Episodes

TitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
Allen Lane1961020120160528 (BBC7)
20160529 (BBC7)
20190914 (BBC7)
20190915 (BBC7)
Publisher and founder of Penguin books, Allen Lane answers the questions posed by George Scott, Margaret Lane and Walter Allen.

Aged 58 when interviewed, Allen talks of his life as a pioneering paperback publisher and his discovery of DH Lawrence.

Sir Allen Lane was born in 1902 and died in 1970.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions. Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Only 40 or so of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1961.

The publisher and founder of Penguin books answers questions.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

The publisher and founder of Penguin books answers questions in the BBC Home Service's interview series. From February 1961.

Baroness Summerskill1961040920161008 (BBC7)
20161009 (BBC7)
20190216 (BBC7)
20190217 (BBC7)
Feminist, Labour politician, doctor and writer, Baroness Summerskill answers questions posed by Denzil Batchelor and Stephen Black.

The Baroness keeps the interviewers on their toes in a time where women were traditionally not so forthright with their opinions. She was interviewed in 1961 (aged 60) when her time in the House of Commons was nearing an end.

Baroness Edith Summerskill was born in 1901 and died in 1980.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions. Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Only 40 or so of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1961.

The conservationist, ornithologist and painter answers the questions.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

The feminist, Labour politician, doctor and writer answers the questions in the BBC Home Service interview series. From April 1961.

Bernard Levin1964010320180828 (BBC7)Journalist, critic and acerbic interviewer, Bernard Levin answers questions from John Bowen and Brian Groombridge.

Launched in 1952, Frankly Speaking was a completely novel and ground breaking BBC series. Initially there were three interviewers and the series was both unrehearsed and unscripted.

Bernard Levin died aged 75 in 2004. Famous for his Times column from 1971 to 1997, he also wrote for the Spectator, Daily Mail and the Daily Express.

In the 1960s, Levin was a regular on the satirical BBC TV show That Was the Week That Was, where his prickly style often drew criticism.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1964.

The journalist and acerbic interviewer answers the questions in the BBC's interview series

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1964.

Bette Davis - Self-portrait Of A Star1963060320150414 (BBC7)
20150415 (BBC7)
20170617 (BBC7)
20170618 (BBC7)
20181215 (BBC7)
20181216 (BBC7)
Actor George Coulouris and BBC producer Peter Duval Smith interview Hollywood icon Bette Davis.

In an occasionally heated conversation about her career, Oscar-winning Davis shares her opinions on what it means to be a star after 30 years in the business.

Davis shoots down the "misconception" that she creates frictions on her movie sets. Her arguments were always with the front office. The actress also strongly counters Duvall Smith's claim that she uses the same mannerisms in every performance - blaming instead her imitators.

Films discussed include 'Dark Victory' (1939), 'Juarez' (1939), 'Watch on the Rhine' (1943) and Davis's most recent hit at the time, 'What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?' with Joan Crawford (1962).

George Coulouris had previously starred alongside Bette Davis in the films 'All This, and Heaven Too' (1940), 'Watch on the Rhine' (1943) and 'Mr Skeffington' (1944). He's best known for playing Walter Parks Thatcher in the Orson Welles drama 'Citizen Kane' (1941).

Launched in 1952, Frankly Speaking was a completely novel and ground breaking BBC series. Initially there were three interviewers and the series was both unrehearsed and unscripted.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1963.

Oscar-winning Bette Davis on her Hollywood life.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

Actor George Coulouris and BBC producer Peter Duval Smith interview Hollywood icon Bette Davis.

George Coulouris had previously starred alongside Bette Davis in the films 'All This, and Heaven Too' (1940), 'Watch on the Rhine' (1943) and 'Mr Skeffington' (1944). He's best known for playing Walter Parks Thatcher in the Orson Welles drama 'Citizen Kane' (1941).

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1963.

Davis shoots down the ""misconception"" that she creates frictions on her movie sets. Her arguments were always with the front office. The actress also strongly counters Duvall Smith's claim that she uses the same mannerisms in every performance - blaming instead her imitators.

Brian Epstein1964052720150428 (BBC7)
20150429 (BBC7)
20170520 (BBC7)
20170521 (BBC7)
20181222 (BBC7)
20181223 (BBC7)
Brian Epstein, 29-year-old manager of the Beatles talks about his life to Bill Grundy.

