Evidence - Humans And Animals, The [world Service]

Episodes

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Animal Minds20170420

Claudia Hammond and Tim Cockerill ask are we more like animals than we know?

The BBC World Service is joining forces with Wellcome Collection to explore some of the biggest challenges facing our world today in a new programme of events and radio broadcasts. In this programme, presenters Claudia Hammond and Tim Cockerill join scientists, other experts and a live audience to find out if we are more like animals than we know.

Claudia discusses how clever animals are with Professor Laurie Santos, who studies dogs and apes to understand the origin of the human mind, and Professor Anil Seth who thinks the consciousness of octopuses can be revealing. Research has shown Capuchin monkeys to be spiteful and we tend to think dogs can feel guilt but what is really going on in an animal’s mind and are their emotions real.

Speakers include:

Laurie Santos professor of psychology and animal cognition at Yale University

Professor Anil Seth from the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, Sussex

Produced in association with Wellcome Collection.

Image: Nile crocodile Credit: Getty Images

Animal Minds20170420

The BBC World Service is joining forces with Wellcome Collection to explore some of the biggest challenges facing our world today in a new programme of events and radio broadcasts. In this programme, presenters Claudia Hammond and Tim Cockerill join scientists, other experts and a live audience to find out if we are more like animals than we know.

Claudia discusses how clever animals are with Professor Laurie Santos, who studies dogs and apes to understand the origin of the human mind, and Professor Anil Seth who thinks the consciousness of octopuses can be revealing. Research has shown Capuchin monkeys to be spiteful and we tend to think dogs can feel guilt but what is really going on in an animal’s mind and are their emotions real.

Speakers include:

Laurie Santos professor of psychology and animal cognition at Yale University

Professor Anil Seth from the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, Sussex

Produced in association with Wellcome Collection.

Image: Nile crocodile Credit: Getty Images

Claudia Hammond and Tim Cockerill ask are we more like animals than we know?

Living With Animals20170421

Claudia Hammond and Tim Cockerill look at how we live with animals

The BBC World Service is joining forces with Wellcome Collection to explore some of the biggest challenges facing our world today in a new programme of events and radio broadcasts. In this programme, presenters Claudia Hammond and Tim Cockerill join scientists, other experts and a live audience to look at how we live with animals.

Richard Pell has discovered a secret history of the domesticated animals we share our lives with willingly or unwillingly. He discusses the evolution of the brown rat to the fancy rat, how canaries learnt to sing and why goats are going to the moon. Humans and wild animals often live in close proximity but conflicts between the two derail conservation programmes. Tobias Nyumba shares his experience of interactions between humans and elephants in Kenya and crocodile expert Simon Pooley shows how history and culture can solve conflicts between humans and predators.

Speakers include:

Richard Pell, Director, Center for PostNatural History

Simon Pooley, Lambert Lecturer in Environment (Applied Herpetology), Birkbeck University of London

Tobias O Nyumba, PhD student, University of Cambridge.

Produced in association with Wellcome Collection.

Image: Taxidermied parrots in a museum store, Museum National D'Histoire Naturelle Paris, France, 1982.

Credit: Richard Ross © the artist

Living With Animals20170421

The BBC World Service is joining forces with Wellcome Collection to explore some of the biggest challenges facing our world today in a new programme of events and radio broadcasts. In this programme, presenters Claudia Hammond and Tim Cockerill join scientists, other experts and a live audience to look at how we live with animals.

Richard Pell has discovered a secret history of the domesticated animals we share our lives with willingly or unwillingly. He discusses the evolution of the brown rat to the fancy rat, how canaries learnt to sing and why goats are going to the moon. Humans and wild animals often live in close proximity but conflicts between the two derail conservation programmes. Tobias Nyumba shares his experience of interactions between humans and elephants in Kenya and crocodile expert Simon Pooley shows how history and culture can solve conflicts between humans and predators.

Speakers include:

Richard Pell, Director, Center for PostNatural History

Simon Pooley, Lambert Lecturer in Environment (Applied Herpetology), Birkbeck University of London

Tobias O Nyumba, PhD student, University of Cambridge.

Produced in association with Wellcome Collection.

Image: Taxidermied parrots in a museum store, Museum National D'Histoire Naturelle Paris, France, 1982.

Credit: Richard Ross © the artist

Claudia Hammond and Tim Cockerill look at how we live with animals

Preventing Epidemics20170417

Claudia Hammond and Ha Mi ask "Does sharing our lives with animals lead to new diseases?"

