George Butterworth And His Contemporaries

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
01Folk Revival20160801

How Butterworth helped preserve British folk tunes and inspired a generation of composers.

George Butterworth and contemporaries: a visit to the home of the English Folk Song and Dance Society reveals how British folk tunes inspired a generation of composers.

A close friend of Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth was killed at the age of 31, during the battle of the Somme as dawn broke on the 5th August 1916. A war hero, he was awarded the Military Cross twice. Butterworth's legacy rests on a handful of pieces, notably his much loved English Idylls and folk-song arrangements. He belongs to a generation of composers who showed great promise early on, only to be denied the chance to reach musical maturity. Over the course of the week, the series also features the work of four contemporaries of Butterworth: fellow Englishmen Ernest Farrar and W Denis Browne, the Scottish composer Cecil Coles and the Australian composer Frederick Septimus Kelly. All of them, like Butterworth, died on active service during the Great War. Among the musical gems, there's the first ever recording of Denis Browne's ballet "The Comic Spirit", made for the series by the BBC Philharmonic. Their musical trajectory may be short, but this lost generation of composers nonetheless made an indelible mark on the face of British music.

Today Donald Macleod and Dr Kate Kennedy, an authority on this period, pay a visit to Cecil Sharp House, the home of the English Folk Dance and Song Society, to meet Laura Smyth, the Library and Archives Director. Looking through Butterworth's diaries and notebooks they find out how he helped to preserve our native folk music and how this revival influenced his contemporaries' music.

George Butterworth

English Idyll No.1

English String Orchestra

William Boughton, conductor

Folk Songs from Sussex (selection)

Roderick Williams, baritone

Iain Burnside, piano

Vaughan Williams

Norfolk Rhapsody No.1

London Symphony Orchestra

Richard Hickox, conductor

Ernest Farrar

English Pastoral Impressions

Philharmonia Orchestra

Alasdair Mitchell, conductor

The Banks of Green Willow

01Folk Revival20160801

How Butterworth helped preserve British folk tunes and inspired a generation of composers.

George Butterworth and contemporaries: a visit to the home of the English Folk Song and Dance Society reveals how British folk tunes inspired a generation of composers.

A close friend of Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth was killed at the age of 31, during the battle of the Somme as dawn broke on the 5th August 1916. A war hero, he was awarded the Military Cross twice. Butterworth's legacy rests on a handful of pieces, notably his much loved English Idylls and folk-song arrangements. He belongs to a generation of composers who showed great promise early on, only to be denied the chance to reach musical maturity. Over the course of the week, the series also features the work of four contemporaries of Butterworth: fellow Englishmen Ernest Farrar and W Denis Browne, the Scottish composer Cecil Coles and the Australian composer Frederick Septimus Kelly. All of them, like Butterworth, died on active service during the Great War. Among the musical gems, there's the first ever recording of Denis Browne's ballet "The Comic Spirit", made for the series by the BBC Philharmonic. Their musical trajectory may be short, but this lost generation of composers nonetheless made an indelible mark on the face of British music.

Today Donald Macleod and Dr Kate Kennedy, an authority on this period, pay a visit to Cecil Sharp House, the home of the English Folk Dance and Song Society, to meet Laura Smyth, the Library and Archives Director. Looking through Butterworth's diaries and notebooks they find out how he helped to preserve our native folk music and how this revival influenced his contemporaries' music.

George Butterworth

English Idyll No.1

English String Orchestra

William Boughton, conductor

Folk Songs from Sussex (selection)

Roderick Williams, baritone

Iain Burnside, piano

Vaughan Williams

Norfolk Rhapsody No.1

London Symphony Orchestra

Richard Hickox, conductor

Ernest Farrar

English Pastoral Impressions

Philharmonia Orchestra

Alasdair Mitchell, conductor

The Banks of Green Willow

02Love And Loss20160802

Why the Elizabethans' attitude to culture, poetry and the arts was admired by WD Browne.

FS Kelly's moving Elegy for Rupert Brooke and Butterworth's setting of AE Housman are among a rich seam of poetry explored by this set of composers.

A close friend of Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth was killed at the age of 31, during the battle of the Somme as dawn broke on the 5th August 1916. A war hero, he was awarded the Military Cross twice. Butterworth's legacy rests on a handful of pieces, notably his much loved English Idylls and folk-song arrangements. He belongs to a generation of composers who showed great promise early on, only to be denied the chance to reach musical maturity. Over the course of the week, we'll also hear the work of four contemporaries of Butterworth: fellow Englishmen Ernest Farrar and William Denis Browne, the Scottish composer Cecil Coles and the Australian composer Frederick Septimus Kelly. All of them, like Butterworth, died on active service during the Great War. Among the musical gems, there's the first ever recording of Denis Browne's ballet "The Comic Spirit", made for the series by the BBC Philharmonic. Their musical trajectory may be short, but this lost generation of composers nonetheless has made an indelible mark on the face of British music.

