Exchanges - The Global Economy [world Service]

Episodes

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2014011820140119 (WS)

Why doesn’t money make us happy? French economist Daniel Cohen talks to Justin Rowlatt...

Why doesn’t money make us happy? French economist Daniel Cohen talks to Justin Rowlatt with an audience at a Paris university.

2014011820140119 (WS)

Why doesn’t money make us happy? French economist Daniel Cohen talks to Justin Rowlatt...

Why doesn’t money make us happy? French economist Daniel Cohen talks to Justin Rowlatt with an audience at a Paris university.

French economist Daniel Cohen - Exchanges: The Global Economy2014011820140119 (WS)

Why doesn\u2019t money make us happy? French economist Daniel Cohen talks to Justin Rowlatt...

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

Why doesn’t money make us happy? French economist Daniel Cohen explores the paradox of why growing economies do not lead to growing satisfaction with life. He tells Justin Rowlatt, and an audience at Paris Dauphine University that economics focusses us on competition while it’s cooperation and free-giving that makes us happy.

French economist Daniel Cohen - Exchanges: The Global Economy20140118

Why doesn\u2019t money make us happy? French economist Daniel Cohen talks to Justin Rowlatt...

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

Why doesn’t money make us happy? French economist Daniel Cohen explores the paradox of why growing economies do not lead to growing satisfaction with life. He tells Justin Rowlatt, and an audience at Paris Dauphine University that economics focusses us on competition while it’s cooperation and free-giving that makes us happy.

French Economist Thomas Piketty2014062120140622 (WS)

Economist Thomas Piketty on the gap between the global rich and poor, tax and capitalism

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

The internationally acclaimed French economist Thomas Piketty talks to BBC correspondent Simon Jack in front of a live audience at the Université Paris-Dauphine. His best-selling book, Capital in the 21st Century, rocked the economic world with its arguments about the widening gap between the global rich and poor. We hear more about Piketty’s theories and what they say about our developing perceptions of wealth, tax, and modern capitalism.

Photo: Thomas Piketty. Credit: Getty Images)

French Economist Thomas Piketty20140621

Economist Thomas Piketty on the gap between the global rich and poor, tax and capitalism

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

The internationally acclaimed French economist Thomas Piketty talks to BBC correspondent Simon Jack in front of a live audience at the Université Paris-Dauphine. His best-selling book, Capital in the 21st Century, rocked the economic world with its arguments about the widening gap between the global rich and poor. We hear more about Piketty’s theories and what they say about our developing perceptions of wealth, tax, and modern capitalism.

Photo: Thomas Piketty. Credit: Getty Images)

French Economist Thomas Piketty2014062120140622 (WS)

The internationally acclaimed French economist Thomas Piketty talks to BBC correspondent Simon Jack in front of a live audience at the Université Paris-Dauphine. His best-selling book, Capital in the 21st Century, rocked the economic world with its arguments about the widening gap between the global rich and poor. We hear more about Piketty’s theories and what they say about our developing perceptions of wealth, tax, and modern capitalism.

Photo: Thomas Piketty. Credit: Getty Images)

French Economist Thomas Piketty20141225

Economist Thomas Piketty on the gap between the global rich and poor, tax and capitalism

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

The internationally-acclaimed French economist Thomas Piketty talks to BBC correspondent Simon Jack in front of a live audience at the Université Paris-Dauphine. His best-selling book, Capital in the 21st Century, rocked the economic world with its arguments about the widening gap between the global rich and poor. We hear more about Piketty’s theories and what they say about our developing perceptions of wealth, tax, and modern capitalism.

Photo: Thomas Piketty. Credit: Getty Images

Joseph Stiglitz - Exchanges: The Global Economy2013071320130714 (WS)

Nobel Prize winning economist Professor Joseph Stiglitz on the global cost of inequality

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

Professor Joseph Stiglitz joins the BBC’s Justin Rowlatt, a phalanx of French economists and the Parisian public, as they debate the cost of inequality at Paris Dauphine University.

Professor Stiglitz is a Nobel Prize winning economist, a former advisor of Bill Clinton and former chief economist of the World Bank. His counsel is sought by much of the developing world’s leadership and by national governments across the globe. He has a stark warning to make: inequality is so rampant that all over the world it is depressing economies and dividing societies. Even when they conspicuously live the high life, the rich are incapable of consuming all they earn - the money is piling up and it is a drag on growth. The rest of us – with declining wages and less influence on politicians – are borrowing more to keep living standards the same.

Stiglitz wants to curb financial sectors, restore full employment, get governments to drive growth and raise taxes. Is he right? Can a ‘state-led’ capitalism lead to high growth and stable economies? Is equality really the way to restore health to advanced economies around the world?

