Exchanges At The Frontier [world Service]

Episodes

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2013020920130210 (WS)

AC Grayling and a public audience question the world’s leading scientists about the imp...

AC Grayling and a public audience question the world’s leading scientists about the impact of their work: Frances Ashcroft.

2013020920130210 (WS)

AC Grayling and a public audience question the world’s leading scientists about the impact of their work: Frances Ashcroft.

AC Grayling and a public audience question the world’s leading scientists about the imp...

Frances Ashcroft - Physiologist2013020920130210 (WS)

Electrical charges in the human body - what are the implications for disease and cures?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Electricity is central to life from the moment of conception – when the egg turbo-powers the sperm so it can penetrate its wall, to the moment of death – when electrical activity ceases in the brain. All action is governed by tiny electrical impulses, travelling around our body.

Frances Ashcroft is one of the world's experts on how the body channels electrical charges. What implications does that have for disease and cures, insulin secretion and diabetes?

She has revolutionised the lives of people living with neonatal diabetes – a condition which, thanks to her work, no longer needs treating with insulin. Her current research could affect the lives of many millions now threatened with type two diabetes all around the world.

Frances Ashcroft is a fellow of the Royal Society, Research Professor at the Laboratory of Physiology at Oxford University and L’Oreal Unesco Women in Science Laureate. Anthony Grayling, and an audience at the Wellcome collection in London plus a Skype audience from around the world, asked her about her research into electrical signals and the scourge of diabetes.

Frances Ashcroft - Physiologist20130209

Electrical charges in the human body - what are the implications for disease and cures?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Electricity is central to life from the moment of conception – when the egg turbo-powers the sperm so it can penetrate its wall, to the moment of death – when electrical activity ceases in the brain. All action is governed by tiny electrical impulses, travelling around our body.

Frances Ashcroft is one of the world's experts on how the body channels electrical charges. What implications does that have for disease and cures, insulin secretion and diabetes?

She has revolutionised the lives of people living with neonatal diabetes – a condition which, thanks to her work, no longer needs treating with insulin. Her current research could affect the lives of many millions now threatened with type two diabetes all around the world.

Frances Ashcroft is a fellow of the Royal Society, Research Professor at the Laboratory of Physiology at Oxford University and L’Oreal Unesco Women in Science Laureate. Anthony Grayling, and an audience at the Wellcome collection in London plus a Skype audience from around the world, asked her about her research into electrical signals and the scourge of diabetes.

Is Pain an Emotion?20160213

Is Pain an Emotion?20160213

Irene Tracey known as the Queen of Pain shows how the brain can be easily tricked

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Is Pain an Emotion?2016021320160214 (WS)

Irene Tracey known as the Queen of Pain shows how the brain can be easily tricked

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Is Pain an Emotion?20160213

Professor Irene Tracey is known as the Queen of Pain. Her work demonstrates how simple pain can develop into chronic pain, how our emotions can override the effect of pain killers and what anaesthesia can tell us about consciousness.

Image credit: Dental Instruments, Wellcome Library, London

Is Pain An Emotion?2016021320160214 (WS)

Professor Irene Tracey is known as the Queen of Pain. Her work demonstrates how simple pain can develop into chronic pain, how our emotions can override the effect of pain killers and what anaesthesia can tell us about consciousness.

Image credit: Dental Instruments, Wellcome Library, London

Irene Tracey known as the Queen of Pain shows how the brain can be easily tricked

Irene Tracey known as the Queen of Pain shows how the brain can be easily tricked

J.n. Goswami20131102

Justin Rowlatt meets Professor Jitendra Nath Goswami in Ahmedabad, to discuss India's Mars Orbiter Mission.

Jeremy Farrar - Epidemiologist2013020220130203 (WS)

What if anything can be done to allay the risks of global epidemics?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Philosopher AC Grayling and a public audience question the world's leading scientists about the impact and importance of their work for this year's Exchanges at the Frontier.

In the second programme, Clinician and Director of Oxford University’s Vietnam Infectious Disease Research Unit, Jeremy Farrar joins Grayling at the Wellcome Collection in London. Farrar will discuss the global risks of Sars and influenza and what, if anything can be done to allay the risks of global epidemics.

Jeremy Farrar knows as much about the influenza virus as anyone on the planet. He is a doctor, an epidemiologist, the holder of the Ho Chi Minh Medal from the Government of Vietnam and the British OBE; he is the Director of the Clinical Research Unit of Infectious Disease Hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and the Director of the South East Asia Infectious Disease Clinical Research Network.

(Image: Swine flu virus, Credit: Novartis)

Jeremy Farrar - Epidemiologist20130202

What if anything can be done to allay the risks of global epidemics?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Philosopher AC Grayling and a public audience question the world's leading scientists about the impact and importance of their work for this year's Exchanges at the Frontier.

In the second programme, Clinician and Director of Oxford University’s Vietnam Infectious Disease Research Unit, Jeremy Farrar joins Grayling at the Wellcome Collection in London. Farrar will discuss the global risks of Sars and influenza and what, if anything can be done to allay the risks of global epidemics.

Jeremy Farrar knows as much about the influenza virus as anyone on the planet. He is a doctor, an epidemiologist, the holder of the Ho Chi Minh Medal from the Government of Vietnam and the British OBE; he is the Director of the Clinical Research Unit of Infectious Disease Hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and the Director of the South East Asia Infectious Disease Clinical Research Network.

(Image: Swine flu virus, Credit: Novartis)

Jeremy Farrar - Epidemiologist2013020220130203 (WS)

What if anything can be done to allay the risks of global epidemics?

Philosopher AC Grayling and a public audience question the world's leading scientists about the impact and importance of their work for this year's Exchanges at the Frontier.

In the second programme, Clinician and Director of Oxford University’s Vietnam Infectious Disease Research Unit, Jeremy Farrar joins Grayling at the Wellcome Collection in London. Farrar will discuss the global risks of Sars and influenza and what, if anything can be done to allay the risks of global epidemics.

Jeremy Farrar knows as much about the influenza virus as anyone on the planet. He is a doctor, an epidemiologist, the holder of the Ho Chi Minh Medal from the Government of Vietnam and the British OBE; he is the Director of the Clinical Research Unit of Infectious Disease Hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and the Director of the South East Asia Infectious Disease Clinical Research Network.

(Image: Swine flu virus, Credit: Novartis)

Jitendra Goswami20131102

What is the motivation behind India's mission to Mars?

