Everything You Think About Sport Is Wrong

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Feminism2016121220170405 (R4)

Simon Barnes introduces a new series challenging conventional thinking about sport, and in this first episode he argues that sport is feminism in action.

The truth of sport is that sport is always what it is," Simon argues, and from the end of the corseted tennis player to the 2012 Olympics, he explores how female athletes have repeatedly confounded attempts to turn sport into a place where men can be blokes and women are not only barred but happy to be barred.

Speaking to Nicole Cooke, one of Britain's greatest cyclists, about her life in sport, Simon argues that sport is feminism in action, because it can't help it.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

"The truth of sport is that sport is always what it is," Simon argues, and from the end of the corseted tennis player to the 2012 Olympics, he explores how female athletes have repeatedly confounded attempts to turn sport into a place where men can be blokes and women are not only barred but happy to be barred.

In a new series challenging thinking about sport, Simon Barnes discusses feminism.

Simon Barnes presents a series challenging conventional thinking about sport.

"The truth of sport is that sport is always what it is,"" Simon argues, and from the end of the corseted tennis player to the 2012 Olympics, he explores how female athletes have repeatedly confounded attempts to turn sport into a place where men can be blokes and women are not only barred but happy to be barred.

In this first episode of a new series challenging the way we think about sport, Simon Barnes discusses sport and feminism.

02Beauty2016121320170412 (R4)Simon Barnes continues his challenge to how we think about sport, discussing beauty.

Simon Barnes presents a series challenging conventional thinking about sport.

Continuing his series challenging how we think about sport, Simon Barnes makes the case for beauty in sport.

Simon asks how an appreciation of beauty can translate into a love for football and how Roger Federer achieves art in the pursuit of victory on the tennis court. He explores the complex relationship between victory and beauty, and talks to Permi Jhooti, Britain's first Asian professional footballer, about her work as an artist depicting beauty in sport, and hears why she thinks sport offers her a unique ability to show the depth of her feeling.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

03Intellectuals2016121420170419 (R4)Simon Barnes continues his series about sport, arguing that sport is for intellectuals.

Simon Barnes presents a series challenging conventional thinking about sport.

In the third episode of his series confronting common misconceptions about sport, Simon Barnes explains why he believes sport is for intellectuals.

From French philosopher goalkeepers to James Joyce's Ulysses, Simon argues that to rule out sport as not for intellectuals is to write off some very interesting people. He makes the case for dramatic narrative without authorial intention, and he discusses with former England cricketer Ed Smith the relationship between literary modernism, sport and intellectual life.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

03Intellectuals20170419Simon Barnes continues his series about sport, arguing that sport is for intellectuals.

In the third episode of his series confronting common misconceptions about sport, Simon Barnes explains why he believes sport is for intellectuals.

From French philosopher goalkeepers to James Joyce's Ulysses, Simon argues that to rule out sport as not for intellectuals is to write off some very interesting people. He makes the case for dramatic narrative without authorial intention, and he discusses with former England cricketer Ed Smith the relationship between literary modernism, sport and intellectual life.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

"Simon Barnes continues his series about sport, arguing that sport is for intellectuals.

Producer: Giles Edwards."

04The Novel2016121520170426 (R4)Simon Barnes argues that sport produces narratives worthy of a novel.

Simon Barnes presents a series challenging conventional thinking about sport.

Simon Barnes continues his series challenging conventional thinking about sport, and argues that sport produces narratives worthy of a novel.

Simon argues that sport is as much a novel as Ulysses or Tristram Shandy, with a cast of characters as rich as villains Lance Armstrong, Hansie Cronje and the 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Hydrant,' Tiger Woods, and tragedies as profound as that of Oscar Pistorius. He draws parallels between Andrew Flintoff's legendary performance in the 2005 Ashes and Lord of the Rings, and he discusses the amazing - and amazing variety of - narratives in sport with David Maraniss, associate editor at the Washington Post, himself addicted to sport stories.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

04The Novel20170426Simon Barnes argues that sport produces narratives worthy of a novel.

Simon Barnes continues his series challenging conventional thinking about sport, and argues that sport produces narratives worthy of a novel.

Simon argues that sport is as much a novel as Ulysses or Tristram Shandy, with a cast of characters as rich as villains Lance Armstrong, Hansie Cronje and the 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Hydrant,' Tiger Woods, and tragedies as profound as that of Oscar Pistorius. He draws parallels between Andrew Flintoff's legendary performance in the 2005 Ashes and Lord of the Rings, and he discusses the amazing - and amazing variety of - narratives in sport with David Maraniss, associate editor at the Washington Post, himself addicted to sport stories.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

"Simon Barnes argues that sport produces narratives worthy of a novel.

Producer: Giles Edwards."

05Nationalism2016121620170503 (R4)Simon Barnes concludes his series about sport by arguing that it is not about nationalism.

Simon Barnes presents a series challenging conventional thinking about sport.

In the final episode of his series challenging conventional thinking about sport, Simon Barnes argues that it is not about nationalism, or indeed tribalism of any kind. Instead, Simon welcomes you to join him as a member, or at least a visitor, to the nation of excellence.

Simon talks to Martina Navratilova about the modern shift towards supporting a national champion, and why this matters in sport; he laments the loss of second rate British teams at the Olympics; and maintains that excellence on the level of Usain Bolt's sprinting, Fu Mingxia's diving or Federer's otherworldly tennis can touch us profoundly.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

05Nationalism20170503Simon Barnes concludes his series about sport by arguing that it is not about nationalism.

In the final episode of his series challenging conventional thinking about sport, Simon Barnes argues that it is not about nationalism, or indeed tribalism of any kind. Instead, Simon welcomes you to join him as a member, or at least a visitor, to the nation of excellence.

Simon talks to Martina Navratilova about the modern shift towards supporting a national champion, and why this matters in sport; he laments the loss of second rate British teams at the Olympics; and maintains that excellence on the level of Usain Bolt's sprinting, Fu Mingxia's diving or Federer's otherworldly tennis can touch us profoundly.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

"Simon Barnes concludes his series about sport by arguing that it is not about nationalism.