Future Of Free Speech, The [The Compass] [World Service]

Episodes

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012020032520200329 (WS)Robin Lustig explores the threats to and opportunities for the right to free speech.

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

01Courts and the right to free speech20200318Robin Lustig begins his journey in Washington DC where the first amendment is housed in the National Archive and serves as an almost sacred document. In this programme he asks how Courts around the world make decisions on Free speech. Can they find a line in the sand that shouldn’t be crossed? How do they decide what is, in the modern parlance, ‘hate speech’ and what is merely strongly expressed personal opinion? And can they ever be more than extensions of the political environment they inhabit?

(Photo: The US Supreme Court, 5 February, 2009, Washington, DC. Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Robin Lustig explores the threats to and opportunities for the right to free speech

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

01Courts and the right to free speech2020031820200322 (WS)Robin Lustig begins his journey in Washington DC where the first amendment is housed in the National Archive and serves as an almost sacred document. In this programme he asks how Courts around the world make decisions on Free speech. Can they find a line in the sand that shouldn’t be crossed? How do they decide what is, in the modern parlance, ‘hate speech’ and what is merely strongly expressed personal opinion? And can they ever be more than extensions of the political environment they inhabit?

(Photo: The US Supreme Court, 5 February, 2009, Washington, DC. Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Robin Lustig explores the threats to and opportunities for the right to free speech

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

02Freedom of speech in universities: Who draws the line?20200325Robin visits universities in Hong Kong, Oxford and Washington to establish how important free speech is to them and whether moves to block controversial speakers is compatible with what appears a fundamental freedom of expression in places where all ideas are encouraged and tested. Robin explores where the line is drawn regarding freedom of speech in universities, who draws it and what happens to those who cross it.

Presenter/reporter: Robin Lustig
Producer: Tom Alban and Neil McCarthy
Editor: Philip Sellars

(Photo: Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus, in Hong Kong, 2019. Credit: Getty Images)

Robin Lustig explores the threats to and opportunities for the right to free speech

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

02Freedom of speech in universities: Who draws the line?2020032520200329 (WS)Robin visits universities in Hong Kong, Oxford and Washington to establish how important free speech is to them and whether moves to block controversial speakers is compatible with what appears a fundamental freedom of expression in places where all ideas are encouraged and tested. Robin explores where the line is drawn regarding freedom of speech in universities, who draws it and what happens to those who cross it.

Presenter/reporter: Robin Lustig
Producer: Tom Alban and Neil McCarthy
Editor: Philip Sellars

(Photo: Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus, in Hong Kong, 2019. Credit: Getty Images)

Robin Lustig explores the threats to and opportunities for the right to free speech

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

03Blasphemy or free speech?20200401Robin goes back to his own days as a young reporter when he covered the last blasphemy trial ever held in the UK. At the time it appeared archaic and the end of an era, but blasphemy still exists in many countries across the world. In many ways it is the oldest of all challenges to free speech, so can religions ever truly countenance a world in which free speech is held to be sacred?

(Photo: Asia Bibi, a Christian woman sentenced to death in Pakistan for blasphemy in 2010 and acquitted by the Supreme Court in 2018. Credit: Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images)

Robin Lustig explores the challenge of blasphemy over the right to free speech

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

03Blasphemy or free speech?2020040120200405 (WS)Robin goes back to his own days as a young reporter when he covered the last blasphemy trial ever held in the UK. At the time it appeared archaic and the end of an era, but blasphemy still exists in many countries across the world. In many ways it is the oldest of all challenges to free speech, so can religions ever truly countenance a world in which free speech is held to be sacred?

(Photo: Asia Bibi, a Christian woman sentenced to death in Pakistan for blasphemy in 2010 and acquitted by the Supreme Court in 2018. Credit: Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images)

Robin Lustig explores the challenge of blasphemy over the right to free speech

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

0420200408Robin talks to fellow journalists around the world who have to walk the fine line between an espousal of free speech rights and their own safety. Is there reason to be optimistic about the future? He travels to Paris to the former office of Charlie Hebdo, the French satirical magazine which saw many of its cartoonists and journalist murdered by jihadist gunmen. He meets the editor of the magazine which is currently forced to operate from a secret location for security reasons. On the streets of Hong Kong he joins journalists working for small online publications, reporting from the front line of the clashes between protesters and police in an environment where the larger press organisations are increasingly believed to be under the influence of Beijing.

(Photo: Man sits in a cafe reading Charlie Hebdo, a satirical French magazine. Credit: Reuters)

Robin Lustig explores the threats to and opportunities for the right to free speech.

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

042020040820200412 (WS)Robin talks to fellow journalists around the world who have to walk the fine line between an espousal of free speech rights and their own safety. Is there reason to be optimistic about the future? He travels to Paris to the former office of Charlie Hebdo, the French satirical magazine which saw many of its cartoonists and journalist murdered by jihadist gunmen. He meets the editor of the magazine which is currently forced to operate from a secret location for security reasons. On the streets of Hong Kong he joins journalists working for small online publications, reporting from the front line of the clashes between protesters and police in an environment where the larger press organisations are increasingly believed to be under the influence of Beijing.

