Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight

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0120170717

Novelist David Mitchell introduces this compelling book by a teenager with severe autism.

David Mitchell translates the astonishing follow-up to the ground-breaking THE REASON I JUMP. Naoki Higashida wrote his debut when he was 13 years old - all the more extraordinary since he has 'non-verbal' autism. He finds it difficult to speak, and wrote the entire book using a low-tech Alphabet Grid of Japanese syllables, which he points at one at a time to painstakingly build words. Naoki still uses the same method today.

When the award-winning author of Cloud Atlas David Mitchell, whose own son has autism, discovered Naoki's first book, he felt that for the first time his own son was talking to him about what was going on inside his head, through the words of the young author.

Now, in FALL DOWN SEVEN TIMES GET UP EIGHT, written mostly around the age of 18, we meet a clear-eyed young man learning to co-exist with a mind and body not always at his beck and call. The title of the book is borrowed from a Japanese proverb about the merits of persistence, and offers experience, advice, and hope.

Once again, Naoki pushes beyond the notion of autism as a disability, and shines a light on the autistic landscape from the inside.

Written by Naoki Higashida
Translated by David Mitchell and KA Yoshida
Read by Matthew Beard, and introduced by David Mitchell
Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.

David Mitchell translates the astonishing follow-up to the ground-breaking THE REASON I JUMP. Naoki Higashida wrote his debut when he was 13 years old - all the more extraordinary since he suffers from autism so severe that his condition is classed as 'non-verbal'. He finds it difficult to speak, and wrote the entire book using a low-tech Alphabet Grid of Japanese syllables, which he points at one at a time to painstakingly build words. Naoki still uses the same method today.

When the award-winning author of Cloud Atlas David Mitchell, whose own son has autism, discovered Naoki's first book, he felt that for the first time his own son was talking to him about what was going on inside his head, through the words of the young author.

Now, in FALL DOWN SEVEN TIMES GET UP EIGHT, written mostly around the age of 18, we meet a clear-eyed young man learning to co-exist with a mind and body not always at his beck and call. The title of the book is borrowed from a Japanese proverb about the merits of persistence, and offers experience, advice, and hope.

Once again, Naoki pushes beyond the notion of autism as a disability, and shines a light on the autistic landscape from the inside.

Written by Naoki Higashida
Translated by David Mitchell and KA Yoshida
Read by Matthew Beard, and introduced by David Mitchell
Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.

0120170717

Novelist David Mitchell introduces this compelling book by a teenager with severe autism.

David Mitchell translates the astonishing follow-up to the ground-breaking THE REASON I JUMP. Naoki Higashida wrote his debut when he was 13 years old - all the more extraordinary since he suffers from autism so severe that his condition is classed as 'non-verbal'. He finds it difficult to speak, and wrote the entire book using a low-tech Alphabet Grid of Japanese syllables, which he points at one at a time to painstakingly build words. Naoki still uses the same method today.

When the award-winning author of Cloud Atlas David Mitchell, whose own son has autism, discovered Naoki's first book, he felt that for the first time his own son was talking to him about what was going on inside his head, through the words of the young author.

Now, in FALL DOWN SEVEN TIMES GET UP EIGHT, written mostly around the age of 18, we meet a clear-eyed young man learning to co-exist with a mind and body not always at his beck and call. The title of the book is borrowed from a Japanese proverb about the merits of persistence, and offers experience, advice, and hope.

Once again, Naoki pushes beyond the notion of autism as a disability, and shines a light on the autistic landscape from the inside.

Written by Naoki Higashida
Translated by David Mitchell and KA Yoshida
Read by Matthew Beard, and introduced by David Mitchell
Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.

David Mitchell translates the astonishing follow-up to the ground-breaking THE REASON I JUMP. Naoki Higashida wrote his debut when he was 13 years old - all the more extraordinary since he has 'non-verbal' autism. He finds it difficult to speak, and wrote the entire book using a low-tech Alphabet Grid of Japanese syllables, which he points at one at a time to painstakingly build words. Naoki still uses the same method today.