Jitendra Goswami2013110220131105 (WS)

What is the motivation behind India's mission to Mars?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Whilst NASA is cutting its space budget, India has launched a mission to Mars. What is the motivation behind India's Mars Orbiter Mission, the 300 million kilometre interplanetary expedition? Jitendra Goswami is the lead scientist of India’s first mission to Mars. Before the launch, he spoke to Justin Rowlatt and an audience in Ahmedabad, India about space science and earthly economics.

Picture: JN Goswani, Credit: Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images

Jitendra Goswami20131102

What is the motivation behind India's mission to Mars?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Whilst NASA is cutting its space budget, India has launched a mission to Mars. What is the motivation behind India's Mars Orbiter Mission, the 300 million kilometre interplanetary expedition? Jitendra Goswami is the lead scientist of India’s first mission to Mars. Before the launch, he spoke to Justin Rowlatt and an audience in Ahmedabad, India about space science and earthly economics.

Picture: JN Goswani, Credit: Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images

Jitendra Goswami2013110220131105 (WS)

What is the motivation behind India's mission to Mars?

Jitendra Goswami20131102

Whilst NASA is cutting its space budget, India has launched a mission to Mars. What is the motivation behind India's Mars Orbiter Mission, the 300 million kilometre interplanetary expedition? Jitendra Goswami is the lead scientist of India’s first mission to Mars. Before the launch, he spoke to Justin Rowlatt and an audience in Ahmedabad, India about space science and earthly economics.

Picture: JN Goswani, Credit: Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images

Jitendra Goswami2013110220131105 (WS)

Whilst NASA is cutting its space budget, India has launched a mission to Mars. What is the motivation behind India's Mars Orbiter Mission, the 300 million kilometre interplanetary expedition? Jitendra Goswami is the lead scientist of India’s first mission to Mars. Before the launch, he spoke to Justin Rowlatt and an audience in Ahmedabad, India about space science and earthly economics.

Picture: JN Goswani, Credit: Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images

What is the motivation behind India's mission to Mars?

Lisa Randall - Professor of Physics2013021620130217 (WS)

How many dimensions did the big bang bang?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

What is the God particle? Is that the best name for it? Lisa Randall answers this and other questions about the nature of reality, posed by physics students around the world.

Both a celebrated particle physicist (the world of the very small) and a cosmologist (the world of the very large), Randall is Professor of Theoretical Physics at Harvard University. Her contributions to the world of science include half of the Randall-Sundrum model which is at the forefront of bringing the two worlds or particles and cosmology together.

Randall’s work has improved our understanding of the standard model of particle physics, supersymmetry, baryogenesis, cosmological inflation, and dark matter. Her research explores extra dimensions of space with her current focus being dark matter searches and the Large Hadron Collider. Randall’s studies have made her among the most cited and influential theoretical physicists and she has received numerous awards and honours for her scientific endeavours.

Anthony Grayling and an audience of Physics students from around the world ask her about the Higgs Boson, fields and membranes, matter, anti-matter and black holes.

Lisa Randall - Professor of Physics20130216

How many dimensions did the big bang bang?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

What is the God particle? Is that the best name for it? Lisa Randall answers this and other questions about the nature of reality, posed by physics students around the world.

Both a celebrated particle physicist (the world of the very small) and a cosmologist (the world of the very large), Randall is Professor of Theoretical Physics at Harvard University. Her contributions to the world of science include half of the Randall-Sundrum model which is at the forefront of bringing the two worlds or particles and cosmology together.

Randall’s work has improved our understanding of the standard model of particle physics, supersymmetry, baryogenesis, cosmological inflation, and dark matter. Her research explores extra dimensions of space with her current focus being dark matter searches and the Large Hadron Collider. Randall’s studies have made her among the most cited and influential theoretical physicists and she has received numerous awards and honours for her scientific endeavours.

Anthony Grayling and an audience of Physics students from around the world ask her about the Higgs Boson, fields and membranes, matter, anti-matter and black holes.

Lisa Randall - Professor Of Physics2013021620130217 (WS)

What is the God particle? Is that the best name for it? Lisa Randall answers this and other questions about the nature of reality, posed by physics students around the world.

Both a celebrated particle physicist – (the world of the very small) and a cosmologist (the world of the very large), Randall is Professor of Theoretical Physics at Harvard University. Her contributions to the world of science include half of the Randall-Sundrum model which is at the forefront of bringing the two worlds or particles and cosmology together.

Randall’s work has improved our understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics, supersymmetry, baryogenesis, cosmological inflation, and dark matter. Her research explores extra dimensions of space with her current focus being dark matter searches and the Large Hadron Collider. Randall’s studies have made her among the most cited and influential theoretical physicists and she has received numerous awards and honours for her scientific endeavours.

Anthony Grayling and an audience of sixth form Physics students from around the world asked her about the Higgs Boson, fields and membranes, matter, anti-matter and black holes.

Both a celebrated particle physicist (the world of the very small) and a cosmologist (the world of the very large), Randall is Professor of Theoretical Physics at Harvard University. Her contributions to the world of science include half of the Randall-Sundrum model which is at the forefront of bringing the two worlds or particles and cosmology together.

Anthony Grayling and an audience of Physics students from around the world ask her about the Higgs Boson, fields and membranes, matter, anti-matter and black holes.

How many dimensions did the big bang bang?

Robert Langer - Biochemical Engineer2013012620130127 (WS)

What treatments are in the pipeline from the realm of medical tissue engineering?

Philosopher AC Grayling and a public audience question the world's leading scientists about the impact and importance of their work for this year's Exchanges at the Frontier.

Robert Langer heads an extraordinary biochemical laboratory. He and his team have developed treatments which are in use in every major hospital in the world including locally delivered chemotherapy, artificially-generated human tissue, tumour growth restrictors and gel that fixes damaged vocal chords.

Langer is a founding father of tissue engineering and controlled drug release and is unusual as an academic in that his discoveries have led to him hold over 800 patents, found 25 companies and license his technology to 250 more.

Anthony Grayling and an audience drawn from the world of biochemistry put questions to Langer and asked him about his unique approach to the challenges that illness poses and the life-saving devices he has in the pipeline.

Robert Langer is David H Koch Institute Professor at MIT, USA. Last year Langer won the Joseph Priestly prize for chemistry, and in 2002 he won the Charles Draper Award – considered the Nobel Prize for engineering, both pursuits which are traditionally a long way from medicine where he has made his indelible mark.

(Image: AC Grayling (left) and Robert Langer (right), Credit: Justin Knight)

Robert Langer - Biochemical Engineer2013012620130127 (WS)

What treatments are in the pipeline from the realm of medical tissue engineering?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Philosopher AC Grayling and a public audience question the world's leading scientists about the impact and importance of their work for this year's Exchanges at the Frontier.