He was a quiet, well-spoken public schoolboy, RADA student, from a very comfortably-off Liverpool family. But knowing nothing of the world of pop - how did Epstein find himself in the world of agents and impresarios?

As well as the Beatles, he represented other artistes including Cilla Black. Three years after this interview, Brian Epstein tragically died at the age of 32, after reportedly taking his own life.

Launched in 1952, Frankly Speaking was a completely novel and ground breaking BBC series. Initially there were three interviewers and the series was both unrehearsed and unscripted.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1964.

Brian Epstein, manager of the Beatles, discusses his career.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

Brian Epstein, 29 year old manager of the Beatles talks about his life to Bill Grundy.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1964.

, 29 year old manager of the Beatles talks about his life to Bill Grundy.

Cs Forester1957120120140419 (BBC7)
20140420 (BBC7)
20170527 (BBC7)
20170528 (BBC7)
20190105 (BBC7)
20190106 (BBC7)
The author of the Hornblower stories, CS Forester is quizzed on his childhood, his "alter ego" and his writing methods.

His three interviewers are critic Lionel Hale, journalist Margaret Lane and master mariner Adrian Seligman.

CS Forester (1899-1966) wrote 11 books about fictional Royal Navy officer, Horatio Hornblower.

Launched in 1952, Frankly Speaking was a completely novel and ground breaking BBC series. Initially there were three interviewers and the series was both unrehearsed and unscripted.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1957.

The Hornblower author is quizzed on his childhood, his alter ego and his writing methods

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1957.

The author of the Hornblower stories is quizzed on his childhood, his 'alter ego' and his writing methods. From December 1957.

Danny Blanchflower20150526 (BBC7)
20150527 (BBC7)
The captain of Spurs and N Ireland answers questions in the BBC Home Service series.

Captain of Tottenham Hotspur and of Northern Ireland answers the questions in the BBC Home Service's interview series. From January 1961.

Dr Jacob Bronowski1964022120150407 (BBC7)
20150408 (BBC7)
20190824 (BBC7)
20190825 (BBC7)
Dr Jacob Bronowski discusses his career as a mathematician, scientist, writer and broadcaster with Mary Stocks and John Maddox.

Recorded in January 1964, shortly before he left England to take up a new research post in California.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions - straight to the point.

Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Unknown or very inexperienced broadcasters were employed as interviewers, notably John Freeman, John Betjeman, Malcolm Muggeridge, Harold Hobson, Penelope Mortimer, Elizabeth Beresford and Katherine Whitehorn.

Only about 40 of the original 100 programmes survive in the BBC archive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in February 1964.

The mathematician and broadcaster discusses his career.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

Dr Jacob Bronowski discusses his career as a mathematician, scientist, writer and broadcaster with Mary Stocks and John Maddox. Recorded in January1964, shortly before he left England to take up a new research post in California.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions - straight to the point.

Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Unknown or very inexperienced broadcasters were employed as interviewers, notably John Freeman, John Betjeman, Malcolm Muggeridge, Harold Hobson, Penelope Mortimer, Elizabeth Beresford and Katherine Whitehorn.

Only about 40 of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1964.

Dr Mary Stocks1964070320150421 (BBC7)
20150422 (BBC7)
20190126 (BBC7)
20190127 (BBC7)
Social activist, writer and broadcaster Dr Stocks discusses her career, in the pioneering BBC Home Service series from July 1964.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions. Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Only 40 or so of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1964.

Social activist, writer and broadcaster Dr Stocks discusses her career.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

Edith Sitwell1955091820160514 (BBC7)
20160515 (BBC7)
20190202 (BBC7)
20190203 (BBC7)
The British avant garde poet and critic Dame Edith Sitwell answers questions posed by writer Margaret Lane, critic Lionel Hale, and Oscar-winning screenplay writer Paul Dehn.

Aged 68 when interviewed, she recalls her childhood influences and shares her belief in the popularity of poetry.

Dame Edith was born in 1887 and died in 1964.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions. Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Unknown or very inexperienced broadcasters were employed as interviewers, notably John Betjeman, Malcolm Muggeridge and Penelope Mortimer. Only 40 or so of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1955.

The British avant garde poet answers questions in the BBC Home Service's interview series.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

Unknown or very inexperienced broadcasters were employed as interviewers, notably John Betjeman, Malcolm Muggeridge and Penelope Mortimer. Only 40 or so of the original 100 programmes survive.