When the award-winning author of Cloud Atlas David Mitchell, whose own son has autism, discovered Naoki's first book, he felt that for the first time his own son was talking to him about what was going on inside his head, through the words of the young author.

Now, in FALL DOWN SEVEN TIMES GET UP EIGHT, written mostly around the age of 18, we meet a clear-eyed young man learning to co-exist with a mind and body not always at his beck and call. The title of the book is borrowed from a Japanese proverb about the merits of persistence, and offers experience, advice, and hope.

Once again, Naoki pushes beyond the notion of autism as a disability, and shines a light on the autistic landscape from the inside.

Written by Naoki Higashida
Translated by David Mitchell and KA Yoshida
Read by Matthew Beard, and introduced by David Mitchell
Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.

0220170718

Novelist David Mitchell introduces this compelling book by a teenager with severe autism.

With remarkable insight and openness, Naoki Higashida describes the delight of being able to communicate with others, a rare joy for him, since his autism makes it difficult for him to speak easily, or access the words he would like to say.

Naoki describes spoken language as a blue sea, on which he sits alone, stuck in a tiny boat while others swim and play - and the wonder with which he experiences being able to communicate in writing, as a magic spell which allows him to dive deep beneath the waves of language, and then break the surface, and surprise everyone.

Most of this book was written around the age of eighteen, painstakingly, Japanese syllable by syllable, using a low-tech Alphabet Grid. And, from the Alphabet Grid of the insider, he reveals the pain of being non-verbal, and the depth of love and gratitude he feels for his family. Most compellingly, he reveals autism as simply a different way of being, and of seeing.

Written by Naoki Higashida
Translated by David Mitchell and KA Yoshida
Read by Matthew Beard and introduced by David Mitchell
Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.

0320170719

Novelist David Mitchell introduces this compelling book by a teenager with severe autism.

Naoki Higashida was thirteen before he understood the fact of his disability. His first book, written at that time, revealed a young boy with an astonishing internal life, full of wonder at the world, as well as sadness at the challenges of his condition.

Now, in FALL DOWN SEVEN TIMES, GET UP EIGHT, he looks back on his childhood with the eyes of a thoughtful young man. He describes how he couldn't, as a child, visualise a future for himself. Time's passage felt unending, like a swing he couldn't get off, while the scenery remained unchanging. Now, he has begun not only to inhabit, but also to imagine greater possibilities for his future in the neurotypical world.

Written by Naoki Higashida
Translated by David Mitchell and KA Yoshida
Read by Matthew Beard, and introduced by David Mitchell
Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.

0420170720

Novelist David Mitchell introduces this compelling book by a teenager with severe autism.

Naoki Higashida explores how he experiences the world as a young adult with autism. He describes the challenges he encounters as he attempts to fight the demands of his fixations. He wonders at the joy of hearing the laughter of his family, which he experiences as a bubble-like evanescence. Movingly, he explores how being 'non-verbal' can feel like the dark hours before dawn, and how the loneliness of not being able to hold a conversation with others can be at times overwhelming. Most compellingly, and simply, he explains how it's easier to like himself when he feels loved by others.

Written by Naoki Higashida
Translated by David Mitchell and KA Yoshida
Read by Matthew Beard, and introduced by David Mitchell
Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.

0520170721

Novelist David Mitchell introduces this compelling book by a teenager with severe autism.

Naoki reveals how, as a child, he used to dream of a version of himself without autism. In his imagination, if he could be as others were, all would be well in his world. Now, though he still yearns to pass as an 'ordinary' person, to walk through the world without being noticed and watched all the time, he has come to see that dream as a childhood illusion, and his autism as part of his true self.

While as a child he often wanted to vanish, now, as a young adult, Naoki feels happiest at the centre of his family. Even if he can't express his pleasure externally, these are his moments of greatest joy and belonging.

Written by Naoki Higashida
Translated by David Mitchell and KA Yoshida
Read by Matthew Beard, and introduced by David Mitchell
Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.