Robert Langer heads an extraordinary biochemical laboratory. He and his team have developed treatments which are in use in every major hospital in the world including locally delivered chemotherapy, artificially-generated human tissue, tumour growth restrictors and gel that fixes damaged vocal chords.

Langer is a founding father of tissue engineering and controlled drug release and is unusual as an academic in that his discoveries have led to him hold over 800 patents, found 25 companies and license his technology to 250 more.

Anthony Grayling and an audience drawn from the world of biochemistry put questions to Langer and asked him about his unique approach to the challenges that illness poses and the life-saving devices he has in the pipeline.

Robert Langer is David H Koch Institute Professor at MIT, USA. Last year Langer won the Joseph Priestly prize for chemistry, and in 2002 he won the Charles Draper Award – considered the Nobel Prize for engineering, both pursuits which are traditionally a long way from medicine where he has made his indelible mark.

(Image: AC Grayling (left) and Robert Langer (right), Credit: Justin Knight)

Robert Langer - Biochemical Engineer20130126

What treatments are in the pipeline from the realm of medical tissue engineering?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Philosopher AC Grayling and a public audience question the world's leading scientists about the impact and importance of their work for this year's Exchanges at the Frontier.

Robert Langer heads an extraordinary biochemical laboratory. He and his team have developed treatments which are in use in every major hospital in the world including locally delivered chemotherapy, artificially-generated human tissue, tumour growth restrictors and gel that fixes damaged vocal chords.

Langer is a founding father of tissue engineering and controlled drug release and is unusual as an academic in that his discoveries have led to him hold over 800 patents, found 25 companies and license his technology to 250 more.

Anthony Grayling and an audience drawn from the world of biochemistry put questions to Langer and asked him about his unique approach to the challenges that illness poses and the life-saving devices he has in the pipeline.

Robert Langer is David H Koch Institute Professor at MIT, USA. Last year Langer won the Joseph Priestly prize for chemistry, and in 2002 he won the Charles Draper Award – considered the Nobel Prize for engineering, both pursuits which are traditionally a long way from medicine where he has made his indelible mark.

(Image: AC Grayling (left) and Robert Langer (right), Credit: Justin Knight)

Robert Langer - Biochemical Engineer2013012620130127 (WS)

What treatments are in the pipeline from the realm of medical tissue engineering?

Philosopher AC Grayling and a public audience question the world's leading scientists about the impact and importance of their work for this year's Exchanges at the Frontier.

Robert Langer heads an extraordinary biochemical laboratory. He and his team have developed treatments which are in use in every major hospital in the world including locally delivered chemotherapy, artificially-generated human tissue, tumour growth restrictors and gel that fixes damaged vocal chords.

Langer is a founding father of tissue engineering and controlled drug release and is unusual as an academic in that his discoveries have led to him hold over 800 patents, found 25 companies and license his technology to 250 more.

Anthony Grayling and an audience drawn from the world of biochemistry put questions to Langer and asked him about his unique approach to the challenges that illness poses and the life-saving devices he has in the pipeline.

Robert Langer is David H Koch Institute Professor at MIT, USA. Last year Langer won the Joseph Priestly prize for chemistry, and in 2002 he won the Charles Draper Award – considered the Nobel Prize for engineering, both pursuits which are traditionally a long way from medicine where he has made his indelible mark.

(Image: AC Grayling (left) and Robert Langer (right), Credit: Justin Knight)

Supermassive Black Holes and the Evolution of Galaxies20160305

Supermassive Black Holes and the Evolution of Galaxies2016030520160306 (WS)

A once in 10,000 year event gave astrophysicist Thaisa Storchi Bergman her eureka moment

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Black holes are intriguing and mysterious objects in space from which no light can escape. The existence of black holes or dark stars was first hinted at in the 18th Century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace.
Their theories were abandoned and its only comparatively recently that scientists have been able to study them and appreciate the importance of black holes in the formation of galaxies.

Situated at the peak of the Cerro Pachon Mountain in the Chilean Andes is the Gemini South Observatory and from there astrophysicist professor Thaisa Storchi Bergmann investigates super-massive black holes and their host galaxies, the building blocks of the Universe.

Based at Brazil’s Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul professor Storchi Bergmann has dedicated her career to the study of super-massive black holes and their role in the evolution of galaxies. As she tells Tom Service her eureka moment came when she saw the signs of a star falling into a black hole in a galaxy 20 million light years away, an event predicted to happen only once every 10,000 years.

(Photo: Evidence of Black Holes, Credit: Nasa)

Supermassive Black Holes and the Evolution of Galaxies20160305

A once in 10,000 year event gave astrophysicist Thaisa Storchi Bergman her eureka moment

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Black holes are intriguing and mysterious objects in space from which no light can escape. The existence of black holes or dark stars was first hinted at in the 18th Century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace.
Their theories were abandoned and its only comparatively recently that scientists have been able to study them and appreciate the importance of black holes in the formation of galaxies.

Situated at the peak of the Cerro Pachon Mountain in the Chilean Andes is the Gemini South Observatory and from there astrophysicist professor Thaisa Storchi Bergmann investigates super-massive black holes and their host galaxies, the building blocks of the Universe.

Based at Brazil’s Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul professor Storchi Bergmann has dedicated her career to the study of super-massive black holes and their role in the evolution of galaxies. As she tells Tom Service her eureka moment came when she saw the signs of a star falling into a black hole in a galaxy 20 million light years away, an event predicted to happen only once every 10,000 years.

(Photo: Evidence of Black Holes, Credit: Nasa)

Supermassive Black Holes and the Evolution of Galaxies2016030520160306 (WS)

A once in 10,000 year event gave astrophysicist Thaisa Storchi Bergman her eureka moment

Supermassive Black Holes and the Evolution of Galaxies20160305

Black holes are intriguing and mysterious objects in space from which no light can escape. The existence of black holes or dark stars was first hinted at in the 18th Century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace.

Their theories were abandoned and its only comparatively recently that scientists have been able to study them and appreciate the importance of black holes in the formation of galaxies.

Situated at the peak of the Cerro Pachon Mountain in the Chilean Andes is the Gemini South Observatory and from there astrophysicist professor Thaisa Storchi Bergmann investigates super-massive black holes and their host galaxies, the building blocks of the Universe.

Based at Brazil’s Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul professor Storchi Bergmann has dedicated her career to the study of super-massive black holes and their role in the evolution of galaxies. As she tells Tom Service her eureka moment came when she saw the signs of a star falling into a black hole in a galaxy 20 million light years away, an event predicted to happen only once every 10,000 years.