(Photo: Joseph Stiglitz and Justin Rowlatt - Copyright Université Paris-Dauphine)

Joseph Stiglitz - Exchanges: The Global Economy2013071320140101 (WS)

Nobel Prize winning economist Professor Joseph Stiglitz on the global cost of inequality

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

Professor Joseph Stiglitz joins the BBC’s Justin Rowlatt, a phalanx of French economists and the Parisian public, as they debate the cost of inequality at Paris Dauphine University.

Professor Stiglitz is a Nobel Prize winning economist, a former advisor of Bill Clinton and former chief economist of the World Bank. His counsel is sought by much of the developing world’s leadership and by national governments across the globe. He has a stark warning to make: inequality is so rampant that all over the world it is depressing economies and dividing societies. Even when they conspicuously live the high life, the rich are incapable of consuming all they earn - the money is piling up and it is a drag on growth. The rest of us – with declining wages and less influence on politicians – are borrowing more to keep living standards the same.

Stiglitz wants to curb financial sectors, restore full employment, get governments to drive growth and raise taxes. Is he right? Can a ‘state-led’ capitalism lead to high growth and stable economies? Is equality really the way to restore health to advanced economies around the world?

(Photo: Joseph Stiglitz and Justin Rowlatt - Copyright Université Paris-Dauphine)

Joseph Stiglitz - Exchanges: The Global Economy20130713

Nobel Prize winning economist Professor Joseph Stiglitz on the global cost of inequality

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

Professor Joseph Stiglitz joins the BBC’s Justin Rowlatt, a phalanx of French economists and the Parisian public, as they debate the cost of inequality at Paris Dauphine University.

Professor Stiglitz is a Nobel Prize winning economist, a former advisor of Bill Clinton and former chief economist of the World Bank. His counsel is sought by much of the developing world’s leadership and by national governments across the globe. He has a stark warning to make: inequality is so rampant that all over the world it is depressing economies and dividing societies. Even when they conspicuously live the high life, the rich are incapable of consuming all they earn - the money is piling up and it is a drag on growth. The rest of us – with declining wages and less influence on politicians – are borrowing more to keep living standards the same.

Stiglitz wants to curb financial sectors, restore full employment, get governments to drive growth and raise taxes. Is he right? Can a ‘state-led’ capitalism lead to high growth and stable economies? Is equality really the way to restore health to advanced economies around the world?

(Photo: Joseph Stiglitz and Justin Rowlatt - Copyright Université Paris-Dauphine)

Nassim Nicholas Taleb2014011120140112 (WS)

Justin Rowlatt asks philosopher of randomness Nassim Nicholas Taleb if we can predict h...

Justin Rowlatt asks philosopher of randomness Nassim Nicholas Taleb if we can predict how an economy will behave.

Nassim Nicholas Taleb2014011120140112 (WS)

Justin Rowlatt asks philosopher of randomness Nassim Nicholas Taleb if we can predict how an economy will behave.

Justin Rowlatt asks philosopher of randomness Nassim Nicholas Taleb if we can predict h...

Nassim Nicholas Taleb - Exchanges: The Global Economy2014011120140112 (WS)

3/4 Nassim Nicholas Taleb on risk in economics and in life

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

Do you underestimate the risk you are under? Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s ideas on probability and risk challenge assumptions made by markets and mathematicians all of over the world. His ideas on our blindness to the impact of improbable events have lead him to be described as a ‘super hero of the mind’ and ‘the hottest thinker in the world'. He is the author of the mega-selling books on randomness and the impact of the improbable on life and on economics - Black Swan and Anti-Fragile. His official title is Distinguished Professor of Risk Engineering at New York University and he continually ranks as one of the most influential people on the planet. He joins Justin Rowlatt and an audience at the Grand Amphitheatre of the Sorbonne in Paris for a special event, staged in partnership with Paris Dauphine University.

(Photo: Nassim Nicholas Taleb (left) and Justin Rowlatt)

Nassim Nicholas Taleb - Exchanges: The Global Economy20140111

3/4 Nassim Nicholas Taleb on risk in economics and in life

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

Do you underestimate the risk you are under? Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s ideas on probability and risk challenge assumptions made by markets and mathematicians all of over the world. His ideas on our blindness to the impact of improbable events have lead him to be described as a ‘super hero of the mind’ and ‘the hottest thinker in the world'. He is the author of the mega-selling books on randomness and the impact of the improbable on life and on economics - Black Swan and Anti-Fragile. His official title is Distinguished Professor of Risk Engineering at New York University and he continually ranks as one of the most influential people on the planet. He joins Justin Rowlatt and an audience at the Grand Amphitheatre of the Sorbonne in Paris for a special event, staged in partnership with Paris Dauphine University.

(Photo: Nassim Nicholas Taleb (left) and Justin Rowlatt)

012013071320130714 (WS)

The world’s greatest economists talk to Justin Rowlatt in front of an audience at Paris...