Evelyn Waugh1953111620150324 (BBC7)
20150325 (BBC7)
20170429 (BBC7)
20170430 (BBC7)
20191221 (BBC7)
20191222 (BBC7)
Brideshead Revisited author Evelyn Waugh is grilled about his life and career by Charles Wilmot, Jack Davies and Stephen Black

Regarded as one of the most brilliant novelists of his day, Waugh loathed the BBC. His grandson Alexander believes that this interview, along with a cocktail of sleeping draughts, helped to send him "rather mad". The author later turned his experience on Frankly Speaking into a scene in his novel 'The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold' with Stephen Black becoming the character Angel who haunts Pinfold in his hallucinations.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions - straight to the point.

Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Unknown or very inexperienced broadcasters were employed as interviewers, notably John Freeman, John Betjeman, Malcolm Muggeridge, Harold Hobson, Penelope Mortimer, Elizabeth Beresford and Katherine Whitehorn.

Only about 40 of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in November 1953.

The Brideshead Revisited author discusses his career.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1953.

Regarded as one of the most brilliant novelists of his day, Waugh loathed the BBC. His grandson Alexander believes that this interview, along with a cocktail of sleeping draughts, helped to send him "rather mad". The author later turned his experience on Frankly Speaking into a scene in his novel 'The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold' with Stephen Black becoming the character Angel who haunts Pinfold in his hallucinations.

Flora Robson1960071220150519 (BBC7)
20150520 (BBC7)
20170422 (BBC7)
20170423 (BBC7)
20190112 (BBC7)
20190113 (BBC7)
The actress Dame Flora Robson answers questions posed by John Freeman and Philip Hope-Wallace.

After she performed a poem at the age of five, Flora was told by her father she'd be "the next Ellen Terry". But the strain of performing caused a breakdown at the age of 12. RADA beckoned - and the actress won fame for her powerful, emotional acting as an adult. Her long career included appearances in 60 films and more than 100 plays.

Launched in 1952, Frankly Speaking was a completely novel and ground breaking BBC series. Initially there were three interviewers and the series was both unrehearsed and unscripted.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1960.

Actress Dame Flora Robson answers the questions in the BBC Home Service's interview series

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1960.

After she performed a poem at the age of five, Flora was told by her father she'd be ""the next Ellen Terry"". But the strain of performing caused a breakdown at the age of 12. RADA beckoned - and the actress won fame for her powerful, emotional acting as an adult. Her long career included appearances in 60 films and more than 100 plays.

The actress Dame Flora Robson answers the questions in the BBC Home Service's interview series. With John Freeman. From July 1960.

Fred Perry1961062820161022 (BBC7)
20161023 (BBC7)
20190223 (BBC7)
20190224 (BBC7)
The British three-time Wimbledon tennis champion, Fred Perry (1909 - 1995) is quizzed by Elizabeth Beresford and Denzil Batchelor.

Fred details the obstacles he faced on his path to success on the tennis court - and the determination needed to triumph over his opponents.

Launched in 1952, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking BBC series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers - later two - firing direct questions. Early critics demanded it was axed, but the format won out and eventually won over detractors.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in June 1961.

The former Wimbledon champion answers the questions in the BBC interview series.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

Gracie Fields1960041520150602 (BBC7)
20150603 (BBC7)
20170513 (BBC7)
20170514 (BBC7)
20191228 (BBC7)
20191229 (BBC7)
Lancashire's actress, singer and comic Gracie Fields answers the questions from Harold Hobson, John Freeman and Patricia Brent.

Born Grace Stansfield in 1898, she became one of Britain's biggest box office stars of of both cinema and music hall. Gracie recalls her early years and share her thoughts on stardom.

She's also questioned about life during the Second World War and the way British people treated her. The star also talks of her happy life living on the Italian island of Capri.

Launched in 1952, Frankly Speaking was a completely novel and ground breaking BBC series. Initially there were three interviewers and the series was both unrehearsed and unscripted.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in April 1960.

Lancashire actress and singer Gracie Fields answers the questions.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

Born Grace Stansfield in 1898, she became one of Britain's biggest box office stars of of both cinema and music hall. Gracie recalls her early years and share her thoughts on stardom. She's also questioned about life during the Second World War and the way British people treated her. The star also talks of her happy life living on the Italian island of Capri.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1960.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1960.