(Photo: Evidence of Black Holes, Credit: Nasa)

Supermassive Black Holes And The Evolution Of Galaxies2016030520160306 (WS)

Black holes are intriguing and mysterious objects in space from which no light can escape. The existence of black holes or dark stars was first hinted at in the 18th Century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace.

Their theories were abandoned and its only comparatively recently that scientists have been able to study them and appreciate the importance of black holes in the formation of galaxies.

Situated at the peak of the Cerro Pachon Mountain in the Chilean Andes is the Gemini South Observatory and from there astrophysicist professor Thaisa Storchi Bergmann investigates super-massive black holes and their host galaxies, the building blocks of the Universe.

Based at Brazil’s Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul professor Storchi Bergmann has dedicated her career to the study of super-massive black holes and their role in the evolution of galaxies. As she tells Tom Service her eureka moment came when she saw the signs of a star falling into a black hole in a galaxy 20 million light years away, an event predicted to happen only once every 10,000 years.

(Photo: Evidence of Black Holes, Credit: Nasa)

A once in 10,000 year event gave astrophysicist Thaisa Storchi Bergman her eureka moment

The Search for Hunger Genes20160220

The Search for Hunger Genes20160220

Most people tend to overeat given a generous supply of appetising food, but some don’t put on weight while others do. Sadaaf Farooqi, professor of Metabolism and Medicine at Cambridge investigates the genetics of obesity, the brain’s response to food and how hormones influence metabolism and weight. Many myths surrounding weight gain such as a slow metabolism or, it’s my genes doctor, turn out to be true.

So should we be more compassionate to people who struggle with their weight?

In front of an audience of London Sixth formers at the Wellcome Collection she tells Claudia Hammond how only eating an extra slice of cucumber per day could cause an increase in weight.

(Photo: Statue to illustrate obesity - I Cannot Help the Way I Feel by John Isaacs. Credit: Wellcome Collection)

The Search for Hunger Genes2016022020160221 (WS)

Professor Sadaf Farooqi looks at why some people put on weight and others don\u2019t

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Most people tend to overeat given a generous supply of appetising food, but some don’t put on weight while others do. Sadaaf Farooqi, professor of Metabolism and Medicine at Cambridge investigates the genetics of obesity, the brain’s response to food and how hormones influence metabolism and weight. Many myths surrounding weight gain such as a slow metabolism or, it’s my genes doctor, turn out to be true.

So should we be more compassionate to people who struggle with their weight?

In front of an audience of London Sixth formers at the Wellcome Collection she tells Claudia Hammond how only eating an extra slice of cucumber per day could cause an increase in weight.

(Photo: Statue to illustrate obesity - I Cannot Help the Way I Feel by John Isaacs. Credit: Wellcome Collection)

The Search for Hunger Genes20160220

Professor Sadaf Farooqi looks at why some people put on weight and others don\u2019t

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Most people tend to overeat given a generous supply of appetising food, but some don’t put on weight while others do. Sadaaf Farooqi, professor of Metabolism and Medicine at Cambridge investigates the genetics of obesity, the brain’s response to food and how hormones influence metabolism and weight. Many myths surrounding weight gain such as a slow metabolism or, it’s my genes doctor, turn out to be true.

So should we be more compassionate to people who struggle with their weight?

In front of an audience of London Sixth formers at the Wellcome Collection she tells Claudia Hammond how only eating an extra slice of cucumber per day could cause an increase in weight.

(Photo: Statue to illustrate obesity - I Cannot Help the Way I Feel by John Isaacs. Credit: Wellcome Collection)

The Search For Hunger Genes2016022020160221 (WS)

Professor Sadaf Farooqi looks at why some people put on weight and others don’t

Most people tend to overeat given a generous supply of appetising food, but some don’t put on weight while others do. Sadaaf Farooqi, professor of Metabolism and Medicine at Cambridge investigates the genetics of obesity, the brain’s response to food and how hormones influence metabolism and weight. Many myths surrounding weight gain such as a slow metabolism or, it’s my genes doctor, turn out to be true.

So should we be more compassionate to people who struggle with their weight?

In front of an audience of London Sixth formers at the Wellcome Collection she tells Claudia Hammond how only eating an extra slice of cucumber per day could cause an increase in weight.

(Photo: Statue to illustrate obesity - I Cannot Help the Way I Feel by John Isaacs. Credit: Wellcome Collection)

The Search for Hunger Genes2016022020160221 (WS)

Professor Sadaf Farooqi looks at why some people put on weight and others don’t

The Search for Neanderthal Genes20160312

The Search for Neanderthal Genes2016031220160313 (WS)

How much of a Neanderthal are you? Svante Paabo reveals the secrets of our genes

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

What does the DNA of our closest ancestors tell us about ourselves? Professor Svante Paabo is director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and he tells Robin Ince about being one of the first people in the world to start looking at ancient DNA. From his early work with Egyptian mummies to his breath taking achievement of sequencing the genome of our nearest ancient relatives - the Neanderthals - he has changed how we think about ourselves. His current work is to understand why humans survived and Neanderthals became extinct. Professor Paabo and his team have found a comparatively small number of changes in the genes between us and Neanderthals including changes in the brain. Could these differences explain what makes us human.

(Photo: Skull of neanderthal man)

The Search for Neanderthal Genes20160312

How much of a Neanderthal are you? Svante Paabo reveals the secrets of our genes

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

What does the DNA of our closest ancestors tell us about ourselves? Professor Svante Paabo is director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and he tells Robin Ince about being one of the first people in the world to start looking at ancient DNA. From his early work with Egyptian mummies to his breath taking achievement of sequencing the genome of our nearest ancient relatives - the Neanderthals - he has changed how we think about ourselves. His current work is to understand why humans survived and Neanderthals became extinct. Professor Paabo and his team have found a comparatively small number of changes in the genes between us and Neanderthals including changes in the brain. Could these differences explain what makes us human.

(Photo: Skull of neanderthal man)

The Search for Neanderthal Genes2016031220160313 (WS)

How much of a Neanderthal are you? Svante Paabo reveals the secrets of our genes

The Search for Neanderthal Genes20160312

What does the DNA of our closest ancestors tell us about ourselves? Professor Svante Paabo is director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and he tells Robin Ince about being one of the first people in the world to start looking at ancient DNA. From his early work with Egyptian mummies to his breath taking achievement of sequencing the genome of our nearest ancient relatives - the Neanderthals - he has changed how we think about ourselves. His current work is to understand why humans survived and Neanderthals became extinct. Professor Paabo and his team have found a comparatively small number of changes in the genes between us and Neanderthals including changes in the brain. Could these differences explain what makes us human.

