Finders Keepers [The Compass] [World Service]

Episodes

TitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
Finders Keepers: A House That Came Home2020121620201220 (WS)What chance do communities have of getting looted artefacts back, and what lessons do the world's museums need to learn? Stijn Schoonderwoerd and Wayne Modest describe how the Netherlands are trying to decolonise their museums. Maori elders Sir Hirini Moko Mead and judge Layne Harvey led a successful campaign for the return of a sacred tribal meeting house, stolen over a hundred years before - what can others learn from their experience?

What chance do communities have of getting looted artefacts back?

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

Finders Keepers: A Photograph, A Pipe And A Skull2020120220201206 (WS)Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe is no historical expert. A young Zambian who now lives in northern England, he hasn’t even set foot inside a museum since he was ten years old. All that changes when Kema learns about the movement to return stolen objects back to where they came from. Should these priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake?

Kema measures the scale of the problem on a visit to Newcastle’s Great North Museum. Curator JC Niala shares her experience of seeing a photograph of her grandfather on display in a Kenyan exhibition, and Kema’s father tells him about an ongoing dispute between Britain and Zambia.

Theme music composed by Kema Sikazwe aka Kema Kay

Programme produced by Scattered Pictures

Should priceless stolen objects that form part of history be returned to their origins?

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

Calls for the return of objects, looted from around the world are growing ever louder.

Are age old culture wars really about to end? Finders Keepers introduces the cultural activists who are taking matters, and sometimes statues, into their own hands.

Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe is no historical expert. This young Zambian who now lives in northern England, hasn’t even set foot inside a museum since he was ten years old. All that changes when Kema learns about the movement to return stolen objects back to where they came from.

Should these priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake? From his home in Newcastle, to London, Paris and Amsterdam, Kema talks to curators, campaigners and commentators at the heart of this cultural conflict.

Great museums and looted goods.

Finders Keepers: Great Museums And Looted Goods2020120920201213 (WS)Calls for the return of objects, looted from around the world are growing ever louder.

Are age old culture wars really about to end? Finders Keepers introduces the cultural activists who are taking matters, and sometimes statues, into their own hands.

Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe is no historical expert. This young Zambian who now lives in northern England, hasn’t even set foot inside a museum since he was ten years old. All that changes when Kema learns about the movement to return stolen objects back to where they came from.

Should these priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake? From his home in Newcastle, to London, Paris and Amsterdam, Kema talks to curators, campaigners and commentators at the heart of this cultural conflict.

Theme music composed by Kema Sikazwe aka Kema Kay

Programme produced by Scattered Pictures

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

Finders Keepers: Great Museums And Looted Goods2020121620201220 (WS)Calls for the return of objects, looted from around the world are growing ever louder.

Are age old culture wars really about to end? Finders Keepers introduces the cultural activists who are taking matters, and sometimes statues, into their own hands.

Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe is no historical expert. This young Zambian who now lives in northern England, hasn’t even set foot inside a museum since he was ten years old. All that changes when Kema learns about the movement to return stolen objects back to where they came from.

Should these priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake? From his home in Newcastle, to London, Paris and Amsterdam, Kema talks to curators, campaigners and commentators at the heart of this cultural conflict.

Theme music composed by Kema Sikazwe aka Kema Kay

Programme produced by Scattered Pictures

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

Finders Keepers: Icons And Empire2020120920201213 (WS)Calls for the return of objects, looted from around the world are growing ever louder. Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe travels to London to see the Broken Hill Skull at the Natural History Museum. At the launch of the Return of the Icons campaign, V&A director Tristram Hunt explains how he is responding to Ethiopia’s formal restitution claim. Children’s author, Kandace Chimbiri describes how her writing fills gaping historical hole and French art historian Didier Rykner is convinced that President Macron’s approach, is fundamentally flawed. Should priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake?

Theme music composed by Kema Sikazwe aka Kema Kay

(Photo: Presenter, Kema Sikazwe in front of the Broken Hill Skull (which Zambia is trying to have repatriated from the UK) at the Natural History Museum. Credit: Will Sadler)

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

Calls for the return of objects, looted from around the world are growing ever louder. Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe travels to London to see the Broken Hill Skull at the Natural History Museum. At the launch of the Return of the Icons campaign, V&A director Tristram Hunt explains how he is responding to Ethiopia’s formal restitution claim. Children’s author, Kandace Chimbiri describes how her writing fills gaping historical hole and French art historian Didier Rykner is convinced that President Macron’s approach, is fundamentally flawed. Should priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake?

Calls for the return of objects, looted from around the world are growing ever louder. Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe travels to London to see the Broken Hill Skull at the Natural History Museum. At the launch of the Return of the Icons campaign, V&A director Tristram Hunt explains how he is responding to Ethiopia’s formal restitution claim. Children’s author, Kandace Chimbiri describes how her writing fills gaping historical hole and French art historian Didier Rykner is convinced that President Macron’s approach, is fundamentally flawed. Should priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake?