / AFP / POOL / KIM HONG-JI

From Our Own Correspondent: War Graves In South Korea20160407

In a recent ceremony (pictured above), South Korea and China honoured the remains of Chinese soldiers who fought and died in the Korean War of the 1950s. These bodies are to be taken back to China and buried there. Yet relations with North Korea, just over the border, are more fractious - and Pyongyang, too, left tens of thousands of dead in the South. The remains of those men are very unlikely to be repatriated any time soon. BBC Seoul correspondent Steve Evans reflects on the political and human remains left by the Korean war - and why attitudes to it are so different in China and North Korea today.

Photo: Chinese honor guards salute caskets containing the remains of Chinese soldiers with Chinese national flags during a handing over ceremony of the remains at the Incheon International Airport, March 31, 2016. The coffins carry the remains of 36 soldiers - excavated by South Korea's Defence Ministry from March to November last year - which were flown to the northeastern city of Shenyang, where China has a state cemetery for its war dead. / AFP / POOL / KIM HONG-JI

Honour20141231

Honour. People have fought for it and died for it. Why is this notion so powerful?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Honour. People have fought for it and died for it. People have murdered others because of it. Why is this notion so powerful and so lasting? In this edition we examine the honour-codes of the Japanese samurai, we explore honour in the works of Williams Shakespeare and look at the persistence of so-called honour killings.

Produced by Ian Muir-Cochrane

Inquiry20151202
Inquiry20151202

Inquiry20151202

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Inquiry20160928
Inquiry20161026
Inquiry: Has Russia Won In Ukraine?20160810

Inquiry: Has Russia Won In Ukraine?20160810

Anna Arutunyan explains why Putin has limited control

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

What did President Putin want when he sent men and arms to fight in Eastern Ukraine - and has he got it? In this excerpt from The Inquiry Moscow-based journalist Anna Arutunyan sets out why Putin has limited control over events in Ukraine.

(Image: Russia's President Vladimir Putin attends a rally by the Kremlin Wall in central Moscow. Credit to Getty Images)

Inquiry: Has Russia Won In Ukraine?20160810

What did President Putin want when he sent men and arms to fight in Eastern Ukraine - and has he got it? In this excerpt from The Inquiry Moscow-based journalist Anna Arutunyan sets out why Putin has limited control over events in Ukraine.

(Image: Russia's President Vladimir Putin attends a rally by the Kremlin Wall in central Moscow. Credit to Getty Images)

Inquiry: Has Russia Won In Ukraine?20160810

What did President Putin want when he sent men and arms to fight in Eastern Ukraine - and has he got it? In this excerpt from The Inquiry Moscow-based journalist Anna Arutunyan sets out why Putin has limited control over events in Ukraine.

(Image: Russia's President Vladimir Putin attends a rally by the Kremlin Wall in central Moscow. Credit to Getty Images)

Iraq\u2019s \u2018Angel of Death\u201920150323

Who is the man Iraqi\u2019s are calling the Angel of Death, Abu Azrael? Trending investigates.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Who is the man Iraqi’s are calling the Angel of Death? With several Facebook pages dedicated to photos of him, videos of the man in action, and memes hailing the new hero, Trending investigates the social media campaign behind Abu Azrael.
Has this bearded, bulked up character really just emerged from the rubble of Tikrit just as Iraqi’s need a saviour? Or is he part of an organised campaign that is joining the online propaganda war alongside ISIS?
We speak to the journalist in Baghdad who has met him and a US based researcher in Shia militias and jihadism who explains Abu Azrael’s backstory.

(Photo: Facebook photo posted by Abu Azrael Copyright: Abu Azrael)

Is American Democracy Broken?20141230

Jeffrey Winters, a professor of politics, says the US is part-democracy, part-oligarchy.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Jargon20150506

Why do we use jargon?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Why Factor this week, looks at jargon. The deliberate obfuscation of language. Or in other words, saying things in a way that makes it difficult to understand. George Orwell, in the early twentieth century, hated this ‘inflated style’ of writing and there have been many attempts to get rid of it. In the 1940’s Sir Ernest Gowers from the British Civil Service wrote a book, ‘Plain Words’ which has been re-printed again and again – most recently by his great grand-daughter who tells presenter, Mike Williams why jargon is just as bad today as it ever was. It’s been blamed for pulling the wool over the eyes of the general public and it’s the same all over the world.

Produced by Nina Robinson

(Photo: The classic work Plain Words, originally written and published by Sir Ernest Gowers who wanted to see the English language free of jargon. BBC copyright)

Mali's World-Beating Shallots20150702

A magical tale of allium bulbs, a water spirit and local politics in a Dogon village

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Alex Duval Smith writes from Mali's high Bandiagara escarpment, a cultural and agricultural redoubt for the Dogon people, with a magical tale of superlative shallots, a well in a cave inhabited until recently by a water spirit, and one farmer who can sniff out a spy. Life in Kama Sereme is not easy, and it takes hard work to carve a living from the earth - but Kaye Djiguiba knows his onions. Still, he asks, wouldn't it be easier for everyone - not least the village's women, who have to fetch and carry vast amounts of water - if there were an easier way to irrigate the fields?

(Photo: Kaye Djiguiba in his shallot beds (c) Alex Duval Smith)

More Or Less20141118

Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

More Or Less20141119

Ruth Alexander explains the numbers and statistics in the news and in life.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More or Less - Escobar's Cocaine Deaths20161025

How many people die for every kilo of cocaine processed, shipped & distributed?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Pablo Escobar was one of the world’s most infamous drug traffickers and one of America’s most wanted men. It is this world in the early 1990s that has been brought to life in the Netflix TV series Narcos. So what is the truth behind the numbers of cocaine deaths in the Netflix series - is it really six deaths per kilo?

More or Less - Fishy Numbers?20160216

More or Less - Fishy Numbers?20160216

There were reports recently that there will more plastic in the ocean than fish by 2050. The report comes from The Ellen MacArthur Foundation. But as we discovered, there's something fishy about these figures.

(Image: Plastic waste in the waters off Manila Bay. DIRECTO/AFP/Getty)

More Or Less - Fishy Numbers?20160216

There were reports recently that there will more plastic in the ocean than fish by 2050. The report comes from The Ellen MacArthur Foundation. But as we discovered, there's something fishy about these figures.

(Image: Plastic waste in the waters off Manila Bay. DIRECTO/AFP/Getty)

More or Less - Fishy Numbers?20160216

There were reports recently that there will more plastic in the ocean than fish by 2050.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More or Less: Antibiotics and the Problem of the Broken Market20160301

More or Less: Antibiotics and the Problem of the Broken Market20160301

If we don’t get new antibiotics, as they become more resistant it is likely that people will die. It’s a huge business but there’s a problem - pharmaceutical companies are reluctant to invest time and money to develop new antibiotics. But why not?

(Image: Computer artwork of bacteria - credit: Science Photo Library)

More Or Less: Antibiotics And The Problem Of The Broken Market20160301

If we don’t get new antibiotics, as they become more resistant it is likely that people will die. It’s a huge business but there’s a problem - pharmaceutical companies are reluctant to invest time and money to develop new antibiotics. But why not?

(Image: Computer artwork of bacteria - credit: Science Photo Library)

More or Less: Antibiotics and the Problem of the Broken Market20160301

Why big pharma won\u2019t invest in new antibiotics.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

If we don’t get new antibiotics, as they become more resistant it is likely that people will die. It’s a huge business but there’s a problem - pharmaceutical companies are reluctant to invest time and money to develop new antibiotics. But why not?

(Image: Computer artwork of bacteria - credit: Science Photo Library)

More or Less: Are 95% of Terrorism Victims Muslim?20150121

Tim Harford investigates the statistic.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More Or Less: Are Tall People More Likely to Get Cancer?20151014

More Or Less: Are Tall People More Likely to Get Cancer?20151014

Are tall people really more likely to get cancer? Ruth Alexander looks at a new study

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More Or Less: Are Tall People More Likely to Get Cancer?20151014

Are tall people really more likely to get cancer? Ruth Alexander looks at a new Swedish study that has caused headlines around the world, and asks how worried tall people like her should be about developing the condition.

(Photo: A patient has her height measured. Credit: Shutterstock)

More Or Less: Are Tall People More Likely To Get Cancer?20151014

Are tall people really more likely to get cancer? Ruth Alexander looks at a new Swedish study that has caused headlines around the world, and asks how worried tall people like her should be about developing the condition.

(Photo: A patient has her height measured. Credit: Shutterstock)

More or Less: Black prisoners in the US20150304

\u2018More black men under correctional control now than enslaved in 1850\u2019 - John Legend

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Was Oscar-winner John Legend right to say that there are more black men ‘under correctional control’ in the United States now than were in slavery in 1850? Ruth Alexander and Wesley Stephenson look into the statistics, and consider how US prisoner numbers compare with those of other countries.

Plus, how many Lego bricks, stacked one on top of the other, would it take to destroy the bottom brick? Ruth and the UK’s Open University engineering department find out.

(Image: Common and John Legend accept the Best Original Song Award for Glory from the film Selma at the 2015 Oscars. Credit: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

More or Less: Can We Trust Food Surveys?20160315

More or Less: Can We Trust Food Surveys?20160315

Stories about what foods are good and bad for you, which foods are linked to cancer and which have beneficial qualities are always popular online and in the news. But how do experts know what people are eating? Tim Harford speaks to Christie Aschwanden, FiveThirtyEight’s lead writer for science, about the pitfalls of food surveys. She kept a food diary and answered nutrition surveys and found many of the questions were really hard to answer – how could she tell all the ingredients in a restaurant curry? And, how many tomatoes did she eat regularly over the past six months?

(Photo: Food diary. Credit: Shutterstock)

More Or Less: Can We Trust Food Surveys?20160315

Stories about what foods are good and bad for you, which foods are linked to cancer and which have beneficial qualities are always popular online and in the news. But how do experts know what people are eating? Tim Harford speaks to Christie Aschwanden, FiveThirtyEight’s lead writer for science, about the pitfalls of food surveys. She kept a food diary and answered nutrition surveys and found many of the questions were really hard to answer – how could she tell all the ingredients in a restaurant curry? And, how many tomatoes did she eat regularly over the past six months?

(Photo: Food diary. Credit: Shutterstock)

More or Less: Can We Trust Food Surveys?20160315

The pitfalls of nutrition science - how do really know what people are eating?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Stories about what foods are good and bad for you, which foods are linked to cancer and which have beneficial qualities are always popular online and in the news. But how do experts know what people are eating? Tim Harford speaks to Christie Aschwanden, FiveThirtyEight’s lead writer for science, about the pitfalls of food surveys. She kept a food diary and answered nutrition surveys and found many of the questions were really hard to answer – how could she tell all the ingredients in a restaurant curry? And, how many tomatoes did she eat regularly over the past six months?

(Photo: Food diary. Credit: Shutterstock)

More or Less: China Stock Market Crash20150902

More or Less: China Stock Market Crash20150902

The Chinese Market Crash in context.

How big is the market, how many investors does it have and does it tell us anything about the wider Chinese economy?

More Or Less: China Stock Market Crash20150902

The Chinese Market Crash in context.

How big is the market, how many investors does it have and does it tell us anything about the wider Chinese economy?

More or Less: China Stock Market Crash20150902

The Chinese stock market crash in context.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More or Less: China\u2019s One Child Policy20151110

As China ends its one child policy what has been its impact? Ruth Alexander investigates.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

As China ends its one child rule what has been its impact on the country’s population? The More or Less team take a look at whether the policy on its own has slowed the rate at which China’s population has been growing. Ruth Alexander presents.
(Image: A woman carrying a baby in Yanji, in China's northeast Jilin province. Credit: Getty)

More or Less: China’s One Child Policy20151110

More or Less: China’s One Child Policy20151110

As China ends its one child rule what has been its impact on the country’s population? The More or Less team take a look at whether the policy on its own has slowed the rate at which China’s population has been growing. Ruth Alexander presents.

(Image: A woman carrying a baby in Yanji, in China's northeast Jilin province. Credit: Getty)

More Or Less: China’s One Child Policy20151110

As China ends its one child rule what has been its impact on the country’s population? The More or Less team take a look at whether the policy on its own has slowed the rate at which China’s population has been growing. Ruth Alexander presents.

(Image: A woman carrying a baby in Yanji, in China's northeast Jilin province. Credit: Getty)

More or Less: Climate Change20151208

More or Less: Climate Change20151208

Did climate change contribute to the war in Syria? Ruth Alexander investigates.

Photo: COP21-Eiffel Tower, Credit: Stephane de Sakutin/Getty Images)

More Or Less: Climate Change20151208

Did climate change contribute to the war in Syria? Ruth Alexander investigates.

Photo: COP21-Eiffel Tower, Credit: Stephane de Sakutin/Getty Images)

More or Less: Climate Change20151208

Did climate change contribute to the war in Syria?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More or Less: Counting Foreign Fighters20150805

How many foreigners have joined militants in Iraq and Syria, and where do they come from?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

It has been reported that as many as 20,000 foreign fighters have joined militants in the Middle East and that they make up around 10% of ISIS. Wesley Stephenson and Federica Cocco look at the numbers behind those claims and examine where those fighting in places like Syria and Iraq come from. (Photo: Silhouette of an Iraqi fighter. Credit: Getty Images)

More or Less: Death Penalty abolition20160830

More or Less: Death Penalty abolition20160830

Statistics suggest that officially about half of the countries in the world have abolished Capital Punishment, and a further 52 have stopped its use in practice. But we tell the story behind the numbers and show why the picture is more complicated. We speak to Parvais Jabbar, co-director of the Death Penalty Project.

(Image: Handcuffed hands of a prisoner behind the bars of a prison. Credit: View Apart via Shutterstock)

More Or Less: Death Penalty Abolition20160830

Statistics suggest that officially about half of the countries in the world have abolished Capital Punishment, and a further 52 have stopped its use in practice. But we tell the story behind the numbers and show why the picture is more complicated. We speak to Parvais Jabbar, co-director of the Death Penalty Project.

(Image: Handcuffed hands of a prisoner behind the bars of a prison. Credit: View Apart via Shutterstock)

More or Less: Death Penalty abolition20160830

The story behind the countries that have not executed anyone for 10 years

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Statistics suggest that officially about half of the countries in the world have abolished Capital Punishment, and a further 52 have stopped its use in practice. But we tell the story behind the numbers and show why the picture is more complicated. We speak to Parvais Jabbar, co-director of the Death Penalty Project.

(Image: Handcuffed hands of a prisoner behind the bars of a prison. Credit: View Apart via Shutterstock)

More or Less: Death Row20150527

Is it true that for every nine people executed in the US, there is one person exonerated?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Lawyer Bryan Stephenson recently claimed that for every nine people executed in the US, there is one person who has been exonerated. We ask if this is really true and how it differs from state to state. We also look at how many countries have the death penalty and how often they use it.

(Photo: Corridor in an abandoned penitentiary. Credit: Shutterstock)

More or Less: Drug Deaths in the Philippines20160913

More or Less: Drug Deaths in the Philippines20160913

How many people have died during President Duterte\u2019s drug crackdown?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Over the last two months the government in the Philippines has been encouraging the police to clampdown on the illegal drug trade. The new President, Rodrigo Duterte, went as far as saying that citizens could shoot and kill drug dealers who resisted arrest, and the killings of drug suspects were lawful if the police acted in self-defence. The press have been reporting numbers of how many people have been killed during the crackdown – but how much trust can we put in these figures?

Lottery Wins
We interview Adam Kucharski, author of The Perfect Bet, to find out if maths can give you an edge to playing the lottery or gambling.

(Photo: A Filipino human rights advocate holds a placard as he joins a demonstration in front of the Philippine National Police (PNP) headquarters, protesting the number of deaths related to government's war against illegal drugs. Credit: European Photopress Agency)

More or Less: Drug Deaths in the Philippines20160913

Over the last two months the government in the Philippines has been encouraging the police to clampdown on the illegal drug trade. The new President, Rodrigo Duterte, went as far as saying that citizens could shoot and kill drug dealers who resisted arrest, and the killings of drug suspects were lawful if the police acted in self-defence. The press have been reporting numbers of how many people have been killed during the crackdown – but how much trust can we put in these figures?

Lottery Wins

We interview Adam Kucharski, author of The Perfect Bet, to find out if maths can give you an edge to playing the lottery or gambling.

(Photo: A Filipino human rights advocate holds a placard as he joins a demonstration in front of the Philippine National Police (PNP) headquarters, protesting the number of deaths related to government's war against illegal drugs. Credit: European Photopress Agency)

More Or Less: Drug Deaths In The Philippines20160913

Over the last two months the government in the Philippines has been encouraging the police to clampdown on the illegal drug trade. The new President, Rodrigo Duterte, went as far as saying that citizens could shoot and kill drug dealers who resisted arrest, and the killings of drug suspects were lawful if the police acted in self-defence. The press have been reporting numbers of how many people have been killed during the crackdown – but how much trust can we put in these figures?

Lottery Wins

We interview Adam Kucharski, author of The Perfect Bet, to find out if maths can give you an edge to playing the lottery or gambling.

(Photo: A Filipino human rights advocate holds a placard as he joins a demonstration in front of the Philippine National Police (PNP) headquarters, protesting the number of deaths related to government's war against illegal drugs. Credit: European Photopress Agency)

More or Less: HIV in Africa20160607

More or Less: HIV in Africa20160607

Are 74% of African girls aged 15-24 HIV positive?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The news aggregation website Zimbabwe Today recently ran a headline stating that 74% of African girls aged 15-24 are HIV positive. Although the statistic is not true, Mary Mahy from UNAIDS reveals that young women do have a higher infection rate than young men.
Kyle Evans is a folk singing mathematician by trade who is always looking for new ways to communicate his love of maths to a sometimes apprehensive audience. Next week he is representing the UK against 26 other countries at the Cheltenham Science festival in England. He came into the studio to perform his competition entry.

Producer: Laura Gray
Presenter: Ruth Alexander

(Image: HIV test in Africa. Credit: Polepole-tochan/Getty Images)

More or Less: HIV in Africa20160607

The news aggregation website Zimbabwe Today recently ran a headline stating that 74% of African girls aged 15-24 are HIV positive. Although the statistic is not true, Mary Mahy from UNAIDS reveals that young women do have a higher infection rate than young men.

Kyle Evans is a folk singing mathematician by trade who is always looking for new ways to communicate his love of maths to a sometimes apprehensive audience. Next week he is representing the UK against 26 other countries at the Cheltenham Science festival in England. He came into the studio to perform his competition entry.

Producer: Laura Gray

Presenter: Ruth Alexander

(Image: HIV test in Africa. Credit: Polepole-tochan/Getty Images)

More Or Less: Hiv In Africa20160607

The news aggregation website Zimbabwe Today recently ran a headline stating that 74% of African girls aged 15-24 are HIV positive. Although the statistic is not true, Mary Mahy from UNAIDS reveals that young women do have a higher infection rate than young men.

Kyle Evans is a folk singing mathematician by trade who is always looking for new ways to communicate his love of maths to a sometimes apprehensive audience. Next week he is representing the UK against 26 other countries at the Cheltenham Science festival in England. He came into the studio to perform his competition entry.

Producer: Laura Gray

Presenter: Ruth Alexander

(Image: HIV test in Africa. Credit: Polepole-tochan/Getty Images)

More or Less: Horoscope Health20150624

Can your horoscope predict which diseases you\u2019ll develop?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Horoscope health.
Can your horoscope predict which diseases you’ll develop? Recent media reports say so – and the claim’s based on a study by scientists from the prestigious Columbia University. The ‘More or Less’ team takes a closer look, and hears from its lead author, Dr Nicholas Tatonetti.
(Photo: Zodiac Signs. Credit: Shutterstock)

More or Less: How Many is Too Many Bananas?20150916

More or Less: How Many is Too Many Bananas?20150916

How many bananas are too many?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More or Less: How Many is Too Many Bananas?20150916

There is a belief among some people that too many bananas will kill you. Eat too many and you will overdose on potassium and die. But how many bananas would you need to eat? (Photo: Bunch of bananas)

More Or Less: How Many Is Too Many Bananas?20150916

There is a belief among some people that too many bananas will kill you. Eat too many and you will overdose on potassium and die. But how many bananas would you need to eat? (Photo: Bunch of bananas)

More or Less: How Many Stormtroopers Are There?20151222

More or Less: How Many Stormtroopers Are There?20151222

Are Star Wars\u2019 Stormtroopers the biggest secret army on Earth?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More or Less: How Many Stormtroopers Are There?20151222

Are Star Wars’ Stormtroopers the biggest secret army on Earth? Ruth Alexander investigates, and looks at some of the other numbers behind one of the most successful movie franchises in history.

(Photo: Stormtroopers at Star Wars: The Force Awakens premiere. Credit: PA Wire)

More Or Less: How Many Stormtroopers Are There?20151222

Are Star Wars’ Stormtroopers the biggest secret army on Earth? Ruth Alexander investigates, and looks at some of the other numbers behind one of the most successful movie franchises in history.

(Photo: Stormtroopers at Star Wars: The Force Awakens premiere. Credit: PA Wire)

More or Less: How Reliable is Psychology Science?20150930

More or Less: How Reliable is Psychology Science?20150930

How reliable are psychological science studies? Tim Harford finds out.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Reproducibility of Psychological Science project reported recently and it made grim reading. Having replicated 100 psychological studies published in three psychology journals only 36 had significant results compared to 97% first time around. So is there a problem with psychological science and what should be done to fix it.

(Photo: Conceptual image of a brain. Credit: Shutterstock)

More or Less: How Reliable is Psychology Science?20150930

The Reproducibility of Psychological Science project reported recently and it made grim reading. Having replicated 100 psychological studies published in three psychology journals only 36 had significant results compared to 97% first time around. So is there a problem with psychological science and what should be done to fix it.

(Photo: Conceptual image of a brain. Credit: Shutterstock)

More Or Less: How Reliable Is Psychology Science?20150930

The Reproducibility of Psychological Science project reported recently and it made grim reading. Having replicated 100 psychological studies published in three psychology journals only 36 had significant results compared to 97% first time around. So is there a problem with psychological science and what should be done to fix it.