The world’s greatest economists talk to Justin Rowlatt in front of an audience at Paris Dauphine. Part 1: Joseph Stiglitz.

01Exchanges - The Global Economy2013071320140101 (WS)

Professor Joseph Stiglitz joins the BBC’s Justin Rowlatt, a phalanx of French economists and the Parisian public, as they debate the cost of inequality at Paris Dauphine University.

Professor Stiglitz is a Nobel Prize winning economist, a former advisor of Bill Clinton and former chief economist of the World Bank. His counsel is sought by much of the developing world’s leadership and by national governments across the globe. He has a stark warning to make: inequality is so rampant that all over the world it is depressing economies and dividing societies. Even when they conspicuously live the high life, the rich are incapable of consuming all they earn - the money is piling up and it is a drag on growth. The rest of us – with declining wages and less influence on politicians – are borrowing more to keep living standards the same.

Stiglitz wants to curb financial sectors, restore full employment, get governments to drive growth and raise taxes. Is he right? Can a ‘state-led’ capitalism lead to high growth and stable economies? Is equality really the way to restore health to advanced economies around the world?

(Photo: Joseph Stiglitz and Justin Rowlatt - Copyright Université Paris-Dauphine)

01Exchanges - The Global Economy2013071320140101 (WS)

Professor Joseph Stiglitz joins the BBC’s Justin Rowlatt, a phalanx of French economists and the Parisian public, as they debate the cost of inequality at Paris Dauphine University.

Professor Stiglitz is a Nobel Prize winning economist, a former advisor of Bill Clinton and former chief economist of the World Bank. His counsel is sought by much of the developing world’s leadership and by national governments across the globe. He has a stark warning to make: inequality is so rampant that all over the world it is depressing economies and dividing societies. Even when they conspicuously live the high life, the rich are incapable of consuming all they earn - the money is piling up and it is a drag on growth. The rest of us – with declining wages and less influence on politicians – are borrowing more to keep living standards the same.

Stiglitz wants to curb financial sectors, restore full employment, get governments to drive growth and raise taxes. Is he right? Can a ‘state-led’ capitalism lead to high growth and stable economies? Is equality really the way to restore health to advanced economies around the world?

(Photo: Joseph Stiglitz and Justin Rowlatt - Copyright Université Paris-Dauphine)

01Exchanges: The Global Economy2013071320130714 (WS)

The world’s greatest economists talk to Justin Rowlatt in front of an audience at Paris...

The world’s greatest economists talk to Justin Rowlatt in front of an audience at Paris Dauphine. Part 1: Joseph Stiglitz.

02Exchanges: The Global Economy20131123

It is not the legacy of colonialism that keeps Africa poor, but its dictatorships: Ghanaian economist, George Ayittey argues that Africa is poor because it is not free. He tells Justin Rowlatt and an audience at Paris Dauphine University that foreign aid is a curse upon African economies.

(Picture: Amputee, Mr James, holds his head, he is a civil war victim from Sierra Leone, Credit: Issouf SanogoAFP/Getty Images)

Leading Ghanaian economist George Ayittey talks to Justin Rowlatt in front of an audience at Paris Dauphine University.

02Exchanges: The Global Economy2013112320131124 (WS)

Leading Ghanaian economist George Ayittey talks to Justin Rowlatt in front of an audience at Paris Dauphine University.

Leading Ghanaian economist George Ayittey talks to Justin Rowlatt in front of an audien...

It is not the legacy of colonialism that keeps Africa poor, but its dictatorships: Ghanaian economist, George Ayittey argues that Africa is poor because it is not free. He tells Justin Rowlatt and an audience at Paris Dauphine University that foreign aid is a curse upon African economies.

(Picture: Amputee, Mr James, holds his head, he is a civil war victim from Sierra Leone, Credit: Issouf SanogoAFP/Getty Images)

02Ghanaian Economist George Ayittey - Exchanges: The Global Economy2013112320131124 (WS)

It is not the legacy of colonialism that keeps Africa poor, but its dictatorships

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

It is not the legacy of colonialism that keeps Africa poor, but its dictatorships: Ghanaian economist, George Ayittey argues that Africa is poor because it is not free. He tells Justin Rowlatt and an audience at Paris Dauphine University that foreign aid is a curse upon African economies.

Picture: George Ayittey (left) with presenter Justin Rowlatt

02Ghanaian Economist George Ayittey - Exchanges: The Global Economy20131123

It is not the legacy of colonialism that keeps Africa poor, but its dictatorships

Justin Rowlatt interviews the world's greatest economists

It is not the legacy of colonialism that keeps Africa poor, but its dictatorships: Ghanaian economist, George Ayittey argues that Africa is poor because it is not free. He tells Justin Rowlatt and an audience at Paris Dauphine University that foreign aid is a curse upon African economies.

Picture: George Ayittey (left) with presenter Justin Rowlatt