Funny Kind Of World, A [Radio Scotland]

Does race ever make you feel awkward? Julia Sutherland introduces an international range of comedians, each with their own perspective on race, religion and culture in today's society. Fresh from the stage, Julia talks to some of the comedians to find out the reality behind their stories.

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
012016122620180113
20170217 (RS)
20170218 (RS)

In this episode Tommy Tiernan delivers some of the most challenging material of his career. After being the victim of a tabloid sting, Tommy was hounded internationally for comments taken out of context. He now responds with an excellent routine, before explaining his motives behind it. Jamali Maddix looks at the divides in the UK and Scotland, coming from a mixed race background and not fitting into either of his parent's cultural heritage. Australian comedian Ro Campbell shares how he immigrated to Scotland whilst underestimating quite how remote the Shetland Islands are, whilst Sindu Vee plays the system in an attempt to use overbearing political correctness to her advantage.

A Dabster Production for BBC Radio Scotland.

Does race ever make you feel awkward? Julia Sutherland introduces an international range of comedians, each with their own perspective on race, religion and culture in today's society. Fresh from the stage, Julia talks to some of the comedians to find out the reality behind their stories.

In this episode Tommy Tiernan delivers some of the most challenging material of his career. After being the victim of a tabloid sting, Tommy was hounded internationally for comments taken out of context. He now responds with an excellent routine, before explaining his motives behind it. Jamali Maddix looks at the divides in the UK and Scotland, coming from a mixed race background and not fitting into either of his parent's cultural heritage. Australian comedian Ro Campbell shares how he immigrated to Scotland whilst underestimating quite how remote the Shetland Islands are, whilst Sindu Vee plays the system in an attempt to use overbearing political correctness to her advantage.

A Dabster Production for BBC Radio Scotland.

02Brendon Burns - Tez Ilyas - Masud Milas - Athena Kugblenu2016122620170616
20180120 (RS)

In this episode, outspoken and unforgiving Australian comedian Brendon Burns turns his focus on the hypocrisy of the West. He highlights the failings of colonialism and describes his experiences with aboriginal communities and the lack of integration in his home country. In conversation, Brendon also shares a story about when he overstepped the mark on stage. Closer to home, Tez Ilyas vents his frustration at cultural ignorance in Britain, whilst the truly international Masud Milas explains how being a 'third culture kid' in Hong Kong led to his extremely strong sense of identity and style. With a background in Ghana, Guyana and India, Athena Kugblenu has a different angle on what it means to have three cultures, peoples perceptions and prejudices against her, plus the amazement that someone with dreadlocks can cook a mean curry.

A Dabster Production for BBC Radio Scotland.

In this episode, outspoken and unforgiving Australian comedian Brendon Burns turns his focus on the hypocrisy of the West. He highlights the failings of colonialism and describes his experiences with aboriginal communities and the lack of integration in his home country. In conversation, Brendon also shares a story about when he overstepped the mark on stage. Closer to home, Tez Ilyas vents his frustration at cultural ignorance in Britain, whilst the truly international Masud Milas explains how being a 'third culture kid' in Hong Kong led to his extremely strong sense of identity and style. With a background in Ghana, Guyana and India, Athena Kugblenu has a different angle on what it means to have three cultures, peoples perceptions and prejudices against her, plus the amazement that someone with dreadlocks can cook a mean curry.

A Dabster Production for BBC Radio Scotland.

03Sameena Zehra - Dana Alexander - Marcel Lucont - Des Bishop2017020320171013
20170204 (RS)
20180127 (RS)

In this episode comedian, poet and storyteller Sameena Zehra tells of extremism from within her own family. An atheist born to Muslim parents, Sameena finds herself defending a woman's rights to wear a burka from her furious mother who insists it's subjugation. Sameena also shares her hilarious stories of growing up in India after being used to the comforts of South London. Joining her on stage is Dana Alexander, a Canadian who is so far past the race debate she happily turned up to a far-right political group BBQ without realising the animosity towards her. Languishing in the post-Brexit atmosphere is Marcel Lucont, a French comedian relishing the chance to pass judgement on the UK with a fondness for the 'auld alliance'. In one of the most daring adventures of the series, Irish-American comedian Des Bishop moved to China to learn Mandarin, to be able to perform stand-up there. Stories of working in a (Chinese) restaurant and experiencing racism from an unexpected group of people kick off this show with a bang.

A Dabster Production for BBC Radio Scotland.

Challenging comedy and chat on race, religion and culture, featuring Sameena Zehra.

Does race ever make you feel awkward? Julia Sutherland introduces an international range of comedians, each with their own perspective on race, religion and culture in today's society. Fresh from the stage, Julia talks to some of the comedians to find out the reality behind their stories.

In this episode comedian, poet and storyteller Sameena Zehra tells of extremism from within her own family. An atheist born to Muslim parents, Sameena finds herself defending a woman's rights to wear a burka from her furious mother who insists it's subjugation. Sameena also shares her hilarious stories of growing up in India after being used to the comforts of South London. Joining her on stage is Dana Alexander, a Canadian who is so far past the race debate she happily turned up to a far-right political group BBQ without realising the animosity towards her. Languishing in the post-Brexit atmosphere is Marcel Lucont, a French comedian relishing the chance to pass judgement on the UK with a fondness for the 'auld alliance'. In one of the most daring adventures of the series, Irish-American comedian Des Bishop moved to China to learn Mandarin, to be able to perform stand-up there. Stories of working in a (Chinese) restaurant and experiencing racism from an unexpected group of people kick off this show with a bang.

A Dabster Production for BBC Radio Scotland.

04 LASTLoyiso Gola - Nazeem Hussain - Yuriko Kotani - Terry Alderton2017021020180203
20170211 (RS)

In this final episode of the series we hear from South African superstar Loyiso Gola, who explains the wide range of race and cultural issues in his homeland before telling the best Nelson Mandela joke you will ever hear. Australian Muslim Nazeem Hussain is well aware of the divides across the world and experiences abuse on the internet everyday - but he doesn't let it get to him; he has his own way of turning the tables on the trolls. In conversation Nazeem explains the extent of everyday racism in his life, and how he and others have to adapt just to get through the day. Originally from Japan, Yuriko Kotani moved to the UK twelve years ago and is still amazed by some of the cultural differences, not least the punctuality of the trains. Closing the show is Terry Alderton, a man very sure of where the boundaries are and he's very happy to antagonise those who don't. In the studio he talks about his long history of kicking against the overly cautious censors, whilst on stage he plays an Indian character that is happy to abuse customers to entertain himself.

A Dabster Production for BBC Radio Scotland.

Challenging comedy and chat on race, religion and culture, featuring Terry Alderton.

In this final episode of the series we hear from South African superstar Loyiso Gola, who explains the wide range of race and cultural issues in his homeland before telling the best Nelson Mandela joke you will ever hear. Australian Muslim Nazeem Hussain is well aware of the divides across the world and experiences abuse on the internet everyday - but he doesn't let it get to him; he has his own way of turning the tables on the trolls. In conversation Nazeem explains the extent of everyday racism in his life, and how he and others have to adapt just to get through the day. Originally from Japan, Yuriko Kotani moved to the UK twelve years ago and is still amazed by some of the cultural differences, not least the punctuality of the trains. Closing the show is Terry Alderton, a man very sure of where the boundaries are and he's very happy to antagonise those who don't. In the studio he talks about his long history of kicking against the overly cautious censors, whilst on stage he plays an Indian character that is happy to abuse customers to entertain himself.

A Dabster Production for BBC Radio Scotland.