(Photo: Conceptual image of a brain. Credit: Shutterstock)

More or Less: How Safe is Flying?20150401

Following the Germanwings A320 tragedy, are plane crashes becoming more common?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

All 150 people on board a Germanwings A320 plane were killed when it was brought down over the French Alps during its journey from Barcelona to Dusseldorf. It is the latest in a series of fatal plane crashes to hit the headlines over the past year. But are crashes becoming more common, or does it just seem that way? Ruth Alexander and Hannah Moore report. Plus, Chelsea Football Club is complaining that it has been awarded too few penalties this season. A recent article on its website calls the number – two in 28 games – "abnormally low" compared to previous seasons. Is that right? With Kevin McConway, professor of Applied Statistics at The Open University.
(Image: Rescue workers search the site of the Germanwings plane crash. Credit: Francis Pellier MI DICOM/Ministere de l'Interieur/Getty Images)

More or Less: How Useful are Statistics About Sex?20150513

Sir David Spiegelhalter explains the usefulness of statistics about sex.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More or Less: Leicester City football fluke?20160510

More or Less: Leicester City football fluke?20160510

At the beginning of the season of the English football Premier League, few people would have been brave enough to predict that Leicester City would finish top. But was it that surprising?

Tim Harford speaks to Lord Finkelstein, a political journalist, who has been running his own statistical model to assess the teams in the Premier League. We also hear from James Yorke from the football analytics website Stats Bomb. Was Leicester’s success down to the team’s skills, or was it down to luck?

(Leicester City celebrate with the trophy after winning the Barclays Premier League. Credit: Action Images via Reuters)

More Or Less: Leicester City Football Fluke?20160510

At the beginning of the season of the English football Premier League, few people would have been brave enough to predict that Leicester City would finish top. But was it that surprising?

Tim Harford speaks to Lord Finkelstein, a political journalist, who has been running his own statistical model to assess the teams in the Premier League. We also hear from James Yorke from the football analytics website Stats Bomb. Was Leicester’s success down to the team’s skills, or was it down to luck?

(Leicester City celebrate with the trophy after winning the Barclays Premier League. Credit: Action Images via Reuters)

More or Less: Leicester City football fluke?20160510

The statistics behind the English Premier League\u2019s surprise winners

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

At the beginning of the season of the English football Premier League, few people would have been brave enough to predict that Leicester City would finish top. But was it that surprising?

Tim Harford speaks to Lord Finkelstein, a political journalist, who has been running his own statistical model to assess the teams in the Premier League. We also hear from James Yorke from the football analytics website Stats Bomb. Was Leicester’s success down to the team’s skills, or was it down to luck?

(Leicester City celebrate with the trophy after winning the Barclays Premier League. Credit: Action Images via Reuters)

More or Less: Live 8, The G8 and Making Poverty History20150722

What has been achieved in the ten years since Live 8 sought to Make Poverty History?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Its ten years since some of the world’s richest nations met in Gleneagles, Scotland. It was there that the G8 agreed to improve trade with developing nations, increase aid, and to wipe the debt of some of the poorest countries. The agreement followed Live 8 where the likes of Bono and Bob Geldof demanded that they ‘Make Poverty History’. Wesley Stephenson and the More or Less team look at what has been achieved during the past decade. (Image: Fans at Live Earth Sydney. Credit: Getty)

More or Less: Millennium Development Goals20150708

Have the eight goals for addressing extreme poverty set by the UN made a difference?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Fifteen years ago at the Millennium Summit the United Nations set eight goals for addressing extreme poverty. They became known as the Millennium Development Goals. A deadline of 2015 was set to achieve what the UN said were ‘quantified targets’ – so how did we do? We find that in many cases the targets are incredibly difficult to quantify and that progress in some areas might not be all it seems. Photo: Anti-poverty activists display a protest message pasted on dining plates at a park in Manila, 2007. Credit: Luis Liwanag/AFP/Getty Images

More Or Less: Mobiles or lightbulbs20160329

More Or Less: Mobiles or lightbulbs20160329

Are there more mobile phones than lightbulbs in Uganda? And thyroid cancer in Fukushima

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More Or Less: Mobiles or lightbulbs20160329

Are there more mobile phones than lightbulbs in Uganda? Plus: Thyroid cancer has gone up after the Fukushima accident - but it's not what you think.

(Image: Woman looking at her mobile phone in Kampala, Uganda. Credit: AFP / Getty Images)

More Or Less: Mobiles Or Lightbulbs20160329

Are there more mobile phones than lightbulbs in Uganda? Plus: Thyroid cancer has gone up after the Fukushima accident - but it's not what you think.

(Image: Woman looking at her mobile phone in Kampala, Uganda. Credit: AFP / Getty Images)

More or Less: Nigerian Economy20160105

More or Less: Nigerian Economy20160105

How healthy is the Nigerian economy? Tim Harford looks back over some of the numbers that made the news in 2015.

(Image: Nigerians check their ballot station positions in Yenagoa. Credit: Getty Images)

More Or Less: Nigerian Economy20160105

How healthy is the Nigerian economy? Tim Harford looks back over some of the numbers that made the news in 2015.

(Image: Nigerians check their ballot station positions in Yenagoa. Credit: Getty Images)

More or Less: Nigerian Economy20160105

Tim Harford looks back at some of the most interesting numbers of 2015.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More or Less: Odd Socks and Algorithms20160802

More or Less: Odd Socks and Algorithms20160802

How can the techniques of computer science help us in everyday life? We speak to Brian Christian co-author of Algorithms to Live by: The Computer Science of Human Decisions. He argues that the techniques of computer science can help us manage everyday situations in a more logical and efficient manner. So which algorithm can help solve the problem of odd socks? And what is the most efficient way of alphabetising your book collection? Tim Harford investigates.

(Photo: Socks. Credit: Angela N Perryman/Shutterstock)

More Or Less: Odd Socks And Algorithms20160802

How can the techniques of computer science help us in everyday life? We speak to Brian Christian co-author of Algorithms to Live by: The Computer Science of Human Decisions. He argues that the techniques of computer science can help us manage everyday situations in a more logical and efficient manner. So which algorithm can help solve the problem of odd socks? And what is the most efficient way of alphabetising your book collection? Tim Harford investigates.

(Photo: Socks. Credit: Angela N Perryman/Shutterstock)

More or Less: Odd Socks and Algorithms20160802

How can the techniques of computer science help us in everyday life?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

How can the techniques of computer science help us in everyday life? We speak to Brian Christian co-author of Algorithms to Live by: The Computer Science of Human Decisions. He argues that the techniques of computer science can help us manage everyday situations in a more logical and efficient manner. So which algorithm can help solve the problem of odd socks? And what is the most efficient way of alphabetising your book collection? Tim Harford investigates.

(Photo: Socks. Credit: Angela N Perryman/Shutterstock)

More or Less: Oil20151028

More or Less: Oil20151028

Are a million barrels of Nigeria\u2019s oil stolen per day? Ruth Alexander finds out.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More or Less: Oil20151028

Nigeria’s President Muhammadu Buhari said a million barrels of the country’s oil were stolen per day. Is he right? Ruth Alexander asks Peter Cunliffe-Jones of Africa Check.

Producers: Keith Moore and Phoebe Keane

(Image: A Nigerian Oil Rig. Credit: Getty)

More Or Less: Oil20151028

Nigeria’s President Muhammadu Buhari said a million barrels of the country’s oil were stolen per day. Is he right? Ruth Alexander asks Peter Cunliffe-Jones of Africa Check.

Producers: Keith Moore and Phoebe Keane

(Image: A Nigerian Oil Rig. Credit: Getty)

More or Less: Old versus young Brexit voters20160705

More or Less: Old versus young Brexit voters20160705

Many media outlets have reported that it was predominantly the older generations in the UK who voted to ‘Leave’ the EU in a recent referendum, while those under 25 were keenest to ‘Remain’. It has prompted many listeners to ask whether a referendum on this topic might yield a different result if held in a few years’ time as the electorate changes. We attempt some back of the envelope calculations with Tom Chivers from Buzzfeed. But actually – how good is the data available? How do we know how people voted or how they would vote in the future?

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

More Or Less: Old Versus Young Brexit Voters20160705

Many media outlets have reported that it was predominantly the older generations in the UK who voted to ‘Leave’ the EU in a recent referendum, while those under 25 were keenest to ‘Remain’. It has prompted many listeners to ask whether a referendum on this topic might yield a different result if held in a few years’ time as the electorate changes. We attempt some back of the envelope calculations with Tom Chivers from Buzzfeed. But actually – how good is the data available? How do we know how people voted or how they would vote in the future?

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

More or Less: Old versus young Brexit voters20160705

The effect of young voters on the referendum

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Many media outlets have reported that it was predominantly the older generations in the UK who voted to ‘Leave’ the EU in a recent referendum, while those under 25 were keenest to ‘Remain’. It has prompted many listeners to ask whether a referendum on this topic might yield a different result if held in a few years’ time as the electorate changes. We attempt some back of the envelope calculations with Tom Chivers from Buzzfeed. But actually – how good is the data available? How do we know how people voted or how they would vote in the future?

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

More or Less: Qatar Migrant Worker Deaths20150610

Is the World Cup really responsible for migrant deaths in Qatar?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Is the football World Cup really responsible for 1200 migrant deaths in Qatar? We talk to the International Trade Unions Confederation who first published the figure. Plus, we solve the fiendish maths exam question that perplexed students so much it became a trend on Twitter.

(Photo: Foreign labourers working on the construction site of the al-Wakrah football stadium. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

More or Less: Swimming World Records20160816

More or Less: Swimming World Records20160816

Why are swimming world records frequently being broken?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

World Records are being set at a much faster rate in swimming than in other sports. At the Rio Olympics, British swimmer Adam Peaty managed to break the men's 100m breaststroke world record twice in two days. Tim Harford speaks to swimming coach, Rick Madge, about the reasons swimmers keep getting better results in the pool.

Also, science writer Christie Aschwanden makes the case for the virtues of the 5,000 metre race. She says that in recent times it has become very popular for people to train to run a marathon. But when you look at the numbers, is the 5K a better distance?

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Charlotte McDonald

(Image: Britain's Adam Peaty swimming, credit: Reuters)

More or Less: Swimming World Records20160816

World Records are being set at a much faster rate in swimming than in other sports. At the Rio Olympics, British swimmer Adam Peaty managed to break the men's 100m breaststroke world record twice in two days. Tim Harford speaks to swimming coach, Rick Madge, about the reasons swimmers keep getting better results in the pool.

Also, science writer Christie Aschwanden makes the case for the virtues of the 5,000 metre race. She says that in recent times it has become very popular for people to train to run a marathon. But when you look at the numbers, is the 5K a better distance?

Presenter: Tim Harford

Producer: Charlotte McDonald

(Image: Britain's Adam Peaty swimming, credit: Reuters)

More Or Less: Swimming World Records20160816

World Records are being set at a much faster rate in swimming than in other sports. At the Rio Olympics, British swimmer Adam Peaty managed to break the men's 100m breaststroke world record twice in two days. Tim Harford speaks to swimming coach, Rick Madge, about the reasons swimmers keep getting better results in the pool.

Also, science writer Christie Aschwanden makes the case for the virtues of the 5,000 metre race. She says that in recent times it has become very popular for people to train to run a marathon. But when you look at the numbers, is the 5K a better distance?

Presenter: Tim Harford

Producer: Charlotte McDonald

(Image: Britain's Adam Peaty swimming, credit: Reuters)

More or Less: The Ignorance Test.20150415

Can you pass world health expert Hans Rosling\u2019s Ignorance Test?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Professor Hans Rosling - perhaps best described as a kind of international development myth buster - delivers his Ignorance Test. Hans is a professor of international public health, and has started the Ignorance Project to investigate what people know and don’t know about the world. His organisation, Gapminder, uses surveys to ask people simple questions about key-aspects of global development. Most people do badly. Hans asked presenter Ruth Alexander three questions from his Ignorance Test. Can you do any better?

More or Less: The Mathematical Secrets to Relationships20150218

How maths can help you find love, and hold on to it.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In celebration of Valentine’s Day, Tim Harford interviews Hannah Fry, author of a new book The Mathematics of Love. Should you be bold and approach people at parties? Should you compromise in a relationship or is disagreement healthy? Hannah explains how equations have revealed some of the answers to finding a lasting relationship.

(Photo: Valentine's day rose and chocolates. Credit: Press Association)

More or Less: The Story of Average20160412

More or Less: The Story of Average20160412

How astronomers introduced the world to the average

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In the 1600s astronomers were coming up with measurements to help sailors read their maps with a compass. But with all the observations of the skies they were making, how do they choose the best number? We tell the story of how astronomers started to find the average from a group of numbers. By the 1800s, one Belgian astronomer began to apply this to all sorts of social and national statistics – and the ‘Average Man’ was born.

(Image: Illustration of an observatory. Credit: Shutterstock)

More or Less: The Story of Average20160412

In the 1600s astronomers were coming up with measurements to help sailors read their maps with a compass. But with all the observations of the skies they were making, how do they choose the best number? We tell the story of how astronomers started to find the average from a group of numbers. By the 1800s, one Belgian astronomer began to apply this to all sorts of social and national statistics – and the ‘Average Man’ was born.

(Image: Illustration of an observatory. Credit: Shutterstock)

More Or Less: The Story Of Average20160412

In the 1600s astronomers were coming up with measurements to help sailors read their maps with a compass. But with all the observations of the skies they were making, how do they choose the best number? We tell the story of how astronomers started to find the average from a group of numbers. By the 1800s, one Belgian astronomer began to apply this to all sorts of social and national statistics – and the ‘Average Man’ was born.

(Image: Illustration of an observatory. Credit: Shutterstock)

More or Less: The Sustainable Development Goals \u2013 are there just too many?20161011

Is there a better way of looking at the Sustainable Development Goals?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

It’s now a year since the UN set its new Sustainable Development Goals to try to make the world a better place. They include 17 goals and a massive 169 targets on subjects like disease, education and governance. But some people like Bjorn Lomborg are saying that there’s just too many and they are too broad, and left like that will never achieve anything. Is he right – and is there a better way to make the world better and stop some countries lagging behind? Wesley Stephenson and Charlotte McDonald find out.

(Image: A teacher writes on a blackboard during a class in Kenya. Credit: Getty Images)

More Or Less: The Sustainable Development Goals € Are There Just Too Many?20161011

It’s now a year since the UN set its new Sustainable Development Goals to try to make the world a better place. They include 17 goals and a massive 169 targets on subjects like disease, education and governance. But some people like Bjorn Lomborg are saying that there’s just too many and they are too broad, and left like that will never achieve anything. Is he right – and is there a better way to make the world better and stop some countries lagging behind? Wesley Stephenson and Charlotte McDonald find out.

(Image: A teacher writes on a blackboard during a class in Kenya. Credit: Getty Images)

More Or Less: The Sustainable Development Goals € Are There Just Too Many?20161011

It’s now a year since the UN set its new Sustainable Development Goals to try to make the world a better place. They include 17 goals and a massive 169 targets on subjects like disease, education and governance. But some people like Bjorn Lomborg are saying that there’s just too many and they are too broad, and left like that will never achieve anything. Is he right – and is there a better way to make the world better and stop some countries lagging behind? Wesley Stephenson and Charlotte McDonald find out.

(Image: A teacher writes on a blackboard during a class in Kenya. Credit: Getty Images)

More or Less: The World's Most Profitable Product20160524

More or Less: The World's Most Profitable Product20160524

Is the iPhone the most profitable product in history? What are the other contenders?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Recently one of our listeners contacted us to say he heard a BBC correspondent describe the iPhone as the most profitable product in history. It was just an off-the-cuff comment but it got us thinking - could it be true? We compare and contrast a range of products suggested by More or Less listeners to work out if the iPhone truly is the most profitable.

Producer: Laura Gray

(Image: An iPhone on a pile of coins. Credt: Shutterstock)

More or Less: The World's Most Profitable Product20160524

Recently one of our listeners contacted us to say he heard a BBC correspondent describe the iPhone as the most profitable product in history. It was just an off-the-cuff comment but it got us thinking - could it be true? We compare and contrast a range of products suggested by More or Less listeners to work out if the iPhone truly is the most profitable.

Producer: Laura Gray

(Image: An iPhone on a pile of coins. Credt: Shutterstock)

More Or Less: The World's Most Profitable Product20160524

Recently one of our listeners contacted us to say he heard a BBC correspondent describe the iPhone as the most profitable product in history. It was just an off-the-cuff comment but it got us thinking - could it be true? We compare and contrast a range of products suggested by More or Less listeners to work out if the iPhone truly is the most profitable.

Producer: Laura Gray

(Image: An iPhone on a pile of coins. Credt: Shutterstock)

More or Less: Violence, shootings and the police in the US20160719

More or Less: Violence, shootings and the police in the US20160719

Protests have spread across the United States over the last few weeks. The protestors have been registering their feelings about incidents where police have shot and killed black men. High profile recent incidents resulted in the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castle, and the protestors feel that minorities are being disproportionately targeted by the police.

On top of this, at a recent protest in Dallas a gunman shot and killed five police officers.

But what can the numbers tell us about the issue? How many people do police officers kill each year in the USA? And how many police officers are killed? Tim Harford investigates.

Producers: Charlotte McDonald, Elizabeth Cassin

(Image: Police officers stand guard at a barricade following the sniper shooting in Dallas. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

More Or Less: Violence, Shootings And The Police In The Us20160719

Protests have spread across the United States over the last few weeks. The protestors have been registering their feelings about incidents where police have shot and killed black men. High profile recent incidents resulted in the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castle, and the protestors feel that minorities are being disproportionately targeted by the police.

On top of this, at a recent protest in Dallas a gunman shot and killed five police officers.

But what can the numbers tell us about the issue? How many people do police officers kill each year in the USA? And how many police officers are killed? Tim Harford investigates.

Producers: Charlotte McDonald, Elizabeth Cassin

(Image: Police officers stand guard at a barricade following the sniper shooting in Dallas. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

More or Less: Violence, shootings and the police in the US20160719

Tim Harford investigates the numbers surrounding police shootings in the USA.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Protests have spread across the United States over the last few weeks. The protestors have been registering their feelings about incidents where police have shot and killed black men. High profile recent incidents resulted in the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castle, and the protestors feel that minorities are being disproportionately targeted by the police.

On top of this, at a recent protest in Dallas a gunman shot and killed five police officers.

But what can the numbers tell us about the issue? How many people do police officers kill each year in the USA? And how many police officers are killed? Tim Harford investigates.

Producers: Charlotte McDonald, Elizabeth Cassin

(Image: Police officers stand guard at a barricade following the sniper shooting in Dallas. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

More or Less: When Companies Track Your Life20160621

More or Less: When Companies Track Your Life20160621

How are companies using our personal data? It is a familiar concern. Online retailers are tracking us so they can sell things to us. Bricks and mortar retailers have loyalty card schemes. Our banks and credit card companies know all about us. And of course, the big computer and telecoms companies could potentially track our internet searches, our phone calls – even our location as we wander around. But this isn’t the first time that large corporations have gathered sensitive data about their customers. We tell the shadowy story of how the personal details of Americans were pooled among insurance companies more than a hundred years ago. (Photo: A police CCTV camera observes a woman walking. Credit: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images)

More Or Less: When Companies Track Your Life20160621

How are companies using our personal data? It is a familiar concern. Online retailers are tracking us so they can sell things to us. Bricks and mortar retailers have loyalty card schemes. Our banks and credit card companies know all about us. And of course, the big computer and telecoms companies could potentially track our internet searches, our phone calls – even our location as we wander around. But this isn’t the first time that large corporations have gathered sensitive data about their customers. We tell the shadowy story of how the personal details of Americans were pooled among insurance companies more than a hundred years ago. (Photo: A police CCTV camera observes a woman walking. Credit: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images)

More or Less: When Companies Track Your Life20160621

How are companies using our personal data?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

How are companies using our personal data? It is a familiar concern. Online retailers are tracking us so they can sell things to us. Bricks and mortar retailers have loyalty card schemes. Our banks and credit card companies know all about us. And of course, the big computer and telecoms companies could potentially track our internet searches, our phone calls – even our location as we wander around. But this isn’t the first time that large corporations have gathered sensitive data about their customers. We tell the shadowy story of how the personal details of Americans were pooled among insurance companies more than a hundred years ago. (Photo: A police CCTV camera observes a woman walking. Credit: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images)

More or Less: Worm Wars20150819

More or Less: Worm Wars20150819

A debate has been raging over the last month about the benefits of mass deworming projects. Hugely popular with the UN and charities, the evidence behind the practice has come under attack. Are the criticisms justified? We hear from the different sides – both economists and epidemiologists and their approach to the numbers. (Photo: A nurse gives medecine to a child to prevent worms. Credit: AFP)

More Or Less: Worm Wars20150819

A debate has been raging over the last month about the benefits of mass deworming projects. Hugely popular with the UN and charities, the evidence behind the practice has come under attack. Are the criticisms justified? We hear from the different sides – both economists and epidemiologists and their approach to the numbers. (Photo: A nurse gives medecine to a child to prevent worms. Credit: AFP)

More or Less: Worm Wars20150819

Are mass deworming projects a good idea?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A debate has been raging over the last month about the benefits of mass deworming projects. Hugely popular with the UN and charities, the evidence behind the practice has come under attack. Are the criticisms justified? We hear from the different sides – both economists and epidemiologists and their approach to the numbers. (Photo: A nurse gives medecine to a child to prevent worms. Credit: AFP)

More or Less: Xenophobia in South Africa20150429

Are international migrants stealing jobs?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

After a spate of xenophobic attacks in South Africa over the last few weeks, the army has been deployed to calm down volatile hotspots. More or Less looks at some of the numbers behind often cited claims – that migrants are stealing jobs, and that South Africa receives more asylum applications than any other country in the world. (Image: A South African holds up a sign saying 'stand up against xenophobia'. Credit: Mujahid Safodien/ AFP/Getty Images)

No Quick Fix for Myanmar20151001

No Quick Fix for Myanmar20151001

A special essay from Leo Johnson in Mandalay reflects on the doubts and dilemmas besetting Myanmar ahead of its landmark elections this November. The military junta might have already earmarked a quarter of the seats for its own officers; still, there is a chance that Aung San Suu Kyi and her party the NLD could make huge gains. But are they prepared for the tasks of lifting the nation out of poverty, or healing its religious and ethnic divisions?