Donald Macleod and Dr Kate Kennedy examine why the Elizabethans' attitude to culture, poetry and the arts was much admired by composer W Denis Browne. They also discuss how the outbreak of World War One influenced the kind of poetry that caught popular attention.

W Denis Browne

Diaphenia

Epitaph on Salathiel Pavy

To Gratiana Dancing and Singing

Robin Tritschler, tenor

Malcolm Martineau, piano

Ernest Farrar

Rhapsody No.1: The Open Road

Philharmonia Orchestra

Alasdair Mitchell, conductor

George Butterworth

Six Songs From A Shropshire Lad

Benjamin Luxon, baritone

David Willison, piano

Frederick Kelly

Elegy for Strings "In Memoriam Rupert Brooke"

BBC Symphony Orchestra

David Lloyd-Jones, conductor

Requiescat

Roderick Williams, baritone

Iain Burnside, piano.

02Love And Loss20160802

Why the Elizabethans' attitude to culture, poetry and the arts was admired by WD Browne.

FS Kelly's moving Elegy for Rupert Brooke and Butterworth's setting of AE Housman are among a rich seam of poetry explored by this set of composers.

A close friend of Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth was killed at the age of 31, during the battle of the Somme as dawn broke on the 5th August 1916. A war hero, he was awarded the Military Cross twice. Butterworth's legacy rests on a handful of pieces, notably his much loved English Idylls and folk-song arrangements. He belongs to a generation of composers who showed great promise early on, only to be denied the chance to reach musical maturity. Over the course of the week, we'll also hear the work of four contemporaries of Butterworth: fellow Englishmen Ernest Farrar and William Denis Browne, the Scottish composer Cecil Coles and the Australian composer Frederick Septimus Kelly. All of them, like Butterworth, died on active service during the Great War. Among the musical gems, there's the first ever recording of Denis Browne's ballet "The Comic Spirit", made for the series by the BBC Philharmonic. Their musical trajectory may be short, but this lost generation of composers nonetheless has made an indelible mark on the face of British music.

Donald Macleod and Dr Kate Kennedy examine why the Elizabethans' attitude to culture, poetry and the arts was much admired by composer W Denis Browne. They also discuss how the outbreak of World War One influenced the kind of poetry that caught popular attention.

W Denis Browne

Diaphenia

Epitaph on Salathiel Pavy

To Gratiana Dancing and Singing

Robin Tritschler, tenor

Malcolm Martineau, piano

Ernest Farrar

Rhapsody No.1: The Open Road

Philharmonia Orchestra

Alasdair Mitchell, conductor

George Butterworth

Six Songs From A Shropshire Lad

Benjamin Luxon, baritone

David Willison, piano

Frederick Kelly

Elegy for Strings "In Memoriam Rupert Brooke"

BBC Symphony Orchestra

David Lloyd-Jones, conductor

Requiescat

Roderick Williams, baritone

Iain Burnside, piano.

03Ae Housman20160803

Distant landscapes and evocations of a lost world, in Butterworth's settings of poetry by AE Housman and RL Stevenson.

A close friend of Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth was killed at the age of 31, during the battle of the Somme as dawn broke on the 5th August 1916. A war hero, he was awarded the Military Cross twice. Butterworth's legacy rests on a handful of pieces, notably his much loved English Idylls and folk-song arrangements. He belongs to a generation of composers who showed great promise early on, only to be denied the chance to reach musical maturity. This week's series also features the work of four contemporaries of Butterworth: fellow Englishmen Ernest Farrar and W Denis Browne, the Scottish composer Cecil Coles and the Australian composer Frederick Septimus Kelly. All of them, like Butterworth, died on active service during the Great War. Among the musical gems, there's the first ever recording of Denis Browne's ballet "The Comic Spirit", made for the series by the BBC Philharmonic. Their musical trajectory may be short, but this lost generation of composers nonetheless made an indelible mark on the face of British music.

Today Donald Macleod is joined once again by Dr Kate Kennedy, a specialist on this period of our cultural history. The poetry of AE Housman invokes vocal and instrumental responses from Butterworth.

Frederick Kelly

Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day

Robin Tritschler, tenor

Malcolm Martineau, piano

Ernest Farrar

Vagabond Songs, Op.10

Stephen Varcoe, baritone

Clifford Benson, piano

George Butterworth

Bredon Hill and Other Songs

Benjamin Luxon, baritone

David Willison, piano

Cecil Coles

From the Scottish Highlands

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

Martyn Brabbins, conductor

Rhapsody: A Shropshire Lad

English String Orchestra

William Boughton, conductor.

How the poetry of AE Housman invoked vocal and instrumental responses from Butterworth.

03Ae Housman20160803

How the poetry of AE Housman invoked vocal and instrumental responses from Butterworth.

Distant landscapes and evocations of a lost world, in Butterworth's settings of poetry by AE Housman and RL Stevenson.

A close friend of Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth was killed at the age of 31, during the battle of the Somme as dawn broke on the 5th August 1916. A war hero, he was awarded the Military Cross twice. Butterworth's legacy rests on a handful of pieces, notably his much loved English Idylls and folk-song arrangements. He belongs to a generation of composers who showed great promise early on, only to be denied the chance to reach musical maturity. This week's series also features the work of four contemporaries of Butterworth: fellow Englishmen Ernest Farrar and W Denis Browne, the Scottish composer Cecil Coles and the Australian composer Frederick Septimus Kelly. All of them, like Butterworth, died on active service during the Great War. Among the musical gems, there's the first ever recording of Denis Browne's ballet "The Comic Spirit", made for the series by the BBC Philharmonic. Their musical trajectory may be short, but this lost generation of composers nonetheless made an indelible mark on the face of British music.

Today Donald Macleod is joined once again by Dr Kate Kennedy, a specialist on this period of our cultural history. The poetry of AE Housman invokes vocal and instrumental responses from Butterworth.

Frederick Kelly

Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day

Robin Tritschler, tenor

Malcolm Martineau, piano

Ernest Farrar

Vagabond Songs, Op.10

Stephen Varcoe, baritone

Clifford Benson, piano

George Butterworth

Bredon Hill and Other Songs

Benjamin Luxon, baritone

David Willison, piano

Cecil Coles

From the Scottish Highlands

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

Martyn Brabbins, conductor

Rhapsody: A Shropshire Lad

English String Orchestra

William Boughton, conductor.

04Over The Hills And Far Away20160804

The search for a "new sound" is illustrated in a walk along the Thames and a lurid tale of revenge.

A close friend of Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth was killed at the age of 31, during the battle of the Somme as dawn broke on the 5th August 1916. A war hero, he was awarded the Military Cross twice. Butterworth's legacy rests on a handful of pieces, notably his much loved English Idylls and folk-song arrangements. He belongs to a generation of composers who showed great promise early on, only to be denied the chance to reach musical maturity. Over the course of the week, we'll also hear the work of four contemporaries of Butterworth: fellow Englishmen Ernest Farrar and W Denis Browne, the Scottish composer Cecil Coles and the Australian composer Frederick Septimus Kelly. All of them, like Butterworth, died on active service during the Great War. Among the musical gems, there's the first ever recording of Denis Browne's ballet "The Comic Spirit", made for the series by the BBC Philharmonic. Their musical trajectory may be short, but this lost generation of composers nonetheless has made an indelible mark on the face of British music.

In today's instalment, Donald Macleod is joined once more by Dr Kate Kennedy, an authority on this period. While Butterworth's popular English Idylls reflect the popularity of pastoral and folk idioms, in fact the musical language of these composers draws on a broad net of influences.

George Butterworth

English Idyll No.2

Hallé Orchestra

Mark Elder, conductor

W Denis Browne

Arabia

Martyn Hill, tenor

Clifford Benson, piano

Love Blows as the Wind Blows

Jonathan Lemalu, bass-baritone

Belcea Quartet

Ernest Farrar

Variations for Piano and Orchestra

Howard Shelley, piano

Philharmonia Orchestra

Alasdair Mitchell, conductor

Cecil Coles

Fra Giacomo, scena for baritone and orchestra

Paul Whelan, baritone

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

Martyn Brabbins, conductor.

How the musical language of composers like Butterworth drew on a broad net of influences.

04Over The Hills And Far Away20160804

The search for a "new sound" is illustrated in a walk along the Thames and a lurid tale of revenge.

A close friend of Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth was killed at the age of 31, during the battle of the Somme as dawn broke on the 5th August 1916. A war hero, he was awarded the Military Cross twice. Butterworth's legacy rests on a handful of pieces, notably his much loved English Idylls and folk-song arrangements. He belongs to a generation of composers who showed great promise early on, only to be denied the chance to reach musical maturity. Over the course of the week, we'll also hear the work of four contemporaries of Butterworth: fellow Englishmen Ernest Farrar and W Denis Browne, the Scottish composer Cecil Coles and the Australian composer Frederick Septimus Kelly. All of them, like Butterworth, died on active service during the Great War. Among the musical gems, there's the first ever recording of Denis Browne's ballet "The Comic Spirit", made for the series by the BBC Philharmonic. Their musical trajectory may be short, but this lost generation of composers nonetheless has made an indelible mark on the face of British music.