(Photo: Skull of neanderthal man)

The Search For Neanderthal Genes2016031220160313 (WS)

What does the DNA of our closest ancestors tell us about ourselves? Professor Svante Paabo is director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and he tells Robin Ince about being one of the first people in the world to start looking at ancient DNA. From his early work with Egyptian mummies to his breath taking achievement of sequencing the genome of our nearest ancient relatives - the Neanderthals - he has changed how we think about ourselves. His current work is to understand why humans survived and Neanderthals became extinct. Professor Paabo and his team have found a comparatively small number of changes in the genes between us and Neanderthals including changes in the brain. Could these differences explain what makes us human.

(Photo: Skull of neanderthal man)

How much of a Neanderthal are you? Svante Paabo reveals the secrets of our genes

01Bonnie Bassler, Professor of Molecular Biology - Exchanges at the Frontier2014020820140209 (WS)

Can understanding of how bacteria communicate solve the problem of failing antibiotics?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Bonnie Bassler is the world specialist in how bacteria communicate within the human body. In a special edition of Exchanges At The Frontier she takes questions from children all over the world, and explains to A.C. Grayling and pupils at Haverstock School in London that her breakthrough in understanding how bacteria communicate holds the key to solving the problem of failing antibiotics.

(Picture: Bonnie Bassler. Credit: Wellcome Library, London)

01Bonnie Bassler, Professor of Molecular Biology - Exchanges at the Frontier20140208

Can understanding of how bacteria communicate solve the problem of failing antibiotics?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Bonnie Bassler is the world specialist in how bacteria communicate within the human body. In a special edition of Exchanges At The Frontier she takes questions from children all over the world, and explains to A.C. Grayling and pupils at Haverstock School in London that her breakthrough in understanding how bacteria communicate holds the key to solving the problem of failing antibiotics.

(Picture: Bonnie Bassler. Credit: Wellcome Library, London)

01Exchanges At The Frontier2014020820140209 (WS)

AC Grayling speaks to Bonnie Bassler, the world specialist in how bacteria communicate...

AC Grayling speaks to Bonnie Bassler, the world specialist in how bacteria communicate within the human body.

01Exchanges At The Frontier2014020820140209 (WS)

AC Grayling speaks to Bonnie Bassler, the world specialist in how bacteria communicate within the human body.

AC Grayling speaks to Bonnie Bassler, the world specialist in how bacteria communicate...

01Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Sir Paul Nurse20111126
01Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Sir Paul Nurse20111126

Sir Paul Nurse is a Nobel Prize-winning cell biologist and the new President of The Royal Society, the oldest science establishment in the world.

He is a trail-blazing geneticist as well as director of the new Francis Crick Institute, set to be the world's biggest biomedical research centre when it opens in London in 2015.

Join him in conversation about the cell cycle, trying to cure cancer and his thoughts for the future of science.

AC Grayling in conversation with Sir Paul Nurse, a Nobel Prize-winning cell biologist

01Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Sir Paul Nurse20111127
01Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Sir Paul Nurse20111127

AC Grayling in conversation with Sir Paul Nurse, a Nobel Prize-winning cell biologist

01Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Sir Paul Nurse20111126

Sir Paul Nurse is a Nobel Prize-winning cell biologist and the new President of The Royal Society, the oldest science establishment in the world.

He is a trail-blazing geneticist as well as director of the new Francis Crick Institute, set to be the world's biggest biomedical research centre when it opens in London in 2015.

Join him in conversation about the cell cycle, trying to cure cancer and his thoughts for the future of science.

AC Grayling in conversation with Sir Paul Nurse, a Nobel Prize-winning cell biologist

01Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Sir Paul Nurse20111127

AC Grayling in conversation with Sir Paul Nurse, a Nobel Prize-winning cell biologist

01Genomics - Exchanges at the Frontier2015011720150118 (WS)

Prof Nazneen Rahman and her search for genes that can cause cancer

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Nazneen Rahman works as a doctor and a researcher searching for genes that can cause cancer. Her work identifying genetic mutations has led to new more effective treatments being developed. Philosopher professor A.C. Grayling investigates the ethical considerations and the future of gene testing in front of an audience of students from Brazil, Ghana and the UK, who all put their questions to Nazneen.

Thanks to teachers and pupils of Aburi Girls Senior High School, Ghana, Colegio Bandeirantes, São Paulo, Brazil and from London, the City and Islington Sixth Form, Ibstock School, Hammersmith Academy, London Oratory School, Kingston Grammar School, Camden School for Girls, North London Collegiate School, Francis Holland School and Henrietta Barnet for taking part.

(Photo: Nazneen Rahman)

01Genomics - Exchanges at the Frontier20150117

Prof Nazneen Rahman and her search for genes that can cause cancer

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Nazneen Rahman works as a doctor and a researcher searching for genes that can cause cancer. Her work identifying genetic mutations has led to new more effective treatments being developed. Philosopher professor A.C. Grayling investigates the ethical considerations and the future of gene testing in front of an audience of students from Brazil, Ghana and the UK, who all put their questions to Nazneen.

Thanks to teachers and pupils of Aburi Girls Senior High School, Ghana, Colegio Bandeirantes, São Paulo, Brazil and from London, the City and Islington Sixth Form, Ibstock School, Hammersmith Academy, London Oratory School, Kingston Grammar School, Camden School for Girls, North London Collegiate School, Francis Holland School and Henrietta Barnet for taking part.

(Photo: Nazneen Rahman)

02Exchanges At The Frontier2014021520140216 (WS)

AC Grayling speaks to Henry Markram, who is building a super computer which will virtua...

AC Grayling speaks to Henry Markram, who is building a super computer which will virtually replicate the human brain.

02Exchanges At The Frontier2014021520140216 (WS)

AC Grayling speaks to Henry Markram, who is building a super computer which will virtually replicate the human brain.

AC Grayling speaks to Henry Markram, who is building a super computer which will virtua...

02Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Vilayanur Ramachandran20111203

Vilayanur Ramachandran has been called the Marco Polo of neuroscience.

How do you cure excruciating pain in a limb that no longer exits?

Professor Ramachandran's extraordinary low tech solutions have completely alleviated phantom limb pain for many people and present possibilities for the treatment of conditions like autism.

He is the Director of the Center for Brain and Cognition at the University of California, San Diego.

Join him in conversation as he demonstrates some of the simple experiments which reveal hidden truths about all of our brains.

(Image: Human brain held inside a room in a brain bank. Credit: Science Photo Library)

AC Grayling in conversation with Vilayanur Ramachandran, the 'Marco Polo' of neuroscience

02Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Vilayanur Ramachandran20111203

Vilayanur Ramachandran has been called the Marco Polo of neuroscience.

How do you cure excruciating pain in a limb that no longer exits?