Lancashire's actress, singer and comic Gracie Fields answers the questions from Harold Hobson, John Freeman and Patricia Brent.

Harold Lloyd1962080220150505 (BBC7)
20150506 (BBC7)
20170506 (BBC7)
20170507 (BBC7)
20181229 (BBC7)
20181230 (BBC7)
Silent film comedy great, Harold Lloyd, answers questions from Liam O'Leary and Peter Duval Smith.

Heralding from the same era as Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd was one of the most popular film comedians of the golden age of silent film. After starting acting aged just 12, Lloyd reveals he never wanted to be a matinee idol. He also attributes his success to a good cameraman and carefully crafted stunts.

Launched in 1952, Frankly Speaking was a completely novel and ground breaking BBC series. Initially there were three interviewers and the series was both unrehearsed and unscripted.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1962.

Silent film comedy great Harold Lloyd answers questions in the pioneering interview series

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1962.

Hermione Gingold1960122820160507 (BBC7)
20160508 (BBC7)
20190907 (BBC7)
20190908 (BBC7)
The sharp-tongued, eccentric star of stage and film, Hermione Gingold discusses her career with renowned journalist John Freeman and theatre critic Philip Hope-Wallace.

Aged 63 when interviewed, the English-born actress was by then based in the USA and had been living in New York for five years.

Hermione Gingold was born in 1897 and died in 1987.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions. Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Unknown or very inexperienced broadcasters were employed as interviewers, notably John Betjeman, Malcolm Muggeridge and Penelope Mortimer. Only 40 or so of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1960.

The star of stage and film answers questions in the BBC Home Service's interview series.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

The sharp-tongued, eccentric star of stage and film answers the questions in the BBC Home Service's interview series. From December 1960.

Hugh Cudlipp1965121020161015 (BBC7)
20161016 (BBC7)
20190921 (BBC7)
20190922 (BBC7)
A newspaper editor at just 24, Hugh Cudlipp had left Cardiff aged 14 to become a reporter in Manchester. At 52, when he was the charismatic Chairman of the Mirror Newspaper group, he was interviewed by Joan Yorke and Derek Cooper.

Joan Yorke was a journalist and went on to present the very first edition of You and Yours in 1971. Derek Cooper was a radio reporter and went on to present Radio 4's long running Food Programme. Hugh Cudlipp died in 1998 aged 85.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions. Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Only 40 or so of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1965.

The Welsh journalist and newspaper editor answers the questions in the interview series.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

A newspaper editor at just 24, Hugh Cudlipp had left Cardiff aged 14 to become a reporter in Manchester. At 52, when he was the charismatic Chairman of the Mirror Newspaper group, he was interviewed by Joan Yorke and Derek Cooper.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions. Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Only 40 or so of the original 100 programmes survive.

Jean Renoir2016102920161030 (BBC7)The film director answers the questions in the BBC Home Service's interview series.

The French film director, Jean Renoir (1894 - 1979) is quizzed by Dilys Powell and Andrew Forge.

Jean reveals the problems of having a famous father - artist Auguste Renoir - and his motivation for making films.

Launched in 1952, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking BBC series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers - later two - firing direct questions. Early critics demanded it was axed, but the format won out and eventually won over detractors.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in June 1962.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

John Braine1959000020160521 (BBC7)
20160522 (BBC7)
The 'angry young man' and author of Room at the Top answers questions.

'Angry young man' author of 'Room at the Top', John Braine answers the questions posed by John Bowen, Peter Duval Smith and George Scott.

Aged 37 when interviewed, he talks about his Yorkshire, working class background and the impact of his success.

John Braine was born in 1922 and died in 1986.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions. Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Only 40 or so of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1959.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

Maurice Chevalier1963051020150317 (BBC7)
20150318 (BBC7)
20190119 (BBC7)
20190120 (BBC7)
French entertainer Maurice Chevalier is interviewed about his life and career by Penelope Mortimer, Colin MacInnes and Carl Wildman.