In today's instalment, Donald Macleod is joined once more by Dr Kate Kennedy, an authority on this period. While Butterworth's popular English Idylls reflect the popularity of pastoral and folk idioms, in fact the musical language of these composers draws on a broad net of influences.

George Butterworth

English Idyll No.2

Hallé Orchestra

Mark Elder, conductor

W Denis Browne

Arabia

Martyn Hill, tenor

Clifford Benson, piano

Love Blows as the Wind Blows

Jonathan Lemalu, bass-baritone

Belcea Quartet

Ernest Farrar

Variations for Piano and Orchestra

Howard Shelley, piano

Philharmonia Orchestra

Alasdair Mitchell, conductor

Cecil Coles

Fra Giacomo, scena for baritone and orchestra

Paul Whelan, baritone

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

Martyn Brabbins, conductor.

How the musical language of composers like Butterworth drew on a broad net of influences.

05A Lost Generation20160805

Two major orchestral scores from 1914 and 1915, the broadcast premiere of WD Browne's ballet The Comic Spirit and Butterworth's Fantasia, the last music he wrote.

A close friend of Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth was killed at the age of 31, during the battle of the Somme as dawn broke on the 5th August 1916. A war hero, he was awarded the Military Cross twice. Butterworth's legacy rests on a handful of pieces, notably his much loved English Idylls and folk-song arrangements. He belongs to a generation of composers who showed great promise early on, only to be denied the chance to reach musical maturity. Over the course of the week, the series also features the work of four contemporaries of Butterworth: fellow Englishmen Ernest Farrar and W Denis Browne, the Scottish composer Cecil Coles and the Australian composer Frederick Septimus Kelly. All of them, like Butterworth, died on active service during the Great War. Among the musical gems, there's the first ever recording of Denis Browne's ballet "The Comic Spirit", made for the series by the BBC Philharmonic. Their musical trajectory may be short, but this lost generation of composers nonetheless made an indelible mark on the face of British music.

In the final chapter of this series looking at composers whose lives were cut short by the first World War, Donald Macleod and Dr Kate Kennedy reflect on their musical legacy.

George Butterworth

The True Lover's Farewell

Mark Stone, baritone

Stephen Barlow, piano

Ernest Farrar

Heroic Elegy, Op.36

Philharmonia Orchestra

Alasdair Mitchell, conductor

W Denis Browne

The Comic Spirit (edited and completed by R Weedon)

BBC Philharmonic

Richard Davis, conductor

Fantasia for Orchestra (concert version realised and completed by M Yates)

Royal Scottish National Orchestra

Martin Yates, conductor.

The musical legacy of Butterworth and other composers whose lives were cut short by WWI.

05A Lost Generation20160805

Two major orchestral scores from 1914 and 1915, the broadcast premiere of WD Browne's ballet The Comic Spirit and Butterworth's Fantasia, the last music he wrote.

A close friend of Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth was killed at the age of 31, during the battle of the Somme as dawn broke on the 5th August 1916. A war hero, he was awarded the Military Cross twice. Butterworth's legacy rests on a handful of pieces, notably his much loved English Idylls and folk-song arrangements. He belongs to a generation of composers who showed great promise early on, only to be denied the chance to reach musical maturity. Over the course of the week, the series also features the work of four contemporaries of Butterworth: fellow Englishmen Ernest Farrar and W Denis Browne, the Scottish composer Cecil Coles and the Australian composer Frederick Septimus Kelly. All of them, like Butterworth, died on active service during the Great War. Among the musical gems, there's the first ever recording of Denis Browne's ballet "The Comic Spirit", made for the series by the BBC Philharmonic. Their musical trajectory may be short, but this lost generation of composers nonetheless made an indelible mark on the face of British music.

In the final chapter of this series looking at composers whose lives were cut short by the first World War, Donald Macleod and Dr Kate Kennedy reflect on their musical legacy.

George Butterworth

The True Lover's Farewell

Mark Stone, baritone

Stephen Barlow, piano

Ernest Farrar

Heroic Elegy, Op.36

Philharmonia Orchestra

Alasdair Mitchell, conductor

W Denis Browne

The Comic Spirit (edited and completed by R Weedon)

BBC Philharmonic

Richard Davis, conductor

Fantasia for Orchestra (concert version realised and completed by M Yates)

Royal Scottish National Orchestra

Martin Yates, conductor.

The musical legacy of Butterworth and other composers whose lives were cut short by WWI.