(Photo: Man sits in a cafe reading Charlie Hebdo, a satirical French magazine. Credit: Reuters)

Robin Lustig explores the threats to and opportunities for the right to free speech.

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

04Journalists: Free speech v personal safety20200408Robin talks to fellow journalists around the world who have to walk the fine line between an espousal of free speech rights and their own safety. Is there reason to be optimistic about the future? He travels to Paris to the former office of Charlie Hebdo, the French satirical magazine which saw many of its cartoonists and journalist murdered by jihadist gunmen. He meets the editor of the magazine which is currently forced to operate from a secret location for security reasons. On the streets of Hong Kong he joins journalists working for small online publications, reporting from the front line of the clashes between protesters and police in an environment where the larger press organisations are increasingly believed to be under the influence of Beijing.

(Photo: Man sits in a cafe reading Charlie Hebdo, a satirical French magazine. Credit: Reuters)

Robin Lustig explores journalists' freedom to report against threats to their own safety

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

04Journalists: Free speech v personal safety2020040820200412 (WS)Robin talks to fellow journalists around the world who have to walk the fine line between an espousal of free speech rights and their own safety. Is there reason to be optimistic about the future? He travels to Paris to the former office of Charlie Hebdo, the French satirical magazine which saw many of its cartoonists and journalist murdered by jihadist gunmen. He meets the editor of the magazine which is currently forced to operate from a secret location for security reasons. On the streets of Hong Kong he joins journalists working for small online publications, reporting from the front line of the clashes between protesters and police in an environment where the larger press organisations are increasingly believed to be under the influence of Beijing.

(Photo: Man sits in a cafe reading Charlie Hebdo, a satirical French magazine. Credit: Reuters)

Robin Lustig explores journalists' freedom to report against threats to their own safety

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

04Journalists: Free speech v personal safety2020040820200412 (WS)Robin talks to fellow journalists around the world who have to walk the fine line between an espousal of free speech rights and their own safety. Is there reason to be optimistic about the future? He travels to Paris to the former office of Charlie Hebdo, the French satirical magazine which saw many of its cartoonists and journalist murdered by jihadist gunmen. He meets the editor of the magazine which is currently forced to operate from a secret location for security reasons. On the streets of Hong Kong he joins journalists working for small online publications, reporting from the front line of the clashes between protesters and police in an environment where the larger press organisations are increasingly believed to be under the influence of Beijing.

(Photo: Man sits in a cafe reading Charlie Hebdo, a satirical French magazine. Credit: Reuters)

Robin Lustig explores journalists' freedom to report against threats to their own safety

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

Robin Lustig explores the threats to and opportunities for the right to free speech.

05Tech companies and free speech2020041520200419 (WS)Is it up to tech companies to police what people should or shouldn\u2019t say, post or tweet?

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

05Tech companies and free speech20200415Tech companies now find themselves in the firing line of free speech debate. To what extent can they duck the issue given their global coverage? Is it up to them to police what people say from the dangerous privacy of their own keyboards? And with truth and fake news being trumpeted by the highest powers in many lands can they be held responsible for drawing the lines in debates about what should or shouldn’t be said, posted or tweeted?

And at the heart of the series is a desire to test the absolute conviction of those who would espouse free speech and see it as a basic human right?

(Photo: Social media apps on a phone. Credit: Getty Images)

Is it up to tech companies to police what people should or shouldn\u2019t say, post or tweet?

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

05Tech companies and free speech2020041520200419 (WS)Tech companies now find themselves in the firing line of free speech debate. To what extent can they duck the issue given their global coverage? Is it up to them to police what people say from the dangerous privacy of their own keyboards? And with truth and fake news being trumpeted by the highest powers in many lands can they be held responsible for drawing the lines in debates about what should or shouldn’t be said, posted or tweeted?

And at the heart of the series is a desire to test the absolute conviction of those who would espouse free speech and see it as a basic human right?

(Photo: Social media apps on a phone. Credit: Getty Images)

Is it up to tech companies to police what people should or shouldn\u2019t say, post or tweet?

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society

05Tech Companies And Free Speech2020041520200419 (WS)Tech companies now find themselves in the firing line of free speech debate. To what extent can they duck the issue given their global coverage? Is it up to them to police what people say from the dangerous privacy of their own keyboards? And with truth and fake news being trumpeted by the highest powers in many lands can they be held responsible for drawing the lines in debates about what should or shouldn’t be said, posted or tweeted?

And at the heart of the series is a desire to test the absolute conviction of those who would espouse free speech and see it as a basic human right?

(Photo: Social media apps on a phone. Credit: Getty Images)

Is it up to tech companies to police what people should or shouldn't say, post or tweet?

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society