Photo: Female day labourers ride on truck on their way to work on September 21, 2015. (Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images)

No Quick Fix For Myanmar20151001

A special essay from Leo Johnson in Mandalay reflects on the doubts and dilemmas besetting Myanmar ahead of its landmark elections this November. The military junta might have already earmarked a quarter of the seats for its own officers; still, there is a chance that Aung San Suu Kyi and her party the NLD could make huge gains. But are they prepared for the tasks of lifting the nation out of poverty, or healing its religious and ethnic divisions?

Photo: Female day labourers ride on truck on their way to work on September 21, 2015. (Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images)

No Quick Fix for Myanmar20151001

Leo Johnson asks if November's elections can bring prosperity and peace to the country

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Leo Johnson in Mandalay reflects on the doubts and dilemmas besetting Myanmar ahead of its landmark elections this November. The military junta might have already earmarked a quarter of the seats for its own officers; still, there is a chance that Aung San Suu Kyi and her party the NLD could make huge gains. But are they prepared for the tasks of lifting the nation out of poverty, or healing its religious and ethnic divisions?

Photo: Female day labourers ride on truck on their way to work on September 21, 2015. (Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images)

Nudity20141217

Why does the naked human form provoke such strong reactions?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

On track in the Andes?20150625

Simon Parker hears Peruvians' views of a proposed new railway across South America

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Social media; not what, but where you say it.20150105

Taking a look at how people are using different social networks.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

This programme normally takes a look at what is being talked about on social media, but this week we take a look at where people are having these discussions.

Are people moving from public social networks like Twitter, to more private platforms such as chatapps. In 2014 we saw a number of places where Whatsapp and Firechat were being used to communicate privately to avoid government censors. We speak to the BBC’s app editor Trushar Barot to find out why different platforms are popular.

(Image: A customer inspects a new phone in a store. Photo by Lintao Zhang/Getty Images)

Talking About Death20150826

It’s something that will come to all of us. So why is it so hard to talk about death?

Mike Williams meets a British doctor facing her own mortality and another in India who wrestles with telling her patients the bad news

Produced by Smita Patel

(Photo: Four gravestones in a graveyard. Credit: Shutterstock)

Talking about Death20150826

It\u2019s something that will come to all of us. So why is it so hard to talk about death?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

It’s something that will come to all of us. So why is it so hard to talk about death?
Mike Williams meets a British doctor facing her own mortality and another in India who wrestles with telling her patients the bad news

Produced by Smita Patel

(Photo: Four gravestones in a graveyard. Credit: Shutterstock)

Testour: a Tunisian town where history runs backwards20150827

Testour: a Tunisian town where history runs backwards20150827

A special essay from Edward Lewis explores the fascinating twists and turns of the history of Testour. This place was founded and built by Muslims and Jews expelled from the Iberian peninsula during the Reconquista, between the 12th and 15th centuries AD. Now it's inhabited mostly by Arabic-speaking Muslims - but signs of the original builders' nostalgia for Spain and cosmopolitan culture are everywhere. This is by no means a typical Tunisian town - yet it holds valuable, centuries-old lessons about tolerance and migration across the Mediterranean which are still very relevant today.

Photo: the minaret of Testour's mosque incorporates loudspeakers, a unique clock tower - and a clockface with numerals in reverse order. (c) Edward Lewis @ejlewis80

Testour: A Tunisian Town Where History Runs Backwards20150827

A special essay from Edward Lewis explores the fascinating twists and turns of the history of Testour. This place was founded and built by Muslims and Jews expelled from the Iberian peninsula during the Reconquista, between the 12th and 15th centuries AD. Now it's inhabited mostly by Arabic-speaking Muslims - but signs of the original builders' nostalgia for Spain and cosmopolitan culture are everywhere. This is by no means a typical Tunisian town - yet it holds valuable, centuries-old lessons about tolerance and migration across the Mediterranean which are still very relevant today.

Photo: the minaret of Testour's mosque incorporates loudspeakers, a unique clock tower - and a clockface with numerals in reverse order. (c) Edward Lewis @ejlewis80

Testour: a Tunisian town where history runs backwards20150827

Edward Lewis explores the history of a town settled by people expelled from Andalucia

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

A special essay from Edward Lewis explores the fascinating twists and turns of the history of Testour. This place was founded and built by Muslims and Jews expelled from the Iberian peninsula during the Reconquista, between the 12th and 15th centuries AD. Now it's inhabited mostly by Arabic-speaking Muslims - but signs of the original builders' nostalgia for Spain and cosmopolitan culture are everywhere. This is by no means a typical Tunisian town - yet it holds valuable, centuries-old lessons about tolerance and migration across the Mediterranean which are still very relevant today.

Photo: the minaret of Testour's mosque incorporates loudspeakers, a unique clock tower - and a clockface with numerals in reverse order. (c) Edward Lewis @ejlewis80

The baby that divided a nation20150212

Nick Thorpe meets a Gypsy family whose newborn baby has divided Hungary.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Nick Thorpe meets a Gypsy family whose newborn baby Rikardo has divided Hungary, and sparked a national debate on racism.

Rikardo is their third child, a fact that Elod Novad, deputy leader of the far-right Jobbik party, used to claim Hungarians would soon be "a minority" in their "own homes" and that Gypsies were Hungary's "biggest problem". This caused an avalanche of both approval and condemnation of his views. Rikardo has became Hungary's most famous Gypsy, at only a few days old.

The Roma, or Gypsies are they prefer to be called, are Hungarians with equal rights. Rikardo's birth seemed to hold up a mirror in which both Hungarian racism and anti-racism were reflected. Opposition and government politicians tried to outdo one another with gestures and words of solidarity with the family.

(Photo: Baby Rikardo and his parents. Credit: BBC)

The Forum20150109

Why do some people value small feet?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Forum: The Imminent Demise of the Novel?20150313

Writer Will Self on why the move to digital could spell the end of the serious novel

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry20141118

Are sanctions hurting Putin? Veteran European diplomat Sir Robert Cooper and Fyodor Lukyanov, editor of Russia in Global Affairs, give their view.

The Inquiry20141118

Are sanctions hurting Putin?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry - Can We Learn To Live With Nuclear Power?20150901

The Inquiry - Can We Learn To Live With Nuclear Power?20150901

After the Fukushima disaster in Japan, the country is turning its reactors back on.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In 2011, following a devastating tsunami, Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power station went into meltdown, leaking radiation. It was the most serious nuclear accident since Chernobyl. It appeared to send the nuclear power industry into retreat – and not just in Japan.

Other nations had second thoughts too. Germany decided to phase out its nuclear reactors altogether. But now Japan has resumed nuclear power generation.

At the heart of the “nuclear wobble” of 2011 is the question of risk: attitudes to, and understanding of, risk vary surprisingly between nations and cultures. But after one of the most shocking incidents in nuclear power's history, will we be able to cope with our fears? In other words - our question this week - can we learn to live with nuclear power? Presenter: Michael Blastland

(Image: A Czech Power plant. Credit: AP)

The Inquiry - Can We Learn To Live With Nuclear Power?20150901

In 2011, following a devastating tsunami, Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power station went into meltdown, leaking radiation. It was the most serious nuclear accident since Chernobyl. It appeared to send the nuclear power industry into retreat – and not just in Japan.

Other nations had second thoughts too. Germany decided to phase out its nuclear reactors altogether. But now Japan has resumed nuclear power generation.

At the heart of the “nuclear wobble? of 2011 is the question of risk: attitudes to, and understanding of, risk vary surprisingly between nations and cultures. But after one of the most shocking incidents in nuclear power's history, will we be able to cope with our fears? In other words - our question this week - can we learn to live with nuclear power? Presenter: Michael Blastland

(Image: A Czech Power plant. Credit: AP)

The Inquiry - Can We Learn To Live With Nuclear Power?20150901

In 2011, following a devastating tsunami, Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power station went into meltdown, leaking radiation. It was the most serious nuclear accident since Chernobyl. It appeared to send the nuclear power industry into retreat – and not just in Japan.

Other nations had second thoughts too. Germany decided to phase out its nuclear reactors altogether. But now Japan has resumed nuclear power generation.

At the heart of the “nuclear wobble? of 2011 is the question of risk: attitudes to, and understanding of, risk vary surprisingly between nations and cultures. But after one of the most shocking incidents in nuclear power's history, will we be able to cope with our fears? In other words - our question this week - can we learn to live with nuclear power? Presenter: Michael Blastland

(Image: A Czech Power plant. Credit: AP)

The Inquiry - Is There A New Nuclear Arms Race?20150414

John Mecklin says nuclear-weapon states are competing again.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry \u2013 What\u2019s the Yemen Conflict Really About20150421

Sarah Jamal says the 2011 revolution failed to deliver justice

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Are we fighting cancer the right way?20160203

The Inquiry: Are we fighting cancer the right way?20160203

Dr Vincent DeVita says rules and regulations are stifling innovation

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Are we fighting cancer the right way?20160203

In this extract from The Inquiry, leading oncologist Dr Vincent DeVita warns that strict rules governing the use of drugs block innovation and prevent doctors from curing patients.

Image: Biological samples being analysed at Cancer Research UK/ Getty/Dan Kitwood

The Inquiry: Are We Fighting Cancer The Right Way?20160203

In this extract from The Inquiry, leading oncologist Dr Vincent DeVita warns that strict rules governing the use of drugs block innovation and prevent doctors from curing patients.

Image: Biological samples being analysed at Cancer Research UK/ Getty/Dan Kitwood

The Inquiry: Are We Fighting Cancer The Right Way?20160601

In this extract from The Inquiry, leading oncologist Dr Vincent DeVita warns that strict rules governing the use of drugs block innovation and prevent doctors from curing patients.

(Photo: Biological samples being analysed at Cancer Research UK. Credit: Dan KitwoodGetty Images)

The Inquiry: Are We Fighting Cancer The Right Way?20160601

In this extract from The Inquiry, leading oncologist Dr Vincent DeVita warns that strict rules governing the use of drugs block innovation and prevent doctors from curing patients.

(Photo: Biological samples being analysed at Cancer Research UK. Credit: Dan KitwoodGetty Images)

The Inquiry: Are we Fighting Cancer the Right Way?20160601

The World Health Organisation says cancer rates around the world are rising fast

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Are We Really About To End World Poverty?20160615

Helen Clark, head of the UNDP, explains the global poverty target.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Helen Clark - head of the United Nations Development Programme (and a possible future UN leader) - explains the new global poverty target to eradicate extreme poverty by 2030. But the claim that ending poverty is within our grasp is one we’ve heard many times before. Will it be different this time?

Presenter: Linda Yueh

(Image: A homeless boy in poverty. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Inquiry: Are we Tired of Talking About Climate Change?20150331

Professor Robert Gifford explains how we are hard-wired to avoid tackling climate change

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Can A Corrupt County Get Clean?20161012

Endemic corruption is very hard to deal with. But not impossible. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Former Georgian government spokesman, Shota Utiashvili explains how they got rid of police corruption in just a few short years – but with some pretty drastic methods.

The Inquiry: Can A Corrupt County Get Clean?20161012

Endemic corruption is very hard to deal with. But not impossible. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Former Georgian government spokesman, Shota Utiashvili explains how they got rid of police corruption in just a few short years – but with some pretty drastic methods.

The Inquiry: Can a Corrupt County Get Clean?20161012

Shota Utiashvili explains how his country eradicated police corruption.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Can Colombia Reintegrate The FARC?20160727

The Inquiry: Can Colombia Reintegrate The FARC?20160727

Ex-fighter Boris Forero describes his journey from left wing guerrilla to psychologist

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Former fighter Boris Forero describes being brought up in a Communist household and joining the FARC when he was 19. He spent several years in the jungle with the guerrillas, who have fought a 50-year war with the Colombian government. Today he works with a government organisation that helps former fighters reintegrate into Colombian society. He says that it will be easier for those expected to lay down their arms in the coming months to reintegrate as a group than for those who did so individually.

Presenter: Helena Merriman

(Photo: Fighters of the Front 53, a faction of the leftist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrilla movement, in Los Alpes, 150 Km southeast of Bogota. Credit to: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can Colombia Reintegrate The FARC?20160727

Former fighter Boris Forero describes being brought up in a Communist household and joining the FARC when he was 19. He spent several years in the jungle with the guerrillas, who have fought a 50-year war with the Colombian government. Today he works with a government organisation that helps former fighters reintegrate into Colombian society. He says that it will be easier for those expected to lay down their arms in the coming months to reintegrate as a group than for those who did so individually.

Presenter: Helena Merriman

(Photo: Fighters of the Front 53, a faction of the leftist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrilla movement, in Los Alpes, 150 Km southeast of Bogota. Credit to: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can Colombia Reintegrate The Farc?20160727

Former fighter Boris Forero describes being brought up in a Communist household and joining the FARC when he was 19. He spent several years in the jungle with the guerrillas, who have fought a 50-year war with the Colombian government. Today he works with a government organisation that helps former fighters reintegrate into Colombian society. He says that it will be easier for those expected to lay down their arms in the coming months to reintegrate as a group than for those who did so individually.

Presenter: Helena Merriman

(Photo: Fighters of the Front 53, a faction of the leftist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrilla movement, in Los Alpes, 150 Km southeast of Bogota. Credit to: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can Coral Reefs Survive?20160907

The Inquiry: Can Coral Reefs Survive?20160907

Marine biologist Rebecca Albright explains why we should care about coral

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Why do coral reefs matter? Rebecca Albright is a marine biologist from the Carnegie Institution for Science in San Francisco. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, she explains just how much damage has been done to coral and why we should care.

(Photo: Fish looking out from the coral of the Great Barrier Reef. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can Coral Reefs Survive?20160907

Why do coral reefs matter? Rebecca Albright is a marine biologist from the Carnegie Institution for Science in San Francisco. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, she explains just how much damage has been done to coral and why we should care.

(Photo: Fish looking out from the coral of the Great Barrier Reef. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can Coral Reefs Survive?20160907

Why do coral reefs matter? Rebecca Albright is a marine biologist from the Carnegie Institution for Science in San Francisco. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, she explains just how much damage has been done to coral and why we should care.

(Photo: Fish looking out from the coral of the Great Barrier Reef. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can Europe Resist The Rise Of Radical Politics?20141216

Political scientist Andreas Johansson Heino explains the rise of the right in Sweden.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Can Nigeria End Oil Corruption?20151020

Kolawole Banwo explains the scale of President Buhari\u2019s challenge.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Around 300,000 barrels of oil were stolen everyday in Nigeria last year. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Kolawole Banwo - a government advisor on good governance – explains the scale of the challenge faced by President Buhari if he is to fulfil his promise to end corruption in the oil industry.

(Photo: Buhari inauguration. Credit: AP)

The Inquiry: Can the EU Survive?20160629

The Inquiry: Can the EU Survive?20160629

Aristotle Kallis says the EU has no future without the people\u2019s trust

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Is Britain’s vote to leave the European Union the beginning of the end of the project? Aristotle Kallis is an expert on populist movements through history. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he argues that the EU has no future if it fails to win back the trust of the European people.

(Photo: David Cameron, Chancellor Angela Merkel, Bulgarian Prime minister Roesen Plevneliev, Eurozone finance ministers with bank notes, euro coins and a map of Europe in the background. Credit to Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can the EU Survive?20160629

Is Britain’s vote to leave the European Union the beginning of the end of the project? Aristotle Kallis is an expert on populist movements through history. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he argues that the EU has no future if it fails to win back the trust of the European people.

(Photo: David Cameron, Chancellor Angela Merkel, Bulgarian Prime minister Roesen Plevneliev, Eurozone finance ministers with bank notes, euro coins and a map of Europe in the background. Credit to Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can The Eu Survive?20160629

Is Britain’s vote to leave the European Union the beginning of the end of the project? Aristotle Kallis is an expert on populist movements through history. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he argues that the EU has no future if it fails to win back the trust of the European people.

(Photo: David Cameron, Chancellor Angela Merkel, Bulgarian Prime minister Roesen Plevneliev, Eurozone finance ministers with bank notes, euro coins and a map of Europe in the background. Credit to Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can The Internet Be Policed?20150106

Nate Anderson has been investigating online crime, and visiting the dark web

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Can Trump Win?20160713

The Inquiry: Can Trump Win?20160713

Campaign veteran Scott Jennings on why candidates need money

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Donald Trump is about to be officially designated the Republican party candidate for president of the United States. But he's still trailing in most important polls and he's raised far less money than his opponent, Hillary Clinton. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Scott Jennings, a veteran of several presidential campaigns, sets out why money is essential to success.

(Photo: Donald Trump, presidential candidate 2016. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can Trump Win?20160713

Donald Trump is about to be officially designated the Republican party candidate for president of the United States. But he's still trailing in most important polls and he's raised far less money than his opponent, Hillary Clinton. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Scott Jennings, a veteran of several presidential campaigns, sets out why money is essential to success.

(Photo: Donald Trump, presidential candidate 2016. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can Trump Win?20160713

Donald Trump is about to be officially designated the Republican party candidate for president of the United States. But he's still trailing in most important polls and he's raised far less money than his opponent, Hillary Clinton. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Scott Jennings, a veteran of several presidential campaigns, sets out why money is essential to success.

(Photo: Donald Trump, presidential candidate 2016. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can Virtual Reality Help Treat PTSD?20160518

The Inquiry: Can Virtual Reality Help Treat PTSD?20160518

Psychologist Skip Rizzo uses virtual worlds to help soldiers talk about their experiences

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Skip Rizzo is director for medical virtual reality at the University of Southern California. He uses virtual reality to help treat people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A common treatment for PTSD is to get people to recount their traumatic memories, but a lot of sufferers bury them. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Skip Rizzo describes how he recreated scenes from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars to help soldiers talk through their experiences.

(Photo: virtual reality presented in the form of binary code, in the shape of a man’s head with virtual reality glasses on. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Inquiry: Can Virtual Reality Help Treat PTSD?20160518

Skip Rizzo is director for medical virtual reality at the University of Southern California. He uses virtual reality to help treat people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A common treatment for PTSD is to get people to recount their traumatic memories, but a lot of sufferers bury them. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Skip Rizzo describes how he recreated scenes from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars to help soldiers talk through their experiences.

(Photo: virtual reality presented in the form of binary code, in the shape of a man’s head with virtual reality glasses on. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Inquiry: Can Virtual Reality Help Treat Ptsd?20160518

Skip Rizzo is director for medical virtual reality at the University of Southern California. He uses virtual reality to help treat people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A common treatment for PTSD is to get people to recount their traumatic memories, but a lot of sufferers bury them. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Skip Rizzo describes how he recreated scenes from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars to help soldiers talk through their experiences.

(Photo: virtual reality presented in the form of binary code, in the shape of a man’s head with virtual reality glasses on. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Inquiry: Can We Quake-Proof A City?20160323

The Inquiry: Can We Quake-Proof A City?20160323

Architect David Malott has designed some of the world’s tallest buildings. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he explains his plan to build a mile-high tower in Tokyo – an earthquake zone. He says tall towers are safer in an earthquake than single-storey dwellings. This extract includes audio from a visualisation of earthquakes in Japan by Solarwatcher.net.

(Photo: Japan's highest mountain Mount Fuji is seen behind the skyline of the Shinjuku, Tokyo at sunset)

The Inquiry: Can We Quake-proof A City?20160323

Architect David Malott has designed some of the world’s tallest buildings. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he explains his plan to build a mile-high tower in Tokyo – an earthquake zone. He says tall towers are safer in an earthquake than single-storey dwellings. This extract includes audio from a visualisation of earthquakes in Japan by Solarwatcher.net.

(Photo: Japan's highest mountain Mount Fuji is seen behind the skyline of the Shinjuku, Tokyo at sunset)

The Inquiry: Can We Quake-Proof A City?20160323

Architect David Malott on his plan for a mile-high quake-resistant building

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Architect David Malott has designed some of the world’s tallest buildings. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he explains his plan to build a mile-high tower in Tokyo – an earthquake zone. He says tall towers are safer in an earthquake than single-storey dwellings. This extract includes audio from a visualisation of earthquakes in Japan by Solarwatcher.net.

(Photo: Japan's highest mountain Mount Fuji is seen behind the skyline of the Shinjuku, Tokyo at sunset)

The Inquiry: Can You Make Bankers Behave Better?20160706

The Inquiry: Can You Make Bankers Behave Better?20160706

Dutch regulator Wijnand Nuijts on using psychologists to improve bankers' behaviour

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

From Libor rate-rigging to the sub-prime mortgage crisis, many say that problems in banking culture lie behind these scandals. But can it be changed? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Dutch regulator Wijnand Nuijts explains how his team uses psychologists to try to improve bankers' behaviour.

(Photo: The Goldman Sachs building is seen in lower Manhattan on April 15, 2016 in New York City. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can You Make Bankers Behave Better?20160706

From Libor rate-rigging to the sub-prime mortgage crisis, many say that problems in banking culture lie behind these scandals. But can it be changed? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Dutch regulator Wijnand Nuijts explains how his team uses psychologists to try to improve bankers' behaviour.

(Photo: The Goldman Sachs building is seen in lower Manhattan on April 15, 2016 in New York City. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Can You Make Bankers Behave Better?20160706

From Libor rate-rigging to the sub-prime mortgage crisis, many say that problems in banking culture lie behind these scandals. But can it be changed? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Dutch regulator Wijnand Nuijts explains how his team uses psychologists to try to improve bankers' behaviour.

(Photo: The Goldman Sachs building is seen in lower Manhattan on April 15, 2016 in New York City. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Cuba - What Would Che Say?20150407

Lucia de Toledo on what Che Guevara would make of the diplomatic thaw with the US

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Do Drone Strikes Work?20150929

The Inquiry: Do Drone Strikes Work?20150929

In this excerpt, Brian Glyn Williams, professor of Islamic studies at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, argues that drone strikes have made the US safer.