Sadly the full programme from 1963 no longer exists, but this is a long extract. Then in his 70s, he speaks openly about how much he owes to English vaudeville and music hall. Chevalier reveals his use of the then new-fangled stage microphone, touches on his working class roots, his adored mother and two bouts of depression. He's also questioned about his stage persona as the sophisticated, romantic, Frenchman versus the real Chevalier.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions - straight to the point.
Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Unknown or very inexperienced broadcasters were employed as interviewers, notably John Freeman, John Betjeman, Malcolm Muggeridge, Harold Hobson, Penelope Mortimer, Elizabeth Beresford and Katherine Whitehorn.

Only about 40 of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1963.

The French entertainer talks frankly about his career.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

The French entertainer talks frankly about his career. Extract of the BBC Home Service's pioneering interview series. From May 1963.

Peter Scott1961062120161001 (BBC7)
20161002 (BBC7)
20190209 (BBC7)
20190210 (BBC7)
The conservationist, ornithologist and painter, Peter Scott answers questions posed by Dilys Powell, Harry Rae and John Hillaby.

He was interviewed in 1961 (aged 52) when his autobiography 'The Eye of the Wind' had just been published..

Sir Peter Scott was born in 1909 and died in 1989.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions. Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Only 40 or so of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1961.

The conservationist, ornithologist and painter answers the questions.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

The conservationist, ornithologist and painter answers the questions in the BBC Home Service's interview series. From June 1961."

Stanley Holloway1960122020160430 (BBC7)
20160501 (BBC7)
20190831 (BBC7)
20190901 (BBC7)
Actor and singer, Stanley Holloway OBE discusses his career with renowned journalist John Freeman (remembered for his Face to Face interviews) and theatre critic Philip Hope-Wallace.

Aged 70 when interviewed, Stanley looks back over his career so far. He's best remembered on the big screen for Brief Encounter, Passport To Pimlico, The Titfield Thunderbolt and The Lavender Hill Mob. But it was playing Eliza Doolittle's father Alfred the dustman in the original Broadway (1956) and London (1958) productions of 'My Fair Lady' that won him the 1964 film role which brought Stanley international fame.

Stanley Holloway was born in 1890 and died in 1982.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions. Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Unknown or very inexperienced broadcasters were employed as interviewers, notably John Betjeman, Malcolm Muggeridge and Penelope Mortimer. Only 40 or so of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in July 1960.

The English singer and actor discusses his career.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

The English singer and actor discusses his career in the BBC Home Service's pioneering interview series. From July 1960.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1960.

Tennessee Williams1959080220150331 (BBC7)
20150401 (BBC7)
20170610 (BBC7)
20170611 (BBC7)
The American playwright discusses his career.

American playwright Tennessee Williams faces a three-way interview with John Freeman, John Bowen and Peter Duval Smith.

Recorded during a visit to England in 1959, Tennessee had by then written all his major plays - but despite that was seriously questioning his future in the commercial theatre. He talks candidly of the misery of waiting for the reviews after opening night.

Launched in 1952 on the BBC Home Service, Frankly Speaking was a novel, ground breaking series. Unrehearsed and unscripted, the traditional interviewee/interviewer pairing was initially jettisoned for three interviewers firing direct questions - straight to the point.

Early critics described it as 'unkempt', 'an inquisition' and described the guest as prey being cornered, quarry being pursued - with calls to axe the unscripted interview. But the format won out and eventually won over its detractors.

Unknown or very inexperienced broadcasters were employed as interviewers, notably John Freeman, John Betjeman, Malcolm Muggeridge, Harold Hobson, Penelope Mortimer, Elizabeth Beresford and Katherine Whitehorn.

Only about 40 of the original 100 programmes survive.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1959.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.

William Walton1962052520150512 (BBC7)
20150513 (BBC7)
20170624 (BBC7)
20170625 (BBC7)
British composer Sir William Walton answers the questions in the BBC's interview series.

British composer Sir William Walton answers the questions from Dilys Powell and Antony Hopkins.

Living in Italy at the time, Sir William had not long turned 60. Revealing his regrets and musical influences, he explains how he goes about his work.

Asked about getting married late in life, Sir William reveals how love struck when he spotted Susana - who became Lady Walton.

Launched in 1952, Frankly Speaking was a completely novel and ground breaking BBC series. Initially there were three interviewers and the series was both unrehearsed and unscripted.

First broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1962.

British composer Sir William Walton answers the questions in the BBC Home Service's interview series. From May 1962.

Probing interviews with some of the arts and entertainment world's most notable figures.