First Ladies Of Fleet Street

Episodes

TitleFirst
Broadcast
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With Ann Leslie, Rachel Sylvester, Jayne Fincher and Cathy Newman20181213

Fleet Street’s always been seen as the domain of men, whether they be newspaper magnates, editors, publishers, journalists, photographers or news boys!
Well, for every famous man there’s at least one woman who can stand up and be counted amongst them. The likes of Rachel Beer, editor-in-chief of The Observer and The Sunday Times; the first ‘glossy’ style magazine Queen, the brainchild of Mrs Beeton no less; the first British daily newspaper The Daily Courant, created by Elizabeth Mallett.

Independent, strong-minded women who achieved much in this ‘man’s world,’ paving the way for future generations of women in Fleet Street.
To help celebrate the 100th anniversary of female suffrage in 2018, Nina Myskow explores and celebrates the contribution made by female journalists, columnists, photographers and editors to the newspaper industry over the years.

In Part 2, Nina looks at the Reporters.......

“I didn't come into this job to be liked. I came into this job to make a difference - to hold people to account. … You need to be sure of yourself, and don’t let the bastards get you down." (Cathy Newman)
Nina asks how much has changed for women journalists in the last 100 years.
According to a recent study by Women in Journalism – not much. Male journalists still dominate front-page bylines and in 2017 only 25 per cent of front page stories were written by women.
Together with Ann Leslie and Rachel Sylvester (The Times), Cathy Newman discusses how they forged their respective paths as journalists, who influenced them and how to promote change.

And......The Photographers
“It’s easy to take photos – but so much harder to get the picture.” (Doreen Spooner)
Every picture tells a story and Nina examines how the role of women behind the lens has changed. The photographs taken by Doreen Spooner - the first woman to become a staff photographer on the Daily Mirror in the 1940s - captured images of life in Britain set against the backdrop of a changing world. And the scoop that secured her place in Fleet Street history - that photo of Christine Keeler and Mandy Rice-Davies.

Doreen inspired Royal photographer Jayne Fincher who discusses her career and remembers her time in the press pack at the height of Di-mania.

And finally, throughout the series, Nina looks at the role of women in newspapers, set against the backdrop of social and political change through the decades and with personal testimony of the women involved, asks just how far have we’ve come…and where do we go from here?

Nina Myskow celebrates the contribution made by women to the newspaper industry.

Nina Myskow celebrates the First Ladies of Fleet Street.

With Ann Leslie, Rachel Sylvester, Jayne Fincher And Cathy Newman20181213

Fleet Street’s always been seen as the domain of men, whether they be newspaper magnates, editors, publishers, journalists, photographers or news boys!
Well, for every famous man there’s at least one woman who can stand up and be counted amongst them. The likes of Rachel Beer, editor-in-chief of The Observer and The Sunday Times; the first ‘glossy’ style magazine Queen, the brainchild of Mrs Beeton no less; the first British daily newspaper The Daily Courant, created by Elizabeth Mallett.

Independent, strong-minded women who achieved much in this ‘man’s world,’ paving the way for future generations of women in Fleet Street.
To help celebrate the 100th anniversary of female suffrage in 2018, Nina Myskow explores and celebrates the contribution made by female journalists, columnists, photographers and editors to the newspaper industry over the years.

In Part 2, Nina looks at the Reporters....

“I didn't come into this job to be liked. I came into this job to make a difference - to hold people to account. … You need to be sure of yourself, and don’t let the bastards get you down." (Cathy Newman)
Nina asks how much has changed for women journalists in the last 100 years.
According to a recent study by Women in Journalism – not much. Male journalists still dominate front-page bylines and in 2017 only 25 per cent of front page stories were written by women.
Together with Ann Leslie and Rachel Sylvester (The Times), Cathy Newman discusses how they forged their respective paths as journalists, who influenced them and how to promote change.

And....The Photographers
“It’s easy to take photos – but so much harder to get the picture.” (Doreen Spooner)
Every picture tells a story and Nina examines how the role of women behind the lens has changed. The photographs taken by Doreen Spooner - the first woman to become a staff photographer on the Daily Mirror in the 1940s - captured images of life in Britain set against the backdrop of a changing world. And the scoop that secured her place in Fleet Street history - that photo of Christine Keeler and Mandy Rice-Davies.

Doreen inspired Royal photographer Jayne Fincher who discusses her career and remembers her time in the press pack at the height of Di-mania.