Professor Williams spent four summers in Afghanistan researching terrorism and is the author of Predators: The CIA's Drone War on Al-Qaeda, based on his field work in Pakistan.

(Photo: Reaper flies without pilot. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Do Drone Strikes Work?20150929

In this excerpt, Brian Glyn Williams, professor of Islamic studies at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, argues that drone strikes have made the US safer.

Professor Williams spent four summers in Afghanistan researching terrorism and is the author of Predators: The CIA's Drone War on Al-Qaeda, based on his field work in Pakistan.

(Photo: Reaper flies without pilot. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Do Drone Strikes Work?20150929

Professor Brian Glyn Williams argues that drones have prevented terror attacks.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In this excerpt, Brian Glyn Williams, professor of Islamic studies at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, argues that drone strikes have made the US safer.

Professor Williams spent four summers in Afghanistan researching terrorism and is the author of Predators: The CIA's Drone War on Al-Qaeda, based on his field work in Pakistan.

(Photo: Reaper flies without pilot. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Do We Have Enough Genders?20160113

Brin Bixby says gender is a spectrum and that many people do not fit neatly into male or female categories. In this excerpt from the Inquiry, she explains how she lives as both male and female but would prefer it if society was less focussed on binary genders.

(Photo:Transgender trans-sexual concept. Credit: Thinkstock by Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Do We Have Enough Genders?20160113

Brin Bixby, who is bi-gender, says gender is a spectrum

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Brin Bixby says gender is a spectrum and that many people do not fit neatly into male or female categories. In this excerpt from the Inquiry, she explains how she lives as both male and female but would prefer it if society was less focussed on binary genders.

(Photo:Transgender trans-sexual concept. Credit: Thinkstock by Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Do We Have Enough Genders?20160413

The Inquiry: Do We Have Enough Genders?20160413

Brin Bixby, who is bi-gender, says gender is a spectrum and that many people do not fit neatly into male or female categories.

(Photo: Transgender trans-sexual concept. Credit: Thinkstock by Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Do We Have Enough Genders?20160413

Brin Bixby, who is bi-gender, says gender is a spectrum and that many people do not fit neatly into male or female categories.

(Photo: Transgender trans-sexual concept. Credit: Thinkstock by Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Do We Have Enough Genders?20160413

Brin Bixby, who is bi-gender, says gender is a spectrum

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Has Austerity Worked?20150630

What the arguments about austerity are really about.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Has President Assad Won?20160224

The Inquiry: Has President Assad Won?20160224

Analyst Hassan Hassan on President Assad\u2019s support among the Syrian people.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Has President Assad Won?20160224

Middle East analyst Hassan Hassan is from eastern Syria, where his home town is now run by so called Islamic State. Before President Assad received military backing from Russia, he was losing the support of even his most loyal followers. So what does his power base look like now?

The Inquiry: Has President Assad Won?20160224

Middle East analyst Hassan Hassan is from eastern Syria, where his home town is now run by so called Islamic State. Before President Assad received military backing from Russia, he was losing the support of even his most loyal followers. So what does his power base look like now?

The Inquiry: Have we Underestimated Plants?20151118

The Inquiry: Have we Underestimated Plants?20151118

An exploration of what plants can do \u2013 and what we can learn from them.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

New research suggests plants might be capable of more than many of us might expect. Some – controversially – even describe plants as “intelligent”, or even “sentient”. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Professor Daniel Chamovitz - Dean of the Faculty of Life Sciences at Tel Aviv University - explains how plants, despite not having brains, are able to make “decisions” and exchange information. He warns that failing to understand how plants work could have devastating consequences for the human race.

(Photo: US-Fall-Shenandoah, Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Have We Underestimated Plants?20151118

New research suggests plants might be capable of more than many of us might expect. Some – controversially – even describe plants as “intelligent?, or even “sentient? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Professor Daniel Chamovitz - Dean of the Faculty of Life Sciences at Tel Aviv University - explains how plants, despite not having brains, are able to make “decisions? and exchange information. He warns that failing to understand how plants work could have devastating consequences for the human race.

(Photo: US-Fall-Shenandoah, Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Have we Underestimated Plants?20151118

New research suggests plants might be capable of more than many of us might expect. Some – controversially – even describe plants as “intelligent?, or even “sentient?. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Professor Daniel Chamovitz - Dean of the Faculty of Life Sciences at Tel Aviv University - explains how plants, despite not having brains, are able to make “decisions? and exchange information. He warns that failing to understand how plants work could have devastating consequences for the human race.

(Photo: US-Fall-Shenandoah, Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: How Can We Fix Antibiotics?20161026

Science journalist Bruce Mohun explains the lengths scientists go to find new antibiotics

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

What do sloths, remote caves and Komodo dragons have to do with antibiotics? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, science journalist, Bruce Mohun talks about following scientists all over the world as they try to find the next generation of antibiotics.

(Photo: A depiction of EHIC bacteria Credit: HZI/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: How Did Governments Lose Control of Encryption?20160302

The Inquiry: How Did Governments Lose Control of Encryption?20160302

Cryptography was once controlled by the state, which deployed it for military and diplomatic ends. But in the 1970s, long-haired hippy Whitfield Diffie came up with what has been described as the most revolutionary concept in encryption since the Renaissance. Diffie’s invention took the keys away from the state and marked the start of the ‘Crypto Wars’ – the fight for the right of individuals and companies to communicate beyond the gaze of government agencies. In this excerpt from The Inquiry Diffie explains how his invention helped governments lose control of encrytption.

(Photo: Whitfield Diffie. Credit: Stanford University)

The Inquiry: How Did Governments Lose Control Of Encryption?20160302

Cryptography was once controlled by the state, which deployed it for military and diplomatic ends. But in the 1970s, long-haired hippy Whitfield Diffie came up with what has been described as the most revolutionary concept in encryption since the Renaissance. Diffie’s invention took the keys away from the state and marked the start of the ‘Crypto Wars’ – the fight for the right of individuals and companies to communicate beyond the gaze of government agencies. In this excerpt from The Inquiry Diffie explains how his invention helped governments lose control of encrytption.

(Photo: Whitfield Diffie. Credit: Stanford University)

The Inquiry: How Did Governments Lose Control of Encryption?20160302

Whitfield Diffie on his 1970s invention which changed encryption forever.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Cryptography was once controlled by the state, which deployed it for military and diplomatic ends. But in the 1970s, long-haired hippy Whitfield Diffie came up with what has been described as the most revolutionary concept in encryption since the Renaissance. Diffie’s invention took the keys away from the state and marked the start of the ‘Crypto Wars’ – the fight for the right of individuals and companies to communicate beyond the gaze of government agencies. In this excerpt from The Inquiry Diffie explains how his invention helped governments lose control of encrytption.

(Photo: Whitfield Diffie. Credit: Stanford University)

The Inquiry: How Did Iceland Clean up its Banks?20160210

The Inquiry: How Did Iceland Clean up its Banks?20160210

Gudrun Johnsen on how she helped make sense of Iceland\u2019s banking collapse

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

When Iceland’s banking sector collapsed in 2008 it was 10 times the size of the country’s entire economy. Gudrun Johnsen sat on the special commission put in place in the aftermath of the crash. In this excerpt from The Inquiry she explains how they were determined to find out what went wrong. “As a consequence,” she says, “we were able to clean house pretty quickly.”

(Photo: Demonstrators in central Reykjavik 22 November 2008. Credit AFP/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: How Did Iceland Clean up its Banks?20160210

When Iceland’s banking sector collapsed in 2008 it was 10 times the size of the country’s entire economy. Gudrun Johnsen sat on the special commission put in place in the aftermath of the crash. In this excerpt from The Inquiry she explains how they were determined to find out what went wrong. “As a consequence,? she says, “we were able to clean house pretty quickly.?

(Photo: Demonstrators in central Reykjavik 22 November 2008. Credit AFP/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: How Did Iceland Clean Up Its Banks?20160210

When Iceland’s banking sector collapsed in 2008 it was 10 times the size of the country’s entire economy. Gudrun Johnsen sat on the special commission put in place in the aftermath of the crash. In this excerpt from The Inquiry she explains how they were determined to find out what went wrong. “As a consequence,? she says, “we were able to clean house pretty quickly.?

(Photo: Demonstrators in central Reykjavik 22 November 2008. Credit AFP/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: How Did We Mess Up Antibiotics?20161019

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, infectious disease specialist Brad Spellberg explains why we are struggling to find the antibiotics we need. He also describes what it’s like to treat a patient resistant to all antibiotics.

The Inquiry: How Did We Mess up Antibiotics?20161019

Dr Brad Spellberg explains why discovering new antibiotics is so difficult.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: How Did We Mess Up Antibiotics?20161019

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, infectious disease specialist Brad Spellberg explains why we are struggling to find the antibiotics we need. He also describes what it’s like to treat a patient resistant to all antibiotics.

The Inquiry: How Did We Save the Ozone Layer?20160803

The Inquiry: How Did We Save the Ozone Layer?20160803

Former director of Friends of the Earth describes the impact of targeting aerosol use

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The story of how environmental campaigners persuaded people to stop using aerosols. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, the former director of Friends of the Earth, Jonathan Porritt, tells us about the campaign he lead in the 1980s to stop the use of aerosols. The success of the campaign wasn’t just down to slogans and leaflets; he may have also had a little bit of unexpected help from Princess Diana.

(Photo: Severe thinning of Earth's protective ozone layer found over Antarctica, by NASA scientists. Credit to: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: How Did We Save the Ozone Layer?20160803

The story of how environmental campaigners persuaded people to stop using aerosols. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, the former director of Friends of the Earth, Jonathan Porritt, tells us about the campaign he lead in the 1980s to stop the use of aerosols. The success of the campaign wasn’t just down to slogans and leaflets; he may have also had a little bit of unexpected help from Princess Diana.

(Photo: Severe thinning of Earth's protective ozone layer found over Antarctica, by NASA scientists. Credit to: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: How Did We Save The Ozone Layer?20160803

The story of how environmental campaigners persuaded people to stop using aerosols. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, the former director of Friends of the Earth, Jonathan Porritt, tells us about the campaign he lead in the 1980s to stop the use of aerosols. The success of the campaign wasn’t just down to slogans and leaflets; he may have also had a little bit of unexpected help from Princess Diana.

(Photo: Severe thinning of Earth's protective ozone layer found over Antarctica, by NASA scientists. Credit to: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: How Do You Save the Rhino?20151027

The Inquiry: How Do You Save the Rhino?20151027

How selling licenses to kill rhino could save the species.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: How Do You Save the Rhino?20151027

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Danene van der Westhuyzen – argues that selling licenses to hunt old, aggressive rhinos could help ensure the survival of the rhino. Danene is Namibia's first female dangerous game professional hunter.

(Photo: Danene van der Westhuyzen, Credit: Aru Game Lodges)

The Inquiry: How Do You Save The Rhino?20151027

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Danene van der Westhuyzen – argues that selling licenses to hunt old, aggressive rhinos could help ensure the survival of the rhino. Danene is Namibia's first female dangerous game professional hunter.

(Photo: Danene van der Westhuyzen, Credit: Aru Game Lodges)

The Inquiry: How Easy Is It To Dope In Sport?20150707

Victor Conte explains how he helped athletes like Dwain Chambers cheat.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: How has Rwanda Saved the Lives of 590,000 Children?20150428

Fidele Ngabo says it\u2019s down to an army of health workers

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: How Has the US Gun Lobby Been so Successful?20160127

The Inquiry: How Has The Us Gun Lobby Been So Successful?20160127

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Richard Feldman – president of the Independent Firearm Owners’ Association in the US, and a former lobbyist for the National Rifle Association – explains how the NRA lobbies US lawmakers.

The Inquiry: How Has the US Gun Lobby Been so Successful?20160127

The National Rifle Association is one of the most powerful organisations in the US

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: How Much Inequality Is too Much?20160106

The Inquiry: How Much Inequality Is too Much?20160106

Jared Bernstein says too much inequality is bad for America\u2019s economy

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: How Much Inequality Is too Much?20160106

Jared Bernstein, a former economic adviser to President Obama, says there is too much inequality in America today. In this excerpt from The Inquiry he explains why, in his view, inequality is bad for the US economy.

(Photo: Woman walks past poor man, Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: How Much Inequality Is Too Much?20160106

Jared Bernstein, a former economic adviser to President Obama, says there is too much inequality in America today. In this excerpt from The Inquiry he explains why, in his view, inequality is bad for the US economy.

(Photo: Woman walks past poor man, Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: How Strong Is NATO?20150217

Former NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen on the military alliance and Russia.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: How Will A Population Boom Change Africa?20150908

The Inquiry: How Will A Population Boom Change Africa?20150908

Hans Rosling says the doubling of Africa\u2019s population could be a good news story.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The UN forecasts that the number of people living in Africa will double in the next 35 years. Nigeria, the fastest-growing nation, is expected to become the third-largest country in the world by 2050. By the end of the century, almost 40% of the world’s population will live on this one continent. It raises questions about how countries – some of which are already facing big challenges – will cope. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Hans Rosling argues that this spectacular demographic shift could be a good news story for Africa.

The Inquiry: How Will A Population Boom Change Africa?20150908

The UN forecasts that the number of people living in Africa will double in the next 35 years. Nigeria, the fastest-growing nation, is expected to become the third-largest country in the world by 2050. By the end of the century, almost 40% of the world’s population will live on this one continent. It raises questions about how countries – some of which are already facing big challenges – will cope. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Hans Rosling argues that this spectacular demographic shift could be a good news story for Africa.

The Inquiry: How Will A Population Boom Change Africa?20150908

The UN forecasts that the number of people living in Africa will double in the next 35 years. Nigeria, the fastest-growing nation, is expected to become the third-largest country in the world by 2050. By the end of the century, almost 40% of the world’s population will live on this one continent. It raises questions about how countries – some of which are already facing big challenges – will cope. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Hans Rosling argues that this spectacular demographic shift could be a good news story for Africa.

The Inquiry: How Will A Population Boom Change Africa?20151223
The Inquiry: How Will a Population Boom Change Africa?20151223

The Inquiry: How Will a Population Boom Change Africa?20151223

Hans Rosling says the doubling of Africa\u2019s population could be a good news story

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The UN forecasts that the number of people living in Africa will double in the next 35 years. Nigeria, the fastest-growing nation, is expected to become the third-largest country in the world by 2050. By the end of the century, almost 40% of the world’s population will live on this one continent. It raises questions about how countries – some of which are already facing big challenges – will cope. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Hans Rosling argues that this spectacular demographic shift could be a good news story for Africa.

The Inquiry: How Will a Population Boom Change Africa?20151223

The UN forecasts that the number of people living in Africa will double in the next 35 years. Nigeria, the fastest-growing nation, is expected to become the third-largest country in the world by 2050. By the end of the century, almost 40% of the world’s population will live on this one continent. It raises questions about how countries – some of which are already facing big challenges – will cope. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Hans Rosling argues that this spectacular demographic shift could be a good news story for Africa.

The Inquiry: Is Brexit Inevitable?20160720

The Inquiry: Is Brexit Inevitable?20160720

“Brexit means Brexit,? says Theresa May, Britain’s new prime minister. It sounds unequivocal: the UK voted in a referendum to leave the European Union, so that’s what it must do. But credible figures have suggested that Brexit may not actually happen. Is that possible? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Guardian journalist John Harris says Britain’s political elite cannot wriggle out of Brexit without unleashing “malign, divisive political forces?.

Presenter: Maria Margaronis

(Photo: Illustration flags of the European Union and the Union flag sit on top of a sand castle on a beach in Southport, United Kingdom. Credit to Getty images)

The Inquiry: Is Brexit Inevitable?20160720

“Brexit means Brexit,? says Theresa May, Britain’s new prime minister. It sounds unequivocal: the UK voted in a referendum to leave the European Union, so that’s what it must do. But credible figures have suggested that Brexit may not actually happen. Is that possible? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Guardian journalist John Harris says Britain’s political elite cannot wriggle out of Brexit without unleashing “malign, divisive political forces?

Presenter: Maria Margaronis

(Photo: Illustration flags of the European Union and the Union flag sit on top of a sand castle on a beach in Southport, United Kingdom. Credit to Getty images)

The Inquiry: Is Brexit Inevitable?20160720

John Harris says Britain cannot wriggle out of Brexit without provoking dangerous anger

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

“Brexit means Brexit,” says Theresa May, Britain’s new prime minister. It sounds unequivocal: the UK voted in a referendum to leave the European Union, so that’s what it must do. But credible figures have suggested that Brexit may not actually happen. Is that possible? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Guardian journalist John Harris says Britain’s political elite cannot wriggle out of Brexit without unleashing “malign, divisive political forces”.

Presenter: Maria Margaronis

(Photo: Illustration flags of the European Union and the Union flag sit on top of a sand castle on a beach in Southport, United Kingdom. Credit to Getty images)

The Inquiry: Is Cyber Warfare Really That Scary?20150505

Thomas Rid suggests attacks on critical infrastructure are difficult and unlikely

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Could an online attack cripple our power grid, hospitals and government and financial systems? Thomas Rid from King’s College, London, is the author of ‘Cyber War Will Not Take Place’. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he discusses the difficulty of actually carrying out a large-scale infrastructure attack, and suggests we should focus on more mundane threats.

(Photo:Binary code cyber war. Credit: Profit_Image/Shutterstock)

The Inquiry: Is Islamic State Finished?20160928

Seth Jones explains how so-called Islamic State already have a plan in case of defeat

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Is it too Late to Save Syria\u2019s Antiquities?20151111

The threat to Syria\u2019s cultural heritage from years of war.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Syria’s cultural heritage is being attacked from all sides - the Assad regime, opportunistic looters, opposition forces, Islamic State fighters and even Russian air strikes. Ancient sites like Palmyra have been destroyed, and it is feared that hundreds of precious valuables have been smuggled out of the country to be sold on the international art market. Is it too late to save Syria’s antiquities? We speak to experts including the specialist trying to recover stolen items being sold on the global antiquities market, the volunteer organising a kind of archaeological resistance inside Syria, and the team reconstructing the country’s historic sites using technology.

(Photo: Baalshamin detonation; Credit: AP)

The Inquiry: Is it too Late to Save Syria’s Antiquities?20151111

The Inquiry: Is it too Late to Save Syria’s Antiquities?20151111

Syria’s cultural heritage is being attacked from all sides - the Assad regime, opportunistic looters, opposition forces, Islamic State fighters and even Russian air strikes. Ancient sites like Palmyra have been destroyed, and it is feared that hundreds of precious valuables have been smuggled out of the country to be sold on the international art market. Is it too late to save Syria’s antiquities? We speak to experts including the specialist trying to recover stolen items being sold on the global antiquities market, the volunteer organising a kind of archaeological resistance inside Syria, and the team reconstructing the country’s historic sites using technology.

(Photo: Baalshamin detonation; Credit: AP)

The Inquiry: Is It Too Late To Save Syria’s Antiquities?20151111

Syria’s cultural heritage is being attacked from all sides - the Assad regime, opportunistic looters, opposition forces, Islamic State fighters and even Russian air strikes. Ancient sites like Palmyra have been destroyed, and it is feared that hundreds of precious valuables have been smuggled out of the country to be sold on the international art market. Is it too late to save Syria’s antiquities? We speak to experts including the specialist trying to recover stolen items being sold on the global antiquities market, the volunteer organising a kind of archaeological resistance inside Syria, and the team reconstructing the country’s historic sites using technology.

(Photo: Baalshamin detonation; Credit: AP)

The Inquiry: Is Nigeria's Army Failing?20150203

Is Nigeria\u2019s Army failing? Nigeria\u2019s National Security Advisor responds.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Is Opposition to GM Crops Irrational?20150602

David Ropeik says we\u2019re hard-wired to be more suspicious of man-made risks

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

David Ropeik is a consultant in risk-perception and author of the book 'How Risky is it, Really?' In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he discusses the psychological reasons why so many people don’t accept the scientific consensus that GM foods are safe to eat. He suggests we’re hard-wired to be more suspicious of man-made risks than natural ones.

Photo: David Ropeik (Credit: The Donahue Foundation)

The Inquiry: Is Pakistan Serious About Tackling Militants?20150120

Dr Ayesha Siddiqa says the government continues to turn a blind eye to militants.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Is Retirement Over?20160831

The Inquiry: Is Retirement Over?20160831

David Blake says young people today will have to work until they drop

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

For millennia human beings worked until they dropped. Then in the late 19th century, Otto von Bismarck started the first state pension in Germany. The idea caught on. By the 20th century, advances in medicine meant that many more people were surviving childhood and living longer and longer into old age.

This was great news for those individuals but not such good news for governments and companies who found themselves having to fund ever-longer retirements. In this excerpt from The Inquiry David Blake, director of the Pensions Institute at Cass Business School in London, says retirement might soon be a thing of the past.

(Photo: Clayton Fackler, 72, works at the check out at a supermarket in Ohio. Credit: J.D. Pooley/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Is Retirement Over?20160831

For millennia human beings worked until they dropped. Then in the late 19th century, Otto von Bismarck started the first state pension in Germany. The idea caught on. By the 20th century, advances in medicine meant that many more people were surviving childhood and living longer and longer into old age.

This was great news for those individuals but not such good news for governments and companies who found themselves having to fund ever-longer retirements. In this excerpt from The Inquiry David Blake, director of the Pensions Institute at Cass Business School in London, says retirement might soon be a thing of the past.

(Photo: Clayton Fackler, 72, works at the check out at a supermarket in Ohio. Credit: J.D. Pooley/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Is Retirement Over?20160831

For millennia human beings worked until they dropped. Then in the late 19th century, Otto von Bismarck started the first state pension in Germany. The idea caught on. By the 20th century, advances in medicine meant that many more people were surviving childhood and living longer and longer into old age.

This was great news for those individuals but not such good news for governments and companies who found themselves having to fund ever-longer retirements. In this excerpt from The Inquiry David Blake, director of the Pensions Institute at Cass Business School in London, says retirement might soon be a thing of the past.

(Photo: Clayton Fackler, 72, works at the check out at a supermarket in Ohio. Credit: J.D. Pooley/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Is Russia Vulnerable?20151013

The Inquiry: Is Russia Vulnerable?20151013

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Alexander Korolev argues that a new type of geopolitics is emerging as Russia and China become closer allies.

Born in Siberia Dr Korolev is a research fellow at the National University of Singapore specialising in China-Russia relations. He believes that while international isolation and a faltering economy may have forced Russia to look East, its alliance with Chain has made it stronger.

(Photo: President Putin at the UN General Assembly. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Is Russia Vulnerable?20151013

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Alexander Korolev argues that a new type of geopolitics is emerging as Russia and China become closer allies.

Born in Siberia Dr Korolev is a research fellow at the National University of Singapore specialising in China-Russia relations. He believes that while international isolation and a faltering economy may have forced Russia to look East, its alliance with Chain has made it stronger.

(Photo: President Putin at the UN General Assembly. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Is Russia Vulnerable?20151013

Putin pivots to the East

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Alexander Korolev argues that a new type of geopolitics is emerging as Russia and China become closer allies.
Born in Siberia Dr Korolev is a research fellow at the National University of Singapore specialising in China-Russia relations. He believes that while international isolation and a faltering economy may have forced Russia to look East, its alliance with Chain has made it stronger.

(Photo: President Putin at the UN General Assembly. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Is Saudi to Blame for \u2018IS\u2019?20151216

How did Saudi Arabia's strict version of Islam become so entwined with its politics?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Many claim that ‘Islamic State’ is the ideological offspring of Saudi Arabia; that the strict form of Islam originating in the Kingdom - and the Saudi state's aggressive promotion of it around the world – has fostered terrorism. Prof Bernard Haykel explains what Wahhabism is and how it came to be Saudi Arabia’s state religion. Presenter: Helena Merriman
(Photo: Kingdom Tower in Riyadh. Credit to Shutterstock)

The Inquiry: Is Saudi to Blame for ‘IS’?20151216

The Inquiry: Is Saudi to Blame for ‘IS’?20151216

Many claim that ‘Islamic State’ is the ideological offspring of Saudi Arabia; that the strict form of Islam originating in the Kingdom - and the Saudi state's aggressive promotion of it around the world – has fostered terrorism. Prof Bernard Haykel explains what Wahhabism is and how it came to be Saudi Arabia’s state religion. Presenter: Helena Merriman

(Photo: Kingdom Tower in Riyadh. Credit to Shutterstock)

The Inquiry: Is Saudi To Blame For €is’?20151216

Many claim that ‘Islamic State’ is the ideological offspring of Saudi Arabia; that the strict form of Islam originating in the Kingdom - and the Saudi state's aggressive promotion of it around the world – has fostered terrorism. Prof Bernard Haykel explains what Wahhabism is and how it came to be Saudi Arabia’s state religion. Presenter: Helena Merriman

(Photo: Kingdom Tower in Riyadh. Credit to Shutterstock)

The Inquiry: Is Streaming Good for Music?20150714

Chris Carey explains why he thinks streaming is the music industry\u2019s only hope.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Streaming services like Spotify, Apple Music and others give users access to a vast archive of music either for free or for a small paid subscription. But does streaming reward artists fairly? And does it affect the quality and variety of music that's made? In other words: is streaming good for music? In this excerpt from The Inquiry music data analyst Chris Carey explains the streaming business model – and why, in his view, it could be the music industry’s only hope.

(Photo: Lucy Rose, Credit: BBC)

The Inquiry: Migrant Crisis \u2013 What Else Could Europe Try?20150825

Alexander Betts says refugees could support the economies of neighbouring countries.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Tens of thousands of migrants continue to queue at the borders of the European Union in search of a better life. Their journeys are often hazardous and thousands have drowned in the Mediterranean trying to reach Italy or Greece. Attempts to share the burden among EU member states have been dogged by internal politics. And Europe’s actions so far have focussed on deterrence despite little evidence that such a strategy will work. So, in this week’s Inquiry, we’re asking what else Europe could try? In this excerpt from The Inquiry Alexander Betts argues Europe and other world powers could help refugees re-settle closer to home, where they could be an economic boon rather than a burden.

(Photo: Young migrant at Psalidi on Kos, Credit: Press Association Wires)

The Inquiry: Migrant Crisis – What Else Could Europe Try?20150825

The Inquiry: Migrant Crisis – What Else Could Europe Try?20150825

Tens of thousands of migrants continue to queue at the borders of the European Union in search of a better life. Their journeys are often hazardous and thousands have drowned in the Mediterranean trying to reach Italy or Greece. Attempts to share the burden among EU member states have been dogged by internal politics. And Europe’s actions so far have focussed on deterrence despite little evidence that such a strategy will work. So, in this week’s Inquiry, we’re asking what else Europe could try? In this excerpt from The Inquiry Alexander Betts argues Europe and other world powers could help refugees re-settle closer to home, where they could be an economic boon rather than a burden.

(Photo: Young migrant at Psalidi on Kos, Credit: Press Association Wires)

The Inquiry: Migrant Crisis € What Else Could Europe Try?20150825

Tens of thousands of migrants continue to queue at the borders of the European Union in search of a better life. Their journeys are often hazardous and thousands have drowned in the Mediterranean trying to reach Italy or Greece. Attempts to share the burden among EU member states have been dogged by internal politics. And Europe’s actions so far have focussed on deterrence despite little evidence that such a strategy will work. So, in this week’s Inquiry, we’re asking what else Europe could try? In this excerpt from The Inquiry Alexander Betts argues Europe and other world powers could help refugees re-settle closer to home, where they could be an economic boon rather than a burden.

(Photo: Young migrant at Psalidi on Kos, Credit: Press Association Wires)

The Inquiry: Should Anyone Ever Talk To IS?20150811

The Inquiry: Should Anyone Ever Talk To IS?20150811

Jonathan Powell makes the case that talks with so-called Islamic State are inevitable.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Should Anyone Ever Talk To IS?20150811

Negotiator Jonathan Powell makes the case that talks with so-called Islamic State are inevitable.

(Photo: Jonathan Powell, Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Should Anyone Ever Talk To Is?20150811

Negotiator Jonathan Powell makes the case that talks with so-called Islamic State are inevitable.

(Photo: Jonathan Powell, Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Should Governments Drop Money Out of Helicopters?20151209

The Inquiry: Should Governments Drop Money Out of Helicopters?20151209

Adair Turner says it\u2019s time to try something radical to boost economic growth.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Since the crash of 2008 wages in advanced economies have hardly risen and unemployment remains stubbornly high in many countries. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Adair Turner, former head of the Financial Services Authority in the UK, explains why he thinks it’s time to try something radical to boost economic growth.

The Inquiry: Should Governments Drop Money Out of Helicopters?20151209

Since the crash of 2008 wages in advanced economies have hardly risen and unemployment remains stubbornly high in many countries. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Adair Turner, former head of the Financial Services Authority in the UK, explains why he thinks it’s time to try something radical to boost economic growth.

The Inquiry: Should Governments Drop Money Out Of Helicopters?20151209

Since the crash of 2008 wages in advanced economies have hardly risen and unemployment remains stubbornly high in many countries. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Adair Turner, former head of the Financial Services Authority in the UK, explains why he thinks it’s time to try something radical to boost economic growth.

The Inquiry: Should we fear artificial intelligence?20150113

Nick Bostrom warns that super-intelligent computers could mean the end of humanity

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Should We Solar Panel the Sahara?20151230

The Inquiry: Should We Solar Panel the Sahara?20151230

Harvesting the sun’s power where it shines brightest, in the Sahara Desert, could reduce global demand for fossil fuels. A lot. In this excerpt of The Inquiry, nuclear physicist Gerhard Knies explains how it could work.

The Inquiry: Should We Solar Panel The Sahara?20151230

Harvesting the sun’s power where it shines brightest, in the Sahara Desert, could reduce global demand for fossil fuels. A lot. In this excerpt of The Inquiry, nuclear physicist Gerhard Knies explains how it could work.

The Inquiry: Should We Solar Panel the Sahara?20151230

Nuclear physicist Gerhard Knies explains his startlingly simple idea.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: The US And Iran: How Close Could They Get?20141209

Mehdi Khalaji spent 14 years training to become an Ayatollah in Iran.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: What Are The Consequences of Cheap Oil?20141223

John Hofmeister is a former president of Shell Oil.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: What Does China Want From Space?20150616

Tian Zhaoxia explains China\u2019s ancient fascination with the moon.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Fifteen years ago, manned space flight was still a dream for China. Now, they’re looking to the moon. Tian Zhaoxia is an English teacher at Nanjing Normal University. In this excerpt from the Inquiry, she explains China’s ancient fascination with the moon, and tells a mythical story that even found its way to the Apollo moon mission

Photo: China-Science-Space (Credit:Mark Ralston/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Does China's Stock Market Crash Tell Us?20150721

In a country where everything is big, numbers can be deceptive.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: What Does Kim Jong Un Want?20150127

Jean Lee explores the ambitions of North Korea\u2019s enigmatic and unpredictable leader

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: What Does The President Need To Know?20151006

The Inquiry: What Does The President Need To Know?20151006

How to deal with the flood of intelligence information coming into the US government.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: What Does The President Need To Know?20151006

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Will Inboden, part of President George W. Bush’s National Security Council, talks about how intelligence officials sort through the huge amount of information coming into the US government.

The Inquiry: What Does The President Need To Know?20151006

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Will Inboden, part of President George W. Bush’s National Security Council, talks about how intelligence officials sort through the huge amount of information coming into the US government.

The Inquiry: What Happened to Al-Qaeda?20160406

The Inquiry: What Happened to Al-Qaeda?20160406

In recent years al-Qaeda has been eclipsed by the so-called Islamic State. But we are in danger of underestimating the threat from al-Qaeda, according to analyst Katherine Zimmerman. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, she explains that although the central core is depleted, al-Qaeda is now made up of smaller groups spread through different countries around the world. These affiliated groups still share the same goals, she says, and pose a durable threat.

(Photo: A fighter is seen standing in front of an image of Osama bin Laden, the late head of al-Qaeda, in the town of Rada. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Happened To Al-qaeda?20160406

In recent years al-Qaeda has been eclipsed by the so-called Islamic State. But we are in danger of underestimating the threat from al-Qaeda, according to analyst Katherine Zimmerman. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, she explains that although the central core is depleted, al-Qaeda is now made up of smaller groups spread through different countries around the world. These affiliated groups still share the same goals, she says, and pose a durable threat.

(Photo: A fighter is seen standing in front of an image of Osama bin Laden, the late head of al-Qaeda, in the town of Rada. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Happened to Al-Qaeda?20160406

Katherine Zimmerman explains how and why the movement still poses a threat

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In recent years al-Qaeda has been eclipsed by the so-called Islamic State. But we are in danger of underestimating the threat from al-Qaeda, according to analyst Katherine Zimmerman. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, she explains that although the central core is depleted, al-Qaeda is now made up of smaller groups spread through different countries around the world. These affiliated groups still share the same goals, she says, and pose a durable threat.

(Photo: A fighter is seen standing in front of an image of Osama bin Laden, the late head of al-Qaeda, in the town of Rada. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Happened To The European Dream?20160504

The Inquiry: What Happened To The European Dream?20160504

Adriaan from the Netherlands on the backlash against deepening European integration

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, European integration went through a golden era - including agreement on plans for a single currency, the euro. But that high water mark was quickly followed by a backlash. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Adriaan Schout from the Netherlands Institute of International Relations explains why and how Europeans began to resist the accelerating growth of the "European project".

(Image: A postcard calling on people to 'Strike Back at the Empire' is displayed ahead of the Dutch referendum in 2005 that rejected the European Union Constitution. Credit: JOHN D MCHUGH/AFP/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Happened To The European Dream?20160504

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, European integration went through a golden era - including agreement on plans for a single currency, the euro. But that high water mark was quickly followed by a backlash. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Adriaan Schout from the Netherlands Institute of International Relations explains why and how Europeans began to resist the accelerating growth of the "European project".

(Image: A postcard calling on people to 'Strike Back at the Empire' is displayed ahead of the Dutch referendum in 2005 that rejected the European Union Constitution. Credit: JOHN D MCHUGH/AFP/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Happened To The European Dream?20160504

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, European integration went through a golden era - including agreement on plans for a single currency, the euro. But that high water mark was quickly followed by a backlash. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Adriaan Schout from the Netherlands Institute of International Relations explains why and how Europeans began to resist the accelerating growth of the "European project".

(Image: A postcard calling on people to 'Strike Back at the Empire' is displayed ahead of the Dutch referendum in 2005 that rejected the European Union Constitution. Credit: JOHN D MCHUGH/AFP/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Is China Doing to Clear the Air?20160120

The Inquiry: What Is China Doing to Clear the Air?20160120

Dr Jim Zhang explains how air pollution in China damages unborn babies

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

If a pregnant woman breathes polluted air it can damage not just her health but that of her unborn child too. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Dr Jim Zhang from Duke University in the US reveals what he found when he studied the weight of babies born just after a period of reduced air pollution in Beijing. His findings may surprise you.

(Photo: A man and his child wear masks to protest against pollution, Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Is China Doing to Clear the Air?20160120

If a pregnant woman breathes polluted air it can damage not just her health but that of her unborn child too. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Dr Jim Zhang from Duke University in the US reveals what he found when he studied the weight of babies born just after a period of reduced air pollution in Beijing. His findings may surprise you.

(Photo: A man and his child wear masks to protest against pollution, Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Is China Doing To Clear The Air?20160120

If a pregnant woman breathes polluted air it can damage not just her health but that of her unborn child too. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Dr Jim Zhang from Duke University in the US reveals what he found when he studied the weight of babies born just after a period of reduced air pollution in Beijing. His findings may surprise you.

(Photo: A man and his child wear masks to protest against pollution, Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Kind Of Person Becomes A Violent Jihadi?20160420

The Inquiry: What Kind Of Person Becomes A Violent Jihadi?20160420

Former CIA operative Marc Sageman asks why some people turn to political violence

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Former CIA operative Marc Sageman has spent decades studying militants. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he says his ex-colleagues don't have the skills to find out why some people turn to political violence.

(Photo: The CIA symbol shown on the floor of CIA Headquarters, in Langley, Virginia. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Kind Of Person Becomes A Violent Jihadi?20160420

Former CIA operative Marc Sageman has spent decades studying militants. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he says his ex-colleagues don't have the skills to find out why some people turn to political violence.

(Photo: The CIA symbol shown on the floor of CIA Headquarters, in Langley, Virginia. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Kind Of Person Becomes A Violent Jihadi?20160420

Former CIA operative Marc Sageman has spent decades studying militants. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he says his ex-colleagues don't have the skills to find out why some people turn to political violence.

(Photo: The CIA symbol shown on the floor of CIA Headquarters, in Langley, Virginia. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What Will Happen When Robots Take Our Jobs?20150818

The Inquiry: What Will Happen When Robots Take Our Jobs?20150818

As more and more work is automated, the prospect of a future without work becomes ever closer. Tech journalist and life coach David Baker says we should embrace it.

(Photo: David Baker Credit: Nick Wilson)

The Inquiry: What Will Happen When Robots Take Our Jobs?20150818

As more and more work is automated, the prospect of a future without work becomes ever closer. Tech journalist and life coach David Baker says we should embrace it.

(Photo: David Baker Credit: Nick Wilson)

The Inquiry: What Will Happen When Robots Take Our Jobs?20150818

Tech journalist and life coach David Baker says we should embrace a world without work.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: What\u2019s Behind The Anti-Vax Movement?20150804

Juniper Russo on why she didn\u2019t vaccinate her children \u2013 but then changed her mind.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Opposition to vaccines in the US has led to the first measles death in the country for 12 years. It follows a big rise in cases, blamed on so-called “anti-vaxxers”, who say vaccines do more harm to children than good. Why are their views so popular when the accepted science says the opposite? Juniper Russo explains what drew her to the movement and why she later changed her mind about vaccinating her two children.

(Photo: Juniper Russo, Credit: Juniper Russo)

The Inquiry: What's Killing White American Women?20160511

The Inquiry: What's Killing White American Women?20160511

Addiction expert Dr Andrew Kolodny on the US's prescription painkiller epidemic

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Advances in everything from medicine to nutrition to economic growth mean death rates have been falling around the world for years. But for less educated white American women, that trend has reversed. One reason is a rise in drug overdoses. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Dr Andrew Kolodny of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing explains how a slick 1990s marketing campaign led to the US's worst ever drug addiction epidemic.

(Photo: Prescription Oxycodone pain pills lie on display. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What's Killing White American Women?20160511

Advances in everything from medicine to nutrition to economic growth mean death rates have been falling around the world for years. But for less educated white American women, that trend has reversed. One reason is a rise in drug overdoses. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Dr Andrew Kolodny of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing explains how a slick 1990s marketing campaign led to the US's worst ever drug addiction epidemic.

(Photo: Prescription Oxycodone pain pills lie on display. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What's Killing White American Women?20160511

Advances in everything from medicine to nutrition to economic growth mean death rates have been falling around the world for years. But for less educated white American women, that trend has reversed. One reason is a rise in drug overdoses. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Dr Andrew Kolodny of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing explains how a slick 1990s marketing campaign led to the US's worst ever drug addiction epidemic.

(Photo: Prescription Oxycodone pain pills lie on display. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What's the point of Lotteries?20160914

The Inquiry: What's the point of Lotteries?20160914

It is now hard to find a country that does not have a state sponsored lottery – even the remote Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan recently adopted one. They have famously been called a “tax for people who are bad at maths? and make little economic sense for the individuals who play. Instead, lotteries allow governments to raise much needed revenue to be spent on ‘good causes.’ But there’s more to lotteries than powerballs and million dollar prizes. Should we embrace them as a way of making life more fair?

Presenter: Michael Blastland

(Photo: Lottery balls are seen in a box at a Liquor store in San Lorenzo, California. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What's The Point Of Lotteries?20160914

It is now hard to find a country that does not have a state sponsored lottery – even the remote Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan recently adopted one. They have famously been called a “tax for people who are bad at maths? and make little economic sense for the individuals who play. Instead, lotteries allow governments to raise much needed revenue to be spent on ‘good causes.’ But there’s more to lotteries than powerballs and million dollar prizes. Should we embrace them as a way of making life more fair?

Presenter: Michael Blastland

(Photo: Lottery balls are seen in a box at a Liquor store in San Lorenzo, California. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: What's the point of Lotteries?20160914

National lotteries exist all over the world. What are they for?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

It is now hard to find a country that does not have a state sponsored lottery – even the remote Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan recently adopted one. They have famously been called a “tax for people who are bad at maths” and make little economic sense for the individuals who play. Instead, lotteries allow governments to raise much needed revenue to be spent on ‘good causes.’ But there’s more to lotteries than powerballs and million dollar prizes. Should we embrace them as a way of making life more fair?

Presenter: Michael Blastland

(Photo: Lottery balls are seen in a box at a Liquor store in San Lorenzo, California. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Who Can Fix Fifa?20150526

Law professor Mark Pieth tried to reform football\u2019s governing body from the inside.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Fifa has been described as a “totalitarian” set-up “beyond ridicule” with a leadership “incapable of reform or cultural change”. A corruption report is said to have contained “numerous materially incomplete and erroneous representations”. So what’s it like trying to change it from the inside? Law professor Mark Pieth did just that – and underestimated the challenge.

The Inquiry: Who runs Mexico?20141125

Alejandro Hope worked for Mexico's civilian intelligence agency on organised crime.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Who Wants What In Libya?20150310

Libya expert Mattia Toaldo on the government working 1000 km away from its civil service.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Who Wins in a Cashless Economy?20160921

Harvard economist Ken Rogoff makes the case for cashless

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Who Wins In A Cashless Economy?20160921

Proponents of a cashless future point to the use of wads of notes in criminality and corruption. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Harvard economist Ken Rogoff explains the various ways in which cash holds back economies.

The Inquiry: Why Are 10,000 Children Missing In Europe?20161005

The Inquiry: Why Are 10,000 Children Missing In Europe?20161005

Gulwali Passarlay recounts his journey as a 12-year-old from Afghanistan to Britain

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Why Are 10,000 Children Missing In Europe?20161005

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Gulwali Passarlay recounts his journey as a lone 12-year-old from Afghanistan to Britain.

The Inquiry: Why Are 10,000 Children Missing In Europe?20161005

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Gulwali Passarlay recounts his journey as a lone 12-year-old from Afghanistan to Britain.

The Inquiry: Why Are Wages So Low?20160309

The Inquiry: Why Are Wages So Low?20160309

President Obama\u2019s chief economist Jason Furman on the question his boss asks him most.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Why Are Wages So Low?20160309

President Obama’s chief economist Jason Furman on the question his boss asks him most often. In America, media wages have been stagnant for more than 40 years – and it’s a problem across the developed world.

(Photo: Furman and Obama, Credit: Pete Souza)

The Inquiry: Why Are Wages So Low?20160309

President Obama’s chief economist Jason Furman on the question his boss asks him most often. In America, media wages have been stagnant for more than 40 years – and it’s a problem across the developed world.

(Photo: Furman and Obama, Credit: Pete Souza)

The Inquiry: Why Aren't More Dishonest Bankers In Jail?20141202

Senator Ted Kaufman backed a bill giving prosecutors more power to go after rogue bankers

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Why Can\u2019t Egypt Stop FGM?20160608

Dalia abd El-Hameed says Egypt needs a sexual revolution if it\u2019s to end FGM

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Since FGM was outlawed in Egypt in 2008 the percentage of girls aged 15 to 17 who have had FGM has dropped from 75% to 60%. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, women’s rights activist Dalia abd El-Hameed says Egypt needs a sexual revolution if it’s to get that number down to zero.

(Image: A gynaecologist cooperating with the Coptic Center for Training and Development gives a lecture on Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in a village close to Beni Sueif a town 130 kilometers south of Cairo.)

The Inquiry: Why Can’t Egypt Stop FGM?20160608

The Inquiry: Why Can’t Egypt Stop FGM?20160608

Since FGM was outlawed in Egypt in 2008 the percentage of girls aged 15 to 17 who have had FGM has dropped from 75% to 60%. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, women’s rights activist Dalia abd El-Hameed says Egypt needs a sexual revolution if it’s to get that number down to zero.

