Evidence, The [world Service]

Episodes

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Contagious cities20190420

The Evidence travels to Hong Kong to discover how the city is shaped by epidemics.

From the 19th century plague, which heralded in westernised medicine, to the 2003 SARS outbreak, contagion has left indelible traces on Hong Kong.

SARS was the first major epidemic of the 21st century, killing hundreds and terrifying thousands. In 2003 a 64 year old doctor checked into his Hong Kong hotel. A few days later he died from a mystery virus. By then other hotel guests caught planes to Singapore and Canada and the US, where they were taken ill too.

No one knew what the virus was but a dedicated group of scientists and doctors managed to halt the outbreak in a very short time. Joining Claudia Hammond at the Tai Kwun Centre for Heritage and Arts are virologist Malik Peiris, who co discovered the SARS virus, and Vivian Taam Wong, who had the task of running the hospitals during the outbreak.

Art curator Ying Kwok and artist Angela Su consider the role art can play in the healing process,. And presenter Claudia Hammond looks to the future and asks Keiji Fukuda what lessons can be learnt to prevent other outbreaks. Perhaps the real fear today is what happens to public health when people no longer trust experts.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald

Image: A woman crosses a busy road in Hong Kong wearing a mask
Credit: PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images

How Hong Kong has been shaped by epidemics

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science\u2019s effect on our world

Contagious cities2019042020190421 (WS)

The Evidence travels to Hong Kong to discover how the city is shaped by epidemics.

From the 19th century plague, which heralded in westernised medicine, to the 2003 SARS outbreak, contagion has left indelible traces on Hong Kong.

SARS was the first major epidemic of the 21st century, killing hundreds and terrifying thousands. In 2003 a 64 year old doctor checked into his Hong Kong hotel. A few days later he died from a mystery virus. By then other hotel guests caught planes to Singapore and Canada and the US, where they were taken ill too.

No one knew what the virus was but a dedicated group of scientists and doctors managed to halt the outbreak in a very short time. Joining Claudia Hammond at the Tai Kwun Centre for Heritage and Arts are virologist Malik Peiris, who co discovered the SARS virus, and Vivian Taam Wong, who had the task of running the hospitals during the outbreak.

Art curator Ying Kwok and artist Angela Su consider the role art can play in the healing process,. And presenter Claudia Hammond looks to the future and asks Keiji Fukuda what lessons can be learnt to prevent other outbreaks. Perhaps the real fear today is what happens to public health when people no longer trust experts.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald

Image: A woman crosses a busy road in Hong Kong wearing a mask
Credit: PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images

How Hong Kong has been shaped by epidemics

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science\u2019s effect on our world

Healthy buildings20190504

Opened in the 1930s, Paimio Sanatorium was a modernist vision rising out of the pine forests of South West Finland. Every detail of the building was designed by Alvar and Aino Aalto with tuberculosis patients in mind, from the sun terraces, to the colour scheme, soft lighting and fur lined sleeping bags.

Recorded in the relaxation room at the Paimio Sanatorium, Tommi Lindh director of the Alvar Aalto Foundation explains how the building was viewed at the time, Professor Heini Hakosalo Senior Research fellow at Oulu University recounts what life was like living for years in the sanatoria and Laura Arpianen Professor of Health and Wellbeing Architecture at Aalto University in Helsinki says that we have forgotten the importance of the patient experience and suggests what we can learn from the Paimio Sanatorium

The Evidence is produced in collaboration with Wellcome Collection

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald

Image: The Paimio Sanatorium in Finland, BBC

What does Finland's Paimio Sanatorium tell us about design and health?

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science\u2019s effect on our world

Healthy buildings2019050420190505 (WS)

Opened in the 1930s, Paimio Sanatorium was a modernist vision rising out of the pine forests of South West Finland. Every detail of the building was designed by Alvar and Aino Aalto with tuberculosis patients in mind, from the sun terraces, to the colour scheme, soft lighting and fur lined sleeping bags.

Recorded in the relaxation room at the Paimio Sanatorium, Tommi Lindh director of the Alvar Aalto Foundation explains how the building was viewed at the time, Professor Heini Hakosalo Senior Research fellow at Oulu University recounts what life was like living for years in the sanatoria and Laura Arpianen Professor of Health and Wellbeing Architecture at Aalto University in Helsinki says that we have forgotten the importance of the patient experience and suggests what we can learn from the Paimio Sanatorium

The Evidence is produced in collaboration with Wellcome Collection

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald

Image: The Paimio Sanatorium in Finland, BBC

What does Finland's Paimio Sanatorium tell us about design and health?

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science\u2019s effect on our world

Healthy Buildings20190504

Cutting edge discussions produced in collaboration with Wellcome Collection that aim to challenge how we think and feel about health.

Programme Three: Healthy Buildings
From the iconic Paimio Sanatorium in Finland, designed by Alvar Alto and built in the 1930’s we ask how a building can impact your health. How did Finland go from a TB black spot to a couple of hundred cases a year? Historian Heini Hakasalo tells Claudia Hammond about the feelings of people as they entered the sanatorium and architect Jonas Malmberg explains how the how style of the building is linked to the disease.

Cutting edge discussions that challenge how we think and feel about health.

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science\u2019s effect on our world

How magic tricks reveal how we think20190427

Programme Two: Smoke and Mirrors

Smoke and Mirrors recorded at the Wellcome Collection in London investigates the history of spiritualism and magic and asks what can magic can tell us about our brains. Magician and neuroscientist Matt Thompkins demonstrates how you can play tricks with memory, psychologist Chris French debunks paranormal beliefs and cultural historian Elsa Richardson questions the value of myth busting while political economist Will Davies looks at changing attitudes to knowledge and why feelings have taken over the world.

Presented by Claudia Hammond.

Image: A Magician doing a magic trick.
Credit: Getty Images.

Why do humans like to be deceived? How magicians trick our brains and our perception.

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science\u2019s effect on our world

How magic tricks reveal how we think20190427

This programme is recorded at the Wellcome Collection in London and it investigates the history of spiritualism and magic and asks what can magic can tell us about our brains. Magician and neuroscientist Matt Thompkins demonstrates how you can play tricks with memory, psychologist Chris French debunks paranormal beliefs and cultural historian Elsa Richardson questions the value of myth busting while political economist Will Davies looks at changing attitudes to knowledge and why feelings have taken over the world.

Presented by Claudia Hammond.

Image: A Magician doing a magic trick.
Credit: Getty Images.

Why do humans like to be deceived? How magicians trick our brains and our perception.

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science\u2019s effect on our world

How magic tricks reveal how we think2019042720190428 (WS)

This programme is recorded at the Wellcome Collection in London and it investigates the history of spiritualism and magic and asks what can magic can tell us about our brains. Magician and neuroscientist Matt Thompkins demonstrates how you can play tricks with memory, psychologist Chris French debunks paranormal beliefs and cultural historian Elsa Richardson questions the value of myth busting while political economist Will Davies looks at changing attitudes to knowledge and why feelings have taken over the world.

Presented by Claudia Hammond.

Image: A Magician doing a magic trick.
Credit: Getty Images.

Why do humans like to be deceived? How magicians trick our brains and our perception.

Claudia Hammond joins scientists and experts to explore science\u2019s effect on our world