Recorded on location with farmers in the Mekong Delta and with an invited metropolitan audience at The Factory Contemporary Arts Centre in Ho Chi Minh City, presenters Claudia Hammond and Ha Mi discover the personal experiences of farmers on the front line looking out for new diseases and hear from the scientists who are trying to understand and prevent future epidemics.

Speakers include:

Ho Dang Trung Nghia

Nguyen Van Cuong

Stephen Baker, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Produced in association with Wellcome Collection.

Image: Pigs. © Geraldine Fitzgerald, BBC

Preventing Epidemics20170417

Recorded on location with farmers in the Mekong Delta and with an invited metropolitan audience at The Factory Contemporary Arts Centre in Ho Chi Minh City, presenters Claudia Hammond and Ha Mi discover the personal experiences of farmers on the front line looking out for new diseases and hear from the scientists who are trying to understand and prevent future epidemics.

Speakers include:

Ho Dang Trung Nghia

Nguyen Van Cuong

Stephen Baker, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Produced in association with Wellcome Collection.

Image: Pigs. © Geraldine Fitzgerald, BBC

Claudia Hammond and Ha Mi ask "Does sharing our lives with animals lead to new diseases?"

Should Vets And Doctors Work More Closely Together?20170419

Claudia Hammond and Graham Easton ask should vets and doctors work more closely together?

The BBC World Service is joining forces with Wellcome Collection to explore some of the biggest challenges facing our world today in a new programme of events and radio broadcasts. In this programme, presenters Claudia Hammond and Graham Easton join scientists, other experts and a live audience to ask what is man’s relationship with animals.

Historically doctors and vets worked together and data from 19th Century zoos led to a better understanding of rickets and tuberculosis in humans and animals. Comparisons between the squalid conditions in the zoos and Victorian workhouses distilled out characteristics of the diseases and feeding lion cubs a better diet meant more survived. With the rise of modern medicine doctors and vets have become estranged. But could human medicine benefit from pioneering work in cats and dogs?

Speakers include:

Abigail Wood, Professor in the History of Human and Animal Health, Kings College London

Noel Fitzpatrick, Professor of Veterinary Orthopaedics, University of Surrey and Managing Director of specialist small animal hospital Fitzpatrick Referrals.

Produced in association with Wellcome Collection.

Image: Vet with happy dog. © Getty Images

Should Vets And Doctors Work More Closely Together?20170419

The BBC World Service is joining forces with Wellcome Collection to explore some of the biggest challenges facing our world today in a new programme of events and radio broadcasts. In this programme, presenters Claudia Hammond and Graham Easton join scientists, other experts and a live audience to ask what is man’s relationship with animals.

Historically doctors and vets worked together and data from 19th Century zoos led to a better understanding of rickets and tuberculosis in humans and animals. Comparisons between the squalid conditions in the zoos and Victorian workhouses distilled out characteristics of the diseases and feeding lion cubs a better diet meant more survived. With the rise of modern medicine doctors and vets have become estranged. But could human medicine benefit from pioneering work in cats and dogs?

Speakers include:

Abigail Wood, Professor in the History of Human and Animal Health, Kings College London

Noel Fitzpatrick, Professor of Veterinary Orthopaedics, University of Surrey and Managing Director of specialist small animal hospital Fitzpatrick Referrals.

Produced in association with Wellcome Collection.

Image: Vet with happy dog. © Getty Images

Claudia Hammond and Graham Easton ask should vets and doctors work more closely together?

Should We All Be Vegetarians?20170418

The ethical and scientific reasons of whether or not to be a vegetarian

Claudia Hammond and Tim Cockerill host an event at the Wellcome Collection.

As more people in the West are becoming vegetarian or vegan for ethical and environmental reasons, we ask if this is a sustainable option globally. The impact on the environment of a family giving up meat in a western country would be the same as not driving a small car for a year. In the US the average person eats over 100Kg of meat annually whilst in developing countries this is 13Kg. The protein and micronutrients from animals in poor rural communities make an important contribution to the diets of impoverished families. Chickens also provide local women with an income source. How can the worlds of veganism and meat eating be reconciled and what can the archaeological bones of chickens tell us about how animal welfare has changed?

Speakers include:

Jimmy Smith, Director General of International Livestock Research Institute in Kenya

Holly Miller, archaeologist, (expert on the history of chickens), Nottingham University

Matthew Cole, sociologist, Open University, and former chair of the Vegan Society

Dr Peter Scarborough, Senior Researcher, British Heart Foundation Centre on Population Approaches for Non-Communicable Disease Prevention

Produced in association with Wellcome Collection.

Image: Vegetable dish Credit: Getty Images