(Image: A gynaecologist cooperating with the Coptic Center for Training and Development gives a lecture on Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in a village close to Beni Sueif a town 130 kilometers south of Cairo.)

The Inquiry: Why Can’t Egypt Stop Fgm?20160608

Since FGM was outlawed in Egypt in 2008 the percentage of girls aged 15 to 17 who have had FGM has dropped from 75% to 60%. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, women’s rights activist Dalia abd El-Hameed says Egypt needs a sexual revolution if it’s to get that number down to zero.

(Image: A gynaecologist cooperating with the Coptic Center for Training and Development gives a lecture on Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in a village close to Beni Sueif a town 130 kilometers south of Cairo.)

The Inquiry: Why Do Mexicans Drink So Much Soda?20160330

The Inquiry: Why Do Mexicans Drink So Much Soda?20160330

How a lack of clean water is helping to fuel Mexico\u2019s thirst for sugary soft drinks.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Claudia Campero argues that a lack of reliable drinking water is helping to fuel Mexico’s thirst for sugary soft drinks. Most research places Mexico at the top of the chart when it comes to the consumption of these drinks: by some estimates, they get through half a litre per person every day. Mexico also has some of the highest rates of obesity and diabetes in the world, exacerbated by their love of sugar sweetened beverages.

Presenter: James Fletcher

(Photo: A variety of fizzy drinks stocked on a shelf in a shop. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Why Do Mexicans Drink So Much Soda?20160330

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Claudia Campero argues that a lack of reliable drinking water is helping to fuel Mexico’s thirst for sugary soft drinks. Most research places Mexico at the top of the chart when it comes to the consumption of these drinks: by some estimates, they get through half a litre per person every day. Mexico also has some of the highest rates of obesity and diabetes in the world, exacerbated by their love of sugar sweetened beverages.

Presenter: James Fletcher

(Photo: A variety of fizzy drinks stocked on a shelf in a shop. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Why Do Mexicans Drink So Much Soda?20160330

In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Claudia Campero argues that a lack of reliable drinking water is helping to fuel Mexico’s thirst for sugary soft drinks. Most research places Mexico at the top of the chart when it comes to the consumption of these drinks: by some estimates, they get through half a litre per person every day. Mexico also has some of the highest rates of obesity and diabetes in the world, exacerbated by their love of sugar sweetened beverages.

Presenter: James Fletcher

(Photo: A variety of fizzy drinks stocked on a shelf in a shop. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Why Do So Many People Dislike Hillary?20160622

The Inquiry: Why Do So Many People Dislike Hillary?20160622

Hillary Clinton is the odds-on favourite to be the next president of the USA. But polls show more and more Americans view her unfavourably. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, seasoned observer of US politics Mark Halperin tries to make sense of this political paradox.

(Image: Hillary Clinton is the odds-on favourite to be the next president of the USA. But polls show more and more Americans view her unfavourably. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, seasoned observer of US politics Mark Halperin tries to make sense of this political paradox)

The Inquiry: Why Do So Many People Dislike Hillary?20160622

Hillary Clinton is the odds-on favourite to be the next president of the USA. But polls show more and more Americans view her unfavourably. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, seasoned observer of US politics Mark Halperin tries to make sense of this political paradox.

(Image: Hillary Clinton is the odds-on favourite to be the next president of the USA. But polls show more and more Americans view her unfavourably. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, seasoned observer of US politics Mark Halperin tries to make sense of this political paradox)

The Inquiry: Why Do So Many People Dislike Hillary?20160622

Seasoned political observer Mark Halperin on Hillary Clinton's likeability deficit

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Hillary Clinton is the odds-on favourite to be the next president of the USA. But polls show more and more Americans view her unfavourably. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, seasoned observer of US politics Mark Halperin tries to make sense of this political paradox.

(Image: Hillary Clinton is the odds-on favourite to be the next president of the USA. But polls show more and more Americans view her unfavourably. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, seasoned observer of US politics Mark Halperin tries to make sense of this political paradox)

The Inquiry: Why do Tax Havens Still Exist?20150728

Jamie Whyte says tax havens are actually a good thing.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

As public anger and politicians’ rhetoric against tax havens has grown in recent years, one could be forgiven for wondering why more haven’t been shut down. Philosopher and politician Jamie Whyte argues that in fact, tax havens are a good thing – acting as a brake against the “uglier” side to democracy.

(Photo: Island in the Seychelles. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Inquiry: Why Do US Cops Keep Killing Unarmed Black Men?20150519

Former cop Seth Stoughton says a \u2018warrior mentality\u2019 makes police more likely to shoot

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Recent deaths of unarmed black men at the hands of US police have triggered protests in a number of American cities. Seth Stoughton is a former police officer, now a Law Professor at the University of South Carolina. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he argues that a ‘warrior mentality’ has come to dominate police training and tactics, and that this makes police more likely to resort to deadly force.

Photo: Police wearing riot gear walk toward a man with his hands raised in Ferguson (Credit: AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

The Inquiry: Why Don\u2019t Cities Want the Olympics?20160817

Judith Grant Long puts forward a radical solution to guarantee the future of the Olympics

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Olympic Games has a problem. In recent years the number of cities entering bids to host either the Winter or Summer Olympics has dropped dramatically. So how can we ensure the future of the Olympic Games? Judith Grant Long, Associate Professor of Sport Management and Planning at the University of Michigan in the US, looks at some radical solutions.

(Image of a banner saying 'No Boston Olympics' permission from Liam Kerr and Chris Dempsey)

The Inquiry: Why don\u2019t we eradicate mosquitoes?20160217

Heather Ferguson says we should focus our efforts on a small minority of mosquitoes.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Should we be concerned about the possible unintended consequences of removing mosquitoes from the ecosystem? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, mosquito expert Heather Ferguson suggests we could get rid of the most dangerous species without wreaking havoc on nature.

(Photo: Aedes Aegypti mosquito, Credit: LUIS ROBAYO / Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Why Don’t Cities Want the Olympics?20160817

The Inquiry: Why Don’t Cities Want the Olympics?20160817

The Olympic Games has a problem. In recent years the number of cities entering bids to host either the Winter or Summer Olympics has dropped dramatically. So how can we ensure the future of the Olympic Games? Judith Grant Long, Associate Professor of Sport Management and Planning at the University of Michigan in the US, looks at some radical solutions.

(Image of a banner saying 'No Boston Olympics' permission from Liam Kerr and Chris Dempsey)

The Inquiry: Why Don’t Cities Want The Olympics?20160817

The Olympic Games has a problem. In recent years the number of cities entering bids to host either the Winter or Summer Olympics has dropped dramatically. So how can we ensure the future of the Olympic Games? Judith Grant Long, Associate Professor of Sport Management and Planning at the University of Michigan in the US, looks at some radical solutions.

(Image of a banner saying 'No Boston Olympics' permission from Liam Kerr and Chris Dempsey)

The Inquiry: Why don’t we eradicate mosquitoes?20160217

The Inquiry: Why don’t we eradicate mosquitoes?20160217

Should we be concerned about the possible unintended consequences of removing mosquitoes from the ecosystem? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, mosquito expert Heather Ferguson suggests we could get rid of the most dangerous species without wreaking havoc on nature.

(Photo: Aedes Aegypti mosquito, Credit: LUIS ROBAYO / Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Why Don’t We Eradicate Mosquitoes?20160217

Should we be concerned about the possible unintended consequences of removing mosquitoes from the ecosystem? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, mosquito expert Heather Ferguson suggests we could get rid of the most dangerous species without wreaking havoc on nature.

(Photo: Aedes Aegypti mosquito, Credit: LUIS ROBAYO / Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Why is Argentina Still so Sexist?20150915

The Inquiry: Why is Argentina Still so Sexist?20150915

Known as the ‘Sexy Deputy? Victoria Donda is all too familiar with sexism. In this excerpt from The Inquiry she describes her campaign in the Argentine National Congress for new laws to protect women from street harassment. Male colleagues, she says, are oblivious to the problem while many female politicians find it necessary to act like men in order to secure positions of power.

(Photo: Argentina Femicide Demo. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Why Is Argentina Still So Sexist?20150915

Known as the ‘Sexy Deputy? Victoria Donda is all too familiar with sexism. In this excerpt from The Inquiry she describes her campaign in the Argentine National Congress for new laws to protect women from street harassment. Male colleagues, she says, are oblivious to the problem while many female politicians find it necessary to act like men in order to secure positions of power.

(Photo: Argentina Femicide Demo. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Why is Argentina Still so Sexist?20150915

More than a third of lawmakers in Argentina are women, yet society remains deeply macho.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Known as the ‘Sexy Deputy” Victoria Donda is all too familiar with sexism. In this excerpt from The Inquiry she describes her campaign in the Argentine National Congress for new laws to protect women from street harassment. Male colleagues, she says, are oblivious to the problem while many female politicians find it necessary to act like men in order to secure positions of power.

(Photo: Argentina Femicide Demo. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Why Is South Africa Still So Unequal?20150512

Yoliswa Dwane on the poor schooling she sees as the root cause of continuing inequality.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Twenty-one years after the end of apartheid, South Africa remains one of the most unequal countries on the planet. Yoliswa Dwane went to a township school where she was crammed into a classroom with 100 other students and only one teacher. Now she’s dedicated her career to improving South Africa’s education system through the social movement Equal Education. In this excerpt from The Inquiry she explains how she sees poor schooling as at the root of her country’s continuing inequality.

Photo: Yoliswa Dwane speech (Credit: Equal Education)

The Inquiry: Why was Mohammed Akhlaq Killed?20151104

The Inquiry: Why was Mohammed Akhlaq Killed?20151104

Mohammed Akhlaq’s murder shocked India. A mob broke into his house last month and beat him to death. They believed a rumour that Mr Akhlaq, a Muslim, had broken a Hindu taboo by slaughtering a cow. We find out how the cow became such a political animal and look at whether Hindu nationalists are feeling bolder in today’s India.

(Photo: An Indian woman sprinkles yoghurt paste on to a cow's head; Credit:Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Why Was Mohammed Akhlaq Killed?20151104

Mohammed Akhlaq’s murder shocked India. A mob broke into his house last month and beat him to death. They believed a rumour that Mr Akhlaq, a Muslim, had broken a Hindu taboo by slaughtering a cow. We find out how the cow became such a political animal and look at whether Hindu nationalists are feeling bolder in today’s India.

(Photo: An Indian woman sprinkles yoghurt paste on to a cow's head; Credit:Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Why was Mohammed Akhlaq Killed?20151104

What a murder tells us about modern India.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Mohammed Akhlaq’s murder shocked India. A mob broke into his house last month and beat him to death. They believed a rumour that Mr Akhlaq, a Muslim, had broken a Hindu taboo by slaughtering a cow. We find out how the cow became such a political animal and look at whether Hindu nationalists are feeling bolder in today’s India.

(Photo: An Indian woman sprinkles yoghurt paste on to a cow's head; Credit:Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Will Anyone Help the Rohingya?20150609

Myanmar journalist Aung Zaw explains why Aung Sang Suu Kyi won\u2019t speak for the Rohingya

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

She has won the Nobel Peace Prize, she leads Myanmar’s pro-democracy opposition, but Aung Sang Suu Kyi has been reluctant to speak out for Myanmar’s Rohingya minority. Aung Zaw is the editor of Irrawaddy Magazine, an independent publication banned in Myanmar until 2012. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he explains that prejudice against the Rohingya is so intense that if Aung Sang Suu Kyi spoke up for them it would wreck her chances in November’s elections.

(Photo: Journalist Aung Zaw. Credit: James Fletcher, BBC)

The Inquiry: Will the Dalai Lama Reincarnate?20150324

Does the future of Tibet and the unity of China rest on an esoteric question of rebirth?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Inquiry: Would A New International Convention Help Refugees?20160525

The Inquiry: Would A New International Convention Help Refugees?20160525

As the world grapples with a new refugee crisis, and the largest numbers of displaced people since World War Two, many think the UN’s 65-year old Refugee Convention isn’t working. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, political philosopher Luara Ferracioli says the only way to deal with refugees is to distribute numbers more fairly around the world.

(Photo: A Somali father and his daughter queue to register at Dadaab in Kenya, the world's largest refugee camp. Credit: TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Would A New International Convention Help Refugees?20160525

As the world grapples with a new refugee crisis, and the largest numbers of displaced people since World War Two, many think the UN’s 65-year old Refugee Convention isn’t working. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, political philosopher Luara Ferracioli says the only way to deal with refugees is to distribute numbers more fairly around the world.

(Photo: A Somali father and his daughter queue to register at Dadaab in Kenya, the world's largest refugee camp. Credit: TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Would A New International Convention Help Refugees?20160525

Luara Ferracioli explains the best way to deal with the refugees crisis

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

As the world grapples with a new refugee crisis, and the largest numbers of displaced people since World War Two, many think the UN’s 65-year old Refugee Convention isn’t working. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, political philosopher Luara Ferracioli says the only way to deal with refugees is to distribute numbers more fairly around the world.

(Photo: A Somali father and his daughter queue to register at Dadaab in Kenya, the world's largest refugee camp. Credit: TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Would Donald Trump Be a Dangerous President?20160824

The Inquiry: Would Donald Trump Be a Dangerous President?20160824

Elaine Kamarck says a US President\u2019s power is limited, whoever they are

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Senior Republican national security officials in the US have signed a letter arguing that Donald Trump “would be a dangerous president”. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Elaine Kamarck – who has worked in the White House – says a US President’s power is limited, whoever they are.

(Photo: Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during an event at Trump SoHo Hotel, 2016, New York. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Would Donald Trump Be A Dangerous President?20160824

Senior Republican national security officials in the US have signed a letter arguing that Donald Trump “would be a dangerous president? In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Elaine Kamarck – who has worked in the White House – says a US President’s power is limited, whoever they are.

(Photo: Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during an event at Trump SoHo Hotel, 2016, New York. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Would Donald Trump Be a Dangerous President?20160824

Senior Republican national security officials in the US have signed a letter arguing that Donald Trump “would be a dangerous president?. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, Elaine Kamarck – who has worked in the White House – says a US President’s power is limited, whoever they are.

(Photo: Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during an event at Trump SoHo Hotel, 2016, New York. Credit: Getty Images)

The Inquiry: Would Greece Be Better Off Out Of The Euro?20150623

Dimitris Christopoulos on why losing Greece would threaten European stability

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Greece sits in a “dangerous neighbourhood”, according to Dimitris Chrisopoulos, who teaches history and politics at Panteion University in Athens. It’s sandwiched between the Middle East, North Africa and the Balkans. In this excerpt from The Inquiry, he argues that if Greece left the Euro, it could threaten the stability of Greece and Europe.

Photo: Aerial shot (Credit: NASA)

The Why Factor20141119

The extraordinary and hidden histories behind everyday objects and actions.

The Why Factor - Chasing Riches20150225

Why do the rich want to get richer? What drives the wealthy to want more?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Why do the rich want to get richer? Why when you’ve got a million or even a billion do you want more? Mike Williams asks a multi-billionaire and a multi-millionaire what drives them to keep making more money. He also speaks to a banker, who looks after the wealthy and a football agent, who represents high paid players and tries to discover whether the rich are different from everyone else.

(Photo: Image of a superyacht believed to belong to a Vodka Tycoon. Credit to Phil Walter/Getty Image)

The Why Factor - Cooking20141203

Why do we cook, and not just eat raw food?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Why Factor - Daydreaming20150422

Does everyone\u2019s mind wander? And why do we do it?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Freud thought daydreaming was not a useful activity, and many teachers across the world have been heard to say “stop daydreaming” to their pupils. But it seems to have redeeming purposes.

Opera singer Noah Stewart explains how he uses daydreaming as a way to prepare himself for the stage. And Peter Moore, an IT contractor who was held hostage in Iraq, describes how his mind began to fill the emptiness of his days with dreams of escape and comfort.

While daydreaming may be universal across cultures, there seem to be many differences in in how we do it - from playful vivid fantasies, to problem solving, to obsessing. And is daydreaming a taboo subject? We explore why it’s not discussed.

(Photo: A young girl lays on the grass daydreaming. Credit: George Marks/Retrofile/Getty Images)

The Why Factor - Suicide20150408

Every year, across the world, around a million people take their own lives. But why?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The desire to live is strong in us humans. But it’s not always enough. Sometimes people fall so low that they can see only one way forward. And every year, across the world, around a million people take their own lives. Why?

The answers are as complex and numerous as the people themselves but, often, there are common features… and, by understanding these, it may be possible to help them.

Presenter: Mike Williams
Producer: Ben Carter

If you’ve been affected by this programme and would like to get help please visit: www.samaritans.org or www.befrienders.org

(Photo: Steve Mallen whose 18 year old son Edward who took his own life in February 2015. BBC Copyright)

The Why Factor - Why do we Draw?20150617

Why do we draw, how do we get good at it and what do we reveal through our drawings?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Are some people simply more visual than others? And what do we reveal through our drawings? Drawing is something we all do unselfconsciously as children before we learn to write. It is a form of expression that goes back 40,000 years and began on the walls of caves. But why do we draw? Is it to make our mark on the world, to decorate our surroundings, or is it a way of communicating with others when words fail us?

Lucy Ash talks to Stephen Wiltshire, world famous for his incredibly detailed pen and ink cityscapes and to Rebecca Chamberlain, a psychologist now at the University of Leuven in Belgium, who is studying art school students to try and understand how people get better at drawing. She speaks to David Hockney renowned for both his traditional draughtsmanship and his enthusiasm for new technology, and to Lizzie Ellis, who comes from a remote community in central Australia and draws with a stick, telling stories through her traditional form of Aboriginal women's art. And, at the London charity Kids Company, Arts manager Jebet Mengech encourages children to express themselves with pencils, crayons and felt tips using drawing to reveal problems in the children’s lives.

(Photo: A student in a life class at the Royal School of Drawing)

The Why Factor: Thin20160531

The Why Factor: Thin20160531

Former French model Victoire Macon-Dauxerre talks to Mike Williams about the fashion industry’s obsession with 'thin' and how she ended up living on three apples a day.

(Photo: A vendor arranges stick-thin mannequins in a store in China. Credit: China Photos/Getty Images)

The Why Factor: Thin20160531

Former French model Victoire Macon-Dauxerre talks to Mike Williams about the fashion industry’s obsession with 'thin' and how she ended up living on three apples a day.

(Photo: A vendor arranges stick-thin mannequins in a store in China. Credit: China Photos/Getty Images)

The Why Factor: Thin20160531

Life as a model eating three apples a day

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Why Factor: Addiction - Why Do Some People Succumb To It?20160223

Last week we looked at the science of pleasure… the biochemistry of the brain’s reward system. This week, what happens when that mechanism goes wrong. Addiction.

How can something that’s start off being pleasurable end up making us feel so low?

Mike Williams talks to scientists and former addicts in the search for some answers.

Produced by Ben Carter

(Photo: Collection of different hard drugs Heroin, Pills, Tobacco and Alcohol. Credit to Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Addiction - Why Do Some People Succumb to it?20160223

Why does pleasure and desire lead to addiction in some people but not others?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Last week we looked at the science of pleasure… the biochemistry of the brain’s reward system. This week, what happens when that mechanism goes wrong. Addiction.

How can something that’s start off being pleasurable end up making us feel so low?

Mike Williams talks to scientists and former addicts in the search for some answers.

Produced by Ben Carter

(Photo: Collection of different hard drugs Heroin, Pills, Tobacco and Alcohol. Credit to Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: American Identity20160503

The Why Factor: American Identity20160503

As part of the BBC World Service Season on Identity, The Why Factor asks what does the rest of the world think of the United States - one of the most recognisable nations on the planet?

The Why Factor: American Identity20160503

As part of the BBC World Service Season on Identity, The Why Factor asks what does the rest of the world think of the United States - one of the most recognisable nations on the planet?

The Why Factor: American Identity20160503

What does the rest of the world think of the United States?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Why Factor: Assisted Death20161004

Is it ever right to take a life? Mike Williams explores the dilemmas of assisted death

Is it ever right to take a life? Mike Williams explores the ethical dilemmas of assisting death. In a few countries, terminally-ill people suffering pain and distress are allowed to get help from friends, family and physicians to bring their lives to an end. In many countries, it is a crime.

Helping someone to kill themselves is illegal in the UK but there are attempts to get the law revised. The rules are most liberal in Belgium where recently a 17-year-old boy became the first minor to be granted help with dying. And, in the United States, California has become the fifth state to approve what they’ve called “physician assisted death?.

(Photo: Woman touching elderly man's hand. Credit: Arman Zhenikeyev/Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Assisted Death20161004

Is it ever right to take a life? Mike Williams explores the dilemmas of assisted death

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Is it ever right to take a life? Mike Williams explores the ethical dilemmas of assisting death. In a few countries, terminally-ill people suffering pain and distress are allowed to get help from friends, family and physicians to bring their lives to an end. In many countries, it is a crime.

Helping someone to kill themselves is illegal in the UK but there are attempts to get the law revised. The rules are most liberal in Belgium where recently a 17-year-old boy became the first minor to be granted help with dying. And, in the United States, California has become the fifth state to approve what they’ve called “physician assisted death”.

(Photo: Woman touching elderly man's hand. Credit: Arman Zhenikeyev/Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Assisted Death20161004

Is it ever right to take a life? Mike Williams explores the ethical dilemmas of assisting death. In a few countries, terminally-ill people suffering pain and distress are allowed to get help from friends, family and physicians to bring their lives to an end. In many countries, it is a crime.

Helping someone to kill themselves is illegal in the UK but there are attempts to get the law revised. The rules are most liberal in Belgium where recently a 17-year-old boy became the first minor to be granted help with dying. And, in the United States, California has become the fifth state to approve what they’ve called “physician assisted death?