And finally, throughout the series, Nina looks at the role of women in newspapers, set against the backdrop of social and political change through the decades and with personal testimony of the women involved, asks just how far have we’ve come…and where do we go from here?

Nina Myskow celebrates the contribution made by women to the newspaper industry.

Nina Myskow celebrates the First Ladies of Fleet Street.

With Jane Moore, Eleanor Mills and Janet Street-Porter20181206

Fleet Street’s always been seen as the domain of men, whether they be newspaper magnates, editors, publishers, journalists, photographers or news boys!
Well, for every famous man there’s at least one woman who can stand up and be counted amongst them. The likes of Rachel Beer, editor-in-chief of The Observer and The Sunday Times; the first ‘glossy’ style magazine Queen, the brainchild of Mrs Beeton no less; the first British daily newspaper The Daily Courant, created by Elizabeth Mallett.

Independent, strong-minded women who achieved much in this ‘man’s world,’ paving the way for future generations of women in Fleet Street.
To help celebrate the 100th anniversary of female suffrage in 2018, Nina Myskow explores and celebrates the contribution made by female journalists, columnists, photographers and editors to the newspaper industry over the years.

In Part 1, Nina looks at......The Editors
“When a woman editor is tough, she's seen as hardnosed; when it's a man, it's acceptable." (Eve Pollard)
Incredibly, it wasn’t until 1987 (eight years after a woman took up residence in Downing Street) when Wendy Henry took over at the News of the World, that Fleet Street got its first woman editor since 1903.
The women who’ve held the top job including Eleanor Mills and Janet Street-Porter discuss their experiences of being the boss set against the time in which they were living.

And the Columnists......
“The success of "self-centred and thick" Celebrity Big Brother winner Chantelle "may explain why huge swathes of the next generation are leaving school displaying no talent, caring little about academic achievement and chanting the mantra 'I want to be famous'." (Jane Moore, The Sun 2006)
Once described by Princess Diana as the Wednesday Witches, Sue Carroll, Linda Lee Potter, Jane Moore and co could make or break a reputation. Jane Moore discusses just what makes a good columnist.

And finally, throughout the series, Nina looks at the role of women in newspapers, set against the backdrop of social and political change through the decades and with personal testimony of the women involved, asks just how far have we’ve come…and where do we go from here?

Nina Myskow celebrates the contribution made by women to the newspaper industry.

Nina Myskow celebrates the First Ladies of Fleet Street.

With Jane Moore, Eleanor Mills And Janet Street-porter20181206

Fleet Street’s always been seen as the domain of men, whether they be newspaper magnates, editors, publishers, journalists, photographers or news boys!
Well, for every famous man there’s at least one woman who can stand up and be counted amongst them. The likes of Rachel Beer, editor-in-chief of The Observer and The Sunday Times; the first ‘glossy’ style magazine Queen, the brainchild of Mrs Beeton no less; the first British daily newspaper The Daily Courant, created by Elizabeth Mallett.

Independent, strong-minded women who achieved much in this ‘man’s world,’ paving the way for future generations of women in Fleet Street.
To help celebrate the 100th anniversary of female suffrage in 2018, Nina Myskow explores and celebrates the contribution made by female journalists, columnists, photographers and editors to the newspaper industry over the years.

In Part 1, Nina looks at....The Editors
“When a woman editor is tough, she's seen as hardnosed; when it's a man, it's acceptable." (Eve Pollard)
Incredibly, it wasn’t until 1987 (eight years after a woman took up residence in Downing Street) when Wendy Henry took over at the News of the World, that Fleet Street got its first woman editor since 1903.
The women who’ve held the top job including Eleanor Mills and Janet Street-Porter discuss their experiences of being the boss set against the time in which they were living.

And the Columnists....
“The success of "self-centred and thick" Celebrity Big Brother winner Chantelle "may explain why huge swathes of the next generation are leaving school displaying no talent, caring little about academic achievement and chanting the mantra 'I want to be famous'." (Jane Moore, The Sun 2006)
Once described by Princess Diana as the Wednesday Witches, Sue Carroll, Linda Lee Potter, Jane Moore and co could make or break a reputation. Jane Moore discusses just what makes a good columnist.

And finally, throughout the series, Nina looks at the role of women in newspapers, set against the backdrop of social and political change through the decades and with personal testimony of the women involved, asks just how far have we’ve come…and where do we go from here?

Nina Myskow celebrates the contribution made by women to the newspaper industry.

Nina Myskow celebrates the First Ladies of Fleet Street.