Professor Ramachandran's extraordinary low tech solutions have completely alleviated phantom limb pain for many people and present possibilities for the treatment of conditions like autism.

He is the Director of the Center for Brain and Cognition at the University of California, San Diego.

Join him in conversation as he demonstrates some of the simple experiments which reveal hidden truths about all of our brains.

(Image: Human brain held inside a room in a brain bank.

Credit: Science Photo Library)

AC Grayling in conversation with Vilayanur Ramachandran, the 'Marco Polo' of neuroscience

02Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Vilayanur Ramachandran20111204
02Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Vilayanur Ramachandran20111204

AC Grayling in conversation with Vilayanur Ramachandran, the 'Marco Polo' of neuroscience

02Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Vilayanur Ramachandran20111203

Vilayanur Ramachandran has been called the Marco Polo of neuroscience.

How do you cure excruciating pain in a limb that no longer exits?

Professor Ramachandran's extraordinary low tech solutions have completely alleviated phantom limb pain for many people and present possibilities for the treatment of conditions like autism.

He is the Director of the Center for Brain and Cognition at the University of California, San Diego.

Join him in conversation as he demonstrates some of the simple experiments which reveal hidden truths about all of our brains.

(Image: Human brain held inside a room in a brain bank.

Credit: Science Photo Library)

AC Grayling in conversation with Vilayanur Ramachandran, the 'Marco Polo' of neuroscience

02Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Vilayanur Ramachandran20111204

AC Grayling in conversation with Vilayanur Ramachandran, the 'Marco Polo' of neuroscience

02Henry Markram, Director of the Human Brain Project - Exchanges at the Frontier2014021520140216 (WS)

Building a super computer which will virtually replicate the human brain

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Henry Markram has received the biggest personal grant in the history of science. He has a billion euros to build a super computer which will replicate the human brain. Within ten years, the Human Brain Project expects to have recreated every neuron of the brain so that existing brain research can be brought together in one model.

Professor Markram tells AC Grayling and an audience at Wellcome Collection in London how the virtual brain will reveal the mental experience of illness and will revolutionise the treatment of neurological disorders.

(Picture: Henry Markram. Credit: Wellcome Library, London)

02Henry Markram, Director of the Human Brain Project - Exchanges at the Frontier20140215

Building a super computer which will virtually replicate the human brain

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Henry Markram has received the biggest personal grant in the history of science. He has a billion euros to build a super computer which will replicate the human brain. Within ten years, the Human Brain Project expects to have recreated every neuron of the brain so that existing brain research can be brought together in one model.

Professor Markram tells AC Grayling and an audience at Wellcome Collection in London how the virtual brain will reveal the mental experience of illness and will revolutionise the treatment of neurological disorders.

(Picture: Henry Markram. Credit: Wellcome Library, London)

02Robotics - Exchanges at the Frontier2015012420150125 (WS)

Nasa engineer Ashitey Trebi-Ollenu explains how to drive a robot on Mars

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Nasa Engineer Ashitey Trebi-Ollennu designs the robotic arms on the Mars Rovers. He tells Claudia Hammond how to drive a robot on Mars, what findings from the Mars Landers which have surprised him the most and discusses whether we will ever be able to live on Mars. He has worked on many of the Mars missions including Phoenix and Curiosity and is now focussing on the Insight mission. This will launch in 2016 and for the first time will be able to drill into the crust of the Red Planet with the aim of revealing how terrestrial planets are formed.

Mr Trebi-Ollennu founded the Ghana Robotics Academy Foundation dedicated to encouraging the next generation of students in Ghana to take part in science projects. Together with the audience at the Wellcome Collection he discusses the fact that despite engineering being a traditionally male dominated field, they have attracted a high proportion of girls onto their workshops.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
(Photo: Ashitey Trebi-Ollennu. Credit:BBC)

02Robotics - Exchanges at the Frontier20150124

Nasa engineer Ashitey Trebi-Ollenu explains how to drive a robot on Mars

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Nasa Engineer Ashitey Trebi-Ollennu designs the robotic arms on the Mars Rovers. He tells Claudia Hammond how to drive a robot on Mars, what findings from the Mars Landers which have surprised him the most and discusses whether we will ever be able to live on Mars. He has worked on many of the Mars missions including Phoenix and Curiosity and is now focussing on the Insight mission. This will launch in 2016 and for the first time will be able to drill into the crust of the Red Planet with the aim of revealing how terrestrial planets are formed.

Mr Trebi-Ollennu founded the Ghana Robotics Academy Foundation dedicated to encouraging the next generation of students in Ghana to take part in science projects. Together with the audience at the Wellcome Collection he discusses the fact that despite engineering being a traditionally male dominated field, they have attracted a high proportion of girls onto their workshops.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
(Photo: Ashitey Trebi-Ollennu. Credit:BBC)

03Exchanges At The Frontier2014022220140223 (WS)

Matthew Sweet speaks to Iain Couzin, a specialist in collective animal behaviour.

Matthew Sweet speaks to Iain Couzin, a specialist in collective animal behaviour, about dealing with locusts destroying crops.

03Exchanges At The Frontier2014022220140223 (WS)

Matthew Sweet speaks to Iain Couzin, a specialist in collective animal behaviour.

Matthew Sweet speaks to Iain Couzin, a specialist in collective animal behaviour, about dealing with locusts destroying crops.

03Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Valerie Mizrahi20111210

Valerie Mizrahi is the Director of the Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine at the University of Cape Town, where she has done ground-breaking work on tuberculosis.

It was once thought to be almost eradicated but now it is estimated that a third of the world's population is infected with TB.

It is the biggest killer amongst HIV positive people, claiming nearly two million lives every year.

With its links to Aids it is a controversial subject in South Africa, where Professor Mizrahi pioneers work on HIV and TB.

Join her in conversation AC Grayling, about her zeal for medical research and her determination to bring life saving innovations to the developing world.

(Image: Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. Credit: Science Photo Library)

AC Grayling in conversation with Valerie Mizrahi, who has done ground-breaking work on TB.

03Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Valerie Mizrahi20111210

Valerie Mizrahi is the Director of the Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine at the University of Cape Town, where she has done ground-breaking work on tuberculosis.

It was once thought to be almost eradicated but now it is estimated that a third of the world's population is infected with TB.

It is the biggest killer amongst HIV positive people, claiming nearly two million lives every year.

With its links to Aids it is a controversial subject in South Africa, where Professor Mizrahi pioneers work on HIV and TB.

Join her in conversation AC Grayling, about her zeal for medical research and her determination to bring life saving innovations to the developing world.

(Image: Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria.

Credit: Science Photo Library)

AC Grayling in conversation with Valerie Mizrahi, who has done ground-breaking work on TB.

03Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Valerie Mizrahi20111211
03Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Valerie Mizrahi20111211

AC Grayling in conversation with Valerie Mizrahi, who has done ground-breaking work on TB.

03Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Valerie Mizrahi20111210

Valerie Mizrahi is the Director of the Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine at the University of Cape Town, where she has done ground-breaking work on tuberculosis.

It was once thought to be almost eradicated but now it is estimated that a third of the world's population is infected with TB.

It is the biggest killer amongst HIV positive people, claiming nearly two million lives every year.

With its links to Aids it is a controversial subject in South Africa, where Professor Mizrahi pioneers work on HIV and TB.

Join her in conversation AC Grayling, about her zeal for medical research and her determination to bring life saving innovations to the developing world.

(Image: Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria.

Credit: Science Photo Library)

AC Grayling in conversation with Valerie Mizrahi, who has done ground-breaking work on TB.

03Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Valerie Mizrahi20111211

AC Grayling in conversation with Valerie Mizrahi, who has done ground-breaking work on TB.

03Iain Couzin - Collective Animal Behaviour - Exchanges at the Frontier2014022220140223 (WS)

Why do fish shoal, birds flock and locusts swarm?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Fish shoal, birds flock and locusts swarm. Professor Iain Couzin has discovered the secret of why locusts form such enormous devastating swarms. He has also researched how the traffic systems of ants are so much more efficient than ours, and why humans behave the way they do in crowds. He talks to Matthew Sweet and an audience at the Wellcome Collection about what we can learn from the collective behaviour of animals.

(Picture courtesy of Iain Couzin)

03Iain Couzin - Collective Animal Behaviour - Exchanges at the Frontier20140222

Why do fish shoal, birds flock and locusts swarm?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Fish shoal, birds flock and locusts swarm. Professor Iain Couzin has discovered the secret of why locusts form such enormous devastating swarms. He has also researched how the traffic systems of ants are so much more efficient than ours, and why humans behave the way they do in crowds. He talks to Matthew Sweet and an audience at the Wellcome Collection about what we can learn from the collective behaviour of animals.

(Picture courtesy of Iain Couzin)

03Saving Coral - Exchanges at the Frontier2015013120150201 (WS)

Marine Biologist Mary Hagedorn has an innovative plan to save the coral reefs

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Can the coral reefs be saved? Marine biologist Mary Hagedorn of the Smithsonian Institute in the United States is developing an innovative conservation technique that harnesses human in vitro fertilisation techniques, fishing nets and kayaks.

The world’s coral reefs could become extinct within the next 50 years as the oceans become warmer and more acidified. Local fishing and farming methods in many parts of the world also add to the threats to the health of the reef. Without coral reefs the worlds fish stocks will fall which will have economic and social consequences.

In order to save genetic material for future generations Mary Hagedorn tells Claudia Hammond about progress in cryopreservation for coral sperm, eggs and embryos and the challenges in reseeding the ocean, and the possibility of storing the coral bank in space.

(Photo: Coral. Credit: Rebecca Spindler)

03Saving Coral - Exchanges at the Frontier20150131

Marine Biologist Mary Hagedorn has an innovative plan to save the coral reefs

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Can the coral reefs be saved? Marine biologist Mary Hagedorn of the Smithsonian Institute in the United States is developing an innovative conservation technique that harnesses human in vitro fertilisation techniques, fishing nets and kayaks.

The world’s coral reefs could become extinct within the next 50 years as the oceans become warmer and more acidified. Local fishing and farming methods in many parts of the world also add to the threats to the health of the reef. Without coral reefs the worlds fish stocks will fall which will have economic and social consequences.

In order to save genetic material for future generations Mary Hagedorn tells Claudia Hammond about progress in cryopreservation for coral sperm, eggs and embryos and the challenges in reseeding the ocean, and the possibility of storing the coral bank in space.

(Photo: Coral. Credit: Rebecca Spindler)

04Emotion of Decision Making - Exchanges at the Frontier2015020720150208 (WS)

Does emotion influence decision-making and do we make worse decisions as we get older?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

How does emotion influence decision-making? Prof Ray Dolan explains to AC Grayling how we don’t necessarily get wiser as we get older and asks whether drugs can restore our ability to think clearly.

Prof Dolan is the Mary Kinross Professor of Neuropsychiatry at University College, London, and Director of its Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging. A pioneer in the neuroscience of decision-making, he investigates the structures in the brain involved in decision-making, using advanced techniques of neuroimaging and behavioural analysis.

Image Credit: Cerebral cortex of a brainbow mouse. Getty Images

04Emotion of Decision Making - Exchanges at the Frontier20150207

Does emotion influence decision-making and do we make worse decisions as we get older?

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

How does emotion influence decision-making? Prof Ray Dolan explains to AC Grayling how we don’t necessarily get wiser as we get older and asks whether drugs can restore our ability to think clearly.

Prof Dolan is the Mary Kinross Professor of Neuropsychiatry at University College, London, and Director of its Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging. A pioneer in the neuroscience of decision-making, he investigates the structures in the brain involved in decision-making, using advanced techniques of neuroimaging and behavioural analysis.

Image Credit: Cerebral cortex of a brainbow mouse. Getty Images

04Exchanges At The Frontier 201120111217
04Exchanges At The Frontier 201120111217

Some of the world's leading scientists are quizzed on the impact of their work by the philosopher Anthony Grayling.

Some of the world's leading scientists are quizzed on the impact of their work by the p.

04Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Gebisa Ejeta20111218

Gebisa Ejeta is an Ethiopian born award-winning plant scientist working on drought-resistant crops in Africa.

He has experienced hunger first hand during his childhood in Ethiopia and is now an advisor to President Barrack Obama as well as a being World Food Prize Laureate and Distinguished Professor at Purdue University, USA.

Join him in conversation about addressing the food crisis in Horn of Africa and abolishing famine world wide.

(Image: A malnourished child in Somalia. Credit: Reuters)

AC Grayling in conversation with Gebisa Ejeta, can he help abolish famine world wide?

04Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Gebisa Ejeta20111218

Gebisa Ejeta is an Ethiopian born award-winning plant scientist working on drought-resistant crops in Africa.

He has experienced hunger first hand during his childhood in Ethiopia and is now an advisor to President Barrack Obama as well as a being World Food Prize Laureate and Distinguished Professor at Purdue University, USA.

Join him in conversation about addressing the food crisis in Horn of Africa and abolishing famine world wide.

(Image: A malnourished child in Somalia.

Credit: Reuters)

AC Grayling in conversation with Gebisa Ejeta, can he help abolish famine world wide?

04Exchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Gebisa Ejeta20111218

Gebisa Ejeta is an Ethiopian born award-winning plant scientist working on drought-resistant crops in Africa.

He has experienced hunger first hand during his childhood in Ethiopia and is now an advisor to President Barrack Obama as well as a being World Food Prize Laureate and Distinguished Professor at Purdue University, USA.

Join him in conversation about addressing the food crisis in Horn of Africa and abolishing famine world wide.

(Image: A malnourished child in Somalia.

Credit: Reuters)

AC Grayling in conversation with Gebisa Ejeta, can he help abolish famine world wide?

04Kay Redfield Jamison, Professor of Psychiatry - Exchanges at the Frontier2014030120140302 (WS)

Psychologist Kay Redfield Jamison on the disastrous highs and lows of bipolar disorder

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Kay Redfield Jamison is a clinical psychologist with a rare insight. She is a world leader in the study of bipolar (manic-depressive) illness, a condition that she herself has had since adolescence. As a highly regarded clinician with direct experience of the illness she treats, she has a special perspective on the debilitating nature of this psychiatric disorder and its seductive but disastrous highs, depressions and disordered thinking. She tells A.C.Grayling and an audience at Wellcome Collection in London about mania, creativity and the best medicine for an extraordinary condition.

04Kay Redfield Jamison, Professor of Psychiatry - Exchanges at the Frontier20140301

Psychologist Kay Redfield Jamison on the disastrous highs and lows of bipolar disorder

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Kay Redfield Jamison is a clinical psychologist with a rare insight. She is a world leader in the study of bipolar (manic-depressive) illness, a condition that she herself has had since adolescence. As a highly regarded clinician with direct experience of the illness she treats, she has a special perspective on the debilitating nature of this psychiatric disorder and its seductive but disastrous highs, depressions and disordered thinking. She tells A.C.Grayling and an audience at Wellcome Collection in London about mania, creativity and the best medicine for an extraordinary condition.

04 LASTExchanges At The Frontier2014030120140302 (WS)

Psychologist Kay Redfield Jamison on the disastrous highs and lows of bipolar disorder

Kay Redfield Jamison is a clinical psychologist with a rare insight. She is a world leader in the study of bipolar (manic-depressive) illness, a condition that she herself has had since adolescence. As a highly regarded clinician with direct experience of the illness she treats, she has a special perspective on the debilitating nature of this psychiatric disorder and its seductive but disastrous highs, depressions and disordered thinking. She tells A.C.Grayling and an audience at Wellcome Collection in London about mania, creativity and the best medicine for an extraordinary condition.

04 LASTExchanges At The Frontier2014030120140302 (WS)

Psychologist Kay Redfield Jamison on the disastrous highs and lows of bipolar disorder

Kay Redfield Jamison is a clinical psychologist with a rare insight. She is a world leader in the study of bipolar (manic-depressive) illness, a condition that she herself has had since adolescence. As a highly regarded clinician with direct experience of the illness she treats, she has a special perspective on the debilitating nature of this psychiatric disorder and its seductive but disastrous highs, depressions and disordered thinking. She tells A.C.Grayling and an audience at Wellcome Collection in London about mania, creativity and the best medicine for an extraordinary condition.

05Drug Resistant Malaria - Exchanges at the Frontier2015031420150315 (WS)

How do we halt the rise of drug resistant malaria? Nick White and Francois Nosten discuss

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Professors Francois Nosten and Nick White have worked for 30 years in Thailand treating patients with malaria and researching treatments. Exchanges at the Frontier travels to the Wangpha Clinic on the Thai-Myanmar border where presenter Gareth Mitchell and a local audience talk to professors Nosten and White about how they seized upon a relatively unknown herb from Chinese medicine, fought for years to have it accepted, only to see the disease begin to rise up against it.

With potentially millions of lives at stake – especially children and pregnant women in some of the world’s poorest places – they explain how they are now trying a controversial kill or cure plan to deploy their malaria-busting drug, not just to curb the disease but to eradicate it – village by village. If the early results are good, country by country, continent by continent.

(Photo: Presenter Gareth Mitchell. BBC copyright)

05Drug Resistant Malaria - Exchanges at the Frontier20150314

How do we halt the rise of drug resistant malaria? Nick White and Francois Nosten discuss

A public audience test the world's leading scientists over their work.

Professors Francois Nosten and Nick White have worked for 30 years in Thailand treating patients with malaria and researching treatments. Exchanges at the Frontier travels to the Wangpha Clinic on the Thai-Myanmar border where presenter Gareth Mitchell and a local audience talk to professors Nosten and White about how they seized upon a relatively unknown herb from Chinese medicine, fought for years to have it accepted, only to see the disease begin to rise up against it.

With potentially millions of lives at stake – especially children and pregnant women in some of the world’s poorest places – they explain how they are now trying a controversial kill or cure plan to deploy their malaria-busting drug, not just to curb the disease but to eradicate it – village by village. If the early results are good, country by country, continent by continent.

(Photo: Presenter Gareth Mitchell. BBC copyright)

05 LASTExchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Steven Pinker20111224

Steven Pinker is one of the world's leading authorities on language and the mind.

He is also Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology at Harvard University and the recipient of several major awards for his teaching, books, and scientific research.

Join him in discussion about language acquisition, the nature of the mind and the effect of evolution on the development of human society.

AC Grayling in conversation with Steven Pinker, a leading authority on language and mind

05 LASTExchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Steven Pinker20111224

Steven Pinker is one of the world's leading authorities on language and the mind.

He is also Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology at Harvard University and the recipient of several major awards for his teaching, books, and scientific research.

Join him in discussion about language acquisition, the nature of the mind and the effect of evolution on the development of human society.

AC Grayling in conversation with Steven Pinker, a leading authority on language and mind

05 LASTExchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Steven Pinker20111225
05 LASTExchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Steven Pinker20111224

Steven Pinker is one of the world's leading authorities on language and the mind.

He is also Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology at Harvard University and the recipient of several major awards for his teaching, books, and scientific research.

Join him in discussion about language acquisition, the nature of the mind and the effect of evolution on the development of human society.

AC Grayling in conversation with Steven Pinker, a leading authority on language and mind

05 LASTExchanges At The Frontier 2011, - Steven Pinker20111225

Steven Pinker is one of the world's leading authorities on language and the mind.

He is also Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology at Harvard University and the recipient of several major awards for his teaching, books, and scientific research.

Join him in discussion about language acquisition, the nature of the mind and the effect of evolution on the development of human society.

AC Grayling in conversation with Steven Pinker, a leading authority on language and mind