(Photo: Woman touching elderly man's hand. Credit: Arman Zhenikeyev/Shutterstock)

Is it ever right to take a life? Mike Williams explores the dilemmas of assisted death

The Why Factor: Copying Art20160614

The Why Factor: Copying Art20160614

Mike Williams asks why people copy famous works of art and who buys them.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Why Factor: Copying Art20160614

Why do people try to create old masters and modern art, brush stroke by brush stroke? And why do people buy them? Mike Williams talks to art copier David Henty, fine art expert and gallery owner Philip Mould and Colette Loll, director of the Washington-based Art Fraud Insights.

The Why Factor: Copying Art20160614

Why do people try to create old masters and modern art, brush stroke by brush stroke? And why do people buy them? Mike Williams talks to art copier David Henty, fine art expert and gallery owner Philip Mould and Colette Loll, director of the Washington-based Art Fraud Insights.

The Why Factor: Death Penalty20150325

Why more than 50 countries around the world still execute certain criminals

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

More than four billion people live in countries which retain the death penalty. Mike Williams asks why more than 50 countries around the world still execute certain criminals. What is the death penalty for and how is it carried out? He talks to a former American prison officer who presided over 33 executions in the US state of Ohio and asks whether he has any regrets. He also speaks to a Nigerian former death row prisoner who escaped the gallows with just seconds to spare. And he hears from a lawyer in Indonesia where two convicted Australian drug traffickers are awaiting execution.

(Photo: The Texas death chamber in Huntsville, Texas. Credit to: Joe Raedle/Newsmakers)

The Why Factor: Encryption20150729

What is encryption and why do we do it?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

We use encryption every day: in our bank transfers, on our mobile phones and whenever we buy anything online. Yet what is it and why is it so important?

Mike Williams explores cryptography from the Roman Caesar Cipher to modern day computer encryption.

Classified as a munition in the USA until the late Nineties, lawyer Cindy Cohn recounts the court case she fought which helped put computer encryption into the public’s hands.
Science writer Simon Singh talks us through some the mathematics behind the ciphers and Andrew Clark, a specialist in Information Forensics details the darker side of encryption, through its uses in crime.

Encryption also plays into our obsession with secrets, puzzles and hidden messages. We hear from a fan of the electronic duo, Boards of Canada, who obsessively followed a trail of encrypted clues left by the band in 2013.

Finally, encryption lies at the heart of the debate about national security and individual privacy. We hear from an anonymous contributor from Pakistan where the use of encryption is restricted.

Produced by Rose de Larrabeiti

(Photo: Encrypted icon, internet button on black background. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Encryption20150909

The Why Factor: Encryption20150909

We use encryption every day: in our bank transfers, on our mobile phones and whenever we buy anything online. Yet what is it and why is it so important? Mike Williams explores cryptography from the Roman Caesar Cipher to modern day computer encryption. Classified as a munition in the USA until the late Nineties, lawyer Cindy Cohn recounts the court case she fought which helped put computer encryption into the public’s hands. Science writer Simon Singh talks us through some the mathematics behind the ciphers and Andrew Clark, a specialist in Information Forensics details the darker side of encryption, through its uses in crime. Encryption also plays into our obsession with secrets, puzzles and hidden messages. We hear from a fan of the electronic duo, Boards of Canada, who obsessively followed a trail of encrypted clues left by the band in 2013. Finally, encryption lies at the heart of the debate about national security and individual privacy. We hear from an anonymous contributor from Pakistan where the use of encryption is restricted. Produced by Rose de Larrabeiti (Photo: Encrypted icon, internet button on black background. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Encryption20150909

We use encryption every day: in our bank transfers, on our mobile phones and whenever we buy anything online. Yet what is it and why is it so important? Mike Williams explores cryptography from the Roman Caesar Cipher to modern day computer encryption. Classified as a munition in the USA until the late Nineties, lawyer Cindy Cohn recounts the court case she fought which helped put computer encryption into the public’s hands. Science writer Simon Singh talks us through some the mathematics behind the ciphers and Andrew Clark, a specialist in Information Forensics details the darker side of encryption, through its uses in crime. Encryption also plays into our obsession with secrets, puzzles and hidden messages. We hear from a fan of the electronic duo, Boards of Canada, who obsessively followed a trail of encrypted clues left by the band in 2013. Finally, encryption lies at the heart of the debate about national security and individual privacy. We hear from an anonymous contributor from Pakistan where the use of encryption is restricted. Produced by Rose de Larrabeiti (Photo: Encrypted icon, internet button on black background. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Encryption20150909

What is encryption and why do we do it?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

We use encryption every day: in our bank transfers, on our mobile phones and whenever we buy anything online. Yet what is it and why is it so important? Mike Williams explores cryptography from the Roman Caesar Cipher to modern day computer encryption. Classified as a munition in the USA until the late Nineties, lawyer Cindy Cohn recounts the court case she fought which helped put computer encryption into the public’s hands. Science writer Simon Singh talks us through some the mathematics behind the ciphers and Andrew Clark, a specialist in Information Forensics details the darker side of encryption, through its uses in crime. Encryption also plays into our obsession with secrets, puzzles and hidden messages. We hear from a fan of the electronic duo, Boards of Canada, who obsessively followed a trail of encrypted clues left by the band in 2013. Finally, encryption lies at the heart of the debate about national security and individual privacy. We hear from an anonymous contributor from Pakistan where the use of encryption is restricted. Produced by Rose de Larrabeiti (Photo: Encrypted icon, internet button on black background. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Farewell Letters20161018

Why do we write farewell letters? Whether it's messages from the living to the dying or from the dead to the living, how can we find the words to say goodbye?

A letter from a daughter to her dying father, a last letter from a soldier on the eve of battle, messages of love from a dying mother to her young daughter and a suicide note from a father to his teenage son. Mike Williams explores the comfort and pain of goodbye letters.

Presenter: Mike Williams

Producer: Sally Abrahams

(Photo: Woman and child walking along woodland path. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Farewell Letters20161018

Why do we write farewell letters? And how to find the words to say goodbye?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Why do we write farewell letters? Whether it's messages from the living to the dying or from the dead to the living, how can we find the words to say goodbye?

A letter from a daughter to her dying father, a last letter from a soldier on the eve of battle, messages of love from a dying mother to her young daughter and a suicide note from a father to his teenage son. Mike Williams explores the comfort and pain of goodbye letters.

Presenter: Mike Williams
Producer: Sally Abrahams

(Photo: Woman and child walking along woodland path. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Farewell Letters20161018

Why do we write farewell letters? Whether it's messages from the living to the dying or from the dead to the living, how can we find the words to say goodbye?

A letter from a daughter to her dying father, a last letter from a soldier on the eve of battle, messages of love from a dying mother to her young daughter and a suicide note from a father to his teenage son. Mike Williams explores the comfort and pain of goodbye letters.

Presenter: Mike Williams

Producer: Sally Abrahams

(Photo: Woman and child walking along woodland path. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Fear vs Fact20160809

The Why Factor: Fear vs Fact20160809

Are we living in an age where messages of fear dominate and the truth goes unheard?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Mike Williams asks if we now live in a post-factual age — where messages of fear dominate and the truth goes unspoken or unheard? He investigates the “Backfire Effect” which means that entrenched views can become more entrenched – when confronted by contradictory facts. Politicians are often accused of distorting the truth – with Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump the latest.

(Image - Group of people standing with one holding a newspaper with the headline "Earth Doomed". Credit - Everett Collection via Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Fear vs Fact20160809

Mike Williams asks if we now live in a post-factual age — where messages of fear dominate and the truth goes unspoken or unheard? He investigates the “Backfire Effect? which means that entrenched views can become more entrenched – when confronted by contradictory facts. Politicians are often accused of distorting the truth – with Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump the latest.

(Image - Group of people standing with one holding a newspaper with the headline "Earth Doomed". Credit - Everett Collection via Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Fear Vs Fact20160809

Mike Williams asks if we now live in a post-factual age — where messages of fear dominate and the truth goes unspoken or unheard? He investigates the “Backfire Effect? which means that entrenched views can become more entrenched – when confronted by contradictory facts. Politicians are often accused of distorting the truth – with Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump the latest.

(Image - Group of people standing with one holding a newspaper with the headline "Earth Doomed". Credit - Everett Collection via Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Flags20150128

From identity symbols to signalling tools, why human societies are fascinated by flags

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Why Factor: Graffiti \u2013 Why do we do it?20151007

What lies behind the urge to leave a mark?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

From Stone Age caves, to the buildings of Pompeii and on the walls of our modern cities we find evidence of a very human – and ancient – urge to leave a mark. Why? Mike Williams joins the artists at a Graffiti competition held in London and talks to Art Historian Richard Clay, Professor of Digital Humanities at Newcastle University.

This still illegal activity has gained a more acceptable face in the growth and popularity of street art, but in many countries, graffiti writers still risk their lives to paint political messages on public walls. Researcher Rana Jarbou has been documenting Graffiti in the Arab World since 2007. She reveals the role it has played in the war in Syria.

Graffiti can be political and artistic, but sometimes it is as simple as scratching names and love hearts into desks. For four years Quinn Dombrowski took photographs of the Graffiti left on the study desks of The University of Chicago’s Library. The scrawled messages, an insight into the emotional lives of the students there.

Finally, back in London at the Graffiti competition, Mike picks up a spray-can and has a go himself.

Produced by Rose de Larrabeiti

(Photo: The Why Factor sprayed graffiti on a wall. Credit: Mike Williams)

The Why Factor: Graffiti – Why do we do it?20151007

The Why Factor: Graffiti – Why do we do it?20151007

From Stone Age caves, to the buildings of Pompeii and on the walls of our modern cities we find evidence of a very human – and ancient – urge to leave a mark. Why? Mike Williams joins the artists at a Graffiti competition held in London and talks to Art Historian Richard Clay, Professor of Digital Humanities at Newcastle University.

This still illegal activity has gained a more acceptable face in the growth and popularity of street art, but in many countries, graffiti writers still risk their lives to paint political messages on public walls. Researcher Rana Jarbou has been documenting Graffiti in the Arab World since 2007. She reveals the role it has played in the war in Syria.

Graffiti can be political and artistic, but sometimes it is as simple as scratching names and love hearts into desks. For four years Quinn Dombrowski took photographs of the Graffiti left on the study desks of The University of Chicago’s Library. The scrawled messages, an insight into the emotional lives of the students there.

Finally, back in London at the Graffiti competition, Mike picks up a spray-can and has a go himself.

Produced by Rose de Larrabeiti

(Photo: The Why Factor sprayed graffiti on a wall. Credit: Mike Williams)

The Why Factor: Graffiti € Why Do We Do It?20151007

From Stone Age caves, to the buildings of Pompeii and on the walls of our modern cities we find evidence of a very human – and ancient – urge to leave a mark. Why? Mike Williams joins the artists at a Graffiti competition held in London and talks to Art Historian Richard Clay, Professor of Digital Humanities at Newcastle University.

This still illegal activity has gained a more acceptable face in the growth and popularity of street art, but in many countries, graffiti writers still risk their lives to paint political messages on public walls. Researcher Rana Jarbou has been documenting Graffiti in the Arab World since 2007. She reveals the role it has played in the war in Syria.

Graffiti can be political and artistic, but sometimes it is as simple as scratching names and love hearts into desks. For four years Quinn Dombrowski took photographs of the Graffiti left on the study desks of The University of Chicago’s Library. The scrawled messages, an insight into the emotional lives of the students there.

Finally, back in London at the Graffiti competition, Mike picks up a spray-can and has a go himself.

Produced by Rose de Larrabeiti

(Photo: The Why Factor sprayed graffiti on a wall. Credit: Mike Williams)

The Why Factor: Group Thinking20151229

The Why Factor: Group Thinking20151229

Anyone who has ever been in a meeting has seen the phenomenon of "Groupthink" first hand. The will of the crowd over shadows the wisdom of individuals and it can lead to dangerous consequences. Mike Williams asks why humans succumb to "Groupthink" and how we fight the tendency to follow the hurd even if it leads to very perilous outcomes.

(Image: A meeting. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Group Thinking20151229

Anyone who has ever been in a meeting has seen the phenomenon of "Groupthink" first hand. The will of the crowd over shadows the wisdom of individuals and it can lead to dangerous consequences. Mike Williams asks why humans succumb to "Groupthink" and how we fight the tendency to follow the hurd even if it leads to very perilous outcomes.

(Image: A meeting. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Group Thinking20151229

Mike Williams asks why we succumb to "Groupthink" and how to avoid being part of a crowd.

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Anyone who has ever been in a meeting has seen the phenomenon of "Groupthink" first hand. The will of the crowd over shadows the wisdom of individuals and it can lead to dangerous consequences. Mike Williams asks why humans succumb to "Groupthink" and how we fight the tendency to follow the hurd even if it leads to very perilous outcomes.

(Image: A meeting. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Hunting20160112

Why do we hunt? In some societies hunting is necessary to get food, but why do those who can buy meat in a shop go out hunting? Do they like to kill? Or is there something else at play? Lucy Ash talks to hunters from Canada, South Africa, the US and Scotland, who between them have killed animals ranging from deer to elephants, to ask them why they do it. She finds out that the majority of hunters don’t actually like the act of killing, but hunt because they enjoy the adrenaline-fuelled tracking, or being out in nature with heightened senses, or simply to provide for their families in a way they find much more satisfying than simply buying meat in a grocery store. And then there are some reasons that go deeper.

(Photo: A hunter with this dog and a deer)

The Why Factor: Hunting20160112

Why do we hunt? Why kill animals when we no longer need to do so to eat?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Why do we hunt? In some societies hunting is necessary to get food, but why do those who can buy meat in a shop go out hunting? Do they like to kill? Or is there something else at play? Lucy Ash talks to hunters from Canada, South Africa, the US and Scotland, who between them have killed animals ranging from deer to elephants, to ask them why they do it. She finds out that the majority of hunters don’t actually like the act of killing, but hunt because they enjoy the adrenaline-fuelled tracking, or being out in nature with heightened senses, or simply to provide for their families in a way they find much more satisfying than simply buying meat in a grocery store. And then there are some reasons that go deeper.

(Photo: A hunter with this dog and a deer)

The Why Factor: Identity20160405

The Why Factor: Identity20160405

As part of the BBC World Service Season on Identity, The Why Factor examines one simple question: who are you? Did you choose your identity or was it given to you? Mike Williams asks how our identities are created and if that shapes the way we see the world, and the way the world sees us.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Crowds on Oxford Street, London UK / Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty)

The Why Factor: Identity20160405

As part of the BBC World Service Season on Identity, The Why Factor examines one simple question: who are you? Did you choose your identity or was it given to you? Mike Williams asks how our identities are created and if that shapes the way we see the world, and the way the world sees us.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Crowds on Oxford Street, London UK / Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty)

The Why Factor: Identity20160405

Mike Williams asks a simple question: Who are you?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

As part of the BBC World Service Season on Identity, The Why Factor examines one simple question: who are you? Did you choose your identity or was it given to you? Mike Williams asks how our identities are created and if that shapes the way we see the world, and the way the world sees us.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Crowds on Oxford Street, London UK / Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty)

The Why Factor: Nationality20150715

How would you define yours and how much does it matter?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Why Factor: Newspapers20160712

The Why Factor: Newspapers20160712

Digital news is threatening newspapers, so why do they survive and what is their future?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Free, digital news is threatening traditional newspapers around the world, so why do they survive and what is their future? Mike Williams speaks to legendary newspaper editor Sir Harry Evans and journalist in exile Qaabata Boru who fought to set up an independent newspaper in a Kenyan refugee camp. Mike also hears from Melody Martinsen who owns and edits The Choteau Acantha, a tiny newspaper in rural Montana where not even the premature birth of her son stopped publication. And at the British Library’s newspaper archive, Mike learns how, as chronicles of ordinary people’s lives, newspapers can throw up some surprise stories missed by the history books.

(Image: Early edition of the Daily Mirror spread on table. Credit: Image courtesy of the British Library)

The Why Factor: Newspapers20160712

Free, digital news is threatening traditional newspapers around the world, so why do they survive and what is their future? Mike Williams speaks to legendary newspaper editor Sir Harry Evans and journalist in exile Qaabata Boru who fought to set up an independent newspaper in a Kenyan refugee camp. Mike also hears from Melody Martinsen who owns and edits The Choteau Acantha, a tiny newspaper in rural Montana where not even the premature birth of her son stopped publication. And at the British Library’s newspaper archive, Mike learns how, as chronicles of ordinary people’s lives, newspapers can throw up some surprise stories missed by the history books.

(Image: Early edition of the Daily Mirror spread on table. Credit: Image courtesy of the British Library)

The Why Factor: Newspapers20160712

Free, digital news is threatening traditional newspapers around the world, so why do they survive and what is their future? Mike Williams speaks to legendary newspaper editor Sir Harry Evans and journalist in exile Qaabata Boru who fought to set up an independent newspaper in a Kenyan refugee camp. Mike also hears from Melody Martinsen who owns and edits The Choteau Acantha, a tiny newspaper in rural Montana where not even the premature birth of her son stopped publication. And at the British Library’s newspaper archive, Mike learns how, as chronicles of ordinary people’s lives, newspapers can throw up some surprise stories missed by the history books.

(Image: Early edition of the Daily Mirror spread on table. Credit: Image courtesy of the British Library)

The Why Factor: Portrait Photography20150114

Why do we want to capture human faces?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

From the first photographic portraits captured in the 1830s to the “selfies” of today, we seem fascinated by images of the human face. Mike Williams asks if it is simple vanity or something deeper; perhaps an attempt to learn how other people see us or a desire to capture something of ourselves that may live on when we are gone.

Produced by Smita Patel

(Image: Old black and white and sepia photos at a flea market in Paris, France. Credit to: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Sad Music20150204

Sad music has become more popular according to a study. Why do people listen to it?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Why Factor: Skyscrapers20150311

Are tall buildings vanity projects or a necessary part of our cities?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

In every city in the world there is a viewing platform where you can gaze down upon the place from on-high. But why do we like to build tall and be high – what is it about standing tall and defying gravity that matters so much? Are Skyscrapers simply about vanity or are there practical and even spiritual reasons why we want to build so high?

Mike Williams ventures up the Shard, the tallest building in London, with its architect Renzo Piano. He talks to Blair Kamin, architecture critic at the Chicago Tribune – the city that brought us the skyscraper, as well as experts Daniel Safarik, from the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat and Dr Phillip Oldfield, from the University of Nottingham.

(Photo: The Sears Tower rises above the skyline in Chicago, Illinois. Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

The Why Factor: Television20150520

Why has television proven to be such a powerful influence on our lives?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Television – beamed into our homes with a proliferation of channels and devices to watch. TV has become an integral part of our lives, all over the world, in just a few short decades. Why has TV taken a grip on us which has never weakened? It influences our politics, our cultural attitudes and social perceptions. Does it mainly distract or engage us? Presenter Mike Williams finds out about TV’s humble origins with the grandson of TV’s inventor – John Logie Baird and runs through some of television’s most viewed moments. Featuring one of the biggest reality TV stars in the Middle East; fresh from his 2013 win of the Arab Idol singing contest, Mohammed Assaf shares his thoughts on the medium. TV, once tightly controlled, has escaped into the world and continues to change our societies in unimaginable ways.

Produced by Nina Robinson

(Photo: A wall of 750 television screens at an exhibition celebrating 50 years of television broadcasting, in Melbourne, Australia. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

The Why Factor: The Voice20160906

The Why Factor: The Voice20160906

We each have a unique voice, shape by our biology, history, class and education. It is a powerful tool and we are often judged by the very first words out of our mouths.

In this week’s Why Factor, Mike discovers what makes one voice trustworthy and another not. We hear from a voice coach about how we can adapt and deceive with our voices and a vocalist demonstrates the power of the voice as an instrument.

We also hear from an American teenager who has been voiceless since birth but whose personalised computerized voice has enabled her to find her own.

Presenter: Mike Williams

Producers: Sandra Kanthal and Rose de Larrabeiti

Audio clip of Elaine Mitchener, taken from:

Focus (2012) by Sam Belinfante, courtesy of The Wellcome Collection

(Photo: Woman singing into microphone. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: The Voice20160906

We each have a unique voice, shape by our biology, history, class and education. It is a powerful tool and we are often judged by the very first words out of our mouths.

In this week’s Why Factor, Mike discovers what makes one voice trustworthy and another not. We hear from a voice coach about how we can adapt and deceive with our voices and a vocalist demonstrates the power of the voice as an instrument.

We also hear from an American teenager who has been voiceless since birth but whose personalised computerized voice has enabled her to find her own.

Presenter: Mike Williams

Producers: Sandra Kanthal and Rose de Larrabeiti

Audio clip of Elaine Mitchener, taken from:

Focus (2012) by Sam Belinfante, courtesy of The Wellcome Collection

(Photo: Woman singing into microphone. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: The Voice20160906

What do our voices reveal about ourselves?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

We each have a unique voice, shape by our biology, history, class and education. It is a powerful tool and we are often judged by the very first words out of our mouths.

In this week’s Why Factor, Mike discovers what makes one voice trustworthy and another not. We hear from a voice coach about how we can adapt and deceive with our voices and a vocalist demonstrates the power of the voice as an instrument.

We also hear from an American teenager who has been voiceless since birth but whose personalised computerized voice has enabled her to find her own.

Presenter: Mike Williams
Producers: Sandra Kanthal and Rose de Larrabeiti

Audio clip of Elaine Mitchener, taken from:
Focus (2012) by Sam Belinfante, courtesy of The Wellcome Collection

(Photo: Woman singing into microphone. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Time Perception20160517

The Why Factor: Time Perception20160517

Mike Williams asks why some weeks just fly by but sometimes minutes can seem like hours? Why do we perceive time differently in different circumstances? And are you a Monday or a Friday person?

The Why Factor: Time Perception20160517

Mike Williams asks why some weeks just fly by but sometimes minutes can seem like hours? Why do we perceive time differently in different circumstances? And are you a Monday or a Friday person?

The Why Factor: Time Perception20160517

Mike Williams asks why we perceive time differently in different circumstances

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Why Factor: Violence20160726

The Why Factor: Violence20160726

Anybody who watched the European Championships of football this summer in France would have seen shocking scenes of violence between fans. The vast majority, if not all, were men.

Men also commit more than 90% of murders across the world and are more likely to join a gang.

In this episode of the Why Factor, Caroline Bayley asks: Why are men more violent than women?

She speaks to ex-football hooligan Cass Pennant about his experiences and motivation when violence became his way of life.

Former British Army officer Jane Middleton explains the differences between men and women on the battlefield when she served in Afghanistan.

Caroline also hears views from Sweden about how equal violence between men women in relationships is.

Producer: Keith Moore

(IMAGE: Group of football fans fighting in street - Credit: Carl Court/Getty Images)

The Why Factor: Violence20160726

Anybody who watched the European Championships of football this summer in France would have seen shocking scenes of violence between fans. The vast majority, if not all, were men.

Men also commit more than 90% of murders across the world and are more likely to join a gang.

In this episode of the Why Factor, Caroline Bayley asks: Why are men more violent than women?

She speaks to ex-football hooligan Cass Pennant about his experiences and motivation when violence became his way of life.

Former British Army officer Jane Middleton explains the differences between men and women on the battlefield when she served in Afghanistan.

Caroline also hears views from Sweden about how equal violence between men women in relationships is.

Producer: Keith Moore

(IMAGE: Group of football fans fighting in street - Credit: Carl Court/Getty Images)

The Why Factor: Violence20160726

Why are men more violent than women?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Anybody who watched the European Championships of football this summer in France would have seen shocking scenes of violence between fans. The vast majority, if not all, were men.
Men also commit more than 90% of murders across the world and are more likely to join a gang.

In this episode of the Why Factor, Caroline Bayley asks: Why are men more violent than women?

She speaks to ex-football hooligan Cass Pennant about his experiences and motivation when violence became his way of life.

Former British Army officer Jane Middleton explains the differences between men and women on the battlefield when she served in Afghanistan.

Caroline also hears views from Sweden about how equal violence between men women in relationships is.

Producer: Keith Moore

(IMAGE: Group of football fans fighting in street - Credit: Carl Court/Getty Images)

The Why Factor: Why are More and More Children seeing a Tutor?20151117

The Why Factor: Why are More and More Children seeing a Tutor?20151117

What impact does private tutoring have on education?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Why is private tutoring becoming so commonplace? In London it is estimated that 50% of schoolchildren have a tutor at some point. In Hong Kong, that figure is much higher. What impact does tutoring have education systems around the world? And does it entrench inequality? Mike Williams hears from academics, tutors and the students they teach.

Produced by Rosamund Jones

(Photo: School teacher and student high five in a classroom. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why are More and More Children seeing a Tutor?20151117

Why is private tutoring becoming so commonplace? In London it is estimated that 50% of schoolchildren have a tutor at some point. In Hong Kong, that figure is much higher. What impact does tutoring have education systems around the world? And does it entrench inequality? Mike Williams hears from academics, tutors and the students they teach.

Produced by Rosamund Jones

(Photo: School teacher and student high five in a classroom. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why Are More And More Children Seeing A Tutor?20151117

Why is private tutoring becoming so commonplace? In London it is estimated that 50% of schoolchildren have a tutor at some point. In Hong Kong, that figure is much higher. What impact does tutoring have education systems around the world? And does it entrench inequality? Mike Williams hears from academics, tutors and the students they teach.

Produced by Rosamund Jones

(Photo: School teacher and student high five in a classroom. Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why Do Crazes Take Off?20160920

Pokemon Go has been the runaway success of the summer but why is it that some games, hobbies and activities become crazes while others do not? Is there a secret formula? Johanna Basford, the illustrator behind the current adult colouring book craze and Cheong Choon Ng, who invented the Rainbow Loom, explain how they managed to get their ideas off the ground and loved by millions. We hear from psychologist Ben Michaelis that insecure people are more likely to engage with crazes than people who have a lot of self-confidence. Matthew Alt, co-founder of Alt Japan, a company which produces English versions of Japanese games, explains why so many childhood crazes of the last 30 years including Transformers, Power Rangers, Tamagotchi and Pokemon started in Japan. Presenter Aasmah Mir also takes a trip down memory lane, trying out hula-hooping at a class in London after enthusiastically abandoning the fad 30 years earlier. Is she any better now? Hula-Hoop teacher and performer Anna Byrne explains why the craze is making a comeback. But not all fads are harmless fun. Sometimes playground crazes can go wrong and have devastating consequences. Sabrina Lippell talks openly about the tragic death of her twelve-year-old son William Stanesby after he took part in the so-called ‘choking game’ that encourages participants to restrict their airways.

(Photo: A hand holds a phone showing a Pokémon character on screen. Credit:JoeyPhoto/Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why Do Crazes Take Off?20160920

Pokemon Go has been the runaway success of the summer but why is it that some games, hobbies and activities become crazes while others do not? Is there a secret formula? Johanna Basford, the illustrator behind the current adult colouring book craze and Cheong Choon Ng, who invented the Rainbow Loom, explain how they managed to get their ideas off the ground and loved by millions. We hear from psychologist Ben Michaelis that insecure people are more likely to engage with crazes than people who have a lot of self-confidence. Matthew Alt, co-founder of Alt Japan, a company which produces English versions of Japanese games, explains why so many childhood crazes of the last 30 years including Transformers, Power Rangers, Tamagotchi and Pokemon started in Japan. Presenter Aasmah Mir also takes a trip down memory lane, trying out hula-hooping at a class in London after enthusiastically abandoning the fad 30 years earlier. Is she any better now? Hula-Hoop teacher and performer Anna Byrne explains why the craze is making a comeback. But not all fads are harmless fun. Sometimes playground crazes can go wrong and have devastating consequences. Sabrina Lippell talks openly about the tragic death of her twelve-year-old son William Stanesby after he took part in the so-called ‘choking game’ that encourages participants to restrict their airways.

(Photo: A hand holds a phone showing a Pokémon character on screen. Credit:JoeyPhoto/Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why do Crazes Take Off?20160920

What explains the success of the Hula-Hoop, Rubik\u2019s Cube and Pokemon Go?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Pokemon Go has been the runaway success of the summer but why is it that some games, hobbies and activities become crazes while others do not? Is there a secret formula? Johanna Basford, the illustrator behind the current adult colouring book craze and Cheong Choon Ng, who invented the Rainbow Loom, explain how they managed to get their ideas off the ground and loved by millions. We hear from psychologist Ben Michaelis that insecure people are more likely to engage with crazes than people who have a lot of self-confidence. Matthew Alt, co-founder of Alt Japan, a company which produces English versions of Japanese games, explains why so many childhood crazes of the last 30 years including Transformers, Power Rangers, Tamagotchi and Pokemon started in Japan. Presenter Aasmah Mir also takes a trip down memory lane, trying out hula-hooping at a class in London after enthusiastically abandoning the fad 30 years earlier. Is she any better now? Hula-Hoop teacher and performer Anna Byrne explains why the craze is making a comeback. But not all fads are harmless fun. Sometimes playground crazes can go wrong and have devastating consequences. Sabrina Lippell talks openly about the tragic death of her twelve-year-old son William Stanesby after he took part in the so-called ‘choking game’ that encourages participants to restrict their airways.

(Photo: A hand holds a phone showing a Pokémon character on screen. Credit:JoeyPhoto/Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why do People Take Risks?20150701

Why do some people expose themselves to risks \u2013 and why are we so bad at assessing them?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Some people actively embrace risk by jumping out of aeroplanes, scuba-diving or motor-racing. But we all face risks every day just by eating, drinking, walking and driving – simply going about our daily lives carries all sorts of unseen threats. And yet for some reason we often misperceive these risks. We are not very good at calculating things on which our lives may depend. Why is that? Risk-averse Mike Williams speaks to some risk-takers to find out.

(Photo credit: Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images)

The Why Factor: Why do Pet Videos go Viral?20160823

The Why Factor: Why do Pet Videos go Viral?20160823

Why have cats become celebrities and why do we love to watch and follow them on social media? Those viral videos of our cats stalking us or the dogs saying I love you. Mike Williams meets the cat at the top of the viral video tree - the one and only Grumpy Cat with 12 million followers. Her owners and business managers are just trying to keep up with all her fans.

Assistant professor Jessica Gall Myrick from Indiana University, conducted an online survey of some 7000 cat video watchers and found that people felt happier watching them and were less likely to feel anxious or sad. With all that happiness around, the creator of NyanCat – an animated cat flying through space with a rainbow trail and catchy tune to match, has a mind-boggling 133 million views last time Chris Torres checked. He tells The Why Factor why he thinks it has been such a viral sensation.

We also talk to Jason Eppink, curator of a recent exhibition at the Museum of Moving Image in New York on How Cats Took Over the Internet. Then there is a serious side to all this cat, dog, chicken and goat watching online. Anh Xiao Mina, a writer and researcher, has been looking at the growth of ‘cute cat digital activism’ – the theory that pet viral videos are teaching us important lessons about what we can say and do online and could, in the future, be used to promote new social movements.

(Photo: Grumpy Cat)

The Why Factor: Why Do Pet Videos Go Viral?20160823

Why have cats become celebrities and why do we love to watch and follow them on social media? Those viral videos of our cats stalking us or the dogs saying I love you. Mike Williams meets the cat at the top of the viral video tree - the one and only Grumpy Cat with 12 million followers. Her owners and business managers are just trying to keep up with all her fans.

Assistant professor Jessica Gall Myrick from Indiana University, conducted an online survey of some 7000 cat video watchers and found that people felt happier watching them and were less likely to feel anxious or sad. With all that happiness around, the creator of NyanCat – an animated cat flying through space with a rainbow trail and catchy tune to match, has a mind-boggling 133 million views last time Chris Torres checked. He tells The Why Factor why he thinks it has been such a viral sensation.

We also talk to Jason Eppink, curator of a recent exhibition at the Museum of Moving Image in New York on How Cats Took Over the Internet. Then there is a serious side to all this cat, dog, chicken and goat watching online. Anh Xiao Mina, a writer and researcher, has been looking at the growth of ‘cute cat digital activism’ – the theory that pet viral videos are teaching us important lessons about what we can say and do online and could, in the future, be used to promote new social movements.

(Photo: Grumpy Cat)

The Why Factor: Why do Pet Videos go Viral?20160823

Why have pets become the unlikely stars of the internet?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Why have cats become celebrities and why do we love to watch and follow them on social media? Those viral videos of our cats stalking us or the dogs saying I love you. Mike Williams meets the cat at the top of the viral video tree - the one and only Grumpy Cat with 12 million followers. Her owners and business managers are just trying to keep up with all her fans.

Assistant professor Jessica Gall Myrick from Indiana University, conducted an online survey of some 7000 cat video watchers and found that people felt happier watching them and were less likely to feel anxious or sad. With all that happiness around, the creator of NyanCat – an animated cat flying through space with a rainbow trail and catchy tune to match, has a mind-boggling 133 million views last time Chris Torres checked. He tells The Why Factor why he thinks it has been such a viral sensation.

We also talk to Jason Eppink, curator of a recent exhibition at the Museum of Moving Image in New York on How Cats Took Over the Internet. Then there is a serious side to all this cat, dog, chicken and goat watching online. Anh Xiao Mina, a writer and researcher, has been looking at the growth of ‘cute cat digital activism’ – the theory that pet viral videos are teaching us important lessons about what we can say and do online and could, in the future, be used to promote new social movements.

(Photo: Grumpy Cat)

The Why Factor: Why Do We Love The Bicycle?20151103

The Why Factor: Why Do We Love The Bicycle?20151103

How did this simple machine change the world?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The bicycle - and cycling - started out as somewhat of a faddish leisure pursuit, largely the preserve of middle-aged and wealthy men. Yet it quickly became the world’s most popular means of transport and remains so to this day. So what lies behind its mass appeal?

Author and life-long cyclist Rob Penn, helps us chart the cultural and social impact of the bicycle. From helping to widen the human gene pool to blazing a trail for the women’s movement.

‘It’s like learning to ride a bike’ is a common phrase across the globe for ‘once learned, never forgotten’. But what does this suggest about the human body and cycling? Many people describe it as meditative and calming, but what if cycling could actually have a therapeutic effect on those suffering from serious medical conditions?

Dr Jay Alberts works at the Center of Neurological Restoration at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio - USA, and has recently been looking into the impact of cycling on the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease patients. We hear about his surprising results.

Finally, in the West cycling has become more of a lifestyle choice than a means of transport, but what about in countries like India? We hear from a hardy cyclist who regularly braves the streets of Old Delhi.

Produced by Rose de Larrabeiti

(Photo: Cycling guide Arpita Sinha leading a bike tour through the streets (and ditches) of Delhi, India)

The Why Factor: Why Do We Love The Bicycle?20151103

The bicycle - and cycling - started out as somewhat of a faddish leisure pursuit, largely the preserve of middle-aged and wealthy men. Yet it quickly became the world’s most popular means of transport and remains so to this day. So what lies behind its mass appeal?

Author and life-long cyclist Rob Penn, helps us chart the cultural and social impact of the bicycle. From helping to widen the human gene pool to blazing a trail for the women’s movement.

‘It’s like learning to ride a bike’ is a common phrase across the globe for ‘once learned, never forgotten’. But what does this suggest about the human body and cycling? Many people describe it as meditative and calming, but what if cycling could actually have a therapeutic effect on those suffering from serious medical conditions?

Dr Jay Alberts works at the Center of Neurological Restoration at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio - USA, and has recently been looking into the impact of cycling on the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease patients. We hear about his surprising results.

Finally, in the West cycling has become more of a lifestyle choice than a means of transport, but what about in countries like India? We hear from a hardy cyclist who regularly braves the streets of Old Delhi.

Produced by Rose de Larrabeiti

(Photo: Cycling guide Arpita Sinha leading a bike tour through the streets (and ditches) of Delhi, India)

The Why Factor: Why Do We Love The Bicycle?20151103

The bicycle - and cycling - started out as somewhat of a faddish leisure pursuit, largely the preserve of middle-aged and wealthy men. Yet it quickly became the world’s most popular means of transport and remains so to this day. So what lies behind its mass appeal?

Author and life-long cyclist Rob Penn, helps us chart the cultural and social impact of the bicycle. From helping to widen the human gene pool to blazing a trail for the women’s movement.

‘It’s like learning to ride a bike’ is a common phrase across the globe for ‘once learned, never forgotten’. But what does this suggest about the human body and cycling? Many people describe it as meditative and calming, but what if cycling could actually have a therapeutic effect on those suffering from serious medical conditions?

Dr Jay Alberts works at the Center of Neurological Restoration at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio - USA, and has recently been looking into the impact of cycling on the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease patients. We hear about his surprising results.

Finally, in the West cycling has become more of a lifestyle choice than a means of transport, but what about in countries like India? We hear from a hardy cyclist who regularly braves the streets of Old Delhi.

Produced by Rose de Larrabeiti

(Photo: Cycling guide Arpita Sinha leading a bike tour through the streets (and ditches) of Delhi, India)

The Why Factor: Why do we travel?20150812

The Why Factor: Why do we travel?20150812

Mike Williams asks why do we leave the comfort of our homes to go travel?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Mike Williams asks why do we travel? Why do we leave the comforts of our homes to go to other places?
Psychology has shown that travel - even just thinking about other countries - broadens our minds and makes us more creative. But we travel for many reasons, from acquiring memories, to seeing how other people live, even to build or re-invent our identities. And then there are those, like P. J. O’Rourke, who claim to hate travelling and prefer to stay home. Though it turns out he actually likes tourism, just not tourists.
Mike also talks to South African travel writer Sihle Kuhmalo, Stanford Travel bookshop senior buyer David Montero, and psychologist Corinne Usher.

Produced by Arlene Gregorius

(Photo: An international traveller arrives at an airport. Credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

The Why Factor: Why do we travel?20150812

Mike Williams asks why do we travel? Why do we leave the comforts of our homes to go to other places?

Psychology has shown that travel - even just thinking about other countries - broadens our minds and makes us more creative. But we travel for many reasons, from acquiring memories, to seeing how other people live, even to build or re-invent our identities. And then there are those, like P. J. O’Rourke, who claim to hate travelling and prefer to stay home. Though it turns out he actually likes tourism, just not tourists.

Mike also talks to South African travel writer Sihle Kuhmalo, Stanford Travel bookshop senior buyer David Montero, and psychologist Corinne Usher.

Produced by Arlene Gregorius

(Photo: An international traveller arrives at an airport. Credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

The Why Factor: Why Do We Travel?20150812

Mike Williams asks why do we travel? Why do we leave the comforts of our homes to go to other places?

Psychology has shown that travel - even just thinking about other countries - broadens our minds and makes us more creative. But we travel for many reasons, from acquiring memories, to seeing how other people live, even to build or re-invent our identities. And then there are those, like P. J. O’Rourke, who claim to hate travelling and prefer to stay home. Though it turns out he actually likes tourism, just not tourists.

Mike also talks to South African travel writer Sihle Kuhmalo, Stanford Travel bookshop senior buyer David Montero, and psychologist Corinne Usher.

Produced by Arlene Gregorius

(Photo: An international traveller arrives at an airport. Credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

The Why Factor: Why do we wear Skirts?20151215

The Why Factor: Why do we wear Skirts?20151215

Author Jung Chang explains how the skirt was dangerous during the cultural revolution

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

It’s a simple item of dress but one that says much about the societies in which we live. Mike Williams looks at this most basic form of dress the skirt. A rectangle cloth which throughout centuries has been associated with great meaning including women’s liberation and their oppression, politics & gender. The programme includes an interview with Jung Chang, author of the bestselling “Wild Swans”, who describes how the skirt was a dangerous thing to wear during the cultural revolution. Produced by Smita Patel (Photo: Woman wears a polkadot skirt on a green background. Credit: Shutterstock). Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why do we wear Skirts?20151215

It’s a simple item of dress but one that says much about the societies in which we live. Mike Williams looks at this most basic form of dress the skirt. A rectangle cloth which throughout centuries has been associated with great meaning including women’s liberation and their oppression, politics & gender. The programme includes an interview with Jung Chang, author of the bestselling “Wild Swans?, who describes how the skirt was a dangerous thing to wear during the cultural revolution. Produced by Smita Patel (Photo: Woman wears a polkadot skirt on a green background. Credit: Shutterstock). Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why Do We Wear Skirts?20151215

It’s a simple item of dress but one that says much about the societies in which we live. Mike Williams looks at this most basic form of dress the skirt. A rectangle cloth which throughout centuries has been associated with great meaning including women’s liberation and their oppression, politics and gender. The programme includes an interview with Jung Chang, author of the bestselling “Wild Swans?, who describes how the skirt was a dangerous thing to wear during the cultural revolution. Produced by Smita Patel (Photo: Woman wears a polkadot skirt on a green background. Credit: Shutterstock). Credit: Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why do we wear Suits?20151201

The Why Factor: Why do we wear Suits?20151201

It’s a style of dress that’s spread around the world - the suit. It’s survived, largely unchanged, for the three centuries. But, where does it come from, what’s its appeal and what does it say about those who wear it? Mike Williams talks to fashion designer Paul Smith who wears one every day and to the author Jung Chang who had no choice but to follow suit during the Cultural Revolution in China.

Produced by Smita Patel

(Photo: Two men sit side by side wearing sharp suits. Credit Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why Do We Wear Suits?20151201

It’s a style of dress that’s spread around the world - the suit. It’s survived, largely unchanged, for the three centuries. But, where does it come from, what’s its appeal and what does it say about those who wear it? Mike Williams talks to fashion designer Paul Smith who wears one every day and to the author Jung Chang who had no choice but to follow suit during the Cultural Revolution in China.

Produced by Smita Patel

(Photo: Two men sit side by side wearing sharp suits. Credit Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why do we wear Suits?20151201

The suit, it\u2019s survived for the three centuries. But what\u2019s its appeal?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

It’s a style of dress that’s spread around the world - the suit. It’s survived, largely unchanged, for the three centuries. But, where does it come from, what’s its appeal and what does it say about those who wear it? Mike Williams talks to fashion designer Paul Smith who wears one every day and to the author Jung Chang who had no choice but to follow suit during the Cultural Revolution in China.

Produced by Smita Patel

(Photo: Two men sit side by side wearing sharp suits. Credit Shutterstock)

The Why Factor: Why does commuting make us the way we are?20151021

The Why Factor: Why does commuting make us the way we are?20151021

Hundreds of millions of us bear the stress and boredom of the same journey day in day out: the commute. For some it’s a time of reflection while for others it’s a time to turn the air blue with howls of frustration. Why does commuting make us the people we are and how?

Produced by Sonia Rothwell

(Photo: Rush hour in Nairobi. Credit to Abdinoor Maalim)

The Why Factor: Why Does Commuting Make Us The Way We Are?20151021

Hundreds of millions of us bear the stress and boredom of the same journey day in day out: the commute. For some it’s a time of reflection while for others it’s a time to turn the air blue with howls of frustration. Why does commuting make us the people we are and how?

Produced by Sonia Rothwell

(Photo: Rush hour in Nairobi. Credit to Abdinoor Maalim)

The Why Factor: Why does commuting make us the way we are?20151021

Why does commuting make us the people we are and how?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

Hundreds of millions of us bear the stress and boredom of the same journey day in day out: the commute. For some it’s a time of reflection while for others it’s a time to turn the air blue with howls of frustration. Why does commuting make us the people we are and how?

Produced by Sonia Rothwell

(Photo: Rush hour in Nairobi. Credit to Abdinoor Maalim)

The Why Factor: Why I'm Not Just Blind20160419

The Why Factor: Why I'm Not Just Blind20160419

Lee Kumutat examines why blindness comes to define the identity of people who have little or no sight. Why must blind people either be inspirational or deserving pity?

(image: Camille Wilson, teacher at a regular inner-city school, Kingston Jamaica)

The Why Factor: Why I'm Not Just Blind20160419

Lee Kumutat examines why blindness comes to define the identity of people who have little or no sight. Why must blind people either be inspirational or deserving pity?

(image: Camille Wilson, teacher at a regular inner-city school, Kingston Jamaica)

The Why Factor: Why I'm Not Just Blind20160419

Why must blind people either be inspirational or deserving pity?

A chance to hear extracts from some of our most thought provoking broadcasts.

The Why Factor: Why is Water exceptional?20160209